Search Results for "Dave Hause"

Cory Branan (feat Dave Hause) streams politically charged ‘Another Nightmare In America’

I’d usually say, anything Dave Hause touches is pure gold, but that would seriously sell Cory Branan short on this one. The Richmond, Virginia-based singer/songwriter extraordinaire took on social injustice and police brutality beautifully in his new song ‘Another Nightmare In America‘ whilst The Loved Ones frontman came in more to give the track some extra layers.

‘Another Nightmare In America’ is one of the singles from Branan’s upcoming album ‘ADIOS’. You can give it a spin here.



DS Photo Galley: Dave Hause and the Mermaid with Vapers and Rebuilder (Cambridge, MA)

In the handful of years since The Loved Ones went on their sort of indefinite hiatus (last year’s anniversary shows notwithstanding), Dave Hause hit the ground running as a solo artist, playing shows in the States and abroad as part of the Revival Tour or opening for acts like Alkaline Trio, Gaslight Anthem, Flogging Molly, etc. He added his younger brother, Tim, to the mix on guitar and keyboards when it came time to tour in support of his sophomore album, Devour, four years ago, and the two spent several years touring and eventually writing and recording together since.

For the release of his third album, Bury Me In Philly (February 3rd, Rise Records), Hause has assembled a full band, dubbed The Mermaid, consisting of his brother on (mostly) lead guitar, Bad Religion’s Jay Bentley’s son, Miles, on bass, fellow East-Coaster-turned-Californian Kevin Conroy on drums, and the infinitely talented Kayleigh Goldsworthy on keys and guitars and backing vocals. Prior to heading to Europe for their first official tour as a collective unit, Dave Hause and his newly formed backing band, The Mermaid, played a handful of bi-coastal US record release shows in support of his third solo album, Bury Me In Philly . The shows marked the first-ever time that Hause has performed with a full band since going it alone in the post-Loved Ones years, a very clear — yet potentially nerve-wracking — “next step” in his trajectory as a solo artist. If show #6 as a group is any sign of what’s to come, that trajectory is going to take a marked upturn in the very near future.

The quintet scorched through a sixteen-song set to a sold out crowd upstairs at the legendary Cambridge, Massachusetts, Middle East nightclub last Friday. While tracks from Bury Me In Philly took center stage in the set list, Hause’s first two solo albums were well represented in their own respective rights. It’s fair (and perhaps understated) to say that whether as a solo performer or as the leader of the family duo, the elder Hause has always taken full command of whatever stage he’s graced, engaging the crowd and performing as a full-on, band-leading frontman regardless of the setting or the size of the venue. Part of this ability stems obviously from his punk rock days, but part of it was out of necessity, as his engaging passion and honest intensity as a performer kept him from becoming a dime-a-dozen acoustic-wielding solo performer. And while Hause performing solo (or with only Tim as his accompaniment) will always be compelling, watching The Mermaid in action felt like it was meant to be.

The band gelled quickly, with no obvious signs that they’d been playing together in public for what amounts to less than a calendar week. Conroy and Bentley kept the ship steady and pushed the tempo and Goldsworthy, and accomplished musician in her own right, made her almost constantly changing duties come across almost effortless. The formation of the full band has allowed the younger Hause to take over a more prominent role, and he seems to be truly cherishing it. Tim’s immense talent and youthful energy seem not only increasingly natural on stage but inspirational to his frontman older brother, who appears to be relishing his roles as band leader and big brother in equal parts. Having a capable band at his back allows Hause to finally give older songs like “C’Mon Kid” and “Melanin” and personal favorite “Autism Vaccine Blues” the sort of the sort of full, pedal-down justice they deserve, and the five-piece genuinely seem to be having fun performing with each other in the process.

Direct support on this night (and the rest of the brief East Coast run) was provided by Vapers, a New York-based four piece (officially, though there were five on this night) outfit of semi-mysterious origin. Co-fronted by a couple of familiar faces, “Spanish Maria” Correonero and “Uncle Bernard” (the latter of whom looks eerily similar to Hause’s bud and fellow Loved One David Walsh) and backed by a couple of current and/or former members of Morning Glory, the band play a fun brand of poppy, garagey alternative punk that, at least from a sonic perspective, owes as much to the gritty, post-punk New York City (think Sonic Youth) of a decade ago as it does to the lo-fi hipster punk of present day Williamsburg. The sound is a little bit muddy and angular by design, keeping the band from sounding redundant or formulaic. Fun stuff; check them out.

 Local support on this night came from the mighty Rebuilder. I’m not entirely sure what else I can tell you about Rebuilder that I haven’t told you on these pages before, but they’re obviously my favorite band to come out of this part of the States in recent memory. While no doubt capable of commanding larger stages as will someday hopefully be the case, the five-piece certainly know what they’re doing in the role of local openers. The band got down to business quickly, ripping through eight songs with little downtime, perfectly filling their half-hour slot with a set tailored to the occasion. They ran through a couple of new songs from their upcoming EP, Songs From The Massachusetts Turnpike, that may be among the strongest songs they’ve written to date. Stay tuned for more on that…

…and head below for our full photo gallery from the sold-out, sweat-soaked evening!



Dave Hause and the Mermaid announce upcoming tours with The Bronx, Frank Iero and the Patience

As you may have learned in our recent lengthy interview with Philly-turned-Californian songwriter Dave Hause, it’s fixing to be a pretty busy year for him and his new backing band, The Mermaid (which features, among others, his brother Tim on guitars and Jay Bentley’s son Miles on bass). Today, we’re getting a peak at just what that entails.

Hause will kick off a few weeks of mostly Canadian tour dates on a co-headlining tour with The Bronx in Vancouver on April 4th. That run extends through April 15th in Ottawa, at which time the band will head south and join up with Frank Iero and the Patience in Brooklyn on April 18th for a US tour that runs until May 11th in San Francisco. Check out full details of all of the band’s aforementioned tour dates below.

Hause is touring in support of his stellar third full-length, “Bury Me In Philly,” which was released last Friday (February 3rd) on Rise Records.



DS Interview: Dave Hause Goes West and Gets Hopeful on “Bury Me In Philly”

This might be a bit of an abnormal way to start a lengthy feature piece about the pending release of an artist’s latest album, but in the interest of full disclosure, yours truly considers Dave Hause’s sophomore album, 2013’s Devour, to be the pinnacle of his personal list of ‘desert island’ albums. Very few, if any, albums have had the kind of immediate impact on me that that one did, and it’s only become more compelling — and more deeply personal — due to a variety of real-life issues that have transpired since its release. (Quick anecdote: the first time I heard Devour standout track “Autism Vaccine Blues” was live in concert when Hause opened for Flogging Molly in Boston, and I vividly recall my brother and I looking at each other when the track was over, each only able to mutter an awe-struck “Whoa…” — that’s the only time that’s ever happened in the many hundreds of band performances I’ve ever seen).

And yet, to paraphrase what a wise man once said, you don’t really exist as an artist until the release of album number three. And so it is that on February 3rd, Hause will release his third full-length album as a solo artist, a feat he has not accomplished with any prior musical endeavor (The Loved Ones went on indefinite hiatus after two albums. Paint It Black released three albums, but Hause appears only on the band’s 2003 debut, CVA). The idea that this is his third album with any one musical project seems to resonate especially loudly to the Philly-turned-Cali songwriter “It’s interesting to be hitting the point where I’ve had more releases and more time spent and more records sold and more shows played as a solo guy than I did in the Loved Ones,” he points out, adding that it would take twenty years for some of his musical peers who’ve undertaken similar solo endeavors  (Chuck Ragan, Tim Barry, Brian Fallon, etc) to accomplish.

To say that there was a chance that solo album number three never saw the light of day is not overstating the matter. “I struggled for a while to get the record done,” explains Hause, adding that he “struggled with, well, did I want to continue making music or go back to being a carpenter?” For all of its immense virtue, Devour tugs on some weighty, dark heartstrings, telling equally of the tale of the demise of Hause’s marriage and the realization that our generation was sold a bill of goods by our immediate predecessors. Following up the gravity of that subject matter represented tough, uphill sledding to say the least.

But a lot has happened for Hause since 2013, not the least of which are a new engagement, a cross-country move to the California coast, and a deepening personal and professional relationship with his kid brother, Tim. Ever the razor-sharp observational songwriter, it was only a matter of time before the creative juices got flowing, though the path may have been a little more circuitous than normal. “The producer that I was working with (in the early post-Devour days) was not hearing what I was hearing in any of the demos,” says Hause. “He was, like, unpleasable. So that part of it was really frustrating.”

So ho better to bring in when you’re feeling stuck and frustrated, then, than…your kid brother, Tim, who’s more than a decade your junior? For the unaware, Tim made his touring debut playing keyboards and guitar on the 2014 tour in initial support of Devour, and fulfilled the same role on the two-month nationwide tour that Hause did alongside Chris Farren in support of Rocky Votolato the following year. While it initially fell during that aforementioned period of songwriting frustration, the tour proved fruitful in more ways than one. “I was complaining on that tour,” says Hause, “and I was like ‘I don’t know about this whole Santa Barbara thing; I feel like I haven’t seen a black girl in twenty-eight days’ and (Tim) said ‘that’s what you need to be writing about!‘” As Farren astutely pointed out at the time, such stuck points in writing tend to be followed by a flood of ideas, and that proved to be the case here, albeit eventually.

I’ve always been pretty jealous of guys who have musical soulmates,” says Hause, explaining that while he felt lucky to have such counterparts in his earlier bands The Curse and Step Ahead, those partners were “lost to the crush of working class pressure!” (One owns a beer distributor outside Philly, the other is a teacher.) He found that Lennon/McCartney — or at least Steinkopf/Keinlen or Ragan/Wollard — connection again — hopefully once and for all — in his brother, Tim. “He has this really old soul,” says the elder Hause, a certain sense of wisdom that comes from having lived through the death of his mother when he was a child and his best friend in rather public fashion in more recent years. That wisdom “helps us relate on most matters,” says big brother, quickly continuing that “he’s also got this youthful energy that impacts on ways that I wouldn’t necessarily look at things…. He doesn’t have any punk rock guilt, he’s just fierce and he’s really creative.”

Once Hause brought his brother in the fold, a chance introduction to a childhood musical hero, Eric Bazilian of Philadelphia-based rock band The Hooters (best known for their 1985 radio staple “And We Danced,” and less well known for being the band that a then-seven-year-old Hause saw as his first concert) led to Hause’s renewed passion for songwriting. “I played the material I had for Eric and also for Dan Andriano and Pete Steinkopf, because I was driving myself crazy…and all of a sudden it became clear that I was just not working in the right environment.” Hause severed ties with the producer he’d been frustrated with, and Bazilian and William Wittman subsequently signed on to engineer and produce Hause’s third album. Collectively, Bazilian and Wittman have worked with a veritable “Who’s Who” of rock musicians who maintain melodic pop sensibilities: Cyndi Lauper, The Outfield, The Hold Steady, Scorpions, and on and on and on. While certainly not household names in the punk rock scene, they proved to be the ideal collaborators to pull on Hause’s strengths as a songwriter without shying away from Hause’s punk sensibilities. “They were very vigilant with the punk roots thing,” says Hause, explaining that he has “definitely heard over the course of making the first two solo records that ‘you really need to dial back your punk roots.’ Bill and Eric were not afraid of bands like The Clash or Green Day or The Buzzcocks as reference points in the studio.”

Once principle work with Bazilian began, things took shape quickly. “The biggest learning experience with this album is to trust your gut,” says Hause, “to do the work and not second-guess yourself. Some of those songs (that ended up on Bury Me…) are exactly the way they originally spilled out on the first try, so it’s a lesson you’ve got to keep learning I guess as a creative type.” What resulted was not only the end product that is Bury Me In Philly, Hause’s most wide-ranging album to date, but also a whole lot more. “I wrote a ton of songs,” he explains, “I have another whole record that’s already tracked, it just needs to be mixed.” There’s also another All Brights EP in the can and due for release this coming Spring, plus another EP worth of what Hause calls “post-Devour malaise,” and “what could end up being a new Loved Ones record.”

Moving to California and falling in love seem to have inspired our friend Dave in new directions, ways that he hasn’t been inspired in quite some time, and the lyrics on Bury Me In Philly reflect that bit of newfound optimism. “Sadness and frustration and all of the things that (Devour) was squeezing out give you a false sense of being more compelling than joy and happiness do,” reflects Hause. “I think I’ve learned that that is A) not true and B) (joy and happiness) pull on a different set of heartstrings.” On songs like “The Mermaid,” “Helluva Home,” and “Divine Lorraine,” Hause branches out, incorporating different sonic elements than we might be used to, while still maintaining those elements that make a Dave Hause song a textbook Dave Hause song. He explains: “I think there’s a thing that you would identify, if you were playing a Dave Hause song, whether it’s a Loved Ones song or a solo song, that’s my thing. That straight-up, “No Surrender” influenced punk rock thing that a lot of us in our genre are pretty good at. Whether it’s “Lean On Sheena” or whatever, we all do that thing. But I’m never all that interested in just cranking out ten of those. None of my favorite bands did that.”

There’s also a sense of gratitude that comes through on songs like “The Ride,” gratitude not only from his new relationship but fueled at least in part by Hause quitting booze and drugs. That latter decision came at the beginning of the aforementioned tour with Votolato and noted O’Douls connoisseur Farren, and has continued in the eighteen months that have followed. “Touring is grueling, and drinking heavily is grueling on your ability to get more than one thing done,” he states. “It’s just easier to get all kinds of things done when your goal is not to get to the party or to get fucked up, and then the next morning you’re sort of shaking that goal off and trying to get other things done…with that off the table, your plate starts to clear up a little.” 

Quintessentially Californian references to twelve-dollar juices aside, Hause’s newfound penchant for cleaner living doesn’t quite take center stage on Bury Me In Philly, and that’s by design. “There’s a handful of songs that I wrote that lyrically deal head on with that, and we didn’t put them on the record on purpose,” Hause explains, instead choosing to take his time letting that particular music see the light of day once it’s been aided by the context that only time can provide. “It’s such well-worn ground lyrically that I’ve got to figure out what the angle is on it that’s compelling to me.” Hause explains that while he’s not working a specific program of sobriety, he’s been inspired personally and professionally by the idea of taking things one day at a time. “The clarity that has come (from that mentality) allows me to compress in a different way, and I have a lot of gratitude for being able to do that…Instead of reaching for a bottle of Jameson when the thought of all that pressure comes on, it’s kind of like “okay, let’s just figure out the first problem and we’ll tackle the rest of it as it comes”.” 

With kid brother Tim by his side, Hause is gearing up to hit the road as a solo artist accompanied by a full band for the first time. Named The Mermaid, the band also features Miles Bentley on bass. If the last name sounds familiar, he’s the son of Bad Religion bass player and de facto manager Jay Bentley. Jay proved inspirational to the Hause brothers on their recent nationwide tour together (along with Against Me!), and it was Tim’s decision to carry that family feeling forward when it came time to put together a band. They’ll all combine to give the album its full due; tours of Europe, the States, Canada and Australia are in the works, and Hause seems fired up to get rolling, just like he was in his early, post-Loved Ones days as a solo artist. “I hustled, and that comes from my working-class background,” says Hause. After the economy collapsed a half-dozen years ago, Hause’s construction business dried up. “I couldn’t swing a hammer because there was no money left in it, so I said ‘well, I guess I’ll go strum’.”

That mentality continues to fuel Hause’s artistic fire. “I approach this record just like I approached (his debut solo album, Resolutions). I think that maintaining that sense that there’s a lot of great music out there and I’m not entitled to any of your ears (is vital),” meaning that if he found his way into your ears and, by extension, your hearts, he’s more than earned it. “I think that’s the way to go, because you can’t assume anything these days.” The full-band accompaniment raises the stakes for Hause, but he seems hellbent on doing the work it’ll take to succeed. It’s a little bit scary, but we’re gonna do the work that it takes to take on whatever comes next. In general, socially, I need to be thinking that way as an adult with the current political climate. Like I don’t know what’s next, but where’s the shovel, I’ll get digging!

Head below to read our admittedly lengthy interview. We cover quite a bit of the current political climate as you might imagine, all while extolling the wide-ranging virtues of Bad Religion, The Hold Steady, and 80’s radio gods Bryan Adams and Rick Springfield. There’s also a story about how Chuck Ragan, Brian Fallon and Dan Andriano are responsible for the lack of recent Loved Ones material, and how in spite of living in California, he may be more of a Philadelphian than ever. And as you might have guessed for an artist from the City of Brotherly Love, there’s plenty about Tim and his influence.

Bury Me In Philly is out February 3rd via Rise Records.

 



Dave Hause streams new album “Bury Me In Philly”

Dave Hause is streaming new Rise Records album “Bury Me In Philly”, ahead of Friday’s release. Physical pre-orders are up now.

You can listen to the 11 track record below.



Dave Hause announces February tour

Following the announcement of new album “Bury Me In Philly”, Dave Hause has announced that he will do a small run of U.S. club dates to coincide with the album’s February 3rd release.

Various pre-order packages are also available now.

The list of dates is below.



Dave Hause announces new solo album “Bury Me In Philly,” streams lead single “With You”

Dave Hause has announced he will be releasing his third solo album Bury Me In Philly on February 3rd, 2017 through Rise Records. He has also premiered the lead single “With You,” and announced a European tour in support of the LP.

You can give the new song a listen and find more details on the album and tour below.

Bury Me In Philly will serve as the follow-up to Hause’s 2013 full-length Devour. Head over here to get your pre-orders in for the album.



DS Show Review & Photo Gallery: Bad Religion, Against Me! & Dave Hause – St. Petersburg, FL

As you may have already heard, California punk legends Bad Religion are currently touring the US with Against Me! and Dave Hause. When the tour was announced and I found out it would be stopping in my back yard, at Jannus Live in St. Petersburg, FL, I knew I had to be there.

Fast forward a few months and the day of the show, Wednesday, October 12th, finally arrived. I packed up my camera gear and made my way down to Downtown St. Pete. After battling rush hour traffic, I got to the venue just as Dave Hause was taking the stage. Being a fan of The Loved Ones who had never seen Dave live before, I was excited to see him play.

Hause played a 45-ish minute set, featuring a mix of solo material and Loved Ones songs. Though a fair portion of the crowd didn’t seem all that familiar with him, heads were bobbing, feet were tapping, and hands were clapping all throughout his energetic performance.

Finishing the set on a high note, Bad Religion bassist Jay Bentley and Against Me! drummer Atom Willard joined Hause in playing a handful of songs, including fan-favorite “We Could Be Kings.”

Next up was Against Me!. It had been something like 5 years since I last saw them (I think it was Warped Tour 2011), so I had no clue what to expect. When the band took the stage, the entire crowd let out an ear-piercing shriek akin to something you’d hear at a One Direction concert. I had never heard anything like it a punk show before, but a few seconds into Against Me!’s performance I understood why the crowd was so damn excited.

I thought Against Me! sounded good on their new records, but they are a whole different animal live. Every song they played was injected with energy and intensity, and the crowd never stopped jumping around and singing along for the full hour-long set. What surprised me the most was how many fans knew all the band’s new music. It’s not often that you see a sea of people who know every single word to songs off an album that was just released. I think that definitely shows how good Against Me!’s new music is.

Now, the grand finale, Bad Religion. As always, BR’s set was a mixed bag consisting of a little bit of everything from their extensive discography (16 full-length albums!). The band played classics like “I Want to Conquer the World,” “Against the Grain,” and “Generator,” as well as songs from their latest record True North. They even played random songs like “New America,” which I don’t think I had never seen live before.

What has always amazed me about Bad Religion’s live show is that, despite the fact that they’ve been doing this for more than three decades, they still look like they’re having the time of their lives on stage. Every time see them live, Jay Bentley’s running all over the place, Brian Baker is shredding on guitar, and Greg Graffin’s got a big smile on his face. It’s extremely admirable for a band that’s been around 35 years.

Recent additions Mike Dimkich and Jamie Miller do Bad Religion’s material justice as well. Dimkich, who joined the band after longtime guitarist Greg Hetson’s departure in 2013, seemed to fit in better than he did when I saw BR on the Summer Nationals tour in 2014. Miller, who took Brooks Wackerman’s place earlier this year, was fast and furious on the drums.

Needless to say, this was an awesome show and this tour is a must-see. Check out the tour dates here to see if Bad Religion, Against Me!, and Dave Hause are playing a city near you.

You can check out the full gallery of photos from the show I went to below.



Fifteen Years of Raising Hell – Part Two: Frank Turner, Dave Hause and more on the impact of Lucero

Toward the end of May, Dying Scene published a feature piece marking the fifteenth anniversary of Lucero‘s self-titled debut album. You can read it here if you haven’t done so already. In the course of digging around on the band’s history, however, it dawned on us pretty quickly that any sort of retrospective on Lucero was going to have to dive much deeper than just reexamining their first album. Because, to paraphrase the first couple of paragraphs of that last story, Lucero are, for a great number of people and due to an equally great number of reasons, one of those bands. A band that has a way of not only writing music and lyrics that strike you right in the emotional core, but fundamentally changing

When I started this project a few months ago, I had visions of turning it into a 5,000 word ode to Lucero in my own words. As you’ve probably established, they’re one of those bands for me. The mark of a good storyteller and songwriter is that you are able to paint a picture and strike a nerve that’s so poignant that you put the listener in your shoes, making them feel as though you’re not only singing to them but about them. For myself, like most Lucero fans, the list of songs penned in Ben Nichols’ trademark tone that were probably written precisely about me is at least a couple dozen deep, primarly because the band’s canon is part heartbreaking, part self-deprecating, part cathartic good-time anthem and filled with ever-evolving sonic differences. But let’s be honest; one part-time pseudo-music blogger’s opinion on what he thinks is one of the most important bands in the foundation of this scene isn’t, well…it isn’t that interesting. I mean who do I think I am, Dan Ozzi?

Anyway, with that latter sentiment in mind, we sent out feelers to a couple friends of the scene that we know share our admiration for the ever-changing band of misfits from Memphis, Tennessee. What follows below is, we think, a pretty compelling look at just what makes Lucero Lucero, and what it means to be a fan of the band and of Ben Nichols penchant for songwriting (never that good with words anyway my ass). There are stories of personal encounters (wrapping Christmas presents…drunken tour bus hijinks…etc), there are comparisons to bands like Slayer and NOFX…equal parts entertaining and enlightening and, thanks to the guys we talked to, incredibly thoughtful read. Many thanks to Frank Turner, Dave Hause, and Rebuilder‘s Sal Medrano for the assists! You can head here to scope out Lucero’s upcoming run of US tour dates, which kicks off next weekend (September 24th) in Boston.

 



Fifteen Years of Raising Hell: Part I – Revisiting “Lucero”

We’ve all got those bands. Bands that not only have a way of writing songs that strike us right in our respective emotional cores, but have a fundamental way in altering how we listen to music. Hell, if you’ve been actively listening to music long enough (and let’s be honest, if you’re reading a story about a band like Lucero on a site like Dying Scene, you’re probably an active music listener), you’ve undoubtedly got a metric ton of those bands. The band that first made you fall for punk rock. The band that first broke you from your childhood love of manufactured pop music. The band whose style you copied and adopted as your own. The band that wrote songs that made you realize that music could be intense and personal and still make you laugh your ass off. The band that first got you to care about politics/social causes or made you break out the thesaurus/dictionary/Google search bar. The band that first wrote songs that made you understand…like, really understand…pain and loss and heartache.

Which brings us to Lucero. The genre-bending Memphis band just rounded the corner on fifteen years since the launch of their self-titled debut full-length. Released May 22, 2001 (MadJack Records), Lucero marked the result of three years of cutting their collective teeth as songwriters and, perhaps most notably, one of the hardest-drinking, hardest-working bands in the game. The album dropped with relatively little fanfare, at least by today’s standards; looking back, there was never really a clear moment when the band burst on the national stage or took the scene by comparative storm. What the album’s release did do, however, was put an official time and date stamp on the beginning of what would become a slow build of a career rooted in earnestness and authenticity that would find them a home in myriad genres. Or, perhaps more accurately, eschewing labels and creating their very own genre.

To honor the occasion, Dying Scene decided to revisit Lucero’s self-titled debut album. From there, the project took off, thus the reason this particular installment is labelled “Part I.” You see, over the course of the last decade-and-a-half, Lucero the band has taken on a level of importance that long since eclipsed the relative importance of Lucero, the album. So what happened as this story developed was a shift in ideas, from a story celebrating Lucero as an album, to a story celebrating Lucero as a band and all of the things that that entails; their continually evolving sound, their devoutly loyal fanbase, their rightful place at the flash point of some rather sizable changes in the punk rock landscape. To do Lucero justice, it’s certainly not enough to hear the long-winded ravings of a Dying Scene editor and Lucero fanboy (don’t you worry, though, there will still be plenty of that in the space below). Throughout the process, however, we called on some singer/songwriter friends to have them chime in on what sets Lucero, the band and the album, apart from the rest of the field.  So grab a whiskey and head below to view our revisit of Lucero (with a little help from Dave Hause and Sal Medrano), and stay tuned later in the week for a longer, entertaining piece on the band at large!



Rocky Votolato announces co-headlining tour with Dave Hause and support by Chris Farren (Fake Problems)

Rocky Votolato has announced a co-headlining North American tour with Dave Hause and support from Chris Farren of Fake Problems.

You can check out the dates and locations below.

Rocky’s new album Hospital Handshakes came out April 21, 2015 via No Sleep Records. Make sure you check out our Dying Scene Session and interview with him.



New Music: Jenn Lombari (Lucky United) streams “Welcome Home (11:11)” from self-titled solo debut

More new music for your Hump Day evening.

Tonight, we bring you the first track off the solo debut from Jenn Lombari, whom you probably know best from her role in Rhode Island punk band Lucky United. Her self-produced and self-titled freshman release is due out this Friday on Port Of Providence Records. To whet your appettite, she’s streaming the track “Welcome Home (11:11)” — check it out below.

Like what you hear? Lombari will be opening for Dave Hause in Providence this Friday, and Lucky United will be playing the following night in Newport, Rhode Island. They’re also hard at work recording a full length album, which they hope to have out later this spring. Stay tuned!



The best punk-related releases of Record Store Day 2015 (Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Social Distortion, Dave Hause, OFF! and more)

As you’re probably aware given the recent barrage of Record Store Day release posts here on the pages of Dying Scene, April 18th marks the eighth annual installment of every music lover’s favorite holiday!

The official US list of Record Store Day releases have officially been published. While 2014 was, in my opinion,  bit of a down year comparatively, 2015 seems to be anything but. As always, your friendly Dying Scene staffers took the time to highlight the best of this year’s punk-related releases so you don’t have to (though I stress to you that “punk-related” is applied a bit liberally here). We’ve got everything from new Dave Hause material to reissues of a classic 101ers album (featuring Joe Strummer) and Social Distortion’s self-titled album and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones’ Question The Answers to Cory Branan covering the one-and-only Prince to live sessions from OFF! and Cobra Skulls. Check out our list below, and chime in on the comment section to let us know what you’re most looking forward to.

If you care to peruse the full, official Record Store Day release list, you can do so right here.



Dave Hause announces “Home Alone” 7-inch for Record Store Day

Dave Hause has announced that he will be releasing a four song 7-inch titled Home Alone for this year’s Record Store Day (April 18, 2015, for those of you who didn’t know). The tri-colored single will feature two brand new songs, as well as two demo versions of songs that were on his latest full length, Devour. You can check out an image of the artwork and 7-inch itself below.

Hause last released Devour on October 8, 2013 through Rise Records.



Dave Hause announces new US/Canada tour dates

Photo credit: Jen Maler Photography

Another Wednesday brings with it another announcement from the Dave Hause camp. The Philly-by-way-of-California songwriter announced another batch of tour dates that’ll find him staying busy on the road for most of the month of April. Head below for the full rundown, including previously announced shows in Colorado and the greater New England area,and a special one-off fundraiser event that’ll feature his old band getting back together. No, not The Loved Ones…The Curse!

Hause’s last album, Devour, was released on Rise Records in October 2013, and was the favorite album of the year for a couple of your friendly neighborhood Dying Scene old-timers, myself included.