Search Results for "Bad Religion"

Show Review: Punk in Drublic (9/16/17 – Tacoma, WA)

The Punk in Drublic logline is the sort of thing that makes a Pacific Northwest punk a little misty-eyed: craft beer + punk rock. It sounds so simple, yet until now, it hadn’t been done. Fat Mike has managed to combine the unique atmosphere of a punk rock show with a brewfest. As Langston Hughes said, “Hold fast to dreams.”

The tour stops are cities most likely missed on regular circuits. I arrived at the Tacoma stop with the thought, as I’m sure did everyone else: why the fuck is this in Tacoma? The question is probably the answer. NOFX is a band that has been around forever and toured about everywhere you can think of, doing a weird tour of less-sought American cities seems right up their alley. Sometimes the only reason is why not?

I got to the venue early enough to walk around and take in the sights. It kind of reminded me of a mini-Punk Rock Bowling, but without the oppressive desert heat. In fact, the green grass and cool air were a welcome change from my past festival experiences. If there’s anyone listening out there: the mild climate of the Northwest is perfect for this type of thing. People were drinking beers and chatting, hyping themselves about the last time they saw NOFX or Bad Religion; decked out in Fat Wreck gear and comparing tasting notes. It was a cool vibe, definitely a unique festival experience. I had the pleasure of trying out Stone’s NOFX collaboration beer– a hoppy lager called Punk In Drublic– and am happy to report it tastes about how you’d expect: a big earthy bouquet of lager maltiness with a strong dose of hops. Pretty damn good, if you ask me.

The biggest problem with the beer side of the operation was that there wasn’t enough. There were ten-thousand punks in Tacoma that night, and they drank all the beer.

Photo credit: Evan Olszko

Impressively, it wasn’t even cheap beer, we’re talking ten-bucks-a-pop festival cups here. Fat Mike got his I-told-you-so in on the mic at the end of the night. For next time, they’ll have to remember that the crowd that goes to see a craft beer/ NOFX show aren’t the one-and-done types. Besides the beer running out into the middle of the final set, the festival went pretty smoothly, excepting for the long beer and merch lines. It’s hard to be too upset, allowing for inexperience with this sort of event. If they do it again (and God, I hope they do it again), they’ll need twice the kegs and the volunteers to go with them.

For the music of the day, I’m happy to say all the bands killed it. Tacoma darlings, the Hilltop Rats opened the show, obviously honored to be in the company of such a strong lineup. They played fast and aggressive skate punk with tons of melody and banter. They were there to get the fest started off right, and they were there to have fun along the way– what else can you expect from a band who played a song called “Jell-O Shots”?

Not to beat a dead horse, but the lines for beer were getting gargantuan by the time the music started in earnest. Unfortunately, the beer line predicament kept me in line for the entirety of Bad Cop/ Bad Cop’s set. From where I was though, they sounded great. Warriors is one of my favorites of the year, and I was happy to hear them play and harmonize with expert precision.

Goldinger was up next and if I had to name a song of their’s to save my life, I would have to gracefully accept a bullet. But, when they came on stage, I was in total awe. Those guys have energy to spare. They were bouncing up and down, kicking out muscular riffs that had folks dancing and singing along. Ska isn’t usually my thing, but man, I had to admit– Goldfinger kinda rocked it.

Less Than Jake had a bunch of energy too, and gave a bashful “Thanks, Fat Mike,” for putting on the punk beer fest. If there was a running theme through the night, it was that the band’s were as enthralled with the novelty of the event as the fans. They opened with “All My Best Friends are Metalheads,” which means, if I had to name one song of Less Than Jake’s to save my life, I could do exactly that.

The gateway band that I can’t shake is Bad Religion. Yeah, there were other bands I listened to when I first got into punk, but Bad Religion is the one that I always come back to. What can I say about them that hasn’t been said? Their set at Punk In Drublic was one of the best I’ve seen from them, they sounded great (especially their harmonies) and opened with “American Jesus” and ended with “Fuck Armageddon… This is Hell.” In between those two, they also played “No Control,” “Do What You Want,” “Generator,” “Los Angeles Is Burning,” and a bunch of their other hits. As he is apt to do, Fat Mike jumped on stage for the bridge of “21st Century (Digital Boy).” At Punk Rock Bowling, he took over bass for “We’re Only Gonna Die.” If there’s one thing Fat Mike likes to do (besides drugs), it’s help Bad Religion keep their set exciting. It’s happened before and it’ll happen again, but it always brings a smile to my face.

I’d only see NOFX once before, but knowing how the band follows whims (you know, like pulling off a punk beer fest in Tacoma), I always figured their sets could be pretty distinct. As per usual, there was the trademark banter, which for a NOFX fan is as much a part of their set as well, you know– songs– but, it was funny and entertaining. Fat Mike riffed on event coordinators not having enough beer and then proceeded to play a lot of classic tracks, changing words for laughs along the way. Seeing NOFX in their element with an audience of ten-thousand was a sight to see. You don’t get many opportunities to sing “Bob” with a choir that size. Everyone was really into it, singing and circle pitting– whether in the pit or not– and I was pleasantly surprised to hear them play one of my favorite deep cuts, “I’m a Huge Fan of Bad Religion,” maybe just because I can relate to the title.

All in all, Tacoma’s Punk in Drublic was a unique spectacle of good beer, great live performances, and some logistics that could stand to be improved. But, as Fat Mike celebratorily said, “This is a punk rock festival for ADULTS!” And it certainly was. There was beer and there was a music, and not a fucking kid in sight.

Doesn’t sound too bad, does it?

 

 



Bad Religion announce South American tour

California punk icons Bad Religion have announced some South American tour dates that will take place in November. The dates and locations are below.

Bad Religion have been busy working on a new album, tentatively due for release next year. It will be their first full-length studio album since 2013’s True North as well as their first with Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



Show Review: Rebellion Festival Day 1

DS recently attended the annual, 4 day punk rock extravaganza that is Rebellion Festival in Blackpool, North West England. Read the first of our reviews of the festival below – looking back at the ridiculously strong line up on day 1.

Rebellion – Day 1

High summer in the UK is unpredictable down in London. One day it’s beautiful, sunbathing weather. The next it’s pissing it down. But, in Blackpool, as a soft southerner, you can be sure to be freezing, regardless of the fact its early August. You find yourself swept off your feet by the blasting wind and greeted by people in t-shirts looking at you funny for shivering. Luckily, the annual pilgrimage up there is for Rebellion – the unique, 4 day punk festival held in the cavernous Winter Gardens. And a couple of us were there for Dying Scene. [Continued below]



Bad Religion working on new album

Bad Religion bassist Jay Bentley stated in a recent interview with Krone that they have started working on a new album but haven’t booked studio time yet. He explains (thanks to Ultimate-Guitar.com for the translation):

“We have not even talked about when we go to the studio. We are still on the starting line. We do not have a plan to go where the trip is, but we want to go on the journey. Every single Bad Religion album was created exactly like this. It was never about having to do something, but to do it. I can not be forced into anything else in life.”

We’ll keep you posted as more details on the new Bad Religion album come to light. It will be their first full-length studio album since 2013’s True North as well as their first with Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



Greg Graffin posts fall solo tour dates

Greg Graffin, front man of Bad Religion, has announced a short string of West Coast dates in support of his latest solo record, Millport.

The PhD and punk rocker dabbles in evolutionary biology, anthropology, lecturing, writing and finds the time now and then to pursue his musical passion for Americana and roots-folk music. His latest effort, Millport, is a 10 track journey through the American folk and roots music that Graffin sees as his earliest inspirations: inspirations that have a lasting impact on the punk rock of Bad Religion.

I’ll be sitting, and waiting patiently for East Coast shows. In the meantime, here’s the dates:

SEP 12 Seattle, WA Tractor Taver
SEP 13 Portland, OR Mississippi Studios
SEP 14 SanFrancisco, CA The Chapel


Fat Mike Presents Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival Featuring NOFX, Flogging Molly, Bad Religion

Created from the mind and liver of NOFX‘s frontman Fat Mike, the Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival will debut in the Western U.S. this fall with five special events featuring the best in punk rock music and regional craft beer.

Named for NOFX’s classic Punk In Drublic album, which has sold over one million copies, Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival launches September 16 in Tacoma, WA, with stops in Boise, ID, Concord, CA, Sacramento, CA, and Huntington Beach, CA. NOFX will co-headline each date of Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival alongside Flogging Molly in some markets and Bad Religion in others​, and every show will also feature four other​ bands. Look for full details to be announced in August at www.PunkInDrublicFest.com.

Each Punk In Drublic festival date will feature up to four hours of craft beer tastings with over 100 craft beers, including some of the West Coast’s best and local favorites. Craft beer tastings are included with admission. Festival hours will be Noon – 9:00 PM.

Fat Mike has joined forces with premier music event producer/promoter Synergy Global Entertainment and respected craft beer event production powerhouse Brew Ha Ha Productions for the festival. In addition, to celebrate Punk In Drublic, Fat Mike teamed up with craft beer pioneers Stone Brewing to brew their very own Stone & NOFX Punk in Drublic Hoppy Lager, which will be available in cans only in the festival markets. This collaboration is a huge show of support by Stone, as it marks the first time ever that Stone has worked with a musician for a can release. They’ve even included the festival tour dates on the back of each can. This is a first-of-its-kind level of commitment from a brewery partner for a festival tour.

When asked how Stone & NOFX Punk in Drublic Hoppy Lager tastes, Fat Mike says, “It’s something to wash the noise away.” However, other slogans offered by Mike that were quickly turned down by Stone included, “It’s the beer of champagnes” and finally, “They say you can’t get beer from a stone…oh shit, we just did!”

“We know we’re crazy for letting Fat Mike in our brewery, but we’re doing it anyway,” says Greg Koch, Stone Brewing co-founder. “We have a lot in common in not only refusing to follow the status quo, but actively rejecting it. I have incredible respect for what he and Fat Wreck Chords have done for the independent music scene. Craft beer is currently in a similar open-your-eyes-to-the-man’s-corporate-obfuscation battle. Is independent craft beer punk rock? Very. And even more so now with this collab. See you in the pit!”

Cameron Collins, Co-Founder & Director of Events at Brew Ha Ha Productions explains, “Craft beer and punk rock are cut from the same cloth. Small, independent, and up against some big challenges: taking on BIG BEER, and local bands determined to do it their way, despite what might make them a quick buck. Punk In Drublic throws off the mantle of the ordinary to create an event unlike any other…a perfect pairing of craft beer and punk rock!”

Catch the Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival “stumbling through a town near you”:

Saturday, September 16 – Tacoma, WA – America’s Car Museum (on sale Friday, July 28)
Sunday, September 17 – Boise, ID – Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater (on sale Friday, July 28)
Saturday, October 14 – Concord, CA – Concord Pavilion (on sale Friday, August 11)
Sunday, October 15 – Sacramento, CA – Bonney Field (on sale Friday, August 11)
Saturday, October 28 – Huntington Beach, CA – Bolsa Chica State Park (on sale Friday, September 1)

The Saturday, September 16 (Tacoma) and Sunday, September 17 (Boise) Punk In Drublic shows will feature performances from NOFX, Bad Religion, Goldfinger, Less Than Jake, Bad Cop / Bad Cop and more. Tickets for these two shows go on sale Friday, July 28 at 10:00 AM local time at www.PunkInDrublicFest.com.

General Admission and VIP tickets for the Tacoma and Boise shows are priced as follows. Ticket details for other dates will be announced in August. All tickets include craft beer tasting and access to view the music stage for attendees 21 years or older.

General Admission: starting at $39
Early Entry + VIP Lounge: $99
Early Entry + VIP Lounge + Meet & Greet: $199

VIP Tickets include access to a VIP Entry Lane and VIP Lounge, with:
– Exclusive craft beer tastings
– VIP viewing area of the stage
– Private restrooms
– VIP cash bar
– One hour early entry for craft beer tastings (for those 21+), starting at 12:00 PM



Day Two: Punk Rock Bowling 2017 (Vegas)

Well, it was Day Two, and I was already worn the fuck out. Menzingers played the night before and because of my inane sleep schedule, I got home at three am, then woke up at eight-thirty. Just my luck. But, whatever your level of sobriety or awakeness, Punk Rock Bowling waits for no man.

And besides, this was the big day of the festival for me. My OG heroes, Bad Religion, were headlining. Back when I was still wet behind the mohawk, Bad Religion were the ones who shepherded me into the club– there is no missing Bad Religion, so sleep be damned, I was out in the door.

As for the logistics, Day Two was a step in the right direction for all of us press folks. Most of yesterday’s issues were ironed out and we were ready to party. Security was a little harsher than I remember last year, but only a week after the Manchester attack, it’d have been hard to believe there wouldn’t be changes. Too many of those little things though, and it also starts becoming harder and harder to believe that anything really can be punk rock. It’s a reminder that music and subculture are powerless, no matter how dressed up and resilient it pretends to be in the wake of tragedy. A debate for another day– on to the music.

The Venomous Pinks opened the day with some fast, woah-oh filled punk rock. Kinda hardcore, kinda poppy– like an all female version of Night Birds without the horror and surf lyrical focus. With a little research, I found out that they are apart of the same SquidHat Records family as The Quitters who opened on Day Three. The more you know. Following up The Venomous Pinks were another smaller act, (this is the portion of the day where bands no one’s heard of play, and folks skip for gambling or drinking– which is a shame, because for me, punk rock is absolutely about these young bands injecting new blood into the genre) Ten Can Riot hail from Dallas with a lead singer who doesn’t sound Texan in the least. It’s fast epifat-style jams with some aussie-fied vocals. The crowd wasn’t big, but the folks who were there were receptive to the set and I thought they conducted themselves well enough to keep an eye on in the future.

Lost In Society were a pretty big surprise for me. I had heard a little about them before the festival, I’d heard some good things about their last album, but as is usually the case, I hadn’t actually listened to them before. Seeing them on the stage, I got the lowkey hype surrounding them. They are a tight young band with some big hooks who know how to work the crowd. They brought in everyone who might have just been nodding along with their finale– playing the song “Not Afraid” and teaching the audience its call and response chorus of “Nice to meet you/ FUCK YOU TOO!” Fists were raised and words were sung, it was an awesome end to the set.

I’ll be honest here. I fucking hate celtic punk. It’s corny as hell roleplay for guys who want desperately to belong to a different culture, or it’s corny as hell roleplay for guys who want to engage in a caricature of their own culture. Basically, it’s almost never cool. So, you can probably say The Real Mckenzies aren’t my thing– they have the celtic schtick with the tempering measure of being from Nova Scotia.. It’s almost never cool, but fuck it, I can say it was at least fun. The Real Mckenzies had a sense of humor and looked to be having as much fun as the audience was. They brought things down and gave a surprising (for me, at least) ode to the recently deceased Chris Cornell. It’s nice to see these old guys rocking hard and having a good time while being conscientious of what happens outside of the insular world of punk rock.

The Dickies are one of those old school bands that sound like the Ramones, kinda like the Spits from the days before. They hail back from the early days where punk and garage rock were almost synonymous. Catchy, but not really my thing again. Crowd dug it, but I can’t be into everything, you know? They played their set and I nodded along and let the kids who were into have at it. Sometimes that’s all you can do.

Now, The Bouncing Souls. For me, the Souls were the first big band of the night, and the crowd supported that observation. Everyone was up front for the Jersey boys. I’m a rare breed it seems– there’s an interesting phenomenon with this band, there are the people who don’t care for them, and then there’s the folks that are die-hards (and there are a lot of die-hards)– I’m just a casual fan of the band, not a know-every-word fan. I always wonder what it is about the Souls that bring people together in such an intense way. Maybe it’s that bouncy mix of carefree fun and occasional insight that can take the right psyche and turn one into a True Believer. Either way, of the one other time I’d seen them, this was definitely them at their best. Singer Greg Attonito was genuinely animated and engaged with the set. The energy was good and they ripped through a setlist of singalongs for an adoring audience.

Choking Victim was one of the reasons I made Punk Rock Bowling an unmissable event. One could argue, if you’ve seen Leftover Crack a handful of times, you’ve basically seen Choking Victim. And to be fair, every time I’ve seen Leftover Crack, they’ve made sure to play “500 Channels,” so there is some truth there. But, c’mon. It’s Choking Victim. If you even like them just a little bit, you wanna be able to say you saw them. I was happy to see they got just as strong, if not stronger response than the Bouncing Souls. There was a moment when I looked around and saw all the punks shuffling back and forth, excited as Stza and co. walked on stage and realized: everyone is here for Choking Victim. The front of the stage was packed with punks, for a moment the entire festival ground became part of the crowd. There was no disappointment, they instigated and antagonized with their music (and made sure I got to hear “500 Channels” for a fourth time), with Stza introducing a song dedicated to the police at the venue, about killing cops. It’s not Punk Rock Bowling, and it’s definitely not Choking Victim without a little authority baiting.

The weirdest part of the day wasn’t so much a disappointment as just a bum note. What the fuck was up with Fidlar? They’re fine folks, I’m sure. They play some garage rock/hardcore/ surfy indie rock amalgam, and I know some of the younger kids are into them. They have a little bit of inherited pedigree as one of the members is the son of a member of TSOL. But, no matter what they take from the sounds of punk rock, there is something off about them. It’s like an impression of punk rock rather than an honest interpretation. The crowd agreed too. It was weird seeing so many open spaces in the pit, people looking around, bored and confused at what these rich kids in costume were peddling. Yeah, they had all the moves– they rolled on the stage to play solos and they screamed into mics, but it never felt right. This is punk for kids who go to Coachella. It felt out of place at Punk Rock Bowling.

But, even the weirdness of Fidlar couldn’t really quell the energy of the evening. Bad Religion was going to play. The one band everyone has in common. The gateway band that survives the initial waves of growing taste. Bad Religion are a hard band to grow out of. The crowd moved in a rush toward the stage as the opening notes of “American Jesus” rang out. There was a lot of discussion over what they would open with at Punk Rock Bowling, among the guesses were “True North,” “Against the Grain,” and “Do What You Want” (mine), but Meredith (photographer extraordinaire) and Jeff (friend of Dying Scene, and all around chill dude) nailed the selection. What could me more iconic and rousing to bring the punks together for a headliner? When I’d seen Bad Religion before, they played pretty solid ninety minute sets, so it was actually kind of nice to see a shorter, crisper stage headlining set, about fifteen minutes shorter with a more casual sense of kinship and fun. For Bad Religion, it felt like their thousandth victory lap, and they’re still smiling past the finish line. The set had one extremely notable moment, when NOFX singer/bassist Fat Mike ran on stage in a dress and high-jacked Jay Bentley’s bass to play with the band on “We’re Only Gonna Die.” That’s why you go to Punk Rock Bowling, folks. It’s those kind of moments that you can’t get anywhere else.

They closed with “Fuck Armageddon… This is Hell” as per usual, a song that has become their own “Bro Hymn” over the years. The great thing about Bad Religion though is that they have so much good material to work with, that whatever comes before that is sure to be great. To list all the songs they played would be a challenge (and fucking boring), but you got hits like “Supersonic,” “Generator,” “Los Angeles is Burning,” “Do What You Want,” “Suffer”: whatever they play, it’s gonna be good.

The fest was a-raging that night and despite the weird misstep with Fidlar– who should’ve traded spots with the Bouncing Souls and played earlier in the night– I had to admit it was one of the best lineups of PRB I had ever seen. Choking Victim, Bouncing Souls, and Bad Religion are three pretty huge bands, and I managed to see ‘em all in an evening. That’s killer.

Check out what happened in the photo gallery below and stay tuned for our final installment in our drunken recollections of the beauty and madness that is Punk Rock Bowling!



Watch: Fat Mike joins Bad Religion on “We’re Only Gonna Die” at Punk Rock Bowling.

Even if you didn’t make it out to Vegas for this year’s installment of Punk Rock Bowling last weekend, social media probably alerted you to the fact that NOFX‘s Fat Mike joined Bad Religion on stage for a spirited rendition of the punk rock pioneers’ legendary track “We’re Only Gonna Die.”

There’s really no other introduction or build-up needed; head below to check out audience-shot video of the occasion (uploaded by fan Meredith Cunningham).



Greg Graffin says Bad Religion are gearing up for new album

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin recently offered Las Vegas Weekly an update on the band’s long-awaited new album. Although he didn’t give much information, Greg stated that the band is “definitely gearing up for a new album”, and added, with a laugh, “Our fans are getting itchy.”

We’ll keep you posted as more details on the new Bad Religion album come to light. It will be their first full-length studio album since 2013’s True North as well as their first with Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



7 Things To Do At Punk Rock Bowling That Don’t Involve Moshing

Punk Rock Bowling is right around the corner, and it’s not just shows stacked on top of more shows. It’s a whole three day weekend of punk related events. If you’re going to Vegas this year but fear a severe case of pit fatigue between the main stage lineups and late night club shows, give your eardrums a break and check out our list of “7 Things To Do At Punk Rock Bowling That Don’t Involve Moshing” below



Bad Religion announce European and UK tour

California punk icons Bad Religion have announced a full-scale tour of Europe and the UK that will take place in July and August, and the dates and locations are below.

Bad Religion last released the holiday album Christmas Songs in 2013. The band has been promising a new album, which will be their first since True North (also released in 2013) and their first with Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums. We’ll keep you posted as more details on the new record come to light.



DS Photo Gallery & Show Review: Musink Fest 2017 – Day Three (Costa Mesa, CA 3/19)

Day Three was reserved for the most “mature” roster of the weekend with stalwarts like Unwritten Law and Swingin’ Utters sharing the stage alongside genre defining bands like Pennywise and Bad Religion. 125 cumulative years of punk rock history performing on the same day, all in one place equated to an enormous turnout. So for the last time, we dragged Anarchopunk, kicking and screaming, back across the county line to Costa Mesa to cover this, the final day of Musink 2017. Check it out below!



DS Interview: Greg Graffin on his latest solo effort and new Bad Religion

A couple Fridays ago (March 10th, to be precise) Greg Graffin released a stellar new album, Millport (ANTI- Records). It marks the first time in more than a decade that the Bad Religion frontman has pressed the “pause” button on his punk rock day job in favor of a more traditional, folksy Americana vibe. Millport features not only a core lineup that should seem very familiar to fans of both punk and Americana: Social Distortion‘s Jonny “Two Bags” Wickersham, Brent Harding, and David Hidalgo Jr., but it also includes production credit from Brett Gurewitz, long the musical yin to Graffin’s yang.

While Graffin and his Millport session colleagues rank as some of the most legendary names in punk rock, a project like this allowed them to let go of the traditional constraints of trying to hone a singular sound. “The great thing about this project is that you’re hearing unconstrained love of the songs, and unconstrained love of creating something that we felt was a blend of many genres and therefore something that’s truly creative,” says Graffin, though he quickly points out that none of that is to say that crafting a new Bad Religion album is formulaic; it’s just a different standard. “It’s one of the great challenges as artist is to maintain the tradition of his or her prior work. That’s hard to do. It normally takes (Bad Religion) two years to put out an album. Why has it taken us four year to release an album after True North? Well, True North was such a great album — and we owe it to our fans to take it seriously as a great album — that to do another one is going to take a lot more work.

Graffin and company holed up at California’s Studio 606 and Big Bad Sound for ten days of creating and recording last April, in what he says was basically akin to “hitting record and having a party.” The result is an album that’s the strongest and most cohesive of his solo career, with sounds that range from folk to bluegrass to 70’s rockers that would make Neil Young and Crazy Horse proud. Perhaps the album’s most upbeat singalong is “Time Of Need,” with it’s “Hey Man!” chorus that draws heavily on traditional Gospel hymnals, a bit of a curious decision for someone who’s spent close to four decades fronting a band called Bad Religion. He explains: “One of the greatest things about religion — if it can be said from a guy in Bad Religion — there’s something good about it and it has nothing to do with theology or the philosophy of it, but it has a lot to do with the music. The music is what is handed down through the generations, and punk rock is a kind of roots music now.

Instead of focusing on the lure of paradise and an eternal afterlife, “Time Of Need” places the responsibility for making things better squarely on the shoulders of the listener, and of humanity. “In the old days,” says Graffin, “the Gospels would sing about how hard times were and how God is going to deliver us. What I’m trying to say is that God’s not going to deliver us. We have to be responsible ourselves for this changing environment and changing surroundings. No religion can help this time of need.”

We caught up with Graffin over the phone during a recent late winter blizzard that blanketed much of the Northeast with some of the biggest snow totals of the season. As you might imagine, we talked quite a bit about Graffin and Gurewitz’s long history as collaborators, and just how the solo, Americana projects inspire the two punk rock icons in ways we might not have expected. We also touched on just what the Social D trio brought to the project, and how Graffin hopes to balance solo and Bad Religion material going forward while raising the bar in both areas.

Head below to read our full Q&A!

 



Greg Graffin talks about Bad Religion’s future, Brooks Wackerman leaving for Avenged Sevenfold

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin, who released his new solo album Millport about a week ago, recently spoke to Loudwire about the future of the band, which includes a new album and a 40th anniversary celebration, which will be in 2020. He explains:

“There’s no end in sight. In fact, in two-and-a-half years, there’s a very important 40th anniversary milestone. Another album is on the horizon, but True North was such a good album that I don’t want to put out something that indicates we’re aging, so it’s gotta be as good as True North. [Laughs] We do plan on getting another record out there, hopefully before that 40th anniversary.”

Graffin also talked about drummer Brooks Wackerman’s decision to leave the band for Avenged Sevenfold, saying, “It wasn’t until he announced it [that I knew he was joining Avenged Sevenfold] but he did tell us he was leaving for greener pastures, but he didn’t put it that way. He gave us ample notice. It was not at all bitter, it was wishing him the best of luck.”

Wackerman was replaced by Jamie Miller, who has played in many bands such as …And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, Snot and Souls at Zero (formerly Wrathchild America). He was, however, not the only member of Bad Religion to have left the band in recent years; longtime guitarist Greg Hetson left the band shortly after the release of their latest album True North in 2013 and was replaced by Mike Dimkich, formerly of The Cult.



Greg Graffin on the next Bad Religion album

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin just released his new solo album Millport, but earlier this week, he spoke to OC Register a little bit about the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that they are always talking about new music, but a new record could “take some time”. He added:

“As you get older you want to put stuff out that’s of higher quality than what came before it. Our last album, ‘True North,’ that was a benchmark for us. It was a fantastic album and surprisingly set a new standard for Bad Religion that we’re going to have to do better than.”

When the new Bad Religion album will be released is unknown, but we’ll be sure to keep you updated as more details come to light. Not only will it be their first since 2013’s True North, but their first one with new members Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.