Search Results for "Fat Wreck Chords"

Alkaline Trio announce limited-edition “Past Live” release

Make a little extra space in your coffins, Alkaline Trio fans; there’s a pretty awesome limited edition release coming your way!

If you rewind the tape to 2014, you may recall, the Trio performed a series of shows in select cities around the country in which they took over a location and ran through their eight studio albums over the course of four separate nights. It was a pretty cool concept, especially since they played the albums in a different order depending on the city, so each show had its own unique qualities.

As it turns out, the band teamed up Audiotree during their four nights at the Metro in Chicago and captured the occasion in audio and video formats. At long last, those recordings are now going to be commercially available for the first time — BUT you’ve got to act quickly!

The collection consists of just about 100 songs spread across four nights and is known, rather obviously, as Past Live, and it exists in a variety of options. You’ll not only have the option to purchase the eight studio albums individually on vinyl format, but they’re available as a vinyl box set as well. Also available are a set of four Blu-Rays, exclusive printed posters and tote bags and T-shirts and more. The vinyl box bundle options are ONLY available — we repeat, THE VINYL BOX BUNDLE OPTIONS ARE ONLY AVAILABLE in a limited run pre-order that extends until February 9th. That gives you four weeks to scrape your pennies together, kids. Get your grubby paws on all available options right here!



DS Staff Picks- Gunnar’s Top Ten of 2017

Hey all you punks, here are my top ten albums from this past year. I’m new on the block here at Dying Scene and I’m sure this list is going to make you flustered, and wonder where [insert band name here] is on my list. Regardless, here is some great music that helped me through some tough transitions out of college, the loss of a close friend, and into my new life: you can find it below.



Album Review: No Use For A Name “Rarities Vol. I: The Covers”

A couple of years ago I concluded my review of No Use For A Name’s All The Best Songs (reissue) with the plea for a NUFAN b-sides and rarities compilation to be released sometime in the future. This past summer I got my wish with Rarities Vol. I: The Covers. Note the best part of the title: Vol. I – there will be more!!!

The album kicks off with The Vapors’ “Turning Japanese” which was recorded for the classic Vagrant Records compilation Before You Were Punk (how great were the nineties for punk compilations?). In fact, die-hard No Use fans will recognize many of these songs already. I had thought I was die-hard, and am ashamed for not knowing more of these tracks ahead of time.

Fat Wreck Chords promoted the album in part by releasing “Hybrid Moments” in the weeks leading up to the release date. No Use’s version was met with mild criticism for having slightly different lyrics than the original. This reviewer doesn’t care. Tony’s imitation of The Misfits’ lead singer Glenn Danzig is fantastic, complete with the exaggerated vibrato which was probably intentional, but maybe not.

One of the joys of recording cover songs for a band has to be the opportunity to do things you don’t usually get to do. “I’ve Heard” (Dag Nasty) is a throwback for No Use; even in 1997, when it was recorded, No Use hadn’t been a hardcore band in several years. And how about that cheesy synthesizer sound in Depeche Mode’s “Enjoy the Silence”?

While punk bands generally relegate cover songs to compilations or ep releases, No Use For A Name didn’t shy away from including cover songs on their proper albums. Leche Con Carne, Making Friends, More Betterness, and Hard Rock Bottom contained one unoriginal song each. These four tracks were not included on this Rarities compilation, although a different and earlier version of “Fairytale of New York” is unearthed here.

These thirteen tracks were all recorded by Ryan Greene – who produced most of No Use’s best-known material – between 1996 and 2005. “Dream Police” has that over-produced quality found on Keep Them Confused, recorded the same year, but overall the recordings have a pure stripped-down punk rock sound to them, even taking into account the aforementioned synthesizer.

Still, some songs were previously unreleased. For example, No Use was going to release “Don’t Cry For Me Argentina” on something until Me First and the Gimme Gimmes put it on their show tunes album, so the No Use version just sat on the shelf until now. Also, “The Munsters’ Theme” and their early version of “Fairytale of New York” were unreleased until now (I think).

One of the true highlights is “Badfish”, recorded for the Sublime tribute album back in 2006. “Badfish” is a great song, NUFAN’s arrangement is excellent, and it features some of Tony’s finest singing. Years after it was released, this track has an eerie aura to it. Bradley Nowell of Sublime had been the poster boy for punk/ska geniuses gone too soon; now Tony Sly stands by his side.

The Feel Good Moment of the Album comes at the end. “Beth” shouldn’t be new to NUFAN fans as it was the secret track on Making Friends, but on Rarities it is that much more effective. As the Kiss cover song comes to an end on this posthumous No Use For A Name release, the band refuses to stop and instead breaks into the main guitar riff of NUFAN’s greatest song “Soulmate” (if this doesn’t give you chills, you’re dead inside) before the ensemble disintegrates, giving way to a final rendition of “Gene and Paul I Hate You Most of All”.

NUFAN fans rejoice – the title implies that there will be at least a second volume. There is also talk of a boxed set, a video documentary, and even a No Use and Friends tour. I want all of this to happen and I want it to happen NOW! But I’ll wait, even if I can’t wait.

4 / 5 Stars



DS Exclusive: 2017 – The Year In Pictures (Jay Stone)

I’m not entirely sure how it’s been a full calendar year since I last put one of these compilation posts together, but here we are. I remember pulling last year’s year-end photo gallery together and thinking “damn…that was a busy year.” Fast forward 365 days, and somehow 2017 was actually busier, featuring nearly three dozen shows in five different states and countless memories that have left me not only crossing items off my bucket list but pinching myself as to how surreal this little hobby has become. I shot shows that varied in scale from catching one of my favorite songwriters (Bryan McPherson) at a little bar (The Thirsty Turtle) in the town I grew up in (Nashua, NH) to catching probably the area’s biggest punk band of the last two decades (Dropkick Murphys) at a 7000 seat hockey arena. I shot two separate Warped Tour stops, one of which (Mansfield, MA) took place in a driving rainstorm that parted for just enough time to allow personal favorites Bad Cop/Bad Cop to play a kick-ass set.

I finally shot longtime faves like The Menzingers and Hot Water Music and The Adolescents and Smoking Popes and Bouncing Souls each for the first time, then shot the Souls twice more. I got to see some old pals like Dave Hause and Jared Hart test the waters in some new projects, and some bands I’ve been friendly with for years, like The Interrupters and Bundles and most importantly my dudes in Rebuilder play on bigger and more prominent stages (that are still somehow smaller than they deserve to be playing). I shot one of my favorite all-time bands (Lucero) on a boat on a picture perfect night in Boston Harbor. But more than anything, I got to share an awful lot of awesome experiences with an awful lot of awesome people, some of whom I’m lucky enough to call friends. I still make a lot of this photography stuff up as I go along, but I try to capture the moments that make performances, no matter how big or small, unique and special – eyes, hands, faces, fists, smiles, scowls, exhaustion, celebration, chaos.

Mike McColgan, Street Dogs

What follows below are some of my favorite moments of the year that I was lucky enough to capture in a way that I’m proud of. If you were at some of these events, hopefully this helps you relive some special moments; if you weren’t able to get out to a show, hopefully we helped bring the experience to you. I’ve got some cool stuff cooked up for 2018; thanks for coming along for the ride!

 



Fat Mike working on “Cokie the Clown” album with Travis Barker

Fat Mike has revealed he and Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker are working on a “Cokie the Clown” album. The NOFX frontman made the announcement on Instagram, noting that Barker is “the one drummer that I’ve really wanted to collaborate with”.

This is the first we’ve heard of this album, so that’s pretty much all we know about it. Stay tuned as more details are divulged.



Good Riddance add US and Canada West coast 2018 tour dates

Santa Cruz punk legends Good Riddance have announced some more tour dates for 2018. The run includes 3 new dates from Las Vegas, NV to Denver, CO followed by 3 more dates in Alberta where they will be supported by A Vulture Wake.

You can check out a full list of dates and locations below.

Good Riddance released Peace in Our Time, their first album in 9 years, in April 2015 through Fat Wreck Chords.



Dead To Me announce SW US tour with Western Settings, DFMK

Dead To Me are gonna be roaming the West Coast this February, bringing pals Western Settings and DFMK along for your listening pleasure.

The tour will include a stop at the Awesome Fest in San Diego, along with club dates.

Dead To Me’s last release was their 2016 EP “I Want To Die In Los Angeles”, and the band plans to record a new album titled “American Son of Cholo” this February. Such busy little bees! Go check em out, have a good time and make some questionable decisions.

 



Punk Rock Bowling 2018 lineup announced: Rise Against, NOFX, At The Drive In and more

For the past 20 years, no music festival has carved out as distinct a niche as Punk Rock Bowling & Music Festival. Started in 1999 by Shawn and Mark Stern, the brothers behind BYO Records, as well as founding members of the legendary Los Angeles punk band Youth Brigade, Punk Rock Bowling is one of the few events where the music is just as important as camaraderie—and a little friendly competition. And for its 20th-anniversary celebration, Punk Rock Bowling is going for broke.

“We never even thought about it going two years,” says Mark Stern about the festival’s longevity. “We just set up a party for all our friends in bands and labels, and since everyone had such a great time the first year, more people wanted to come out, so we did it again next year.” That spirit has been carried into each year of Punk Rock Bowling, and the 2018 iteration, which takes place in Las Vegas from May 25-28, shows that it’ll be bigger, better, and a bit more eccentric than years past. Starting on Friday, May 25, Punk Rock Bowling kicks off the weekend with intimate late night club shows that also run all weekend long after the festival stage lets out which runs Sat. May 26 through Monday, May 28.

But what would Punk Rock Bowling be without its adopted sport of choice? In addition to all the bands, there will be an amateur bowling tournament with over 800 participants on Saturday, May 26, offering a series of cash prizes and other assorted goodies before the finals on Sunday, May 27. And if bowling isn’t your thing, on Friday, May 25, there will be a winner-take-all Texas Hold ‘em poker tournament at the Golden Nugget. Never mind the fact there will be pool parties, free comedy shows, punk rock movie screenings, and punk rock lounge acts all scattered throughout the four-day weekend. “I think a lot of the reason that it has continued to grow is because it’s a lot different from a normal festival,” says Mark. “Plus, it’s in Vegas, where there is no curfew. So it just never ends if you don’t want it to.”

The 20th anniversary of Punk Rock Bowling will feature a who’s who of punk bands from all eras of the genre’s storied history. Headlining this year will be Chicago’s Rise Against, a band that’s taken melodic hardcore to new heights with every one of their albums. This is the band’s first time at Punk Rock Bowling, but they’re not the only band new to the festival. In 2018, a an entire wave of first-timers will be taking the stage at Punk Rock Bowling, with a very rare appearance from the elusive At The Drive In, L7, Steve Ignorant performing early CRASS songs, The Marked Men, The Partisans, and British sensation, Slaves (UK) all getting in on the action. “I’m constantly looking for new bands to add to the older reunion type lineups to give young bands a chance and introduce them to our audience,” says Mark. And while Punk Rock Bowling does a bang-up job in that regard, they’ve invited some old friends back to Vegas, with bands such as one of PRB’s main staples, NOFX, along with Against Me!, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and Turbonegro returning this year.

It’s a cavalcade that’s befitting of the Sterns’ initial vision, which was to make an event that was less of a music festival and more of a social gathering. Built on the DIY ethos that has informed every part of the Stern brothers’ careers, Punk Rock Bowling is pulling out all the stops for its 20th anniversary, making it the kind of punk rock cornucopia that has a little something for everyone. “Our goal is to make people want to come back. We want them to have a great time and not feel like they’ve been had,” says Stern. “After all, if it wasn’t for the fans, this weekend would never exist.”

Three-day tickets for Punk Rock Bowling & Music Festival are $150 and are on sale now.
Single-day tickets and the daily lineups will be announced in 2018.

See a comprehensive list of bands announced below.



Music Video: The Bombpops – “FOMO”

San Diego pop-punk band The Bombpops have released a brand new music video for their song, “FOMO.” The track is one off of their debut album, Fear of Missing Out.  

You can watch the clip below.

Fear of Missing Out was released in February through Fat Wreck Chords



NOFX announces Australian shows with Hot Water Music, Bad Cop/Bad Cop, and Dad Religion

Punk veterans and staples, NOFX have just announced two more shows before their date at Download Festival 2018, so all you Aussie punk fans can rejoice for more punk, and more fun. They will be playing with Hot Water Music, Bad Cop/Bad Cop, and Dad Religion.

Check out the flyer below, and make sure to pick up your tickets before they’re all sold out!



Troy Zak (The Real McKenzies) discusses working with Fat Mike, Dan Garrison, and Fat Wreck Chords on Intergalactic Interviews

Troy Zak of The Real McKenzies ventured on over to Intergalactic Interviews to talk about working with punk legend Fat Mike of NOFX, writing with Dan Garrison, and being on Fat Wreck Chords.

The episode is about two hours, so prop your feet up with some popcorn and get ready for some laughs.

Scope out the interview below.



The Dwarves stream new song “Forget me not”

Legendary punks, The Dwarves, are streaming a new song! Check out “Forget Me Not” below.

The song comes off their upcoming album “Take Back the Night”, due out in February of 2018 via Burger Records.



Album Review: Direct Hit!/ Pears – “Human Movement”

Splits are an underrated release. Too often they get lumped in as inessential marketing tools, rather than legitimate installments in two band’s sagas. They’re overshadowed by full-lengths, but make no mistake, a good split has the potential to go down as a classic. Think of the iconic Faith/Void release from Dischord, or all of those amazing BYO Records releases (especially the Leatherface/ Hot Water Music one)– there’s a rich history in regards to the punk rock split and it offers a unique experience. This is the place where bands can try new things and experiment, and maybe that’s just because of the nature of the split, but the truth is: sometimes it’s easiest to be weird when you think no one’s looking.

Human Movement is split between pop punk darlings Direct Hit! and nouveau-skate animals Pears. Their common language is hardcore and choruses– the former that encroaches on Direct Hit!’s sugary concept albums, and the latter that punctuates Zach Quinn’s machine-gun bursts of syllables. Together, they bring together both and play off each others strengths, making Human Movement one of those rare splits that can follow the conversation between Green Star and Brainless God.

Direct Hit! opens Human Movement with the hardcore banger “You Got What You Asked For.” While Direct Hit! has always been adept at the genre, usually throwing one or two screamers in per album, here they deliver on the intensity– with quick stabs of guitar, high tempo drums, and pissed-to-hell vocals. Immediately proceeding, in a moment of minor perfection, they switch gears into the opening of the next song, “Blood on Your Tongue,” with sugary sweet bell synth and pop punk melodies. It’s one of those tangible moments on the Direct Hit! side of Human Movement where you can see the fun the bands are having, and as the record spins, it becomes infectious– from the big melodies of “Open Your Mind,” the new classic “Shifting the Blame,” and their cover of Pears’ “You’re Boring.”

The latter deserves special attention, as one of the best parts of any split is hearing the bands cover each other songs. Direct Hit! attacks “You’re Boring” with so much gusto, you’d swear they were trying to claim it for their own. It stays pretty close to the original, with the biggest difference being some extra pop punk zeal on the chorus. To close out their side of the split, Direct Hit! strike straight hardcore again with “Nothing,” a fast shout-along track with an intense and dreamy bridge.

Pears open their half with “Hey There, Begonia.” It’s on the catchier side of their core sound, with the same fast moving riffs you’d expect and an interpolation of System of a Down’s “Chop Suey.” Again, Human Movement is about bands having fun, and they work it into the bones of their music.

“Mollusk’s Mouth” is a faster song with a lighting fast harmonized lyric section that caught my ear. It alludes to one of the best things about Pears– their creativity and ambition in punk rock is so often realized through the collective talent of their members. These guys can play, they can sing, and they can write songs like no other. Riffs fly, vocal rhythms change from hardcore spitting to soaring melodies, but it never leaves the realm of adult playtime. In “Misery Conquers the World” they incorporate “Let the Bodies Hit the Floor” with a chorus of children booing. Pears is the sound of goofing off.

Pears cover Direct Hit!’s “The World Is Ending” off Brainless God— well, kinda. What they do is actually a lot cooler. They meld in “Buried Alive,” the other hit from Brainless God as well as Masked Intruder’s “Heart-Shaped Guitar.” It’s surprising, weird, and hilarious, and shows Pears in all their glory– showing off and having a little fun. “Never Now” opens with some heavy-ass dissonance before transforming into the sort of thing the band is primarily known for: fast flying lyrics and a singalong chorus. It differentiates itself with the chugging breakdown, showing Pears once again swallowing up more genre influences like a fat and hungry punk rock anaconda.

Human Movement is the sort of the split you want to see released. How often do you get two high profile bands doing this sort of thing anymore? Not very often. Both Pears and Direct Hit! represent the finest of a certain kind of modern punk, established acts who continue to take risks and try and make their music as interesting as possible, all while playing in the chords and melody sandbox. Human Movement is a testament to catchy-punk devotees, a monument to all the wonderful things you can do with rhythm, melody, and words. But, it is also fun, plain and simple. Pears and Direct Hit! play well together, but when they compete, they both win.

4.5/5

 



Mean Jeans announce tour dates with Dirty Fences

Portland pop-punks Mean Jeans have announced some January tour dates with Dirty Fences.

You can check out all the dates and locations below.

The band last released a tribute to Mountain Dew, called “Mountain Dew (I Need It).”  Their last full length album was Tight New Dimension, released April 2016 through Fat Wreck Chords.



DS Photo Galley: Swingin’ Utters with Western Settings, Darius Koski and Duck & Cover (Boston, MA)

For the first time in what I think was about five years, Swingin’ Utters played a headline show in Boston this past Sunday evening (their last two trips through this area were on a tour with Lagwagon three years ago and as part of the massive Fat Wreck 25th Anniversary tour the following summer). Though the lineup has changed AND it was an unseasonably cold mid-November night AND the Patriots were throttling the Denver Broncos on Sunday Night Football at the time, the old school punks came out in droves for the occasion and met the band with what seemed like a throwback vibe.

It was announced just prior to this tour that the Utters are putting out a sort of double-album greatest hits compilation, Drowning In The Sea, Rising With The Sun, on December 8th through Fat Wreck Chords, and the setlist on this particular night seemed to be culled from some of the earlier half of the band’s career. Sure “The Librarians Are Hiding Something” and “Alice” from their most recent couple of post-hiatus albums made welcome appearances, but this seemed like a night for the old guard. Luke Ray has served as a steady breath of fresh air behind the drum kit for the last couple years, and he’s now got his Sciatic Nerve bandmate Tony Teixeira (Nothington/Western Addiction/Cobra Skulls) as his rhythm section counterpart, having taken over for Miles Peck earlier this year. Jack Dalrymple also sat this particular run out, meaning longtime Utters partners Johnny Bonnel and Darius Koski and the new recruits are playing aggressive and lean as a four-piece. In spite of the moving parts throughout the years, the Bonnel and Koski and company remain one of the most esteemed bands in the scene and, truthfully, songs like “No Eager Men” and “Five Lessons Learned” and “Pills And Smoke” and, of course, “”Windspitting Punk” sound just as earnest as ever.

Western Settings are providing direct support on this run. The band have been on a steady climb over the last few years, and with good reason. Their 2015 album, Yes It Is, released digitally here at Dying Scene, remains high on my personal favorites list, and the band has only gotten better in the two years since. Boston can be a bit of a finicky place for out-of-town bands to play, but the four-piece San Diego-based Jawbreaker-meets-Replacements outfit did an admirable job on their first trip through the Bay State. If a band can obviously play with passion and intensity and works up a sweat on their own, dimes to dollars says they’ll win over a crowd that is obviously interested in the headliners, and that seemed the case on this night, as they were increasingly well-received as their 45-minute set moved forward.

Doing double duty on this tour, Swingin’ Utters guitarist and principal songwriter Darius Koski is also serving as support. It’s the first time he’s really hit the road as a solo artist, especially outside California, and he enlisted the help of fellow Utters Luke Ray on drums and Tony Teixeira on bass to fill out some of the instrumentation that appears on his two solo albums, 2015’s Sisu and this month’s stellar What Was Once Is By And Gone (both released on Fat Wreck) and that would have been missed were he playing strictly solo and acoustic. A personal highlight was the short set’s closer, “Another Man,” which appears as the last song on the newest album in stripped down acoustic format, but was given a revved up, electric reworking for this tour.

Boston’s own Duck & Cover were well-deserved local openers for this particular show. There’s been a bit of a garage rock undercurrent in the local scene for the last handful of years that bands like Duck & Cover and The Warning Shots and Michael Kane and the Morning Afters and even Continental and others have been a part of, and that’s been a welcome addition to a seen that has obviously had its fair share of ska-punk and “working class” Celtic punk bands over the last two decades. Made up of members that might look familiar from bands like The Black Cheers and the Acrobrats and Bang Camaro, bands like D&C show that mixing a little Guns & Roses with your Clash and Ramones records is not bad thing.

Head below for our full photo gallery from the evening!