Search Results for "Hardcore"

Sharptooth (hardcore, MD) Release “Clever Girl” and Tour Dates

Baltimore hardcore five-piece Sharptooth have released their latest record entitled Clever Girl. The album features eleven tracks of punishing brutality and will please all fans of socially-conscious hardcore. You can grab a copy on MerchNow, Apple Music, and Amazon.

In addition, Sharptooth have a busy touring schedule in the coming months. You can check out all their dates below.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



En Psychro stream new song “Ravaged Land”

Hello, ladies and gents, I’m happy to introduce to you En Psychro, a hardcore punk act from Nicosia, Cyprus. These guys have been around since 2011 and have a demo, two splits and a full-length album (Faceless Mass, 2014) under their belt. They released a new EP titled “Ravaged Land” a few days ago and the title track is available for stream.

If you enjoy the smell of the street, the feel of cobblestones in your hands and aggressive, straight-forward hardcore punk, check it out below.



EP Stream: Hellbent (hardcore) – “PUPS, PENGUINS, & SOCKEYE SALMON SANDWICHES”

Ontario hardcore band Hellbent are streaming their latest EP, PUPS, PENGUINS, & SOCKEYE SALMON SANDWICHES, in full on all digital streaming services. Now, the EP is about a month old, but it just rolled through our folders and we had to put it up for everyone to hear because it is real good. It is 4 tracks of consistent energy and screaming that blends hardcore punk and 90s-style hardcore in to one fusion that is this EP.

You can check it out below.

PUPS, PENGUINS, & SOCKEYE SALMON SANDWICHES follows the band’s 2016 EP, EP3. 



Sharptooth (Baltimore) premiere new song “No Sanctuary”

Baltimore hardcore act Sharptooth premiered their track “No Sanctuary” from their upcoming debut album “Clever Girl” last Wednesday. Check it out below along with some of the band’s upcoming tour dates.

Pure Noise Records will be releasing “Clever Girl on October 27th.



DS Editorial: The Ten Acts I’m Going to Catch at FEST 16

Fest week is finally here and I’m pretty much beside myself. All of my exhaustive preparation (that I discussed in a previous article) is coming to fruition. Although I’ve never attended The Fest, so I could be completely unprepared for the debauchery that is likely to ensue, I feel that I’ve given myself a good chance to survive. After months of research, hours of listening, and a proprietary winnowing process that I’m not at liberty to discuss, I’ve narrowed my must-see bands down to the 10 you see below. Who’s on your list?

1. Sinai Vessel: Stumbled upon these guys when I was doing my FEST research. Reviewed Brokenlegged for DS. It’s one of my top albums of 2017. I can’t wait to hear it live. Friday. 10:30pm. Rockey’s.

2. Hum: My only fear on this one is that it’s going to be super crowded. I hope I’m wrong. I’ve seen HUM a few times. They are an old Favorite. I’m amped to hear anything off of Downward is Heavenward, especially The Inuit Promise. Saturday. 12:30am. 8 Seconds.

3. Tartar Control: First heard of these guys off of one of The FEST comps. THEY ARE AWESOME!!! I grew up on irreverent punk like The Dead Milkmen and King Missile, and these guys have taken the torch and run with it. Their shtick is like Book of Mormon meets PeeWee’s Playhouse on an acid trip. Friday. 8:20pm. The Wooly.

4. Grade: Hadn’t thought about these guys in years. Got into them around 2000 in the Emo/Screamo heyday. After revisiting their catalog, I am super amped to see them live. This reunion is a can’t miss. Saturday. 5:00pm. 8 Seconds.

5. Typesetter: Caught Typesetter opening for Against Me, and I’ve been a fan ever since. I’m really rooting for these guys. They are amazing musicians writing amazing songs. They bring it live and they seem to be playing 200 shows a year. That kind of work ethic will pay off for them! Friday. 11:20pm. Rockey’s.

6. The Dirty Nil: Don’t call them punk rock, it’s just rock. I missed these guys at Riot Fest and I’ve regretted it ever since. Some tough conflicts in this timeframe, but I’m determined to correct my past mistakes and catch the whole set. These guys stumbled out of the same garage as The Replacements and their revved-up guitar attack will be perfect to jump start your day. Saturday. 2:10pm. Bo Diddley Plaza.

7. The Lillingtons: I’m a huge fan of Kody Templeman’s work in Teenage Bottlerocket. And if you like TB, you’ll like The Lillingtons. The new record got five stars from DS and I can’t wait to hear that stuff. But they have to play All I Hear is Static!!! Friday. 12:50am. 8 Seconds.

8. Superchunk: I go way back with these guys. Seen them probably 10 times. The last time I saw them was at Riot Fest and they were one of the strongest sets that year. I’m expecting them to close out the main stage in epic style. Sunday. 8:00pm. Bo Diddley Plaza.

9. Iron Chic: I backed into these guys in a bizarre way. Got into RVIVR after catching them in DC. Then looked into Latterman. Started listening to IC to prep for The FEST and I’m like “these guys sound a lot like Latterman.” There’s good reason for that as IC lead Phil Douglas was in LM. Long story short, they’re a can’t miss. Sunday. 6:40pm. Bo Diddley Plaza.

10. Extinction AD: A person cannot live on Indie, Shoegaze and Emo alone. Every once in a while you need some metal. Where have these guys been!! They’re like the second coming of Iron Maiden crossed with Pantera!!! I will not miss this set even if I end up getting taken out on a stretcher. Saturday. 6:50pm. 8 Seconds.



Hard Pipe Hitters release preview track “2 out of 3” from upcoming album

Las Vegas hardcorers Hard Pipe Hitters have released a song from their upcoming album, “This Is Rock Bottom.” The album is set to release on November 11th. You can pre-order the album at their bandcamp page. You can stream “2 out of 3,” a song about a failing phallus, below.

I made a few dick jokes last week, and now I’m apparently the guy that has to write about dicks. Just like the old gypsy woman said.



Backtrack stream new track “One With You” from upcoming album

New York hardcore band Backtrack are currently streaming their new track “One With You.” You can listen to it below.

The song is taken from the band’s upcoming album titled Bad To My World, which is set to be released on November 17 via Bridge Nine Records.



Music Video: Emmer Effer – “Clayton Kershaw Jedi Master”

LA hardcore exports Emmer Effer have premiered a music video for their song “Clayton Kershaw Jedi Master”, which can be viewed below.

On the video, which was released to coincide with the start of the Dodgers’ return to the World Series stage after 29 years, guitarist Kevin Wells stated, “I wrote this song from the perspective of a baseball fan who is a child because, in many ways, I still feel like that little kid watching baseball when I watch games. I also made this one of our few songs without a variation of the word, “fuck,” because I don’t think Kershaw would like that if he were to hear the song. Go Dodgers!!!”

“Clayton Kershaw Jedi Master” appears on Emmer Effer’s recent album From the Bottom Down, which was released earlier this month on Felony Records.



Harbour Sharks (hardcore) release lyric video for “Don’t Say Revenge”

British hard rockers Harbour Sharks have released a lyric video for their song “Don’t Say Revenge”. The song comes off the band’s upcoming album “A History of Violence”.

You can check out the video here.

The debut album for the Kingston natives is scheduled to be released October 27th. If you’re a fan of A Day to Remember or Stone Sour you’ll enjoy these guys. 



While She Sleeps announce UK tour

British metalcore band While She Sleeps have announced a series of UK headline dates in December and February. Dates are below.

The band released “You Are We” independently back in April. 



Lotus (Belgian hardcore) premiere video for “The Plea” off their upcoming album “The Road to Calvary”

Belgium’s hardcore hardcorers LOTUS have announced their new album, “The Road to Calvary” will be released on December 9th. For those of you who only speak Hardcore, that’s “XxXThexRoadxtoxCalvaryXxXxxxXXxxxXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.”

In the meantime, they’ve premiered their video for a single off the album, “The Plea,” which you can check out below.



Stick To Your Guns stream full album “True View”

Orange County hardcore outfit Stick To Your Guns are currently streaming their brand new album True View in full. You can listen to it below.

True View was released on October 13h via Pure Noise Records and is their sixth studio album. The album follows the band’s last EP titled Better Ash Than Dust, which was released on September 23rd, 2016.



Dead Ending (hardcore) stream “Bring On The Mob” off upcoming album

Chicago hardcore outfit Dead Ending are streaming the track “Bring On The Mob” off their upcoming album “Shoot the Messenger” out November 17th via Alternative Tentacles. The band, comprised of the legendary Vic Bondi (Articles of Faith), Derek Grant (Alkaline Trio) and Nathan Voorhees (Ensign, Vision), throws some fast paced, in your face political punk rock.

Check out the new song below.

Dead Ending will be holding a record listening party on November 17th at Kuma’s Corner in Chicago.



Hangman (Long Island, Hardcore) to release new EP “A Vile Decree”

Baltimore based hardcore label Flatspot Records have signed Long Island exports Hangman and are to release a five song 7″, “A Vile Decree” on November 3rd.

Pre-orders are up now – and have a listen to advance track “Pesticide” below.



DS Editorial: The Night I Videotaped Circle Jerks & Fear And Barely Lived To Tell About It

Words by Loren Kantor

In the winter of 1981, I responded to a backpage ad in Flipside, an independent zine covering the Los Angeles punk rock scene. The ad read: “Videographer needed to document local punk shows.” I’d spent several thousand dollars on a Panasonic video camera and was looking for a way to recoup the investment. I called the number and spoke with Boris, a man with a heavy Slavic accent. He told me to meet him on Wednesday night at the Stardust Ballroom, an old big band venue at the corner of Western & Sunset in East Hollywood.

All I had to do was videotape several hours of punk rock performances and Boris would pay me $300. It sounded simple enough. I’d been a drummer in high school with a love for prog-rock bands like Genesis and King Crimson. I didn’t know much about punk. I’d heard the Sex Pistols and the Clash. I figured punk was just another outlet for teen angst and rebellion, the essence of all rock ‘n’ roll.

The band list that night included the Circle Jerks, Fear and Black Flag. This would be an epic LA show, but I had no way of knowing this at the time. Boris met me outside the venue. He wore a dark sharkskin suit and his face was pockmarked with acne scars. He introduced me to El Duce, a local punk legend who would be my chaperone that evening. El Duce was a menacing singer for the “rape rock” band The Mentors. He was a bald Latino with a ratty beard, sanpaku eyes and a hairy belly protruding beneath a tight t-shirt. He was rude, crass and prone to spitting on and cursing women. (One of his songs included the lyrics, “Bend up and smell my anal vapor, your face is my toilet paper.”) Boris said, “As long as you stay near him no one will fuck with you.”

Boris said he’d meet me on the sidewalk after the show. I followed El Duce into the lobby past a mass of white teens wearing t-shirts and jeans. People gave El Duce a wide berth as he flashed the finger and made fart sounds with his lips. I noticed several skinheads beating the crap out of a longhair near the concession stand. I also had long hair. I turned on my video camera and started taping. My camera would be my invisibility cloak, my instrument of anonymity.

El Duce disappeared into the crowd leaving me without a security detail. I entered the performance space as the Circle Jerks were playing “Live Fast Die Young.” Singer Keith Morris thrashed around stage screaming indecipherable vocals into the microphone. The music was frenetic with distorted guitar, pulsing bass and hyperactive drums. I searched for a vantage point to position my camera. There was an opening left of stage, directly beneath a large amp. I turned on my portable light and carved through the crowd like a snowplow.

There were about 200 people in the audience. Most were calm except a few trying to start a mosh pit. As the Circle Jerks stormed through their playlist, the throng pushed against me and the slam dancing began in earnest. I was struck by a few wayward arm thrusts but I was more concerned for the camera than my own personal safety.

At the end of the set I followed the Circle Jerks backstage. I entered a small room with graffiti-covered walls, a torn couch and several broken chairs. Guitarist Greg Hetson thrust a beer into my hand. He urged me to roll camera as he yelled directly into the lens. “We’re making history tonight. LA is the center of the punk universe.” Someone else screamed, “The Pistols are pussies.” El Duce entered the room, dropped his pants and grabbed his testicles. Everyone was excited, caught in the magnitude of the evening.

That was when I sensed a menacing presence in the corner. He was a short, stocky man with close-cropped hair, muscular neck and piercing blue eyes. He was quiet and tense, oozing rage like a tiger caught in a steel trap. I pointed the camera toward him. He flipped me off and scowled. I turned away, intimidated. El Duce admonished me, “Don’t diss Lee, man. He’ll mess you up.” He referred to Lee Ving, the notorious lead singer of Fear. To this day I’ve never met a scarier human being.

I returned to the auditorium and was greeted by a stench of body odor and stale beer. The room was now packed with thousands of screaming, shirtless fans. My previous camera position was filled. I made a fateful decision, climbing atop the eight-foot high amplifier on the stage. From there I could tape the performance without anyone blocking my view. The sound might be muffled but I was clear of the mosh pit and out of harm’s way.

As Fear began their set, the crowd roared. Suddenly everything was chaos. Their first song was “I Love Livin’ In The City.” Moshers blitzed the stage and smashed into each other like bowling pins. Two beefy bouncers grabbed the aggressive fans and hurled them into the oscillating mass. A band member played an out-of-tune saxophone. Lee Ving stumbled backwards, bodies flying around him. At one point, he looked my way. This caught the crowd’s attention as if they suddenly noticed me for the first time.

I pointed the camera toward the crowd. This was a big mistake. A cup of beer hit me in the chest. Suddenly I felt the amplifier swaying. I looked down and saw two moshers rocking the amp back and forth. Fans cheered. Lee Ving thrust his fist in the air as if to signal his approval.

The amp toppled. I cradled my camera to my chest and prepared for impact. I fell headfirst into a horde of bodies and limbs. People began punching and kicking me. Someone yanked my hair. Others spit at me. I curled into a ball, making myself as small as possible. For some reason I focused on the song that was playing, “Beef Bologna.” I had the thought, “That’s a strange thing to write a song about.”

Someone grabbed me under the armpits and dragged me away. I’ve no idea who it was. He deposited me by the back wall, near the bathroom. My shirt was soaked from sweat and beer. My breathing was labored. I struggled to my feet and shuffled out of the venue. When I reached the sidewalk, I gulped for air. My nose was bleeding but my main concern was my camera. There was a dent in the camera body but it still worked. I pointed at the marquee and took one last shot. Then I staggered to my car and drove home.

The next morning the phone rang at 6:30. It was Boris. He wanted to know why I didn’t meet him after the show. I told him what happened. He wasn’t interested. All he cared was whether I recorded Black Flag. I told him no. He cursed in Slavic. He said there’d been a near riot and a tape of the show would be gold.

He asked if he could get the tape that morning. I told him my camera was damaged and I wanted extra money. He said he would only pay $200 since I didn’t record Black Flag. We agreed on $400. Before delivering the tape, I watched the footage. The performance shots were dark and the sound quality crackled. But the backstage shots of the Circle Jerks and Lee Ving looked great.

It would take a few weeks before my ribs and nose were back to normal. The trauma would take longer to heal. I don’t know why I didn’t make a copy of the tape. Maybe I wanted to put the incident behind me. That would be the last punk show I ever attended.