Search Results for "Lucero"

DS Photo Gallery: Lucero return to Boston! On a Boat! With Banditos! (6/26/17)

Longtime Boston-area fans of Lucero likely remember back to the band playing aboard a Boston Harbor cruise boat nearly a decade ago. By all accounts (yours truly was not in attendance), it was a bit of disaster, noteworthy in all the wrong reasons, not the least of which were a combination of space issues, technical difficulties, and Mother Nature not being in a particularly good mood. Fast-forward to this past Monday night and they band gave it another shot, this time aboard the larger Provincetown II. The net result could not have been more polar opposite from the 2008 show, giving both the band and the crowd a show that was equally noteworthy but for all the right reasons.

In areas like Boston (and New York and probably other places but I have a horrible East Coast bias), boat cruise shows have become a bit more of a popular option for at least two-and-a-half seasons a year, as soaring real estate costs, liquor licenses, etc., have culminated in a virtual drying up of small- and mid-sized venues. The Provincetown II is an older ship that docks in Boston’s Seaport District and typically spends most of its summer evenings running three-hour booze cruises around the Harbor (that is, when it’s not running as a shuttle between the city and Cape Cod). The minimally-lit stage (which is really not much more than a twelve-by-twelve-foot square set maybe a foot off the floor) is set at the rear of the three-tiered ship’s top deck, meaning that as the opening band takes the stage and the ship pulls away from the dock, you’re not only watching the band play, but watching the city skyline become smaller and smaller in the last few minutes of sunlight.

Boston’s port and harbor remain fairly active and are bordered to the immediate north by Logan International Airport, so tour-opener Banditos (a six-piece Southern-fried rock band from Alabama) started playing in the waning early Summer daylight surrounded by smaller cruise ships, fleets of tanker ships, returning fishing vessels and a string of departing planes taking off immediately overhead. The band were pretty well received, and seemed to think that the experience was just as cool and, in the literal sense, “awesome” on their end as it was on ours. The band’s high-energy forty-minute-ish set seemed to pass particularly quick, probably due in gigantic part to the borderline sensory overload of the experience. It can be tough to pick a perfect opening act for a band like Lucero, but Banditos are a pretty solid fit, their trummed-down Southern jams and three-headed vocal monster seeming to work pretty well on a beer company-sponsored outdoor Summer booze cruise. Their set-closing cover of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’ “I Put A Spell On You” (popularized by Nina Simone or Creedence Clearwater Revival, depending on your perspective) damn near stole the show as Mary Beth Richardson belted out the lead vocals from the center of the crowd.

The sun had officially set by the time Lucero took the stage.As has frequently been the case recently, the band started with a sort of mini acoustic set, kicked off by “Can’t You Hear Them Howl” from their last full-length, 2015’s All A Man Should Do. While that moment may have been scripted (frontman Ben Nichols joked that he “likes to start with that song because (he) likes it and nobody ever requests it”), the remainder of the twenty-one song (by my count, certainly not official) setlist was largely improvisational and wide-ranging. “Texas & Tennessee,” perhaps one of the two or three saddest songs in a catalog that’s chock full of sad songs, made in early appearance as it generally does, followed quickly by crowd favorite “My Best Girl.”

From there, a few twists and turns popped up, as the bulk of the set seemed to be culled mostly from the wishes of the audience who, for their own parts, were loud and engaged all night. Because of the unique setup of the ship’s upper deck, the crowd essentially filled in around the entirety of the stage, making it seem like the band were playing a theater on the round. “Hey Darlin’ Do You Gamble,” “Wasted” and “Hold Fast” were particular favorites for yours truly, if only because I’d not seen them live before. “Chain Link Fence” sounds more raw and intense than it did when it debuted fifteen years ago, and the band, now a five-piece again after losing the horn section that had joined them through three albums and their accompanying touring cycles, seem to have figured out how to accommodate for some of that lack of brightness and depth on songs like “Women & Work” and “On My Way Downtown.”

As the ship had turned around and headed back for port, Nichols played a few stripped down songs, starting with “Loving,” a song written for his filmmaker brother Jeff’s 2016 movie of the same name. He kept things stripped down for “Mom” and was joined by keyboard player/accordionist extraordinaire Rick Steff on “The War” and took on an a capella rendition of his solo track “Last Pale Light In The West,” which he jokingly referred to as the only sort of lullabies he can sing to his infant daughter, before being rejoined by the band for most of the rest of the set. Drummer Roy Berry’s unique playing style has long been one of my favorite things to watch, and he seemed steady as ever despite playing on a boat in an active harbor (guitarist Brian Venable commented after the show that it putting a stage on a boat is like trying to play on a piece of plywood inside a bouncy house, if that gives you a little perspective). Venable’s growling lead guitar playing does not always take center stage in a band like Lucero (particularly in the early years where the leads were more noodling riffs than true leads), but when called upon, he continues to shine on tracks like “Tears Don’t Matter Much” and “Last Night In Town.”

Special note should probably be paid to bassist John C. Stubblefield, who disappeared from the stage at one point toward the mid-point of a particularly raucous rendition of “Tears Don’t Matter Much” to partake of the festivities from the audience’s perspective and did so while missing nary a beat in the process before rejoining his bandmates on the stage in stride. Closer to the end of the evening, Stubblefield eventually raised a red wine-inspired toast to the “best night ever,” before the band wrapped up their set and the ship docked and, while maybe a tad hyperbolic, he wasn’t far off from the truth.

Check out Lucero’s upcoming tour dates here, and our full photo album below.



DS Photo Gallery: Clutch’s “Psychic Warfare” Tour Steamrolls Providence (w/Lucero)

There are some bands that you might not be otherwise familiar yet, but then you see them live and you totally get what all the fuss is about, and that said performances just kinda stick with you forever. Clutch, for me is one of those bands. We’re rounding the corner of two decades since the very first time I saw the Maryland-based quartet (at the 1997 HempFest in Boston alongside Tree and Sam Black Church, if you’re interested), and the second they took the stage at Lupo’s Heartbreak Hotel in Providence, I was immediately transported right back to that place in time.

Now a lot has obviously changed over the twenty years since (not the least of which are hair color and waistlines, and I’m specifically referencing myself). Clutch’s sound has evolved to become a little dirtier and swampier; they’ve always been a solid live band, but now they’re downright explosive.  were a solid live band back then; they now qualify as a premier live act. Drummer Jean-Paul Gaster serves as the anchor to the whole ship. Gaster plays loud, explosive style but has achieved a certain level of transcendence at his craft that he almost looks effortless; like Lebron James toying with Serge Ibaka and the Raptors in the last round of the NBA Playoffs. Tim Sult (lead guitar) and Dan Maines (bass) stay rooted to their respective sides of the stage, leaving supremely dynamic frontman Neil Fallon to roam the stage like an animal stalking his prey. Fallon is a frontman’s frontman and plays the role brilliantly, at times oscillating in performance appearance from motivational speaker to manic cult leader to all out banshee. The band launched into their sixteen song main set with “Crucial Velocity” from 2012’s Earth Rocker, while the bulk of the remainder of the main set drew primarily from their most recent album, Psychic Warfare. Longtime crowd favorite “Electric Worry” (you know, the “vamonos, vamonos” song) kicked off the two-song encore in frenzy-like fashion.

Lucero provide direct support on this leg of the Psychic Warfare tour, a bit of a change of pace sandwiched in between Clutch and “warlock rock” openers The Sword (whom I admittedly didn’t shoot or catch much of). As a longtime fan, this marked the first time I’d caught the Memphis-based quintet in an opening role after having seen them headline venues equal to (or even somewhat larger than) Lupo’s. The abbreviated (50 minutes) set in front of a Clutch crowd (and let’s be honest…Clutch fans are CLUTCH FANS) meant that Ben Nichols and the boys eschewed the acoustic portion that’s crept increasingly into their sets in recent years and focused mostly on uptempo tracks. “Can’t You Hear Them Howl,” the lead single to the band’s last album (2015’s All A Man Should Do), kicked off the set, and from that point forward the band forged ahead in all business style, covering such live staples as “On MY Way Downtown,” “Nights Like These,” “I Can Get Us Out Of Here Tonight” and “Here At The Starlite” in the process. A personal highlight was Nichols’ unaccompanied (unless you count a double shot of whiskey as an accompaniment, which I guess you could), a cappella rendition of his track “Last Pale Light In The West,” from his solo EP of the same name. Nichols joked that tracks like those that he based on Cormac McCarthy’s historical novel Blood Meridian were about all he could come up with for lullabies for his soon-to-be year-old daughter. Nichols was then rejoined by the rest of the band (Brian Venable on lead guitar, Roy Berry on drums, a particularly unanimated John Stubblefield on bass, and the inimitable Rick Steff on keys/accordion) for a rousing version of show-closing staple “The Last Song.” I mentioned before that Clutch fans are “CLUTCH FANS,” and that can ultimately be said for Lucero fans as well. They may have been largely outnumbered in this near-capacity crowd of around a thousandish, but they (we) were certainly a vocal minority.

Check out our full photo gallery below!

 



DS Exclusive: 2016 – A Year in Pictures (Jay Stone)

2016 might have been a multitude of suck for myriad reasons, but the music scene — and the live music scene in general — was nowhere on that list. Your friendly neighborhood Dying Scene editors continue to travel far and wide to try to not only take in as much local and national live music as possible, but to show you first-hand what we’ve been up to.

Because everybody loves year-end wrap up posts (you do still love year-end wrap up posts, right?) your photographer friends decided to pour through the thousands of photos we took this year and pare them down to highlight some of either the best ones, or our personal favorites. For yours truly, shows ran the gamut this year, from neighborhood bars and Elks Lodge basements to sold-out 2500 capacity nightclubs and, of course, the Warped Tour (I know, right?). The highlights were almost too numerous to name, although seeing The Falcon twice, The Loved Ones, Bob Mould, Chuck Ragan a few times, Descendents, NOFX, Teenage Bottlerocket, Lucero (twice), Against Me!, The Interrupters (twice), Bad Cop/Bad Cop, The Scandals a few times, Brian Fallon a few times, Cory Branan four times (in four states!), Laura Jane Grace and Off With Their Heads acoustic in the same year is pretty damn great, and only scratches the surface, really.

Also, for the second year in a row, I think I saw The Scandals’ Jared Hart more times in one year in one form or another than I’ve seen anybody else in a given year, although I may have topped that by probably seeing Rebuilder more times than I’ve seen my own mother. Sorry, ma!

Anyway, check out the gallery below, and stay tuned for more cool concert moments in 2017!



DS Photo Galley: Lucero and Cory Branan at the Music Hall of Williamsburg (Brooklyn, NY)

If we’re being honest, there’s probably very little to say about a Lucero live show that hasn’t been said ad infinitum at this point. As they approach the 20-year mark since their inception, the band have a well-earned reputation for not only playing a high volume of shows year after year, but of playing some of the more intense, memorable shows within a hundred mile radius at any given time. That sentiment is true whether they’re playing in their native Tennessee, on the West Coast, or up in Yankee country. Time has changed and the Lucero family tree has grown, so, as is (rightly) the case with many a band of their tenure, the lure of family has pulled them increasingly off the road, paring the 200-250 show a year mentality down by about half, the net result for this writer is one New England show in the calendar year, and that was at an outdoor beer festival (covered here last month), you take the “four-hours-on-a-Sunday” trek to literal Yankee country (okay…formerly Dodger country) to catch them in their natural, club show element.

And so it was last weekend, when the band’s three-week run with Cory Branan in tow made its northeasternmost spot at the Music Hall of Wiliamsburg in Brooklyn. Perhaps more than most bands in this genre (and really, Lucero are their own genre), the Ben Nichols-led outfit have continued to grow and evolve, never seeming content with resting on their collective laurels. Because of this, the band have had several distinctly different sounds with myriad different lineups, meaning that no two Lucero tours nowadays are entirely alike. They’re now on the road fairly consistently as a somewhat stripped down five piece that finds one-of-a-kind Nichols joined by equally one-of-a-kind longtime core members Brian Venable (lead guitar), Roy Berry (drums), John Stubblefield (bass) and, of course, Rick Steff (keyboards/accordion). The lack of pedal steel and, more recently, horns, has produced a sound that’s closer to the raw, post grunge of the early years, but one that’s also refined by years of growth as musicians and songwriters and owners of the stage.

This particular show found the band taking the stage promptly at 9:15pm and slowly ramping up the intensity level over the course of the first handful of songs. As has been the case at more than a handful of shows over the year since their last album, All A Man Should Do, debuted, the slow, brooding “Went Looking For Warren Zevon’s Los Angeles” kicked the evening off in slow-burn fashion. When the band went opener-free on the tour for that album, they filled the evening by playing both an acoustic and an electric set. That formula seems to have grown legs, as the evening’s first eleven songs all featured Nichols and his newfound Martin acoustic. While it’s to be expected on songs like “Texas & Tennessee” and “The Man I Was,” this gives a little bit of a fun, intricate vibe to older show staples like “My Best Girl” and “Raising Hell.”

Never one to abandon his trademark Epiphone Sheraon II for too long, however, Nichols and company increased the volume (though, admittedly, not the level of happiness…) around 10:00pm sharp, beginning the electric portion of the evening with “Downtown/On My Way Downtown” from 2012’s Women & Work. Though 2016-era Lucero shows tend not to devolve into the occasionally chaotic events that they did in earlier times, Nichols’ constant need to continue pushing boundaries still creates a ‘seat of their pants’ energy that leaves the effect of having both the audience and the remainder of the band left guessing as to exactly what’ll come next.

And what came next was a pretty representative cross-section of the band’s near-twenty-year catalog. Sure All A Man Should Do remained well-represented,  though the band’s 2002 release Tennessee was most represented, producing rambling jams on staples like “Here At The Starlite” and full-crowd singalongs on tracks like “Chain Link Fence” and, of course, “Nights Like These.” “Tears Don’t Matter Much,” from 2003’s That Much Further West, and which name-drops Cory Branan rather famously, garnered probably the most lively crowd response at the 550-capacity Muic Hall, with Berry’s machine-gun-caliber snare and Berry’s steady, heavy groove pacing the way through, providing a launching pad for Nichols and Venable to trade guitar lines. The evening slowed down again toward the end of the set, easing out in much the same way as it eased in, with Nichols donning the Martin acoustic again for “Me & My Girl In ’93” before a brief respite and set closers “Drink Til We’re Gone” and “Fistful Of Tears,” the latter of which found Nichols going guitarless, accompanied only my the always steady, dare I say classy, Steff on keys.

The aforementioned Branan opened the evening’s festivities. (Editor’s note: This marked yours truly’s fourth Branan show in four different States this calendar year, having previously seen him in Connecticut with Brian Fallon and in Rhode Island and Massachusetts with Chuck Ragan). Branan and the Lucero camp, Nichols in particular, obviously go back until about the beginning. Branan is equal parts self-aware (almost painfully so) and self-deprecating, and has long been not only known for his gut-wrenching, razor sharp lyrics but for the curiosity surrounding why, exactly, he hasn’t jumped up to the next level (or two…or four) and become more widely known. When on point (and that’s more often than not in more recent years) about as talented a solo performer as you’ll find, with a unique ability to vary the dynamics of both vocal stylings and his near-virtuoso guitar abilities in a way that will extend its way to all corners of the venue, regardless of the size, and force the listener to pay attention, often times rendering new listeners curious as to what they just heard. Branan’s eleven song set included it’s fair share of long-time crowd favorites (“Prettiest Waitress In Memphis,” “Tall Green Grass,” his own personal Born To Run, “Survivor Blues”) and a handful of tracks from his as-yet-publicly-untitled studio full length, due out next March on Bloodshot Records. Seriously…wait til you hear the song about his dad…

Check out our full photo gallery from the evening below, with a massive mea culpa to Branan for not having been properly in place at the start of his set. I blame New York City… You can still read our ode to the band’s debut album, Lucero, here, and our follow-up ode to the band with help from Dave Hause, Frank Turner and Sal Medrano right here.



DS Photo Gallery: Lucero close out the Copenhagen Beer Celebration (Boston, MA)

God bless the City of Boston for continually trying to breath life, by way of art and music, into the embarrassingly decrepit portion of town that is City Hall Plaza. To paraphrase (read as: steal verbatime) myself from an older story about the Boston Calling Music Festival, City Hall Plaza is, for the non-New Englanders among us, a barren, steaming brick-and-concrete turd located adjacent to a number of otherwise vibrant areas, and has been criminally under-utilized over the years, a literal eyesore for the fifty years since it opened. Boston Calling brought more than a handful of acclaimed national and international performing artists, but it’s since shrunk from biannual to once a year, and has moved away from City Hall entirely. The same team that put it on, however, managed to lire the Copenhagen Beer Celebration to the States for the first time, and provided a pretty eclectic lineup of musical acts to go along with the even more eclectic lineup of microbreweries.

Unlike Boston Calling and other festivals in the past, the focus on the Copenhagen Beer Celebration was beer, not music. And so, in spite of the fact that the stage was located immediately inside the venue’s entrance, most people bypassed the musical festivities for most of the weekend (one session Friday night, two sessions Saturday, all different lineups at each) and opted to hang up the hill at the brewery and food tents. That all changed in time for Lucero, however. As we’ve acknowledged, Lucero are one of “those bands” for people, and engaging with a great number of people Saturday night revealed that the Venn diagram of “people there for the beer” and “people there for Lucero” was, for the most part, a largely concentric circle.

Though the scale might have been larger than most of Lucero’s shows (at least in this area) and because the setting involved the band being fairly separated from the crowd (and despite the fact that it was cold and windy by the end of the 85-minute set), the show still had the feel of a Lucero show. Operating as a five-piece (no horn section for the fly-in/fly-out gig) gave the bulk of the band’s setlist a more raw, stripped-down feel that, while it certainly falls in line with the bulk of the first half of Lucero’s history, has not necessarily been par for the course over the last half-dozen years. Age and the wisdom that comes from spending years as one of the hardest working bands in this or any genre have dulled some of the more intense partying, borderline trainwrecky nature of early Lucero shows, and that’s probably a good thing. I’ve always thought that Roy Berry and John Stubblefield composed one of the steadier and underrated rhythm sections out there, allowing Rick Steff (keys, accordion), Brian Venable (lead guitar) and, of course, frontman Ben Nichols the freedom to wander and take chances and stray pretty far, at times, into the sonic ether. The lack of horn section pushes that issue to more of a forefront, particularly on nights like this that were still peppered with occasional false starts and equipment failures (Venable was relegated to losing his guitar and, as fate would have it, his shirt by the end of the night due to a faulty amplifier).

It was fun to see the band a little bit outside their element for this part of the country, only to then realize that with a band as varied and influential as Lucero, there really isn’t any getting outside their element, as they seem to be their own element, having outlasted myriad bands across genres and carving out their own niche and their own sound.

Check out our full photo gallery from the evening below. While you’re at it, check out our 15th anniversary Lucero retrospective pieces here and here.

 



Fifteen Years of Raising Hell – Part Two: Frank Turner, Dave Hause and more on the impact of Lucero

Toward the end of May, Dying Scene published a feature piece marking the fifteenth anniversary of Lucero‘s self-titled debut album. You can read it here if you haven’t done so already. In the course of digging around on the band’s history, however, it dawned on us pretty quickly that any sort of retrospective on Lucero was going to have to dive much deeper than just reexamining their first album. Because, to paraphrase the first couple of paragraphs of that last story, Lucero are, for a great number of people and due to an equally great number of reasons, one of those bands. A band that has a way of not only writing music and lyrics that strike you right in the emotional core, but fundamentally changing

When I started this project a few months ago, I had visions of turning it into a 5,000 word ode to Lucero in my own words. As you’ve probably established, they’re one of those bands for me. The mark of a good storyteller and songwriter is that you are able to paint a picture and strike a nerve that’s so poignant that you put the listener in your shoes, making them feel as though you’re not only singing to them but about them. For myself, like most Lucero fans, the list of songs penned in Ben Nichols’ trademark tone that were probably written precisely about me is at least a couple dozen deep, primarly because the band’s canon is part heartbreaking, part self-deprecating, part cathartic good-time anthem and filled with ever-evolving sonic differences. But let’s be honest; one part-time pseudo-music blogger’s opinion on what he thinks is one of the most important bands in the foundation of this scene isn’t, well…it isn’t that interesting. I mean who do I think I am, Dan Ozzi?

Anyway, with that latter sentiment in mind, we sent out feelers to a couple friends of the scene that we know share our admiration for the ever-changing band of misfits from Memphis, Tennessee. What follows below is, we think, a pretty compelling look at just what makes Lucero Lucero, and what it means to be a fan of the band and of Ben Nichols penchant for songwriting (never that good with words anyway my ass). There are stories of personal encounters (wrapping Christmas presents…drunken tour bus hijinks…etc), there are comparisons to bands like Slayer and NOFX…equal parts entertaining and enlightening and, thanks to the guys we talked to, incredibly thoughtful read. Many thanks to Frank Turner, Dave Hause, and Rebuilder‘s Sal Medrano for the assists! You can head here to scope out Lucero’s upcoming run of US tour dates, which kicks off next weekend (September 24th) in Boston.

 



Fifteen Years of Raising Hell: Part I – Revisiting “Lucero”

We’ve all got those bands. Bands that not only have a way of writing songs that strike us right in our respective emotional cores, but have a fundamental way in altering how we listen to music. Hell, if you’ve been actively listening to music long enough (and let’s be honest, if you’re reading a story about a band like Lucero on a site like Dying Scene, you’re probably an active music listener), you’ve undoubtedly got a metric ton of those bands. The band that first made you fall for punk rock. The band that first broke you from your childhood love of manufactured pop music. The band whose style you copied and adopted as your own. The band that wrote songs that made you realize that music could be intense and personal and still make you laugh your ass off. The band that first got you to care about politics/social causes or made you break out the thesaurus/dictionary/Google search bar. The band that first wrote songs that made you understand…like, really understand…pain and loss and heartache.

Which brings us to Lucero. The genre-bending Memphis band just rounded the corner on fifteen years since the launch of their self-titled debut full-length. Released May 22, 2001 (MadJack Records), Lucero marked the result of three years of cutting their collective teeth as songwriters and, perhaps most notably, one of the hardest-drinking, hardest-working bands in the game. The album dropped with relatively little fanfare, at least by today’s standards; looking back, there was never really a clear moment when the band burst on the national stage or took the scene by comparative storm. What the album’s release did do, however, was put an official time and date stamp on the beginning of what would become a slow build of a career rooted in earnestness and authenticity that would find them a home in myriad genres. Or, perhaps more accurately, eschewing labels and creating their very own genre.

To honor the occasion, Dying Scene decided to revisit Lucero’s self-titled debut album. From there, the project took off, thus the reason this particular installment is labelled “Part I.” You see, over the course of the last decade-and-a-half, Lucero the band has taken on a level of importance that long since eclipsed the relative importance of Lucero, the album. So what happened as this story developed was a shift in ideas, from a story celebrating Lucero as an album, to a story celebrating Lucero as a band and all of the things that that entails; their continually evolving sound, their devoutly loyal fanbase, their rightful place at the flash point of some rather sizable changes in the punk rock landscape. To do Lucero justice, it’s certainly not enough to hear the long-winded ravings of a Dying Scene editor and Lucero fanboy (don’t you worry, though, there will still be plenty of that in the space below). Throughout the process, however, we called on some singer/songwriter friends to have them chime in on what sets Lucero, the band and the album, apart from the rest of the field.  So grab a whiskey and head below to view our revisit of Lucero (with a little help from Dave Hause and Sal Medrano), and stay tuned later in the week for a longer, entertaining piece on the band at large!



Todd Beene (Chuck Ragan, Lucero) streams “We Miss You” from upcoming album “I Can’t Be Serious”

Todd Beene – Photo credit: Claire Penn



Lucero streaming new song – “Can’t You Hear Them Howl”

The genre-crossing boys in Lucero have a new album in the works. The country/punk group are now streaming another new song off the album. Listen to “Can’t You Hear Them Howl” below.

The song is track four on the band’s upcoming album, All A Man Should Do, which is due out next month (Sept. 18th). You can pre-order the album right here.

Lucero’s last release was August 2014’s Lucero: Live From Atlanta.



Lucero releases music video for “Went Looking for Warren Zevon’s LA” off upcoming “All A Man Should Do” album; preparing for Fall tour

Punk’s honky-tonk heroes Lucero have just announced an upcoming tour this fall in support of their forthcoming album “All A Man Should Do”, currently scheduled for a September 18th release date.

Have a look at the complete list of tour dates and locations below.

Additionally, the band has just made a new song from the album available to stream. The track is entitled “Went Looking for Warren Zevon’s Los Angeles” and you can have a listen below.

Lucero last released “Lucero: Live From Atlanta” back in August, 2014.



Twin Forks (Nashville folk) will support Lucero on tour next year

Nashville folk/Americana 5-piece Twin Forks will head out on tour with Lucero and Ryan Bingham in 2015.  You can find all of the dates below.

In celebration of the tour announcement, the band put up 3 tracks which you can download for free right here.  The band most recently released a self-titled album this past February through Dine Alone Records.



Lucero announce “Lucero: Live From Atlanta,” release live track “Tears Don’t Matter Much”

Punk’s honky-tonk heroes Lucero have just announced details for their upcoming live album “Lucero: Live From Atlanta.” The album was record at the band’s recent show at the Terminal West and will consist of 32 tracks.

You can check out a live recording of “Tears Don’t Matter Much” below.

“Lucero: Live From Atlanta” will be released August 12th 2014. The band last released their “Texas and Tennessee EP” in April 2013.



DS Photo Gallery: Dropkick Murphys – St Patrick’s Day in Boston – Year 14 / Night 1

©Jo M. Wood Photography 2014Dropkick Murphys kicked off another round of Boston St. Patrick’s Day shows on March 14th.  Ken Casey said it best when he said, “Welcome to Night 1 of Year 14!”

This year’s celebration was kicked off by The Boston Stranglers, with their heavy riffs and their powerful screams. On second, from London, England was Skinny Lister.  They Made the House of Blues feel like you we’re in a pub in London, especially when Lorna passed a growler off the stage and into the crowd. Up next, Lucero hit the stage with a completely unique southern rock/gospel sound. Every time singer Ben Nichols sang a lyric you found yourself wanting to have a drink with him, especially we he sang a song about his late grandfather.

Finally the lights went down and Sinead O’Conner started to play. The Murphys hit the stage and opened with the “The Boys Are Back.”  Their set consisted of songs old and new, which was perfectly suited for every fan ranging from those that have been there from the beginning to those just discovering DKM. Check out our photo gallery below.



The Bouncing Souls, Lucero, City And Colour announced for Bonnaroo Festival

Get your glowsticks and your mescaline ready, punkers…the Bonnaroo lineup has been announced!

Bonnaroo is known for having increasingly random lineups as the years go on, but this year’s may take the cake. The headliners are Elton John, Kanye West, Lionel Richie (seriously) and Jack White. The lineup also includes the likes of Skrillex, Ice Cube, Neutral Milk Hotel, Mastodon and Meshuggah. Representing the punk scene will be The Bouncing Souls, Lucero and City and Colour. Weird.

More lineup information here…but you’re probably not going. Bonnaroo takes place June 12-15 in Manchester, Tennessee.



Dropkick Murphys extend spring tour

Dropkick Murphys have added a handful of U.S. dates to their already lengthy tour this spring with London folk punk act Skinny Lister and Tennessee cow punks Lucero. Take a look at all of the dates and locations here.

The band’s most recent release was “Signed And Sealed With Blood,” which came out last year through the band’s own label, Born & Bred Records.