Search Results for "Folk"

Dollar Signs release video for “Punk on the Weekend”

Charlotte based folk-punks Dollar Signs have a new video out for the song “Punk on the Weekend,” which tells the all-too-familiar tale of balancing the drudgery of a day job with the punk rock life.  You can watch it below.

The song will appear on the band’s upcoming EP, Life is Ruff, which is due out on March 28 via their own label Possum Heart Records.



DS Exclusive: Frank Turner plays his biggest North American show to date, w/Arkells, The Bouncing Souls (Boston, MA)

Frank Turner wound down the North American touring run in support of his 2015 full-length, Positive Songs For Negative People, in a big, big way; by headlining the Agganis Arena in his adopted American hometown of Boston, Massachusetts. Turner has played the greater Boston area an awful lot over the last decade, and this particular night, Turners 2031st show as a solo artist, marked his biggest headlining show in the Western Hemisphere to date. It doesn’t exactly reek of journalistic credibility to insert yourself and your outlet into a story, but, well, this is 2017 America. Here at Dying Scene, we’ve covered Frank Turner perhaps more extensively than most other artists over the last half-dozen years, and in some ways Dying Scene’s increase in readership has mirrored Turner’s own increase in listenership on this side of “the pond.” It’s not a 1-to-1 causal relationship, mind you, just a reflection on our similar paths; we’ve caught up with him at record store performances and small club shows and large club shows to opening for bands like Dropkick Murphys and manning afternoon sets at larger festivals. So it was with great pleasure (and perhaps more than a little pride) that we got the chance to take in the events of the evening as Turner and his high-powered backing band, The Sleeping Souls, did their best to blow the roof off the not-quite-capacity 7200-seat arena located on the campus of Boston University.

Okay, back to the regularly scheduled, full-journalistic-integrity portion of the recap. Turner took the stage promptly at 9:20pm accompanied by only an acoustic guitar and started in alone on the first few verses of his newest track, “The Sand In The Gears,” before being joined by the remainder of the Sleeping Souls (Ben Lloyd on guitar, Nigel Powell on drums, Tarrant Anderson on bass and Felix Hagan, filling in for new father Matt Nasir on keys/mandolin/tambourine/etc) for the song’s group singalong outro. From there, as you might imagine the bulk of the set’s remaining twenty songs drew from Turner’s three most recent — and most popular — albums; Positive Songs…, 2013’s Tape Deck Heart, and of course, 2011’s breakthrough, England Keep My Bones, though even half-dozen older tracks turned in to rousing, full-audience singalongs as well. Frank Turner fans are notably passionate and rowdy, and the increased scope of the venue didn’t seem to invite very many casual fans; yours truly did several laps around the floor and the seating areas and found nary an ass in their proverbial seat for the bulk of the evening.

No doubt because of his increased popularity in Europe, but Turner didn’t seem overwhelmed by the size of the venue; appreciative and in awe, maybe, but not overwhelmed. While Turner’s roots remain very firmly planted in his love of punk and hardcore and metal, the energy that Turner and his band have always played with are perfectly suited to play to the very back of even the largest venue, performing as though it’s their duty to keep even those in the cheap seats out of their…well…seats. Before the night was over, the set would feature a full-venue “wall of hugs” (think a metal show’s ‘wall of death,’ only with much less death), opener Will Varley circling the venue and selfie-ing with the people in the top of the back row before taking a celebratory Jameson shot with Turner, and the frontman himself crowd-surfing for the bulk of show-closer “Four Simple Words.” As Turner himself pointed out, some of these efforts might seem like (and were, in fact) typical arena rock frontman hijinks, but they have an effect of engaging everybody in the process. Rock shows are, by definition, communal, celebratory events, and Turner and his mates have perfected the art of taking their responsibility to the audience seriously while conversely not taking themselves too seriously at all.

New Jersey punk veterans The Bouncing Souls served as direct support for this particular night, their only night on the Frank Turner tour, and their first Boston show since the release of their 2016 full-length, Simplicity. The Souls have conquered stages across the globe for more than a quarter-century, so they certainly seemed right at home on the Agganis’ large stage. The band ripped through eighteen songs in their forty-ish minute set, kicking things off with “That Song,” from 2001’s How I Spent My Summer Vacation. From a strictly sonic perspective, straight-forward one-guitar punk rock doesn’t necessarily translate well to a large hockey arena, as the sound tends to come across as loud and muddy. That seemed to be the case for the first half of the Souls’ set on this night, although things certainly improved from there. And the four-piece certainly had more than their fair share of amped up fans in attendance, with traditional favorites like “Sing Along Forever,” “Anchors Aweigh,” “Lean On, Sheena” and, of course, “True Believers,” inspiring gang chantalongs from all points (the latter featuring an unannounced, stealth-style on stage appearance from Boston punk legend Mike McColgan on guest vocals).

Arkells had been touring alongside Turner on the bulk of this run, and while they weren’t direct support on this particular evening, they certainly could have been. The Hamilton, Ontario-based five-piece hit the ground running from the first notes of set-opener “A Little Rain (A Song For Pete).” This is the first time that Arkells have graced the pages of Dying Scene, and their power-pop sound is outside the traditional scope of Dying Scene’s coverage spectrum, but their high energy, politically-charged set filled with positivity and unity was perfect for the evening’s overall theme. Arkells frontman Max Kerman rivals Turner’s own energy, and he had propelled himself onto the railing and into the crowd before the first chorus of the set’s aforementioned first song. If you’re a fan of Turner’s brand of arena folk-rock (and we are) and have a penchant for modern rock radio bands like Twenty One Pilots and Catfish and the Bottlemen, give them a Google.

With apologies to show-opener and frequent Turner tour mate Will Varley, the scope of the setting and the check-in procedure contained therein meant that yours truly missed the photo op portion of his set, though the latter half of his set that we did catch (especially “Talking Cat Blues”) were especially well-received be the vocal crowd. We’ll catch you next time, Will; promise.

Check out our full photo gallery below.



The Smith Street Band announce new album, release music video for new song – “Birthdays”

Australian folk-punk outfit The Smith Street Band have a new music video out for their new song, “Birthdays.” Watch/listen below.

The song comes from the band’s new full-length album, More Scared Of You Than You Are Of Me. That’s due out April 7th on Pool House/Remote Control Records (Aus), SideOneDummy Records (North America), Specialist Subject Records (UK), and Uncle M (EU). It’s up for pre-order now right here.

The album, produced by Jeff Rosenstock, is the band’s first full-length since their 2014 release, Throw Me In The River.



Dollar Signs (Punk/Folk-Punk) announce new EP “Life is Ruff,” stream new track and announce tour

Charlotte based folk-punkers Dollar Signs have announced they will be releasing a new EP, titled “Life Is Ruff,” on March 28 via their own imprint label Possum Heart Records. With this announcement they are streaming a brand new track off the new EP, titled “House of Leaves (Me Alone).” You can listen to it below.

Dollar Signs will be touring in support of their new EP, setting out on the “Life Is Ruff Tour.” You can find the tour poster, dates and locations below the stream.



Harley Poe (Horror Folk Punk) stream new album “Lost and Losing It”

Horror infused folk punk act out of Kokomo, Indiana Harley Poe are currently streaming their latest album, titled “Lost and Losing It,” through CDBaby on YouTube.  You can listen to it below.

“Lost and Losing It” follows their last release, album “Fallen Down” which was released after the band announced they were stopping activities. “Lost and Losing It” is described by frontman Joseph Whiteford as; “These songs aren’t about fictional monsters, but are based on my own reality within this last year.” You can find the rest of his statement on the album here. The album is available to purchase for download from CDBaby.



DS Photo Gallery: Bryan McPherson, The Radiator Rattlers and Nick The Barbarian (Nashua, NH)

Hard-working protest punk troubadour Bryan McPherson spent the better part of December touring eastward from his adopted homeland of California to his original homeland of Boston, Massachusetts, and he’s spent the better part of the past few weeks headed back to the West Coast. Early on the post-inauguration leg of the tour, he rolled through The Thirsty Turtle in yours truly’s original hometown of Nashua, New Hampshire. It probably goes without saying that the present administration is going to require — and inspire — a great deal of fiery protest literature and music and art. McPherson has been a thorn in the side of the status quo for many years now (you may recall his being banned from performing at Disney-owned locations a couple years back while opening for Dropkick Murphys), though his words take on added gravity now.

On the morning of this particular show, women (and the men and children who love them) took to the streets in overwhelming numbers (including an estimated 175,000 in nearby Boston) to protest the policies of the sexist, racist Cheeto-In-Chief, making the firebrand McPherson’s performance a perfect bookend. With little fanfare amidst an intimate but attentive crowd, McPherson ripped through a set comprised mostly of tracks from his last couple full-length albums, 2015’s Wedgewood and 2012’s American Boy, American Girl.

The Radiator Rattlers

Direct support was provided on this night by The Radiator Rattlers, a “cow-punk rock and roll” band from Haverhill, Massachusetts. The raucous seven-piece wasted little time between songs, instead blazing through a high-energy set forty-five-ish minute set that closed with a rather spontaneous, crowd-inspired cover of the Fear classic “I Love Living In The City.”

Nick The Barbarian

Nashua-based tattoo-artist-turned-one-man-band Nick The Barbarian played his typical booze-fueled set of songs about songs about ass-kicking debauchery and murdering the Westboro Baptist Church. His set is a lot of fun, although there was roughly an hour between show-opener Berten Lee’s finger-picked folk punk set and that of the Barbarian, all-but killing whatever sort of momentum had been building for the five-act show (a Massachusetts-based acoustic duo called Hometown Eulogy also played, and though they’re enjoyable, they’re more along the lines of Woodstock-era folk and not included in this particular story), though the Rattlers and McPherson certainly brought the intensity back late in the evening.

Check out the full photo galley below.

 



Serenity Now! (punk) stream new EP “Views From The 666”

Toronto punks Serenity Now! are streaming their newest EP, Views From The 666, in full. The 2-track release is a preview of things to come on the band’s upcoming full-length and can be heard over on the Fireworks Collective Bandcamp. You can check it out below.

Views From The 666 follows the band’s 2015 release, Facsimile. 



Brook Pridemore streams new release “Breakup Songs, With Horns”

Brook Pridemore, a folk-punk/anti-folk artist from Brooklyn, NY, has released his latest EP “Breakup Songs, With Horns.” You can listen to the stream of it below.

On the release, Brook had this to say: Hey, so I made these recordings over the last couple of years. They stemmed from a lot of projects that I started but never quite finished. What I realized over time was that they worked well together as a weird little EP. Scattered, smothered and covered. Two songs are by Mike from Prewar Yardsale (Dina plays on those, as well as three others). One was written for me to sing by Thomas Patrick Maguire. One was written by Neil Kelly and originally recorded by Huggabroomstik. One was written by Kung Fu Crimewave. The others were written by me. Some of this was recorded by Brian Speaker and some was recorded by Casey Holford. They’re both good people who make things sound good.

Brook Pridemore’s last full release prior to “Breakup Songs, With Horns” was album “Brook Pridemore’s Gory Details,” which was released on June 26, 2014.



Escape From The Zoo (members of Days N Daze) stream new album “Killacopter”

Houston folk punk act Escape From The Zoo (featuring Jesse Sandejas of Days N Daze) are streaming their new album Killacopter in its entirety.

You can give it a listen below, and if you like what you hear, the band is offering the whole thing as a pay what you want download.

Killacopter was released on January 20th, 2017.



New Music: Frank Turner – “The Sand In The Gears”

New music from the great Frank Turner on the first full day of the Chester Cheeto administration. It’s an apropos rallying-cry song called “The Sand In The Gears,” and it was recorded live in concert at Turner’s show in Silver Springs, Maryland, the other night.

You can give the track a listen below.

Turner is currently in the early stages of a big North American tour that wraps up February 18th in Boston. Check out the full tour itinerary here.



New Music: Cory Branan streams new track “Imogene” from upcoming album “Adios”

Assuming we haven’t been swallowed up by the fiery hellscape of damnation by the first week of April, we’ll have a new Cory Branan album to look forward to!

It’s called Adios, and it’s billed as “Cory’s death album.” If you saw him out on the road with the likes of Chuck Ragan or Brian Fallon or Lucero last year, you got a taste of what’s to come by way of a song called “The Vow,” penned as an ode to his late father. It’s heart-breaking but razor-sharp, which is pretty much Branan’s wheelhouse.

Adios is due out April 7th on Branan’s longtime label home, Bloodshot Records. Pre-orders of the album, including limited-edition pink vinyl (which yours truly just did — apropos on a day like today) are available here. In the meantime, you can stream the album’s lead single, “Imogene,” right here, and check out Branan’s upcoming tour dates here. Stay tuned for more on Adios in the coming months.

Branan’s last album, “The No Hit Wonder,” was released back in 2014 on Bloodshot Records,



Serenity Now! stream new song “I’ve Seen The World And I’m Tired”

Toronto pop-punkers Serenity Now!, are streaming a brand new song called “I’ve Seen The World And I’m Tired.” The track is one off of their upcoming EP, Views From The 666, which is a two-track teaser EP to their upcoming full-length album. The band also announced that they have signed with Montreal based label, Fireworks Collective to release the album – due out this spring. You can check the new song out below.

Serenity Now! last released Facsimile in 2015.



Davey Dynamite (Dying Scene Records) talks new album, new sound and new plans

There’s a moment in a short school project film about the Chicago folk punk scene where Davey Dynamite stands, legs apart, a battered guitar around his neck, locking eyes with a bearded man less than a meter away as he sings his heart out for all he’s worth. The man bellows the lyrics back with the same amount of intensity and gusto, as if the lyrics mean as much to him as to the young man who wrote them. Rather surprisingly, that bearded man turns out to be a professor of Anthropology which seems to be a fitting summary of Davey Dynamite the artist. He is a singer with that rare ability to connect with his audience on their level no matter who they are or where they come from. He has that uncanny ability to frame instantly relatable lyrics around passionate and powerful punk songs.

Davey grew up in and around Chicago and has been playing as “Davey Dynamite” since 2010 when he discovered the city’s thriving and nurturing punk scene. After a number of solo acoustic albums sprinkled with a handful of “plugged-in” tunes, his new album “Holy Shit” finds him supported by a full band on every track. It is without doubt one of the most inspiring, raw and dynamic releases of the last 12 months. 11 taut, anthemic punk songs replete with irresistible hooks and seismic choruses that sit somewhere between Frank Turner and Against Me! Just like those artists he has an exceptional ability to write lyrics that describe the human condition in new and interesting ways. Below, Davey tells us more about the recording of “Holy Shit”, his influences and what inspires him to write songs that rally against injustice and intolerance in contemporary society.



DS Exclusive: Nathan Leigh Premieres New LP “Ordinary Eternal Machinery”

A few weeks back we premiered the supremely good single “The Slumlord’s Kids” from folk punk, Nathan Leigh. Well, you guys loved it so much Mr. Leigh said that when the new album was released, he’d let you guys get a hold of it first! Well, the day of it’s release is upon us and he made good on his promise and sent Ordinary Eternal Machinery over for us to stream, exclusively for your precious little ears! Even if you’re not a fan of the genre, you’ll want to give this one a go. Sure, it has overtly anti-political lyrics and songs of solidarity as you would expect but it also has sensational music composition that goes far beyond the traditional confines of the trusty acoustic guitar that reminded us of the versatile and ageless Paul Simon. Listen to all eighteen incredible tracks, below!



Music Video: Escape From The Zoo (members of Days N Daze) – “Don’t Blink”

Houston folk punk act Escape From The Zoo (featuring Jesse Sandejas of Days N Daze) have released a music video for their song “Don’t Blink.”

You can check it out below.

Escape From The Zoo last released The Wasted Years EP on February 13th, 2015.