Search Results for "Fat Wreck Chords"

The Dwarves stream new song “Forget me not”

Legendary punks, The Dwarves, are streaming a new song! Check out “Forget Me Not” below.

The song comes off their upcoming album “Take Back the Night”, due out in February of 2018 via Burger Records.



Album Review: Direct Hit!/ Pears – “Human Movement”

Splits are an underrated release. Too often they get lumped in as inessential marketing tools, rather than legitimate installments in two band’s sagas. They’re overshadowed by full-lengths, but make no mistake, a good split has the potential to go down as a classic. Think of the iconic Faith/Void release from Dischord, or all of those amazing BYO Records releases (especially the Leatherface/ Hot Water Music one)– there’s a rich history in regards to the punk rock split and it offers a unique experience. This is the place where bands can try new things and experiment, and maybe that’s just because of the nature of the split, but the truth is: sometimes it’s easiest to be weird when you think no one’s looking.

Human Movement is split between pop punk darlings Direct Hit! and nouveau-skate animals Pears. Their common language is hardcore and choruses– the former that encroaches on Direct Hit!’s sugary concept albums, and the latter that punctuates Zach Quinn’s machine-gun bursts of syllables. Together, they bring together both and play off each others strengths, making Human Movement one of those rare splits that can follow the conversation between Green Star and Brainless God.

Direct Hit! opens Human Movement with the hardcore banger “You Got What You Asked For.” While Direct Hit! has always been adept at the genre, usually throwing one or two screamers in per album, here they deliver on the intensity– with quick stabs of guitar, high tempo drums, and pissed-to-hell vocals. Immediately proceeding, in a moment of minor perfection, they switch gears into the opening of the next song, “Blood on Your Tongue,” with sugary sweet bell synth and pop punk melodies. It’s one of those tangible moments on the Direct Hit! side of Human Movement where you can see the fun the bands are having, and as the record spins, it becomes infectious– from the big melodies of “Open Your Mind,” the new classic “Shifting the Blame,” and their cover of Pears’ “You’re Boring.”

The latter deserves special attention, as one of the best parts of any split is hearing the bands cover each other songs. Direct Hit! attacks “You’re Boring” with so much gusto, you’d swear they were trying to claim it for their own. It stays pretty close to the original, with the biggest difference being some extra pop punk zeal on the chorus. To close out their side of the split, Direct Hit! strike straight hardcore again with “Nothing,” a fast shout-along track with an intense and dreamy bridge.

Pears open their half with “Hey There, Begonia.” It’s on the catchier side of their core sound, with the same fast moving riffs you’d expect and an interpolation of System of a Down’s “Chop Suey.” Again, Human Movement is about bands having fun, and they work it into the bones of their music.

“Mollusk’s Mouth” is a faster song with a lighting fast harmonized lyric section that caught my ear. It alludes to one of the best things about Pears– their creativity and ambition in punk rock is so often realized through the collective talent of their members. These guys can play, they can sing, and they can write songs like no other. Riffs fly, vocal rhythms change from hardcore spitting to soaring melodies, but it never leaves the realm of adult playtime. In “Misery Conquers the World” they incorporate “Let the Bodies Hit the Floor” with a chorus of children booing. Pears is the sound of goofing off.

Pears cover Direct Hit!’s “The World Is Ending” off Brainless God— well, kinda. What they do is actually a lot cooler. They meld in “Buried Alive,” the other hit from Brainless God as well as Masked Intruder’s “Heart-Shaped Guitar.” It’s surprising, weird, and hilarious, and shows Pears in all their glory– showing off and having a little fun. “Never Now” opens with some heavy-ass dissonance before transforming into the sort of thing the band is primarily known for: fast flying lyrics and a singalong chorus. It differentiates itself with the chugging breakdown, showing Pears once again swallowing up more genre influences like a fat and hungry punk rock anaconda.

Human Movement is the sort of the split you want to see released. How often do you get two high profile bands doing this sort of thing anymore? Not very often. Both Pears and Direct Hit! represent the finest of a certain kind of modern punk, established acts who continue to take risks and try and make their music as interesting as possible, all while playing in the chords and melody sandbox. Human Movement is a testament to catchy-punk devotees, a monument to all the wonderful things you can do with rhythm, melody, and words. But, it is also fun, plain and simple. Pears and Direct Hit! play well together, but when they compete, they both win.

4.5/5

 



Mean Jeans announce tour dates with Dirty Fences

Portland pop-punks Mean Jeans have announced some January tour dates with Dirty Fences.

You can check out all the dates and locations below.

The band last released a tribute to Mountain Dew, called “Mountain Dew (I Need It).”  Their last full length album was Tight New Dimension, released April 2016 through Fat Wreck Chords.



DS Photo Galley: Swingin’ Utters with Western Settings, Darius Koski and Duck & Cover (Boston, MA)

For the first time in what I think was about five years, Swingin’ Utters played a headline show in Boston this past Sunday evening (their last two trips through this area were on a tour with Lagwagon three years ago and as part of the massive Fat Wreck 25th Anniversary tour the following summer). Though the lineup has changed AND it was an unseasonably cold mid-November night AND the Patriots were throttling the Denver Broncos on Sunday Night Football at the time, the old school punks came out in droves for the occasion and met the band with what seemed like a throwback vibe.

It was announced just prior to this tour that the Utters are putting out a sort of double-album greatest hits compilation, Drowning In The Sea, Rising With The Sun, on December 8th through Fat Wreck Chords, and the setlist on this particular night seemed to be culled from some of the earlier half of the band’s career. Sure “The Librarians Are Hiding Something” and “Alice” from their most recent couple of post-hiatus albums made welcome appearances, but this seemed like a night for the old guard. Luke Ray has served as a steady breath of fresh air behind the drum kit for the last couple years, and he’s now got his Sciatic Nerve bandmate Tony Teixeira (Nothington/Western Addiction/Cobra Skulls) as his rhythm section counterpart, having taken over for Miles Peck earlier this year. Jack Dalrymple also sat this particular run out, meaning longtime Utters partners Johnny Bonnel and Darius Koski and the new recruits are playing aggressive and lean as a four-piece. In spite of the moving parts throughout the years, the Bonnel and Koski and company remain one of the most esteemed bands in the scene and, truthfully, songs like “No Eager Men” and “Five Lessons Learned” and “Pills And Smoke” and, of course, “”Windspitting Punk” sound just as earnest as ever.

Western Settings are providing direct support on this run. The band have been on a steady climb over the last few years, and with good reason. Their 2015 album, Yes It Is, released digitally here at Dying Scene, remains high on my personal favorites list, and the band has only gotten better in the two years since. Boston can be a bit of a finicky place for out-of-town bands to play, but the four-piece San Diego-based Jawbreaker-meets-Replacements outfit did an admirable job on their first trip through the Bay State. If a band can obviously play with passion and intensity and works up a sweat on their own, dimes to dollars says they’ll win over a crowd that is obviously interested in the headliners, and that seemed the case on this night, as they were increasingly well-received as their 45-minute set moved forward.

Doing double duty on this tour, Swingin’ Utters guitarist and principal songwriter Darius Koski is also serving as support. It’s the first time he’s really hit the road as a solo artist, especially outside California, and he enlisted the help of fellow Utters Luke Ray on drums and Tony Teixeira on bass to fill out some of the instrumentation that appears on his two solo albums, 2015’s Sisu and this month’s stellar What Was Once Is By And Gone (both released on Fat Wreck) and that would have been missed were he playing strictly solo and acoustic. A personal highlight was the short set’s closer, “Another Man,” which appears as the last song on the newest album in stripped down acoustic format, but was given a revved up, electric reworking for this tour.

Boston’s own Duck & Cover were well-deserved local openers for this particular show. There’s been a bit of a garage rock undercurrent in the local scene for the last handful of years that bands like Duck & Cover and The Warning Shots and Michael Kane and the Morning Afters and even Continental and others have been a part of, and that’s been a welcome addition to a seen that has obviously had its fair share of ska-punk and “working class” Celtic punk bands over the last two decades. Made up of members that might look familiar from bands like The Black Cheers and the Acrobrats and Bang Camaro, bands like D&C show that mixing a little Guns & Roses with your Clash and Ramones records is not bad thing.

Head below for our full photo gallery from the evening!



Lagwagon doing…things?

Punk rock legends Lagwagon have fans puzzled and excited all at once. The band posted a mysterious photo on their Instagram. Shortly after the mysterious message the band announced they will be joining Flogging Molly’s “Salty Dog Cruise”. Was that the big news or is it possibly a new album? A Tour? Who knows, but if the boys from Lagwagon say 2018’s going to be “Bananas” best bet something awesome is in the works.



Dying Scene Radio Special Edition- Punk In Drublic Festival – Band Spotlight: Hilltop Rats and John Feldmann of Goldfinger

In this special edition of Dying Scene Radio, we sent the boys down to Orange County for the SoCal leg of Fat Mike’s Punk in Drublic Festival. Luckily, they left the free beer lines long enough to meet up with Washington punks, Hilltop Rats to talk about what it’s like to be shorn by Guttermouth and the perils of working in a porno distribution warehouse, among other things. If that isn’t enough to pique your interest (although we doubt it wasn’t), Bob also managed to snag a quick interview with the always dapper Goldfinger front man, Mr. John Feldmann as he made his way to the stage! All of that and much more below, in this special episode of the official podcast of Dying Scene!



Direct Hit! Are Working on a New Record

Milwaukee-based, psychedelic-loving punk outfit, Direct Hit!, have been in the studio working on a new record. On Friday, the band Tweeted a picture of their drummer Danny Walkowiak behind his kit along with the message: 

“We started making a new album tonight at Howl Street Recordings in Milwaukee with @mikeaar pushing faders. Can’t wait for you all to hear it.”

This year has been a busy one for the four-piece, earlier this month they released a split with label-mates in PEARS.

 



Lagwagon hinting at plans for 2018

California punk veterans Lagwagon just posted a picture of the band members playing with their phones, with bananas on the ground, on their Facebook page. The caption reads, “Coming 2018!!! Lagwagon shit’s bananas”. This indicates that the band is either planning to release a new album or go on tour next year. We’ll keep you posted as more details come to light.

Lagwagon’s latest album Hang was released in October of 2014 through Fat Wreck Chords.



Darius Koski releases video for “Another Man”

Swingin’ Utters guitarist and songwriter Darius Koski most recently released his folk solo album What Was Once Is By And Gone on November 3 via Fat Wreck Chords.

The black and white video for “Another Man” features Koski on the acoustic guitar in the outdoors, directed by Josh Robertson. Check it out below.

You can catch Koski doing double duty on tour, playing as both a member of Swingin’ Utters and opening the shows with his solo project.

 



Lineup for Download Festival in Australia announced

Organizers have announced the lineup for the first-ever edition of Download Festival in Australia, which will take place on March 24th at Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne. Playing at the fest are Korn, Limp Bizkit, Prophets of Rage, Mastodon, NOFX, Bad Cop / Bad Cop, Suicidal Tendencies, Good Charlotte, The Story So Far, Hot Water Music, Amon Amarth, Arch Enemy, Sabaton and many more!

Tickets go on sale at 9AM next Thursday, November 16th, and for more information, go to the festival’s website.



Punk In Drublic release aftermovie

Punk In Drublic Festival have released an aftermovie featuring clips of live performances and general shenanigans from the fest, all set to NOFX’s “Seeing Double At The Triple Rock”. Check it out here.



Album Review: Darius Koski – “What Was Once Is By And Gone”

When Darius Koski released his debut solo album, Sisu, on Fat Wreck Chords a couple of years ago, I remember thinking that even though it was the longtime Swingin’ Utters and Filthy Thieving Bastards guitarist and principle songwriter’s first album under his own name, it nevertheless seemed like it was a quintessentially “Darius Koski” album, full of the sort of neo-folk/Americana rooted non-traditional punk rock left turns that made the Utters and the Bastards unique in their own regards. It was solid, and different from the Utters for sure, but not THAT different to leave people confused.

What Was Once Is By And Gone, released last Friday (November 3rd, also on Fat), pushes the genre-bending theme to newer and bolder and more diverse levels. Sure there are still some Americana-based elements that would have fit nicely on Sisu; album-opener “Black Sheep” and the slow burning “Old Bones,” for example. That fact that stands to reason given that like on his debut album, the bulk of What Was Once Is By And Gone was culled from two decades of songs and song ideas Koski had in the bankThere are a handful of tracks like “Yes I Believe” and “The Observer” that seem to pay direct homage to the uptempo chugging, reverb-heavy rockabilly freight train that Johnny Cash perfected a half-century ago.

But then, of course, there are the more conceptual pieces that make What Was Once Is By And Gone not only stand apart from Sisu, but truly shine in its own right. “Imitation Tala” has has an acoustic backbone that, combined with Koski’s subdued drone, give the track a “world music” feel that reminds me of the band Three Fish, itself a side project for Pearl Jam’s Jeff Ament a couple decades ago. “Stay With Me” and it’s whistle-driven melody evokes a sort of melodramatic cowboy waltz. “Another Man” might be the most straight-forward, Tim Barry-esque acoustic songwriter track that cuts deeply in its emotionally honest tale of introspection and self-doubt.

What Was Once Is by And Gone also contains a few instrumental tracks, though to they are really more vignettes than truly songs. “Tangled Chords” is a brief  hodgepodge of reverb guitar,, spoken word voice-over, and what appears to be the sound of somebody hammering a nail. “A Little Buzz” is bright and hopeful. “A Version” sounds a bit like a sad, blue carnival with it’s weaving trumpet and synthesizer melodies. The repetitive, staccato piano undertones of “Soap Opera” give the track a haunting quality that evokes feelings of a movie score. In fact, all four of the vignettes do a good job of evoking different, movie score style feelings, and that’s not an accident, as Koski has expressed an interest in dipping his toes in that water in the future.

After a relatively busy post-comeback period a few years ago (three albums in four years), things have been quiet on the new music front from the Swingin’ Utters for a little while now. And while there aren’t traditional punk tunes present on What Was Once Is By And Gone, it serves as a welcome addition to the Koski catalog and hopefully offers him enough of a repertoire to make a go at the solo artist route alongside his normal Utters duties.

4/5 Stars

 

 

 



Stream the new Direct Hit!/PEARS split

PEARS and Direct Hit!‘s new split “Human Movement”, which has just been released on Fat Wreck, is streaming now. You can listen to the album, which is 6 songs from each band, below.

The album is available on various formats now.

 

 



Full Set Video: The Flatliners play “The Great Awake” in its entirety at Fest 16

The Flatliners are currently on a 10th anniversary tour for their sophomore LP The Great Awake. You can check out a video of the band playing the full album live at Fest 16 in Gainesville below.

The Great Awake could be considered the band’s breakthrough album. It was their first release on Fat Wreck Chords, featuring the anthemic single “Eulogy”.



Swingin’ Utters announce best of album “Drowning In The Sea, Rising With The Sun”

San Francisco punk legends Swingin’ Utters have jsut announced that via Fat Wreck Chords, they will be releasing a thirty three song album titled Drowning In The Sea, Rising With The Sun as a ‘best of’ hurrah on December 8th.

Available for pre-order today, this anthology touches on the Swingin’ Utters from birth to the their most recent material. Their 1995 debut album The Streets of San Francisco, through 2014’s Fistful of Hollow offers a taste of these guys through their evolution and sums up their identity.

The guys also will be hitting the road starting tomorrow to celebrate, so make sure to pick up your tickets here and check out the dates below.