Search Results for "Solo Project"

Louise Distras asks fans for their cash for new record

Louise Distras is doing a Kickstarter campaign for her latest record. Supposedly a DIY release, the vocalist is in need of £11,000 to aid its production. Fans will get assorted gifts for their pledges of support. All the details of the campaign can be found here.

Louise Distras last release was the 2013 effort Dreams From the Factory Floor.

 



Jeff Rosenstock and Skasucks release split 7″ (free download)

Jeff Rosenstock has released a split 7″ with South Korean ska band Skasucks. You can give the split a listen below, and download it for free (or the price of your choice) on Bandcamp.

Rosenstock’s latest album Worry was released in 2016 through SideOneDummy. He will be touring the US this summer.



Graduation Speech (Kevin Day of Aspiga) streams debut track “Waiting”

Graduation Speech is the new solo project from Kevin Day, the vocalist/guitarist of Paper + Plastick‘s Aspiga. He has announced the release of his debut EP, “Quiet & Calm”, a six song affair which is available for pre-order now.

His debut track, “Waiting”, taken from the EP, is streaming now. You can listen to the song over at The Key.



Allison Weiss premieres new song ‘Runaway’

Pop-punk singer/songwriter Allison Weiss dropped a new song for us all to enjoy. ‘Runaway’ premiered last night and was co-written by Tegan And Sara’s own Tegan Quin. A big listen for fans of the new Paramore album.

Weiss’ last album ‘New Love’ dates back to 2015 and was released via SideOneDummy.

Head down below to check out ‘Runaway’. 



Dan Cribb adds “Happy Birthday Lisa” to Simpsons tribute project

Dan Cribb teamed up with Ecca Vandal for the newest edition to Worst Tribute Ever, Dan’s ongoing tribute album to the Simpsons. “Happy Birthday Lisa” was written by Michael Jackson and aired on the episode “Stark Raving Dad” back in 1991. And I remember watching that episode the night it aired and sweet zombie Jesus now I feel old.

You can stream the album below and download it for FREE at bandcamp because there are still good things in the world.



Tim Holehouse & Tragical History Tour announce EU tour

UK folk punks Tim Holehouse and Tragical History Tour are to embark on an EU/UK tour through June. The Aaahh!! Real Records blues infused solo punk and Make That A Take Records Scottish cowpunk exports play 15 dates on the mainland before ending back in England.

Full dates are below.



MC iPod announces new EP

Cambridge UK based owner of Aaahh!! Real Records Ian Perry, aka MC iPod, is back with a new EP of punk infused nerd rap. The EP, entitled “Prom Night 2002” is a four track affair, including “Where Ya Been, iPod”, featuring MC Lars.

Full details below. MC iPod’s back catalogue is up on Bandcamp now.

 

 



Show Review: Frnkiero and the Patience & Dave Hause and The Mermaid – Music Hall of Williamsburg, Brooklyn (APRIL 18, 2017)

Brooklyn had the honor and privilege not only of catching frnkiero and the Patience on one of their first shows back in the States after a crippling bus accident almost claimed their lives in Australia, but also of the eclectic Dave Hause’s latest project, The Mermaid, on their debut touring circuit, last month – and Jersey Beat was there to document the sights, the sounds, and the smells of it all.

The Mermaid were the openers this tour, but, as everyone who has ever seen Hause perform in any capacity knows, he always steals the show. Hause had recently scaled back his high-energy performances both with The Loved Ones and as a solo artist with his excellent 2013 release, “Devour,” taken on the road with brother Tim as a mellow acoustic set. Now, Hause brings that bounce back with his latest touring band, The Mermaid, in support of Hause’s February release, “Bury Me In Philly.”

A Frank Iero crowd is not the easiest to win over (this fate has only, to the best of my knowledge, been flawlessly achieved by the charming Homeless Gospel Choir and, of course, the impossible not to love live Against Me!). However, The Brothers Hause and the rest of The Mermaid accomplished the task with ease – so much so that the ever-present fan line was just as excited to meet them as they were The Patience, and they all bought cds. I bought a “Dirty Fucker” shirt, which Hause had the entire crowd chanting as an informal fuck you to the current administration.

The album is amazing, and the songs translate incredibly live. And, as always, Dave threw in a jam for us Loved Ones fans in the audience, “C’mon, Kid.” The set went by way too quickly. Hause is always an electriifying performer and a damn fucking good songwriter. If you haven’t grabbed a copy of “Bury Me In Philly” yet, run, don’t walk, to your latest record store / download site and nab one now.

As incredible as The Mermaid were, Iero and The Patience were not to be outdone. Always engaging and fun to watch onstage, Iero has really come into his own as a frontman. These shows see him comfortable and engaged in between songs, trading laughs and sharing anecdotes with the audience. This album, “Parachutes,” informally the sophomore release to 2014’s “Stomachaches,” performed live with three quarters of this current lineup, is really, really good.

Don’t let the innocent faces of this young crowd fool you, kids: this band is punk through and through, and those kids are pretty damn hardcore. Crowdsurfers pepper the pit and beer and sweat hit faces as Iero and the crowd scream every word together. I’m told that it was Iero who insisted that the barricade be removed that night, to eliminate the barrier between band and fan.

The set included the full “Parachutes” album and most of “Stomaches”, as well as a handful of Iero’s solo songs, including “B.F.F.,” which was written by his six-year-old daughter. Their shows are a like a bloodfest of frenetic energy. The band moves so rapidly onstage, that all photographic attempts wind up blurs until they’re in between songs. Everyone’s hair is in their mouths and everyone’s voices are shot at the end of the set – both artist and aficionado.

Iero is a very adept songwriter and interesting performer, and this tour, in particular, is very well worth the trip, but if you can’t make it out, definitely check out “Parachutes,” it’s a total ass-kicker.



DS Interview: Ryan Patterson on the end of Coliseum and the birth of his new Fotocrime solo vehicle

All Break ups can hurt. Band break ups can really hurt. Some breakups can be met with a shrug, some can hit you hard and some can hit you completely out of the blue. On 19th April 2017, progressive punks Coliseum quietly released a statement on their Facebook page announcing their split after a 12 year career which saw the band play over a 1,000 shows and release 5 albums ranging from the bruising hardcore of their debut through to their most realized final 2 albums, the almighty Sister Faith and the post-punk influenced Anxiety’s Kiss. For those who have followed the band over the years it came as a complete shock. Nevertheless, to soften the blow, the aforementioned statement also announced the arrival of frontman Ryan Patterson’s new solo vehicle, Fotocrime. Dying Scene spoke to Ryan about the split, why the time was right to try something new and about the challenges of creating music as a solo artist.

Despite the continued romanticism, making a success of a band relies on a mixture of good will, good fortune and ceaseless endeavor. 3 principles that undoubtedly defined the career of Coliseum, as Patterson explains,“With a band like Coliseum, that was a band that worked really really hard for a really long time and accomplished an unbelievable amount of stuff but a lot of it was through sheer force of will. That and the support of people like record labels who believed in us and invested a lot of money where we weren’t going to be their most popular band.”

With so much effort and resolve required it becomes easier to understand the band’s reasons for calling it quits. In the end it was a sober realization of where they found themselves as a band at the end of the touring cycle for Anxiety’s Kiss, as Patterson explains, “It was pragmatic. It was a pragmatic decision that we made after a lot of thought and I think it was bouncing around in the back of my head for a little bit and once we all started talking about it it just seemed like the best route for all of us and for the band.”

For Patterson, the band had achieved everything that they wanted to do, “We had done more than we could ever hoped to and my only goal in Coliseum was, when I started, was to tour a lot and to craft some legacy and we absolutely did both of those things. We played over 1,000 shows in 4 continents. We put out a lot of music. Most of which I am extremely proud of. Some of which I think is absolutely great for us.” states Patterson emphatically before continuing:

“Certainly we felt with Sister Faith and Anxiety’s Kiss we accomplished what, I think, the band was always leading up to and absolutely what I wanted to do with that band. We just thought ‘where do we go from here?’” We’ve kind of done all of this. We accomplished goals. Sister Faith and Anxiety’s Kiss were really on top of each other in terms of how quickly we wrote and recorded them. I think that’s it, we’re all happy with each other and we’re all happy creatively; let’s not push it to a point where we are not happy creatively and don’t like each other.”

Coupled with the collective acknowledgement of their accomplishments was the recognition that the band weren’t overly eager to work on new music, “For one thing, we didn’t all have a burning desire to work on new material at the time and that kind of seemed to become evident.” Rather than take a break Patterson realized that the most natural thing to do was to call a halt to the band that had become the dominant force in his life for such a long time, as he explains, “We probably could have taken a few years off but with Coliseum I was never really able to slow down. I was always wanting to move forward and I needed time away to clear my head and manage some things in my perception of music and in life. In 12 years I had never had a time in my life when something was not scheduled in terms of a tour or travel or writing or recording and it was kind of time to have a break from that and it was always a kind of uphill struggle.We never kind of broke through so there was a lot of work.”

Naturally, the question asked by fans of the band is whether there is any chance of the band getting back together. While it isn’t something that is going to happen anytime soon, Patterson is keen not to rule it out completely, “The door is shut but it’s not locked. We’re all still close. We’re all still in touch and proud of what we did and I kind of see Coliseum as a living breathing thing that was a part of my life and it still is. It’s still there and there are things that will still happen with it. There’s music that we haven’t released that I’m sure will come out one day. There’s just nothing new happening although there might be one day.”

All told it was not an easy decision to reach but ultimately Patterson is confident that it is the right one for him in the long run, “I never thought I’d say this but it is nice to put an end to something. To close a book. I thought it would be what I would do forever. That Coliseum was always me and my mind. It was difficult to let that go but it’s nice to have it be a thing that ended in a good way.”

While one door closes, another opens and Patterson has announced his intentions with the release of the phenomenal Fotocrime EP featuring the darkly warped, post-punk epic “Always Hell”. A song that acts as the perfect bridge between the sound of Anxiety’s Kiss and Patterson’s new material under the Fotocrime moniker, “The more post-punk vibe kind of continued because that is what I am most into and feels right. When we were done with everything I felt that that song (“Always Hell”) in particular was a good transition from Coliseum to Fotocrime. I don’t think it is wholly indicative of every sound Fotocrime has made. I don’t think it is exactly what the album material I have finished sounds like but it does kind of set the tone and it’s more of a guitar rock song so ties in with Coliseum so it works well in that way. I think it was a good step.”

While that song might sound like a natural progression, it took a long time for Patterson to achieve what he wanted with the new material, “This is not exactly the sound I started off trying to make. When I started, I was trying to make this music that would become Fotocrime and it just wasn’t working. It was pleasing to the ear and the songs were cool but my voice wasn’t where I wanted it to be,” Patterson reveals, “I threw out a bunch of material I wrote immediately after Coliseum did our last tour. Even before we made the decision to stop I started writing things with the idea that it would be my own thing. It just didn’t work.” Naturally, his approach to writing differed tremendously from working with a band mainly due to the absence of one particular instrument, “The nature of having a drum machine and programmed drums is so different from playing with a real drummer and that alone creates a completely different vibe and sound.”

Understandably, the process of creating music alone rather than as part of a band wasn’t an easy transition, “It was a challenge, for sure to make it feel like something that sounded right and fit the bill while still having the vibe that I wanted.” Notably, synthesizers feature more prominently in the Fotocrime material, and despite becoming more a part of Coliseum’s sound on Anxiety’s Kiss, as Patterson points out, understanding how to get the best from them proved to be the biggest test, “The synthesizer stuff was slowly entering Coliseum songs here and there but to do it a lot more was a challenge and certainly synthesizers are entirely their own thing and you’re kind of learning how they work. You have to learn how to work mechanically before you can make them work musically and that’s a challenge” explains Patterson, “Sometimes you get something and I’m so overwhelmed by it that I don’t know how to make music out of it and you have to learn the basics of getting that machine to make musical sounds. So it’s really exciting and it’s challenging and it’s fun in a way that is unique in a different way to the guitar.”

With the EP acting as the perfect appetizer for more material, when exactly listeners can enjoy the main dish is a little more uncertain, “We are trying to take things as it comes. After the release of the EP we are going to start approaching labels. It could be later this year, it could be next year.  We might release it ourselves. It’s kind of entirely unknown at this moment. Getting the EP out first was the goal.” That said, Patterson reveals that the album is in the can and good to go, “It’s done. It’s completely finished and I’m very proud of it and excited about it. I think that inherently it’s the strongest stuff that I’ve done. It is exciting to have new sounds and to share Fotocrime with the world.” With that in mind, it’s clear that some break ups can be for the best after all.



Kevin Devine releases video for “Daydrunk”

New York singer/songwriter Kevin Devine has released a music video for “Daydrunk”, which appears on his latest album Instigator. Check it out below.

Instigator, Devine’s ninth full-length album, came out in 2016. He just kicked off a month-long US tour with Chris Farren and Adult Mom.



Jeff Rosenstock announces summer tour

Jeff Rosenstock just announced a headlining US tour for this summer with former bandmate Laura Stevenson. It will follow Rosenstock through his slot at Chicago’s Pitchfork Festival, with some dates in Canada and Mexico en route.

Tickets go on sale tomorrow (May 3rd). Scope the dates out below.

His latest album Worry was released in 2016 through SideOneDummy.



Jeff Rosenstock (solo/punk) releases one-off single “Dramamine”

Jeff Rosenstock has blessed us. Seriously. “Dramamine” is a killer track that I’ve listened to no less than a dozen times by now. It will be in my head for days. Solo projects catch a lot of flack, but Mr. Jeff clearly has the formula down and knows his way around song structure. If this song hooks you, check out last year’s album WORRY, out via SideOneDummy.

Listen to this track. Listen to it a lot. Listen to it below.



Louise Distras streaming new single “Outside of You”

English solo act Louise Distras (melodic-punk) is streaming her new single “Outside of You”. The song comes off the yet to be named album which serves as a follow up to 2013’s release of the highly acclaimed “Dreams from the Factory Floor”.

Check out the song below along with her upcoming summer tour dates across England.



Dan Cribb releases seventh song for Simpson’s tribute “The Garbage Man” featuring Jen Boyce

Australian pop-punk rocker Dan Cribb is currently streaming his new song “Garbage Man” (off of his Simpson’s cover album “Worst Tribute Ever”) featuring Ball Park bassist and vocalist Jen Boyce. You can listen to it below.

The album is a year long project, with a new track (featuring a new guest musician/vocalist) being released each month. “Worst Tribute Ever” is available for free download.



Chris Farren performs “Still Beating” on Live From The Rock Room

Chris Farren (Fake ProblemsAntarctigo Vespucci, etc.) recently performed “Still Beating” on Live From The Rock Room, and you can check out the video below.

“Still Beating” comes from Chris Farren’s latest album Can’t Die, which was released on September 2nd through SideOneDummy Records.