Search Results for "Fat Wreck Chords"

Direct Hit! and PEARS release dual video for “Blood on Your Tongue” and “Arduous Angel”

Fat Wreck newcomers and future heavyweights Direct Hit! and PEARS have broken convention and released a dual video for Direct HIt’s “Blood On My Tongue” and PEARS’ “Arduous Angle”, both tracks off the bands’ upcoming split “Human Movement.” It plays like a gory feature film and we highly recommend you check out the masterpiece below.

The two vocalists had this to say about the song/video:

“This is a weird video about two groups of people who hate each other, but recognize a common evil and fight against it together,” says Direct Hit’s Nick Woods. “On one side, you have this heroine who orchestrates a kidnapping and drugging to turn this smitten henchman into a weapon. And on the other, you have this kind of weird cleanup crew who paves the way for it to happen. In the end, the people at the top of the chain end up dead, and it’s the middleman tool who gets fucked over.”

“Part of this song is about being a kid who hears their parent fight,” says PEARS vocalist Zach Quinn. “Divorce for some is traumatic, for others, it is a lifesaver. Additionally, I think this is PEARS’ first song with a standard pop structure, which doesn’t happen all too often.”

“Human Movement” is slated for release November 3rd via Fat Wreck Chords.



Fat Mike Presents Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival Rescheduled

The Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival previously scheduled for Saturday October 14th at the Concord Pavilion in Concord, CA has been rescheduled for Saturday October 29th.  The reschedule is due to concern over air quality and crowd safety in Concord due to ongoing wildfires in the surrounding areas.

All tickets for the previously scheduled performance date will be honored at the rescheduled date on Sunday, October 29th. For those unable to attend the postponed date, refunds are available at the original point of purchase.

Because of artist availability, the lineup has been changed to include NOFX, Bad Religion, Goldfinger, Bad Cop / Bad Cop, Get Dead, and more to be announced.



Iconic Minneapolis punk venue Triple Rock closes; this is my eulogy

The Triple Rock, owned by Erik Funk of Dillinger Four and his wife Gretchen Funk, will be shutting down for good after November 22nd. The bar was opened in 1998, and the music side in 2003.

Shows will continue until the bar closes for good, with acts including Craig Finn of the Hold Steady/Lifter Puller, the Dead Boys, Swingin’ Utters, Western Settings, and tonight, Rozwell Kid. I’ve got my fingers crossed for a final Dillinger Four show.

Check out the Star Tribune for more details and comments from Erik Funk. You can see the statement from Triple Rock and NOFX’s “Seeing Double at the Triple Rock” video below.

To put it eloquently, this is a giant fucking bummer. One of my first shows there was Against Me! in, 2004, I think. My most recent show was The Murderburgers with Rational Anthem, City Mouse, and 83 Wolfpack. I lost count of how many times I saw Dillinger Four, Off With Their Heads, and Banner Pilot there.

Dillinger Fourth of July was always the best. You don’t know fine dining until a shirtless, drunk Paddy Costello starts passing out hot dogs and lit cigarettes in the middle of a set. The last D4th of July I went to was in 2016, where I caught The Brokedowns and was instantly a fan.

With no barricades and the stage only a few feet off the ground, it will forever be one of my favorite venues. Most bands I saw mingled, bought drinks for fans, and sold merch themselves. Maybe that’s not so uncommon in other places, but for a kid from a small town in the sticks of southern Minnesota, it was pretty fucking cool. Before I started going to the Triple Rock, I had only been to Warped Tour in 2000 (my first and last time), the legendary First Avenue, and The Quest (Fuck those columns!). Beyond house shows, I had never been exposed to anything so intimate.

Going to the Triple Rock showed me that the people that made the music I loved were just normal people. Billy Morrisette of Dillinger Four gave me a couple of free drinks because I played his (and my) favorite Clash song on the jukebox. I met Paddy at Grumpy’s in NE Minneapolis. We shotgunned cans of Francis Ford Coppola’s champagne out back. He forgot his knockoff Aviators at the end of the night, and I tried to return them the next time I saw him at the Triple Rock, and he told me to keep them. Yes, it’s all incredibly stupid, and yes, I’m dropping names. It doesn’t make me special. And that’s the point. These were just normal (I use that word very, very loosely) people. They made a thing I loved, and I could approach them. We could relate. The people that made the music I loved had time for a naive, wide-eyed kid fresh off the farm town. Fuck yeah.

The Triple Rock was a haven for me during one of the worst times of my life. I never had a bad time there. I saw a lot of great local bands that are no longer around, but still have a place in the giant CD book I’ve been lugging around from car to car since the early 2000s. Pretty Boy Thorson, The Fuck Yeahs, The Goddamn Doo-wop Band, Choke Cherry, Bastard Saint, Cardinal Sin, who knows who else. Hopefully some of the other smaller venues up here can pick up the slack, or maybe something new will come out of this. Either way, the Triple Rock will be sorely missed, but I’m grateful for the memories and all the people I met there, from performers, to staff, to other fans, and even that weird dude walking by out front that tried to sell me flowers at the Murderburgers show.



The Dwarves release video for “Sluts of the USA”

The Dwarves have released a video for “Sluts of the USA”, their contribution to the soundtrack of the film “Fuck Off I Love You“.

You can watch what is, apparently, the cleaner version of the video below. Unless YouTube have taken it down by the time you read this.



Album Review: The Lillingtons – “Stella Sapiente”


11 years is a long time in the music industry. For many bands, it is an entire lifetime, but for The Lillingtons it was just an opportunity to gather strength. For years, The Lillingtons flew just beneath the general radar with a rabid cult-following…until now. Stella Sapiente sees the band gather their acolytes in a campaign for hearts, minds, souls and the domination of the earth.

The dark and otherworldly echoes of “Golden Dawn/Knights Templar” open the album, with lush guitars reverberating into the shadows: equal parts dark ritual and signals from another world. Vocalist and guitarist Kody Templeman paints an aural picture of mystery, that bleeds seamlessly into “Insect Nightmares’. Buzzsaw crunch gives way to a dueling guitar riff Ronnie James Dio would solemnly flash an approving pair of horns at.

The retro vibe continues with “Night Visions”. Deep chorus effects evoke a dark-wave feel, while the gothic horror of the lyric “recurring nightmares cloud my mind, eradication of mankind” weave a Lovecraftian atmosphere of intrigue and foreboding. The band then powers into “K6” and “Zodiac”, more up-tempo, driving tracks. “Pursuit of Pleasure” has one of the most fun choruses I have heard in a while: simple and inescapable like a black hole.

“London Fog” opens with a riff and tone that evoke The Misfits “London Dungeon” with reverence, without feeling like a lift. “Cult of Dagon” is a dis-harmonic, synth powered acid trip followed by “Villagers” and “The Walker”: tracks that maintain the macabre atmosphere while revving the intensity and beats per minute back up. “They Live” shows the band at its absolute best: galloping drums leading scorching guitars in a harmonic race into the unknown. Dual guitars rip into leads that would bring Thin Lizzy to tears. The album closes with the same speed and strength with punk rock/80’s metal hybrid “Drawing Down the Star”, then fades out enigmatically.

Just from the opening riffs of Stella Sapiente, you quickly appreciate the band’s evolution as musicians from their Ramones-core origins. Effects are used to establish mood and emphasize the music brilliantly. The album radiates a dark, mysterious energy while keeping the speed and seriousness of The Too Late Show. This record may be The Lillingtons crowning achievement to date: showcasing a band at the peak of its songwriting ability pushing its own boundaries. This record isn’t a reinvention, its an evolution. My only real complaint is the length: like a dream, the record is over before you’re ready to wake up.

Stella Sapiente is available now through Fat Wreck Chords.

5/5 Stars



Frenzal Rhomb announce Australian tour

Aussie punk-rock legends Frenzal Rhomb have announced a two-month tour of Australia. The tour begins right before the end of the year, and ends in early February. Tickets go on sale this Friday (October 13th), while the tour’s dates are below.

The tour sees Frenzal Rhomb continuing to support their latest album Hi-Vis High Tea, which was released in May through Fat Wreck Chords and is their first in six years.



The Flatliners announce tour to celebrate 10 year anniversary of “The Great Awake”

The Flatliners have announced tour dates to celebrate the 10th anniversary of their classic sophomore LP “The Great Awake”. They will be joined each night by A Wilhelm Scream, who will also be celebrating the ten year anniversary since their release of Career Suicide”. Check out the dates below.

Frontman Chris Cresswell said:

“We can’t believe it, but it’s been 10 years since we released our album The Great Awake…All the way back then, we fired off a message to one of our favourite bands – A Wilhelm Scream – on MySpace (yes… MySpace…) asking them to join us for our record release shows. They obliged, and subsequently embarrassed us on stage every night with their incredible level of musicianship and overall presence. An inimitable friendship was born, and one that’s seen us play in over 10 countries together over the last 10 years, making a hell of a lot of memories along the way.”



Fat Mike hints at Bad Religion and NOFX tour next year

In a recent interview with The Inertia, Fat Mike talked about the Punk in Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival, co-headlined by Bad Religion and his band NOFX.

When asked if there were any bands he wanted on the bill that couldn’t participate in the festival, Mike hinted at NOFX and Bad Religion doing an 18-date tour next year. He said, “I just talked to the Bad Religion guys an hour ago and we’re going to do 18 shows together next year because Tacoma this year was so fun. And Boise.”

It’s been almost a full year since NOFX released their latest album First Ditch Effort, which was their first in four years, following 2012’s Self Entitled. Bad Religion have been promising a new album for a while, which will be their first since 2013’s True North, and is expected to come out next year.



The Flatliners launch new podcast “Carry The Banner”

Ontario punkers The Flatliners have announced the launch of a new podcast called “Carry The Banner”. You can find it on iTunes or Soundcloud.

Band member Chris Cresswell said:

“As a podcast lover, I’d be remiss if I let the opportunity of chatting with the great friends we’ve made through music and other endeavours pass me by as we trot the globe in the name of rock n roll. So I give you Carry The Banner – a podcast born from the idea that music, friendship, positivity, and a little bit of comedy will always make for great entertainment. I’m fired up to be able to share some great stories and insightful conversations with you all, and also just to see where this thing goes.”

The first two episode are out now and include guests from The Menzingers, Comeback Kid and Sights and Sounds.



Starter Jackets (Copyrights, Hospital Job) debut 7″ “Preferred Stock” ready for preorder, listening now

Listen. Stop typing up your super clever rebuttal to your racist uncle’s facebook post about super rich athletes and their hot takes on kneeling. Your racist uncle isn’t going anywhere. But Starter Jackets are going somewhere. And I don’t mean my parents’ closet where my late 90s Minnesota Wild Starter parka is collecting dust. I’m talking about the fine gentlemen that make up the mysterious and stealthily pop-friendly Starter Jackets.

If you’re an awesome specimen of a human being, you may remember that I covered them a few months ago in my Hidden Gems of Bandcamp article

Since then, the band has done some more recording, and it is absofuckinglutely fantastic. Starter Jackets fill a pop-punk new wave void that gives me more joy than three McDonalds breakfast burritos and a bottle of PowerAid after a whiskey hangover. Check out the only break you need below: 



Miguel Chen (Teenage Bottlerocket) to release new book, “I Wanna Be Well: How A Punk Found Peace and You Can To”

If you’ve gotten to know Miguel Chen over the years, either in person or via social media, you’re no doubt aware that in addition to being a proud Wyomingite and, more importantly, bass player for Teenage Bottlerocket, he’s also a pretty devout yoga practitioner. This coming February, he’ll add another title to that list: published author!

With an assist from Rob Meade Sperry, Miguel has written a book entitled I Wanna Be Well: How A Punk Found Piece And You Can Too. Dubbed “a self-help book for people who hate self-help books,” the book tackles how Miguel was able to begin walking a spiritual path after years of running from his problems. And while books of a spiritual nature can take on a bit of a heady tone, don’t worry: each chapter contains a TL:DR summation in the form of a takeaway point. This is 2017, after all.

I Wanna Be Well is due out February 18th via Wisdom Publications, a leading publisher of Buddhist and mindfulness literature. Pre-orders are available on Amazon right here already. Check it out, and stay tuned for more on this over the next couple months!



CJ Ramone announces Japanese shows

Former Ramones bassist CJ Ramone will be playing a handful of shows in Japan later this fall. Check out the tour dates below to see if there’s a show near you.

CJ’s latest album American Beauty was released in March through Fat Wreck Chords.



Dying Scene Radio Special Edition – It’s Not Dead Fest

In this Special Edition of the new and improved Dying Scene Radio, the boys get out of the city and head out to sweltering San Bernardino, CA for the second annual It’s Not Dead Fest. We told the new hosts that if they came back empty handed, we’d cut their funding and whaddaya know?!? It worked!  Not only did they miraculously pull off an interview with the stalwarts of ska, Buck O Nine, they also managed to somehow dupe canadian pop punk phenoms The Flatliners into talking to them! So congrats, gentlemen! For your herculean efforts your existing budget of $0 will remain in place in perpetuity. Now, get back to work! And you dear listener, enjoy the fruits of their labor! Interviews, a fantastic playlist featuring some of the many incredible acts to play the festival and much, much more, below!



The Lillingtons debut new track ‘Zodiac’

Holy shredders Batman, The Lillingtons just dropped a brand new track! ‘Zodiac’ is the second single of the band’s up and coming Fat Wreck Chords debut ‘Stella Sapiente’. That one won’t be out until the 13th of October, but all you impatient punks can head over here for a pre-order.

Check out ‘Zodiac’ below.



Show Review: Punk in Drublic (9/16/17 – Tacoma, WA)

The Punk in Drublic logline is the sort of thing that makes a Pacific Northwest punk a little misty-eyed: craft beer + punk rock. It sounds so simple, yet until now, it hadn’t been done. Fat Mike has managed to combine the unique atmosphere of a punk rock show with a brewfest. As Langston Hughes said, “Hold fast to dreams.”

The tour stops are cities most likely missed on regular circuits. I arrived at the Tacoma stop with the thought, as I’m sure did everyone else: why the fuck is this in Tacoma? The question is probably the answer. NOFX is a band that has been around forever and toured about everywhere you can think of, doing a weird tour of less-sought American cities seems right up their alley. Sometimes the only reason is why not?

I got to the venue early enough to walk around and take in the sights. It kind of reminded me of a mini-Punk Rock Bowling, but without the oppressive desert heat. In fact, the green grass and cool air were a welcome change from my past festival experiences. If there’s anyone listening out there: the mild climate of the Northwest is perfect for this type of thing. People were drinking beers and chatting, hyping themselves about the last time they saw NOFX or Bad Religion; decked out in Fat Wreck gear and comparing tasting notes. It was a cool vibe, definitely a unique festival experience. I had the pleasure of trying out Stone’s NOFX collaboration beer– a hoppy lager called Punk In Drublic– and am happy to report it tastes about how you’d expect: a big earthy bouquet of lager maltiness with a strong dose of hops. Pretty damn good, if you ask me.

The biggest problem with the beer side of the operation was that there wasn’t enough. There were ten-thousand punks in Tacoma that night, and they drank all the beer.

Photo credit: Evan Olszko

Impressively, it wasn’t even cheap beer, we’re talking ten-bucks-a-pop festival cups here. Fat Mike got his I-told-you-so in on the mic at the end of the night. For next time, they’ll have to remember that the crowd that goes to see a craft beer/ NOFX show aren’t the one-and-done types. Besides the beer running out into the middle of the final set, the festival went pretty smoothly, excepting for the long beer and merch lines. It’s hard to be too upset, allowing for inexperience with this sort of event. If they do it again (and God, I hope they do it again), they’ll need twice the kegs and the volunteers to go with them.

For the music of the day, I’m happy to say all the bands killed it. Tacoma darlings, the Hilltop Rats opened the show, obviously honored to be in the company of such a strong lineup. They played fast and aggressive skate punk with tons of melody and banter. They were there to get the fest started off right, and they were there to have fun along the way– what else can you expect from a band who played a song called “Jell-O Shots”?

Not to beat a dead horse, but the lines for beer were getting gargantuan by the time the music started in earnest. Unfortunately, the beer line predicament kept me in line for the entirety of Bad Cop/ Bad Cop’s set. From where I was though, they sounded great. Warriors is one of my favorites of the year, and I was happy to hear them play and harmonize with expert precision.

Goldinger was up next and if I had to name a song of their’s to save my life, I would have to gracefully accept a bullet. But, when they came on stage, I was in total awe. Those guys have energy to spare. They were bouncing up and down, kicking out muscular riffs that had folks dancing and singing along. Ska isn’t usually my thing, but man, I had to admit– Goldfinger kinda rocked it.

Less Than Jake had a bunch of energy too, and gave a bashful “Thanks, Fat Mike,” for putting on the punk beer fest. If there was a running theme through the night, it was that the band’s were as enthralled with the novelty of the event as the fans. They opened with “All My Best Friends are Metalheads,” which means, if I had to name one song of Less Than Jake’s to save my life, I could do exactly that.

The gateway band that I can’t shake is Bad Religion. Yeah, there were other bands I listened to when I first got into punk, but Bad Religion is the one that I always come back to. What can I say about them that hasn’t been said? Their set at Punk In Drublic was one of the best I’ve seen from them, they sounded great (especially their harmonies) and opened with “American Jesus” and ended with “Fuck Armageddon… This is Hell.” In between those two, they also played “No Control,” “Do What You Want,” “Generator,” “Los Angeles Is Burning,” and a bunch of their other hits. As he is apt to do, Fat Mike jumped on stage for the bridge of “21st Century (Digital Boy).” At Punk Rock Bowling, he took over bass for “We’re Only Gonna Die.” If there’s one thing Fat Mike likes to do (besides drugs), it’s help Bad Religion keep their set exciting. It’s happened before and it’ll happen again, but it always brings a smile to my face.

I’d only see NOFX once before, but knowing how the band follows whims (you know, like pulling off a punk beer fest in Tacoma), I always figured their sets could be pretty distinct. As per usual, there was the trademark banter, which for a NOFX fan is as much a part of their set as well, you know– songs– but, it was funny and entertaining. Fat Mike riffed on event coordinators not having enough beer and then proceeded to play a lot of classic tracks, changing words for laughs along the way. Seeing NOFX in their element with an audience of ten-thousand was a sight to see. You don’t get many opportunities to sing “Bob” with a choir that size. Everyone was really into it, singing and circle pitting– whether in the pit or not– and I was pleasantly surprised to hear them play one of my favorite deep cuts, “I’m a Huge Fan of Bad Religion,” maybe just because I can relate to the title.

All in all, Tacoma’s Punk in Drublic was a unique spectacle of good beer, great live performances, and some logistics that could stand to be improved. But, as Fat Mike celebratorily said, “This is a punk rock festival for ADULTS!” And it certainly was. There was beer and there was a music, and not a fucking kid in sight.

Doesn’t sound too bad, does it?