Search Results for "Folk"

Wayne Kennedy (acoustic-punk) streams new EP “God’s Rejects”

Canadian acoustic-punker Wayne Kennedy is streaming his latest EP, God’s Rejects, over on Bandcamp. This is his 3rd release, one that encompasses the same energy and emotion of his previous releases, with a next-level musical recording. It is 5 songs of pure fun, hectic, and personal tracks, songs that Wayne says are some of the best he has ever written.

The acoustic-punk act has a modest goal of 500 downloads for this EP, which is being offered for free on digital platforms. You can listen to the whole thing and grab your copy below.

God’s Rejects serves as a follow-up to 2016’s Train Wrecks. 



Album Review: Human Kitten – “Velvet Waltz”

Human Kitten, the project of Ocean City, Maryland based folk punk artist Elijah Llinas, last released a 16 track album titled I’m Afraid of Everything on October 31, 2016 and hinted that it may be the last release under the Human Kitten moniker. But there was certainly more to be said, a detailing of the relatable grey state of youth shadowed by mental illness in the form of Velvet Waltz.

Originally this release was planned to be a duo of companion EPs, playing off each other and showing two sides of things. This core idea is still present in the mirroring of the album, such as “Stuck Neverlasting” to “Luck Everlasting.” The latter presents a similar state of mind, but swings to a more positive outlook and the feeling of change within reach. Two other companion tracks “Bedroom at Midnight” and “Living Room at Noon” mirror each other in structure. “Bedroom” starts out as a slow and melancholic look at life and builds into an angry determination, whilst “Living Room” starts as upbeat but still vitriolic and moves down into that depressively real side.

The strong vocals followed by a shaky voice barely holding it together perfectly encapsulate the emotions behind the album. The wails of ‘Nothing at all‘ on “Sensory Deprivation” and ‘…a person who you truly believe has earned love‘ on “Living Room at Noon” show a growth in Elijah’s vocals, and the togetherness of the release show his growth as a songwriter. The album has an overall theme of youth and depression, stagnation and realization, growth and loss, and feels like a natural progression from I’m Afraid of Everything with a more cohesive structure.

Velvet Waltz is a look into a relatable depression in the modern day, everyday life, and an occasional lighthearted take on metaphor within a darker construction. Elijah covers everything from social expectations to introversion and video games, with a lot of incredibly well fitting lines such as ‘24 years old I’m still afraid of the telephone.’ The album has some Ghost Mice vibes in the power and the instrumentals, albeit with less tempo, but on a personal level rather than the societal level Ghost Mice discuss frequently.

Overall a more melancholic mood surrounds the album than other Human Kitten releases, with moments of biting anger and pits of crushing dejection. An emotive folk-punk experience that’s just as easy to relate to as it is to sing along, a story of mental illness, introversion, and the desire to grow beyond that and find a better place to stand.

Velvet Waltz is set to be released on October 31st, but you can listen to the first track “Stuck Neverlasting” below to get ready, and pre-order the album digitally on the Human Kitten Bandcamp page.



Blacklist Royals stream track “I Don’t Care”

Nashville punks Blacklist Royals are now streaming their track “I Don’t Care” which is off of their new album titled Model Citizen (releasing later this month) through Paper + Plastick Records. 

This will be the band’s first full-length release since 2014’s Die Young With Me.

Check it out here.



Frank Turner announces new album “Songbook”, premieres new song “There She Is”

Folk-punk hero Frank Turner has announced he is releasing a new album titled “Songbook” on November 24th. It seems the album will be a slight retrospective release featuring reworked classics and one new track titled “There She Is” which you can check out below.

Speaking on the release, Turner states:

“I wanted to release a document of what I’ve done so far, including my favourite recorded songs, 10 new alternative versions of older songs, and one new track. It’s a moment of reflection and celebration of my work as a songwriter to date.”

This will be Turner’s first new album since 2015’s Positive Songs For Negative People released on Xtra Mile Recordings / Interscope Records.



Sincere Engineer (folk-punk) release video for “Corn Dog Sonnet No.7”

Windy City based folk-punk act Sincere Engineer has released a video for the song “Corn Dog Sonnet No. 7”.

You can see the new video below.

The song comes off the upcoming album “Rhombithian” slated to be released October 20th via Red Scare Industries. Rhombithian will be the debut album from Sincere Engineer.



Bobby’s Oar (punk-bluegrass) streaming song “Jealous” off new album

Seattle based country-punks Bobby’s Oar are streaming the song “Jealous” off their upcoming album “Not What I’m Looking For”.

You can give the new song a listen below.

“Not What I’m Looking For” will be the second release from Bobby’s Oar, and if you enjoy Morgan or the Raygun Cowboys you will not be disappointed. 



Tragical History Tour releases “Old Words EP”

Scottish folk punk Tragical History Tour has released a new, four song EP on Cambridge based label Aaahh!! Real Records. The “Old Words EP” is out digitally now, with a CD press run to follow.

You can listen to “Old Words” below.



Album Review: Coffee Project – ‘Wasted Love’

If you’re not familiar with Coffee Project, let me give you a quick introduction. The duo hail from Gainesville and include Buddy from Less Than Jake and Jake who used to be in Rehasher. Imagine catchy and fast pop punk on an acoustic guitar, then add a trombone. Then imagine that every terrible band you’ve ever heard try something like this wasn’t terrible and were actually awesome. That’s basically Coffee Project. Their bandcamp says they “play upbeat catchy singalong acoustic songs that feel more like a punk rock show and less like a coffee shop gig” and that description is pretty accurate it seems.

That said, Coffee Project is truly one my favorite bands I feel I don’t hear enough from. Their new 7”, Wasted Love, which is out now on A-F Records (the label owned by Anti-Flag) comes off as a simple break up record upon seeing the artwork and hearing the title track. But I’m not sure that’s a fair analysis.

See, what I like about this record is that it reflects a breakup from multiple angles, not just the direct heartbreak and sad songs. It talks about frustration with social media, handling anxiety, and how the rest of the world may be perceived from someone who has just lost love, not just one’s inner feelings of grief.

It’s not my favorite thing the band has ever done, but there’s not a ton for me to analyze with only four short songs. They do a good job, as usual, of combining folk elements with punk energy without sounding like a typical folk punk band. It doesn’t feel like a release I can compare to their others, it just sounds like a continuation of what Coffee Project does.

Regardless, I’m going to give this a 3.5/5, (can I give them a 75%? C?) but that doesn’t mean it’s bad. I just wish it was longer and I had more to digest.

Go see Coffee Project at Fest this year, you won’t regret it. Listen to Wasted Love below, and please consider supporting the band and label.



Phoenix folk-punk Ghost in the Willow release first single from upcoming EP, “Missing Persons”

Ghost in the Willow have released “Favourite Company,” their first single from their second EP, “Missing Persons.”

The EP will be released on October 13th. In the mean time, you can check out “Favourite Company” below, and head over to their bandcamp page listen to their first self-titled EP.



Blacklist Royals announce new album “Model Citizen”, stream title track

Nashville punks Blacklist Royals have announced plans to release a new album titled Model Citizen through Paper + Plastick Records.

You can give the title track a listen below.

This will be the band’s first full-length release since 2014’s Die Young With Me.



Morgan (folk/punktry) release new song “I Think We’re Going to Jail”

Quebec cow-folk-punk (punktry) heavyweights Morgan have released a new song “I Think We’re Going to Jail” off their upcoming album “Morgan Deli”.

You can check out the song below.

The new album is the second release for the band, the first since 2014’s “Get A Horse!”. The new record will be released on Stomp Records, and is out September 29th. If your a fan of Old Man Markley or the Raygun Cowboys you will truly enjoy these guys.



Members of F.O.D and 7years announce split

Hans Roofthoot (F.O.D) and Matteo Caldari (7years) will be featured on a new split, coming from Bearded Punk, Inconsapevole, Morning Wood and No Reason Records. The split is due out on October 2nd of this year. There will be 10 songs, 5 from each artist on the split.

The duo will be sharing the stage with Joey Cape in his Genk and Milano gigs. The album, which is an acoustic album, has been inspired by the likes of Joey Cape, Greg Graffin and John K Samson, among others.



The Dreadnoughts announce new album “Foreign Skies”, stream single

Vancouver folk-punks The Dreadnoughts just announced their first album in 7 years. Titled Foreign Skies, it is set to release on November 10th. You can give the epic first single “The Black and White” a listen below, and pre-order the record on CD, vinyl, or digital on bandcamp.

Foreign Skies: is a World War I themed concept album. According to the band, “It’s a challenging album. Some people are going to hate how it opens. Some people are going to hate some stuff in the middle. Some people are going to wonder why we’re not singing about gin and poutine.”

The Dreadnoughts last released Polka’s Not Dead in 2010 through Stomp Records.



Frank Turner releasing new album in 2018

When responding to criticism of his posh “Campfire Punkrock” event, Frank Turner confirmed he will be releasing a new album in 2018. Turner stated that this is “just one small event among everything else I’ll be doing next year – releasing a new record, with the usual run of tours, festivals and benefit shows that comes with that.”

So if paying thousands of dollars to eat hors d’oeuvres and have campfire singalongs isn’t your thing, at least you have a new Frank Turner album to look forward to next year.

Stay tuned for more details on the follow-up to 2015’s Positive Songs For Negative People.



Album Review: AJJ – ‘Back in the Jazz Coffin’

AJJ’s Back in the Jazz Coffin was a nice little mid-summer surprise. There was no announcement about its release, and what little promotion there was for the mini-album has already taken a backseat to the band’s current tour celebrating the tenth anniversary of People Who Can Eat People Are the Luckiest People in the World. Which is okay, because even though Back in the Jazz Coffin is a fine listen it’s not exactly essential.

Back in the Jazz Coffin is mostly notable for scaling things back. The band has stripped away most of the instrumentation and members that they’ve added over the year, leaving the duo of Sean Bonnette and Ben Gallaty, best known as the band’s “classic lineup.” This lends a slight “back to basics” feeling on this album, so if your major complaints about Christmas Island and The Bible 2 were more about the oddball production and stylistic choices rather than the lyrical content, then this collection is for you. However, keep in mind that this is still the same band that did record the aforementioned albums, so even though they’ve scaled back here it’s still slicker than the bathroom recording quality of Plant Your Roots.

“American Body Rentals” is the band’s best intro track since “The Michael Jordan of Drunk Driving” off Knife Man, which is to say, rather than being a full fledged song, it’s a quick ditty that’s over in a flash but still manages to conjure up lyrically absurd images. Unfortunately, it’s mostly middle-of-the-road stuff from there. “Blood, Hatred, Money & Rage 2” and “Border Patrol (Yuma)” have some redeeming qualities: the former has some fun with words in the chorus (“blood, hatred, money and rage / that’s the food I eat / that’s the juicebox I crave”) and the latter would slide in easily somewhere between “Backpack” and “Linda Ronstadt.” The same can’t really be said for “My Crooked Leg,” which is just kind of there.

The highlight of this collection is the final track, “Fuckboi.” In true AJJ fashion, the song tells an uncomfortable tale with coming to terms about being a terrible human in the past, and having to live with that in the present. “I don’t deserve the chance to say I’m sorry but I must because I have to live with me. I have to live inside of me,” the narrator sings to a pregnant woman that he previously mistreated. It’s not easy to come to terms with realizing the awful things you’ve said or done in the past- and it’s even harder when you realize that no matter how badly you feel about it, you’ll never feel as badly as you made them feel and saying “sorry” isn’t going to be enough to heal every wound. As uncomfortable as it can make the listener feel, “Fuckboi” is AJJ at the top of their game.

Back in the Jazz Coffin will be fun to revisit occasionally, but first and final tracks aside, it doesn’t make a very big splash in AJJ’s discography. Completists and fanatics will gobble it up, but the casual listener is best off waiting for the next LP that gets the full promotional treatment instead of a single Facebook post.

3 / 5 Stars

You can stream Back in the Jazz Coffin below.

RIYL: Ramshackle Glory, Mischief Brew, Mountains Goats (circa 2002)