Search Results for "The Interrupters"

The Interrupters begin recording new album

Los Angeles ska-punk band The Interrupters have announced they are currently in the studio working on a new album. The LP is being recorded with Tim Armstrong and Brett Gurewitz, and it will be the band’s third full-length release.

The Interrupters last released Say It Out Loud in 2016 through Hellcat Records.



The Interrupters announce co-headlining tour with SWMRS

L.A. ska band The Interrupters have announced a co-headlining tour with SWMRS.

You can check out all the dates and locations, including a break where The Interrupters will be opening for Green Day, below.

The Interrupters last released Say It Out Loud via Hellcat Records in June of last year.



DS Photo Gallery: Dropkick Murphys and The Interrupters at Agganis Arena (Boston, MA)

 

For the last fifteen-or-so years, Massachusetts-based Celtic punk icons Dropkick Murphys playing a string of hometown shows has become as synonymous with St. Patrick’s Day as their musical forebears Mighty Mighty Bosstones doing a similar thing has been with Christmastime. As the band’s popularity has increased, so too has the size of venues at these St. Patrick’s weekend shenanigans, and the last two years have featured dates at the Agganis Arena, the state-of-the-art, 7200-capacity hockey rink located on the campus of Boston University. For many bands, the tendency on such a large stage might be to play “just the hits” in order to cater to the casual fans, but Dropkick Murphys, as it turns out, are not one of those bands. Say what you will about their level of “Tessie”/”Shipping Up To Boston”- inspired fame, but Dropkick Murphys have long been conscious or remembering the fans that’ve been there since the days when the clubs they played would fit within the confines of the stage of the Agganis (case in point: yours truly first saw the Dropkicks in August 1997, when they played in between the Mr. Rogers Project and The Pietasters at the Living Room in Providence).

A confetti cannon (seen above) and the instrumental “Lonesome Boatman” from the Dropkicks’ latest release 11 Short Stories Of Pain & Glory (released January 6th on their own Born & Bred Records) introduced the band to the stage before they proceeded to launch into their 2007 hit “State Of Massachusetts.” If I can take a minute to inject myself into this story, here’s where I publicly apologize to Ken Casey & Company. I think it’s important to point out that I count myself as one of those hometown fans that’s been hypercritical (unfairly so) of the band over the last dozen post-“Tessie” years, though that’s strictly a musical critique; their tremendous fundraising and community work and their ongoing penchant for giving local bands a break is not only beyond reproach but is ultimately the stuff to which all bands should aspire. But I’ll tell you what…since the 90 minute set that began with the opening tenor banjo riff on “…Massachusetts,” yours truly has been not only back aboard the Good Ship Murphys, but more than a little embarrassed about having jumped off in the first place.

The setlist on this night, as on most nights, was pretty varied and all-encompassing. Sure 11 Short Stories… was well represented, but so too were earlier albums like Do Or Die, Blackout and The Warrior’s Code on songs like “Boys On The Docks,” “Time To Go,” and, of course, the latter album’s title track, which is a shoutout to local boxing legend “Irish” Micky Ward who was, of course, in attendance. What’s perhaps most impressive about a Dropkick Murphys set circa 2017, aside maybe from their ability to keep a crowd constantly fired up, is the level of sheer musicianship among the group’s core. Ken Casey is, by his own admission, not the world’s most astute bass player, but he’s also their unquestionable heart-and-soul. Drummer Matt Kelly and principle frontman Al Barr are about as quietly strong-up-the-middle as you’ll find. Like the band as a whole, the trio of Tim Brennan, Jeff DeRosa and Kevin Rheault (longtime tech who’s filling in for James Lynch on this run), however, don’t get nearly enough credit. At any given time, the three trade off between guitar, mandolin, banjo, bouzouki, tin whistle and keyboard duties, rarely manning the same battle station for more than two or three songs in a row. The seamless nature that things seem to run in that regard is  really awesome, in the literal sense of the word.

Direct support on this night, as on the bulk of the month-long tour, came from The Interrupters. The ska punk quartet have been mighty busy over the last nine months or so since releasing their sophomore album, Say It Out Loud; since playing the duration of last year’s Warped Tour, they headlined full Europe and US tours of their own before heading back across the pond to open for Green Day immediately before this Dropkicks spot. It’s no secret that The Interrupters have been one of yours truly’s favorite bands to cover over the last few years, and performances like this particular one exemplify why, at least in part. The insanely talented (and yet somehow still wildly underrated) rhythm section of twin brothers Jesse (drums) and Justin (bass) Bivona keep the gas pedal floored, with Justin teaming with big brother Kevin (guitar, above) and frontwoman Aimee “Interrupter” as a three-headed ball of constant frenetic energy at the front of the stage. As Kevin mentioned when we caught up for an interview on these pages last year, the band are mindful that they’ve developed a sound product that definitely works, and if anything critical can be said of how they’ve made it work at the end of another long, successful tour run, it’s almost that they make it look TOO easy. (Oh, and they’re one of the only bands that can cover an Operation Ivy classic, “Sound System,” without sounding like a cheap, watered-down knockoff.)

Also opening this night (and most of the rest of the tour) was genuine Irish punk band Blood Or Whiskey. With all apologies to the Dublin-based sextet, a variety of communication mishaps between arena staff lead yours truly on a half-hour-long wild goose chase that resulted in me missing the entirety of their set, save for a song about frontman Dugs Mulhooly’s favorite pub back home closing down, only to be replaced by a coffee shop. Sorry lads…we’ll catch you next time around, we promise.

Head below for our full photo gallery from the Interrupters and Dropkick Murphys sets. And a special thanks to my much younger brother from another mother Nick Gold for the assist. Good on ya, bud.



DS Staff Picks: Jay Stone picks his top sixteen albums of 2016 with Spotify playlist!

I’m not entirely sure how, but we’ve reached the middle of December 2016 without the Earth’s core opening up and swallowing us all down into the burning fiery furnace below. That can only mean one thing; it’s time for people who spend all year pretending to be entertainment journalists to narrow down the most entertaining things of the last 365 days into bite size pieces. And in list form! This is the sixth one of these I’ve done for Dying Scene, so the intro stuff might start to get a bit repetitive. As such, I’ll spare you my normal rambling 1500 word babble and jump in to the music itself. You’re welcome.

As is usually the case, I didn’t trim my list to ten, in spite of our esteemed leader, Johnny X, instructing us to do so. What can I say; I’m not a fan of restrictions, or base ten number systems. I thought there was something apropos about reclaiming the number 16 from the giant shitstorm that was this year. I also genuinely love all of the albums in my final list, and if I were to submit this list a week from now, the last half-dozen or so might be in a very different order. I did adhere to the instructions about keeping the list Dying Scene-relevant. If you’re into expanding horizons, you should check out Sturgill Simpson’s A Sailor’s Guide To Earth, Amanda Shires’ My Piece Of Land, Sadler Vaden’s self-titled album, David Bowie’s Blackstar, Wilco’s Schmilco, and probably a bunch of other mid-tempo stuff I’m forgetting.

As always, I didn’t include EPs, split-releases or live albums in my final list, because…because I didn’t. However, you should by no means skip toyGuitar‘s Move Like A Ghost, Useless ID‘s We Don’t Want The Airwaves and Dead To Me‘s I Wanna Die In Los Angeles on the EP front. You should also check out The Darlings‘ live album, and the Bundles/Dan Webb And The Spiders split 12-inch that came out a couple months ago. Oh, and Oklahoa’s Don’t Make Ghosts put out an EP, Death Ride, that’s easily one of the best debuts this year.

I did include tracks from all of the above, and obviously all of the below, on the Spotify playlist I curated for this story…scroll all the way down for that and hit “play.”

Check out my list below.



The Interrupters release new video for “By My Side”

L.A. ska band The Interrupters just released a video for their song “By My Side,” and you can check it out below.  The song appears on the band’s outstanding sophomore album, Say It Out Loud, which was released on Hellcat Records in June of this year.

The Interrupters just finished a nationwide headlining tour with support from Bad Cop Bad Cop.  You can check out a review of the Boston show here.



DS Photo Gallery: The Interrupters, Bad Cop Bad Cop, The Doped Up Dollies and Mickey Rickshaw take over Boston

To refer to The Interrupters current nationwide tour featuring direct support from Bad Cop Bad Cop as “highly anticipated” would be understating things in every possible way. The seven-week run circumnavigates the lower 48, and serves as not only The Interrupters first full US headlining tour, but Bad Cop Bad Cop’s first lengthy full US tour as well. For those reasons, and I’m sure many others, the tour rightfully ranks as a giant milestone moment filled with countless smaller milestone moments in the careers of both bands. But there is something about the tour that also feels like a milestone moment for the observer. For starters, it feels like a bit of a throwback to the groundbreaking glory days of Epitaph Records and Fat Wreck Chords, respectively, a time period that formulated the punk rock listening habits of a great many of us. But more than that, and you’ll have to forgive my occasionally foggy-at-best memory, but in the recent annals of punk history (and probably the not-so-recent ones too), you’d be hard-pressed to find such a lengthy, well-received tour involving not one, but two female-fronted punk bands playing in front of such high volume crowds. To put things bluntly, the tour feels, on paper, to be important. (Check out our recent tour-previewing interview with Kevin and Aimee from The Interrupters here.)

If you’ve been following the tour via the respective bands’ social media accounts, you’re probably well aware of just how fun and positive and high energy things seem to be as the tour rounds into its second month. But just like calling the tour “highly anticipated” is an understatement of epic proportions, so to is referring to its individual shows as an amalgam of “fun” and “positive” and “high energy.” So when you add to that already stellar lineup two intense and passionate local openers (The Doped Up Dollies and Mickey Rickshaw) the net result is that the Boston stop equated to one of the better showgoing experiences of this or most any other calendar years. Touring in support of their stellar sophomore album, Say It Out Loud, The Interrupters overcame a few early-set microphone-related technical difficulties to blast through a 21-song set that left little-if-anything to be desired.

From the very first notes of set opener “A Friend Like Me,” the foursome never really took their collective feet off the gas pedal. Anchored by the rock-solid Jesse Bivona on drums, the front-of-stage trio of Kevin Bivona (guitar), Justin Bivona (bass) and of course Aimee “Interrupter” Allen on vocals served as a continuous ball of frenetic energy, endlessly dancing, bouncing back-and-forth across the venue’s rather small stage. There are very few bands going who seem to genuinely enjoy their jobs and interacting with crowds night-in and night-out like The Interrupters do. Loyalty and family are recurring themes throughout the band’s body of work, and they seem sincere in referring to their fans as part of their extended family. Another of their family members, David McWane of Big D and the Kids Table fame, joined the band on stage for a true-to-the-0riginal cover of the Operation Ivy classic “Sound System,” while all available members of the collection of opening bands joined the foursome on stage for a dance party during encore closer “This Is My Family” before posing for a now-trademark post set group shot.

As mentioned above, Bad Cop Bad Cop are providing direct support for the duration of this tour. If there were another band in the scene that can match The Interrupters level of frenetic energy and their seeming enjoyment of taking the stage and playing night in and night out, it would o doubt be Bad Cop Bad Cop. Making only their second-ever Boston stop – and their first with bass player Linh Le in the house (Masked Intruder’s Intruder Yellow filled in when the band opened up the Fat Wreck 25th Anniversary tour last year as Le was attending her best friend’s wedding), the band seemed intent on making up for lost time in front of a crowd that seemed all-too eager to welcome them back to town. Drummer Myra Gallarza, who is easily one of the more underrated pace-setters in the scene provided a stable foundation for the three-part monster of co-frontwomen Stacey Dee and Jennie Cotterill to trade riffs and three-part harmonies with the whirling dervish that is Le.

Speaking of three-part harmonies, direct local support came by way of The Doped Up Dollies, a trio that rather famously started as supporting vocalists for David McWane and his band of Boston ska veterans, Big D and the Kids Table, before branching out as a unique, standalone act. The Dollies bill themselves as a three-piece act that play a “fusion of hopscotch/double dutch, ska, reggae, blues and soul,” and backed by a band that I’m pretty sure consisted of eighteen parts (honestly, I lost count but I think there were a total of nine members on the small club stage), including McWane himself, the trio of Brie McWane, Sirae Richardson and Erin McKenzie (pictured in that order above) present one of the more unique newish acts in the game. The variation in styles keeps the band from being pigeonholed, and allows them to fit in perfectly in myriad settings, and they proved to be a fantastic sonic change of pace on this particular bill without sacrificing much, if anything, in the way of overall energy.

Mickey Rickshaw, another stage-crowding local band (I’m relatively convinced that there are 8 of them, but again, the stage was small enough that I might have lost one or two or seven of them), opened the show off with about as frenetic a set as you can get. The band play an unapologetically fast and loud blend of Celtic punk that somehow, because of their energy level, make that occasionally well-worn sound seem fresh and vibrant. In a scene, particularly locally, that can seem crowded and redundant, Mickey Rickshaw have rather quickly made a name for themselves as the cream that has risen to the top.

Check out our full photo gallery below!



DS Interview: Kevin and Aimee from The Interrupters discuss “Say It Out Loud,” their first US headline tour and working with some cool friends

Last week in Santa Barbara, The Interrupters kicked off a lengthy US headlining tour — their first — that’ll keep them on the road for a total of seven-and-a-half weeks. This comes on the heels of the California-based four piece releasing their sophomore album, Say It Out Loud, earlier this summer; an album that, if you haven’t heard it, you should make sure you check out before you finish that “Best of 2016” list. The band have breathed new life — infectiously fun life — into a scene that had become a bit stale by injecting a lock-tight brand of ska-punk that hasn’t been played this well in a decade-and-a-half.

Dying Scene caught up with Aimee “Interrupter” Allen and Kevin Bivona, the frontwoman and guitar player respectively, for an engaging conversation a couple days prior to leaving for tour. If you’re even peripherally familiar with The Interrupters body of work, you’re no doubt familiar with how prevalent the themes of family and unity are in their work. Look no further than tracks like “Family” and “A Friend Like Me” from their self-titled debut album or “By My Side,” the lead single from Say It Out Loud, for first-hand proof of that.

It doesn’t take much in the way of conversation with any of the band members to realize just how genuine those themes are. When Aimee joined up with the three Bivona brothers (twins Justin and Jesse man the bass and drums, respectively), to form the band, what could have been a tricky-to-navigate situation felt, in fact, pretty natural. “Kevin and I had already been writing music together for a year when the twins came in,” says Aimee, before confirming that the twins do, in fact, seem to have their own language (which is fairly apparent if you’ve had conversations with the two): “the twins definitely have their own communication and chemistry far beyond anything you can imagine and are pretty much a single unit when it comes to the drums and bass.”

The hard work that the band spent on the road, particularly over the last year, paid off when it came time to record the follow-up to the self-titled debut. Say It Out Loud is more cohesive, more energetic and more instantly enjoyable than even their first album was. “I think that just playing together live, going out there and playing songs and just being together and figuring out who we are as a band really helped us have a really strong foundation of what we were about,” says Allen. The infectious, high-energy feel is by design, continues Bivona, as the band used the input gained from crowd reactions at their live performances as a barometer when it came time to fine-tune tracks for Say It Out Loud. “With the second record, we would always be like “let’s try this background vocal” or “it would be great if we could get the crowd to sing this with us.” Just trying to keep it high-energy and fun.”

As you’re no doubt aware, the band holed up in the studio with Tim Armstrong (as Allen calls him the Fifth Interrupter) and made the most of what, in hindsight, seems a very brief amount of time to piece the new album together. “Top to bottom, we only spent like maybe six days (recording the music for Say It Out Loud),” explains Bivona, eventually sounding amazed at his own words. “We did vocals over the course of the next two weeks maybe, including background vocals. And we mixed in a month. When I say it out loud, it seems like a long time, but it wasn’t that long in terms of the actual hours put in!”

Armstrong not only lent his professional expertise to the process, inspiring life and impromtu jam sessions when ideas seemed to have become stagnant, but he was also the consummate professional when it came time to take advice from the band. Armstrong contributes vocals to the Say It Out Loud track “Phantom City,” a bit of a darker, mysteriously gritty sound than has been the band’s proverbial bread-and-butter. “Once it comes down to him singing on an Interrupters song,” says Bivona of the inimitable Armstrong, “he is totally willing to take as much input from us as we’re willing to give. Obviously, when Tim’s going to sing on one of your songs, you’re like “dude, do whatever you want!”  But he’ll be like “lyrically, what do you think of how I’m doing it?” He wants it to be good and he wants us to be happy in the end.”

Armstrong’s involvement with the band has not only sparked a slew of “what’s it like to work with Tim” questions from reporters and fans not unlike myself, but has spawned a fairly noticeable number of people who write the band off as a project, or, as a follow up to the similarly composed Distillers of the late 1990s. Whether the band is mindful of that feedback (unfair feedback, in this writer’s opinion) depends on when you asked them about it. I think that when we started out we paid more attention to it,” starts Bivona, before Allen quickly adds that she is not one to pay attention to the commentary. I don’t know what the fuck anyone is saying about us, good or bad. I read the articles about us, but I don’t look at comments.” Instead, the band focus their energy on their family, which includes their ever-growing fanbase, seeking to keep the energy and the audience participation at live shows high, creating an immensely enjoyable experience for all parties involved.

As should be fairly apparent, it’s not just four (five??) Interrupters that compose the band’s family. Guest appearances abound in the band’s videos (see above), on its albums and at live shows. Less Than Jake, for example, appear almost in their entirety on a track on the new album, the by-product of a seemingly chance four-hour jam session inspired by last year’s It’s Not Dead Fest. As Bivona tells it, “Less Than Jake was staying at a hotel literally a mile-and-a-half away from our house and we were working on the record. I hung out with a couple of the guys the night before, and I said “hey, do you think we can put something together and maybe have you guys come over and give a listen and see if you like it?” And next thing you know, they’re all at our house, and we worked on “You’re Gonna Find A Way Out” all in a night’s work.” 

The band also lent their skills to the upcoming full-length from Washington-based street punk band Noi!se, specifically on “The War Inside,” a heart-breaker of a song that tackles the all-too-real issue of soldiers returning home from foreign battlefields only to be faced with a much scarier and more prolonged war of their own: PTSD. While Allen herself is not a former soldier, the issue of PTSD is still all-too real, and lead to perhaps her most haunting vocal duties to date. “I have PTSD, so I get it,” says Allen rather matter-of-factly. “I have all the love in the world for the United States military. Twenty-two soldiers kill themselves every day, and we’ve got to do something. Anything, really. We’ve got to help stop this shit, and the only tool that we have…or that I have…is music!”

The Interrupters tour kicked off last week in Santa Barbara and runs through November 26th in San Diego. Head here for the full rundown to see where you can catch them! In the meantime, check out our full three-person Q&A session below!



Green Day announce North American club shows & European tour w/ The Interrupters

California pop-punk icons Green Day just announced two tours in support of their upcoming album Revolution Radio. The first is a North American tour that will see the band playing small club shows. The second is a European arena tour featuring support from The Interrupters.

The North American run starts in September (tickets on sale this Friday, Sept 9th at 12pm EST), and the European tour will kick off in early 2017. See if there’s a show near you below.

Green Day’s upcoming album Revolution Radio will be their first record in 4 years, serving as a follow-up to 2012’s ¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré! trilogy. Listen to the album’s first single “Bang Bang” here.

UPDATE: 3 shows have been postponed and 1 has been cancelled. According to a press release, this is “all due to illness affecting several members of the band and its crew.”



The Interrupters & Bad Cop/Bad Cop announce North American tour

The Interrupters and Bad Cop/Bad Cop have announced they will be touring North America together this fall. The tour kicks off on October 5th in Santa Barbara, CA, and will make its way across the continent before wrapping up on November 26th in San Diego.

The tour’s pretty long, so odds are there’s a show near you. Check out the full list of dates and locations below.

The Interrupters’ latest album Say It Out Loud was released on June 24th through Hellcat Records. Bad Cop/Bad Cop’s debut album Not Sorry came out in June, 2015 on Fat Wreck Chords.



The Interrupters announce European tour

SoCal ska-punk band The Interrupters have announced they will be touring Europe this summer. The tour kicks off on August 19th in France, and wraps up on September 10th in Italy.

Check out the tour dates below to see if there’s a show near you.

The band’s latest album Say It Out Loud was released on June 24th through Hellcat Records. Like their debut full-length, it was produced by Tim Armstrong of Rancid.



DS Photo Gallery: Warped Tour comes to Hartford (Less Than Jake, Sum 41, The Interrupters and more)

It’s worth mentioning that if you’re reading this (hi dad!), understand that this is the second story that I wrote up that tried to capture all that is the 2016 edition of the Vans Warped Tour. It’s also worth mentioning that this version is much, much shorter than the original. You’re welcome. Seriously.

You see, if you’re of a certain age bracket (like, I don’t know, mid-30s) the continued existence of the traveling punk rock summer camp that is the Vans Warped Tour has obviously been a hot button topic in certain corners (read as: message boards and comment sections) of the punk community at large. We all can reminisce about years gone by, or compare which pre-2000 lineup was best, or patronizingly congratulate ourselves for even recognizing the names of any of the bands on the roster in the last handful of years.

The 2016 lineup is, as you’re probably aware, the best in recent memory, thanks in no small part to the fact that it draws from a handful of the bands that made it all that some of us remember being “back in the day.” And so I initially had a whole article (I hate, HATE, to use the word “thinkpiece”) written extolling the virtues of Kevin Lyman and company for helping the pendulum swing back toward something resembling Warped Tour normalcy. But then I was reminded of a quote from a wise old man that I always picture to be George Carlin but apparently, according to the internet, was actually “Author Unknown” and thus may not have actually been wise or old or male at all, “if something goes without saying, let it.” As such, I deleted the first story, and this is what you get as a result.

So anyway, the Vans Warped Tour rolled into Hartford on a thankfully warm but not blisteringly hot Sunday in July and…you know what…you really don’t care about all that stuff, do you? It’s the Warped Tour; you know this year’s lineup, you know how the individual set times get shuffled on a daily basis, you know there’s going to be a handful of bands you want to see, and handful of bands you want to avoid, and a whole bunch of people you’ve never heard of before and will most likely never hear again. For yours truly, the “who I have to see” list was dictated by a mix of nostalgia and recent fandom. From column A? New Found Glory, Less Than Jake and Sum 41. Column B, meanwhile, was represented by The Interrupters, Teenage Bottlerocket, and Masked Intruder. I could have (and, as it turns actually have) lived without seeing anybody else (sorry Motionless In White…), and as fate would have it, the schedule broke perfectly. NFG and LTJ played the same stage an hour apart. TBR and The Interrupters played neighboring stages back-to-back. Sum 41 played a set that wasn’t really in conflict with anybody, and Masked Intruder closed out one of the amphitheater stages. Perfect timing, really.

 

Say what you will, and there is certainly plenty you could say, about the Warped Tour (and, more specifically, about how you wish last year’s Lyman-produced It’s Not Dead Fest would become a nationally touring entity), but the crowd response at the Hartford stop and, we’re led to believe at a lot of other stops, indicates that it’s not just a select few old guys that miss the days of the skate punk and ska-core Warped lineups of yesteryear, and that there’s room for even more of the old guard at the table in the years to come.

Now if you’ll excuse us, get off our lawn. And check out our photo gallery of the six bands mentioned above down below.



The Interrupters stream “On A Turntable” from upcoming album “Say It Out Loud”

Ska-punks The Interrupters have dropped a new song off their upcoming record Say It Out Loud. called “On A Turntable.”

This tune is much less ska than most of the band’s material, but vocalist Aimee Interrupter’s voice is great and very reminiscent of Brody Dalle’s Distillers days. Check the track out below.

Say It Out Loud will be released June 24th through Hellcat Records.



Music Video: The Interrupters – “By My Side”

SoCal ska-punks The Interrupters have released a music video for “By My Side,” which is taken from their upcoming album Say It Out Loud. Check it out below.

Say It Out Loud is set to release on June 24th through Hellcat Records. Like the band’s debut full-length, it was produced by Tim Armstrong of Rancid.



New Music: The Interrupters – “By My Side” from upcoming album “Say It Out Loud”

Southern California ska-punks The Interrupters have released the lead single from their upcoming sophomore full-length, “Say It Out Loud.” The sing-along new track is called “By My Side” and you can check it out below (see how long it gets stuck in your head for…).

“Say It Out Loud” is due for release June 24th on Hellcat Records, which also released the band’s debut album back in August 2014. Pre-orders for “Say It Out Loud” are available here.

The Interrupters are also playing this year’s Warped Tour. You can find the full list of dates down below the video.



DS Photo Gallery: Rancid, H2O and The Interrupters – Boston, MA

 

In spite of this year serving as the the 20th anniversary of Rancid‘s landmark album …And Out Come The Wolves, the punk pioneers played only a handful shows from the time the calendar flipped to 2015. Luckily for New England area fans, Boston earned a spot on the exclusive list. The band packed the occasionally cavernous-feeling House Of Blues on Lansdowne Street, in spite of the unseasonably warm mid-September temperatures, and in spite of the fact that the show took place on a Tuesday night.

In somewhat atypical fashion for such a venue on such a night, a genuinely sizable crowd had turned out by the time The Interrupters kicked the evening off at 8 o’clock sharp. Though LA-based ska-punk foursome no doubt gained traction in the scene as proteges of Rancid founder Tim Armstrong (the three Bivona brothers — Jesse, Justin and Kevin — served as frequent collaborators in Armstrong’s Tim Timebomb and Friends project), the band have established themselves as a premier, high-energy live band. Drummer Jesse Bivona provided a solid, rock-steady (partial pun intended) foundation as guitarist Kevin, bassist Justin, and frontwoman Aimee Allen made full use of the venue’s large stage, traversing from side-to-side in almost non-stop fashion. In a particularly special moment that paid homage to the scene’s founding fathers, the band were joined by Big D & The Kids Table frontman Dave McWane for a rousing rendition of the Operation Ivy classic “Sound System.”

New York hardcore vets H2O provided direct support for Rancid on this particular evening. The band celebrated their own 20th anniversary last year, and frontman and bastion of positive energy Toby Morse made repeat mention of the debt of gratitude that he and his bandmates owe to their musical “big brothers.” The band’s set spanned most of their catalog, from 1996’s self-titled album to the title track from their forthcoming Bridge Nine Records release, Use Your Voice. Particular attention was paid to 2008’s Nothing To Prove, as almost a quarter of their thirteen-song set focused on songs from their Bridge Nine debut, a direct nod to the label headquartered a dozen-or-so miles north of the city. In typical ‘don’t forget your roots’ fashion, the band performed an impromptu mini cover set that featured guitarist Rusty Pistachio testing out his pipes on The Police classic “Walking On The Moon.”

As you’d expect, the crowd were champing at the bit by the time the headliners took the stage and ripped in to the …Wolves classic “Roots Radicals.” What followed was a twenty-eight song master class in how to compose a setlist that covered the entirety of their catalog while focusing on their most widely-acclaimed album. While this was not a full …And Out Come The Wolves show, thirteen of the album’s tracks were performed over the course of the evening. Another half-dozen songs were culled from the band’s 1994 release, Let’s Go, giving the evening a definite “old school” vibe. The fully bearded (again) Armstrong acted as a whirling dervish for most of the night, anchored by co-frontman Lars Frederiksen on his right and bassist Matt Freeman on his left. Drummer Branden Steineckert has served as a spark plug since joining the band almost a decade ago, and is somehow able to keep a steady, forward beat while playing as a ball of kinetic energy behind the kit.

Sadly for fans of the band, Rancid have got only one show left on their dance card for the remainder of the calendar year. Here’s hoping for a busier 2016, because their current live show still serves as one of the best in the business. Check out our photo gallery below.