Search Results for "dogs"

Street Dogs stream new song “Angels Calling”

Boston punks, Street Dogs‘ new album Stand for Something or Die for Nothing is due to be released on June 22, 2018. Vinyl, digital, and CD pre-orders are available through Century Media.

Excitement for the upcoming release has been building for a while now. In preparation the band has already leaked a few singles from the album, and today, premiere a new working class anthem called “Angels Calling”, this one featuring Boston rapper Slaine. It’s a catchy tune for the tireless and exasperated, and those who “wanna die with [their] boots on.”

The boys are currently on tour in the U.S., after which they will be on their way back to Europe. Those dates and “Angels Calling” below.



The Painted Dogs stream new album “Live Fast, Die Young”

Detroit garage and pop tinged punk act The Painted Dogs are streaming their newest album Live Fast, Die Young, which was released on June 12th.

You can give it a listen below.

The Painted Dogs last released the Vibrator EP in 2016.



Street Dogs release video for “Other Ones”

Boston-based punk band Street Dogs have released a video for “Other Ones.” The song is the second single from their upcoming album Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing, scheduled for a June 22 release via Century Media.

The highly anticipated LP is the first full length album that the band has released since their 2010 self-titled LP and the first recording since their 2014 split with Noi!se.

Watch the video for “Other Ones” below.



Street Dogs stream second track “Other Ones” off of upcoming album “Stand for Something or Die for Nothing”

Boston punk veterans Street Dogs are now streaming a second track “Other Ones” off of their upcoming album “Stand for Something or Die for Nothing.” The new album will be making it’s way to the public on June 22 from Century Media.

The track serves as an anthem to those who serve in the line of law enforcement and the mental toll it can take on them especially in today’s day and age of a politically and socially charged climate.

You can stream the new track below.



DS Exclusive: Mike McColgan on “Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing,” Street Dogs First New Album In Eight Years

Allow me, if you will, the opportunity to rewind your memory all the way back to August of 2010. For contextual purposes, here are some reminders as to that comparatively much simpler time; Dying Scene was barely a year old (and still had white text on a black background! The horror!); MySpace ruled the social networking landscape; the United States was less than two years into the Obama Administration, and we hadn’t had our eyes opened to the fact that the then-President was a Kenyan Muslim by the reality show host and beauty pageant coordinator Donald J. Trump.

It also marked the last time we were graced with a full-length album from working-class firebrand Boston punk veterans Street Dogs. Little did we know at the time that the dozen-and-a-half tracks on that self-titled album would mark the last time we’d hear from the band for quite some time, and the last time we’d hear from that lineup forever. In the time that’s elapsed since that embarked on a brief hiatus, Pete Sosa replaced Paul Rucker on drums, and Lenny Lashley (Darkbuster, Lenny Lashley’s Gang Of One) and Matt Pruitt (Have Nots) took over on guitar duties for longtime members Tobe Bean and Marcus Hollar. Centered around the backbone of Mike McColgan on vocals and Johnny Rioux on bass, the new lineup put together songs for a few 7-inch releases a few years ago, and slowly got to work on their first full-length as a unit.

Next month, June 22nd, to be exact, the wait for a new full-length Street Dogs album is finally over. Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing is slated for release on the band’s new label home, Century Media, and it couldn’t come at a better time. The album finds the band at their shot-out-of-a-cannon best, and serves as a shot across the bow not only for the powers that be that bought and sold our political system on the backs of the working class, but for those that might choose to sit idly by and let it happen. We caught up with the band’s quintessentially blue-collar Bostonian frontman Mike McColgan to chat about just why and how the band put out their best material to date, more than a decade-and-a-half into their life as a band. As you might imagine, McColgan pulled no punches.

I don’t want to be the punk band that sat that fucking out. A lot of fucking bands are sitting that out, and history won’t be kind to them,” McColgan states emphatically. “I have to be honest about what I’m feeling and what I’m thinking. I have a son, and I want to be able to say ‘We didn’t sit back. We stood up. We said something’.” Whether for personal or social or political reasons, McColgan and crew are well aware that there are some people in the scene that they could alienate but putting forward an album that puts out a cohesive statement in this day and age, and they’re more than okay with that. “We’ve always put our money where our mouth is, behind the hard-working people, and taking action. We’ve tried not to be too overbearing or be like Bono about it. But you’ve got to say something. That’s the whole point of Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing…Do! Fucking! Something! Don’t just sit this out and think it’s going to be okay. The stakes are way too fucking high.

If you are a long-time member of the Street Dogs Army, there are more than a few moments on Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing to remind you why you got into the band in the first place; lock-tight rhythms, rapid-fire guitars, infectious hooks, chant-along gang-style choruses that pull the listener and the audience right smack into the middle of the storyline. Look no further than the album’s title track for a textbook example. But there are also some sounds you might not expect; the late 70’s classic arena rock anthemic guitar and higher register vocals on “Mary On Believer Street,” rapper and fellow Bostonian Slaine making a spitfire cameo on “Angels Calling,” the album’s closing track, a cover of the Rolling Stones’ “Torn And Frayed.” In many ways, its those things you’ve grown to love about Street Dogs but performed at a higher level than you’re used to hearing. McColgan credits not only the playing and songwriting stylings of the band’s new members, but the production chops of Rioux, who manned the console on a Street Dogs album solo for the first time (Nate Albert handled the first two albums, Ted Hutt the next two, and Rioux teamed with McColgan’s former Dropkick Murphys bandmate Rick Barton on the self-titled album). “Johnny Rioux came into his own as a producer,” says McColgan. “He pushed me in particular, moreso than anybody, really, really hard. I feel like, at the end of the day, the record really stands up and will stand the test of time. I feel like our fans and maybe some people who don’t even know who the hell we are will like it too.

Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing is not only a great album, it’s a personal album and an important album. It’s tough to encapsulate the breadth and depth of the conversation we had with McColgan into a few lines in an introduction; as is part and parcel when we chat, there’s a lot of ground covered, but perhaps nothing is more poignant than the stories behind some of individual tales that Street Dogs are trying to relate to their listeners on the new album. “These Ain’t The Old Days” looks back at some members of the scene that haven’t, unfortunately, been lucky enough to overcome some of their struggles, namely former Kings of Nuthin’ frontman Torr Skoog who passed away five years ago. The emotion in the song, particularly in Lashley’s vocal contributions, is palpable. “He had to walk out of the studio,” explains McColgan. “He had to take a break. It was that personal and that pivotal and that powerful and that poignant to him.” “The Comeback Zone,” meanwhile, tells three individual tales of redemption that may sound familiar to those that have followed the long-term arc of the careers – and lives – of the band’s individual members.

“Lest We Forget,” though, is perhaps the most personal and emotional song that McColgan has worked on. The song teaches us, the listening audience, about Gerry Dewan, a Boston kid who couldn’t find work on the local fire department, so he moved to New York City and spent a few years working for the New York Fire Department, a budding career that came to a tragic early end on September 11, 2001. McColgan was not only a new recruit to the Boston Fire Department at the time of that fateful day, he was working for Dewan’s brother, William, on the force. “It’s a very, very, very tough thing for me. I’ve been trying to write this song, God, since the Savin Hill days. I’ve written multiple, multiple variations of this song – I’m talking hundreds – because it’s such a heavy, heavy topic, that I was just hellbent on finding the right way to say this and not make it too political.

Head below to check out our full, wide-ranging interview. It’s a pretty special one, particularly as McColgan himself commented on having trouble putting a few feelings into words; noteworthy for a conversation between two guys with Dorchester Irish Catholic roots.

Pre-orders for Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing are still available here.



Street Dogs stream title track from new album “Stand For Something or Die For Nothing”

Street Dogs release their sixth studio album, “Stand For Something or Die For Nothing”, on June 22th via Century Media. Ahead of the album, the band have released the audio for the title track. You can have a listen below.

Full track details and artwork, along with tour dates, were detailed by DS earlier this month.



Street Dogs announce new album, tour dates (East and West coast)

Working class punk rockers Street Dogs are preparing for the release of their sixth studio album titled “Stand For Something or Die For Nothing”, due out June 22 via Century Media.

“The dumbing down of America is a reason to write songs in 2018,” vows Mike McColgan (vocals). “The theme is wake the f*ck up and the working class needs to unite across all colors, creeds, nationalities, genders and realize that we are being pitted against each other by snake oil salesmen and autocrats.”

“Punk, to me, is people living how they want to not how they are told to,” says McColgan. ‘Stand For Something or Die For Nothing’ expresses that ideal through songs like the title track that focuses on freedom of speech and “Working Class Heroes” that focuses upon living the American dream. 

The album was recorded at Woolly Mammoth Studios, Sugarland Studio, and Q Division Studio and was produced by bassist Johnny Rioux.

You can check out the album artwork and track listing, as well as several upcoming shows, below.



Street Dogs announce West Coast tour dates

Boston punks Street Dogs have announced some west coast summer tour dates, which you can check out below.

The bands’ last full length release was the self-titled LP in 2010 that was released on Hellcat Records, with 2014 seeing a split with Noi!se through Pirates Press.



Album Review: Bundles – “Deaf Dogs”

Alright, I’m in a rare corner here. I get to review a band I’ve never heard of, like, ever— from across the country on the recommendation of a fellow Dying Scene writer (shoutout to my better, Jason Stone). The band is Bundles and the album is Deaf Dogs. Well, what does that mean to me? It means I have to put some words together.

Bundles is from Boston and as far as I can tell, Deaf Dogs is their debut album. And from a couple listens and onward, it’s a good one. What does it sound like? Muscular melodic punk from guys who probably dig Avail and the Gaslight Anthem, but probably more on the Avail side. Throat-shredding. Heartfelt. A little on the simple side when it comes to arrangements, driven mostly by bass heavy chugging and shoutalong choruses. I got a distinct street punk vibe here, there’s a certain shared spirit at work, but to be fair, they have about the same connection to a band like Arms Aloft too. Whether you see this as an extension of the working class anthems of street punk or an extension of the working class anthems of melodic punk, just know it’s music you could have a beer with.

The album opens with “Lorem Ipsum,” which stomps out of the stereo with a big verse hook that leads into an even bigger chorus hook. The vocals sound like they’ve been passed through a cheese grater, in the best possible way. In fact, this is where Bundles simple arrangements really benefit themselves. This is punk rock played like punk rock— it’s not reaching to push the boundaries of the genre or aiming for anything loftier than delivering good songs played with passion. With this creed in mind, rhythm, melody, and vocal performance step to the center stage.

Short is another key word for Bundles. Deaf Dogs is full of gloriously short songs. A good amount of the track list doesn’t pass the three minute mark, and a fair amount don’t push two. “TKC” uses its short run time for a raw and ragged singalong that almost reaches into hardcore territory, while, “The Dornishman’s Wife,” the longest song on the album at a whopping three minutes and twenty-eight seconds, slows the tempo but never loses the edge.

“Robots of the Uncanny Valley” is a stand out track that almost feels like an unhinged grunge tune before the whole scene shook off their punk influences to claim rock band status. It’s garage rock in its essence, the sound of people playing the sort of rock ‘n roll they idolize in their mind’s eyes. Inevitably, it comes out as loud and guitar-heavy, with plenty of opportunities for the crowd to singalong. “The State of Seattle” is the number two of the one-two punch, the next sequential track and another highlight of Deaf Dogs that flies by in under two minutes. The pendulum swings both ways though, and if I had to deliver a criticism of Deaf Dogs, it’d be one that a lot of albums like this attract— back to basics rock ‘n roll can only get you so far. Even with a good handful of great songs, a lot of them go by so quickly they’re hard to distinguish. For the most part though, the album survives the sameness sag, with songs like “Oh, Brazil,” and “The Glow” maintaining interest in the latter half.

Deaf Dogs is a strong album, the kind you won’t mind raising a beer and a fist to on any given night. It’s loud, personable, and defiantly minimalist. It’s back to basics punk rock by people who think that rock music should rock.

4/5



DS Photo Gallery: Night Three of Street Dogs Wreck The Halls 2017 with Michael Kane and the Morning Afters and A Wilhelm Scream

Last weekend marked the twelfth installment of Boston street punk veterans Street Dogs‘ annual Wreck The Halls festivities. The shows have taken a variety of shapes and sizes over the years, but remain one of the annual occasions where all of the old punks and skins and hardcore kids get together for a few debaucherous nights to celebrate the holidays and the music and the scene (oh, and to raise money and toys for a few good causes). This year, Wreck The Halls took place in a new spot, Sinclair in Cambridge, and spanned three overwhelmingly successful nights. Street Dogs guitarist Lenny Lashley’s other main project, The New Darkbuster, opened the first night (Thursday) alongside Boston hardcore act Taxi Driver, though sadly, we weren’t in the house for that night. We were, however, in the house when The Abductors and The Pinkerton Thugs came with the throwback ’77-inspired working class punk rock on night number two; check out our review and pictures here. And of course, we were back at it Saturday night when the lineup had a bit of a different feel and just might have been the best of the bunch.

Where the first two nights of the three-night affair focused on a more throwback street punk vibe, night three showed a little bit more of the range of local acts that have been influenced by – and continue to influence – the headliners. As such, Worcester, Massachusetts’ Michael Kane and the Morning Afters got things rolling on the third and final night of hall-wrecking. It’s probably easiest to classify the four-piece as a garage rock band, as the catchiest song in their set – “Old Men Die In New Suits” – owes just as much to the Replacements as it does to mid-70s Bruce Springsteen. Perhaps not coincidentally, both of those name-dropped bands had covers featured prominently in the Morning Afters’ half-hour set, including a set closing rendition of “Born To Run,” a track considered hallowed ground for most in the scene but which the band handled with expert care.

Keeping things in-state, A Wilhelm Scream from New Bedford, Massachusetts, were next out of the chute and my lord did they come to play. If you follow our instagram feed, I think I commented that of all of the bands I shot over thirty-three shows this year for Dying Scene, A Wilhelm Scream were simultaneously the tightest and the heaviest of the bunch, evoking all of the best parts of vintage Strung Out. As a matter of fact, the band play so fast and tight that they blazed through their pre-written setlist in record time, pulling a few older rabbits out of their collective hats. In what was a pretty cool moment for someone that’s an amateur photographer but more importantly a dad, a couple of the AWS guys had their grade-school age kids on stage for the occasion, including frontman Nuno Pereira’s five-year-old son, who was seeing daddy play for the first time ever. Pretty cool moment that further demonstrates what a family the scene really is.

All of this set the stage, of course, for Street Dogs, playing their final area performance of the year. After taking the  stage to the sounds of the timely, poignant Springsteen-led “This Land Is Your Land” singalong, the band came shot out of the gate on all cylinders once again, this time kicking things off with “Rattle and Roll” from their 2010 self-titled release. The followed in rapid succession with the anthemic “Up The Union,” “Punk Rock And Roll” and, of course, “Savin Hill” before coming up for air. Once again, the local working class heroes did a stellar job of mixing a few deeper cuts like the self-titled album digital bonus track “Ballad Of Detroit” into a lengthy setlist chock full of crowd-surf-inducing favorites like “Not Without A Purpose,” “Back To The World,” and “Tobe’s Got A Drinking Problem.” McColgan led the band in a particularly poignant rendition of “Final Transmission” during the set’s midway point. It’s tough to not be moved by even just reading the lyrics of a song like “Final Transmission,” but McColgan seemed to be particularly dialed in on this night, channeling something bigger than any of us.

And, because it’s a hometown Street Dogs show, there were of course some special guests in attendance. The multi-talented Hugh Morrison, who played with Street Dogs’ Mike McColgan, Johnny Rioux and Pete Sosa on the stellar FM359 album a couple years, jumped in on squeeze box for a few numbers. The band’s tour manager, Ryan Packer, who himself is a member of hardcore bands like Slapshot and American War Machine, pitched in on acoustic guitar on “Tobe’s Got A Drinking Problem.” They were also joined on co-lead vocals on “Elizabeth” by Heather Waters, the same voice who sang the original on 2008’s State Of Grace. The one-two punch of the Joe Strummer-inspired “General’s Boombox” directly into a pitch-perfect rendition of the Clash classic “Complete Control” was another particular highlight. No matter what their make-up, the Street Dogs roots have always been planted firmly into the soil that Strummer and The Clash tilled for many years, and they paid true, moving homage to the man on what was just shy of the fifteen year mark of his death. And, of course, there was the stage invasion during “Boston (Borstal) Breakout” that brought the show, and the three-day weekend, to a fitting close. To paraphrase a line from the Street Dogs classic (and personal favorite) “In Defense Of Dorchester,” no matter how far the bands branches might stretch, this town and this scene and the family that they’ve amassed here will always be firmly ingrained in their core.

Check out our full photo gallery from night number three below! Night two words and pictures are still up here.



DS Photo Gallery: Night Two of Street Dogs Wreck The Halls 2017 (w/Pinkerton Thugs and The Abductors)

Last weekend marked the twelfth installment of Boston street punk veterans Street Dogs‘ annual Wreck The Halls festivities. The shows have taken a variety of shapes and sizes over the years, but remain one of the annual occasions where all of the old punks and skins and hardcore kids get together for a few debaucherous nights to celebrate the holidays and the music and the scene (oh, and to raise money and toys for a few good causes). This year, Wreck The Halls took place in a new spot, Sinclair in Cambridge, and spanned three overwhelmingly successful nights. Street Dogs guitarist Lenny Lashley’s other main project, The New Darkbuster, opened the first night (Thursday) alongside Boston hardcore act Taxi Driver, though sadly, we weren’t in the house for that night. We were, however, in the house for nights two and three and somehow lived to tell the tale!

The Abductors got things off to a flying start on night number two (Friday). The Connecticut based outfit have spent most of their eight-year history as a four piece, but they’ve recently added none other than Ritchie Bruiser of the seminal New Hampshire hardcore band The Bruisers on second guitar, beefing up their already beefy, high-powered Oi!-infused street punk sound.

Continuing the throwback New England-centered punk rock theme of the weekend, next up to bat were none other than The Pinkerton Thugs. The four-piece have been on-again and more typically off-again over the years, but have been newly reformed around Paul Russo and recently released their final LP, 2000’s End Of An Era, on vinyl for the first time. The Pinkerton Thugs came of age in the mid-to-late 1990s, the last real formative golden era for the Boston area punk music scene, and yet somehow, according to the spreadsheet I keep from all my show-going years, I don’t think I’d ever seen them before (even though a kid I went to high school with played drums for the Thugs for a while). It took 21 years, but another one off the old time bucket list!

Which brings us to Street Dogs. After an interlude that consisted of a live rendition Bruce Springsteen covering timeless Woody Guthrie classic “This Land Is Your Land” proudly leading the show-goers in a singalong, the band came flying out of the gate with “Savin Hill,” the ode to frontman Mike McColgan’s formative stomping grounds. The Street Dogs lineup has varied a little over the years, but I’ll be damned if the roster we’ve been graced with the last four or five years (McColgan and longtime bassist Johnny Rioux backed by Pete Sosa on drums and Lenny Lashley and Matt Pruitt on guitar) isn’t the tightest and most powerful edition to date. The band obviously earned their stripes as a true blue collar, working-class punk rock band and have the pedigree to back it up, but they are also underrated as a straight-up rock-and-roll band. Sure McColgan spends a fair amount of the set at the barricade, surrounded by fans singing in unison and not only invites but takes part in crowd surfing and making old-fashioned circle pits, but there are also equal shades of Roger Daltrey and Keith Richards and Brad Delp in the way he struts and jives and belts out primal-level screams when necessary.

The setlist on this particular night was probably the deepest I’ve seen them play in this lineup, ranging from a fairly obscure early demo (“Locked and Loaded” which, I must point out, was predicted by my good friend Nick Gold in a pre-show chat) to a brand-new song, “Stand For Something.” The latter is slated to appear on the band’s forthcoming full-length, which is slated for release probably early in the springtime via Century Media, and is destined to be an instant classic, as evidenced by the volume of the people that had heard the song the previous night and were chanting the song’s singalong chorus in unison already. CJ Ramone hopped on stage to assume lead vocal duties for a rousing rendition of the Ramones’ classic “53rd & 3rd,” during the encore, and half the crowd (including the same luchador-masked crowd surfer I mentioned in the Bouncing Souls show review a couple weeks ago) hopped on stage for the set-closing “Borstal Breakout,” originally penned by Sham 69 and adapted for the Boston scene by the Street Dogs themselves years ago.

Head below to see our photo gallery, and stay tuned for our shots from the Wreck The Halls finale, featuring Michael Kane and the Morning Afters and A Wilhelm Scream! Oh…and we’ll also have more to say about that coming Street Dogs full-length coming down the ‘pike very soon!



Street Dogs announce 2017 Wreck the Halls Shows

Boston punks Street Dogs have just announced more details about their annual series of hometown Christmas shows. Deck the halls with Boston punk, and beer am I right?

The vets are set to play at The Sinclair in Cambridge on December 14 through 16, each with different supporting acts on each night. December 14 will play host to The New Darkbusters, and Taxi Driver. December 15 will have Pinkerton Thugs and The Abductors, and December 16 will finish out with A Wilheim Scream and Michael Kane and The Morning Afters.

You can pick up some tickets here.

 



My Space Invaders (punk) streaming new album “Dogs ‘n’ Pigs”

Italian punks My Space Invaders have taken a page out of the Nofx playbook and recorded a pretty slick one track album. It’s no “Decline”, but it was released on the same day eighteen years later, pretty awesome none the less.

You can check it out below.

“Dogs ‘n’ Pigs” is the third album from My Space Invaders, the first since the 2014 release of “No Money, No Fun”. If you like Lagwagon or Nofx give these guys a listen.



Street Dogs announce Wreck The Halls 2017 dates

Longtime Boston punk rock heavyweights Street Dogs have announced preliminary details for their annual run of hometown Christmastime shows!

The 2017 edition of Wreck The Halls will take place over three nights — December 14, 15 and 16 — at the Sinclair, right smack in the middle of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Tickets are currently on sale, and you can snag yours right here.

No support acts have been announced yet, but stay tuned for those details, as well as a whole bunch more info about the band’s upcoming full-length release on Century Media. It’ll be their first such album to feature the retooled lineup that finds longtime core members Mike McColgan and Johnny Rioux joined by Pete Sosa on drums and Matt Pruitt and Lenny Lashley on guitars, and we caught up with the fellas a little while back for a pretty extensive discussion. Keep your eyes peeled!



Street Dogs post dispatch from the studio

Boston’s veteran rebel rousers and venerable punk rockers, Street Dogs, have posted an update from the studio, featuring Boston rapper Slaine.


From the band’s Facebook: “Back in the studio working on our new album and we had the honor of working with our good friend Slaine

2010 saw the release of the band’s last self-titled LP on Hellcat records, with 2014 seeing a split with Noi!se through Pirates Press.

No word yet on a release date or any details for this new record, but Dying Scene will keep you all posted.