Search Results for "Tim Barry"

Tim Barry releases music video for new song “Running Never Tamed Me”

Tim Barry has released a music video for the song “Running Never Tamed Me”, you can watch it below. The song is from the recently released album “High on 95” which came out on Chunksaah Records.

The video contains shots of Tim with his family along side various types on transport and he claims the song caused his two daughters to break down crying the first time they heard it.

Tim just kicked off his US tour and you can find the full list of upcoming dates below the video.



DS Exclusive: Tim Barry talks “High On 95,” performing with the Richmond Symphony, and detaching from social media

It’s become redundant — and probably a sign of downright journalistic laziness — to refer to singer-songwriters like Tim Barry as being of the “heart on their sleeve” variety; the scene is not just full of them bit is outright defined by their presence. With the release of High On 95 last month, Barry has now amassed six studio full length albums (seven, if we’re including the Laurel Street Demos, which coincidentally now means that the Richmond, Virginia native has released more studio albums as a solo artist than he did in his past life as one of the scene’s most posthumously beloved bands) that truthfully don’t find him wearing his heart on his sleeve. Hell, just the idea of Tim Barry even sporting sleeves on his trademark, road-battered Conrail Twitty t-shirt in general seems almost laughable. Sure, as with his other albums, High on 95 contains it’s share of up-tempo, foot-stomping, front porch rockers, a few that take the piss out of himself and his surroundings, and of course a few introspective tales of frustration and catharsis. But if you’ve truly immersed yourself in Barry’s solo catalog, you’re no doubt aware that each album contains at least one track that your heart out of your chest and uses it to punch you directly in the midsection. As Rivanna Junction had “Exit Wounds,” Manchester had “South Hill”, 28th & Stonewall had “Walk 500 Miles,” 40 Miler had “Driver Pull,” and Lost & Rootless had “Solid Gone.”

Continuing on in that theme, High on 95 has it’s own such moment 9/10ths of the way in, on a track called “Running Never Tamed Me.” The weight of the song can perhaps best be told in an anecdote from Barry himself. Not one to normally listen to his own music, Barry was minivan-bound, sorting through mixes in the High On 95 recording process while taking his girls — Lela Jane, now 5, and Coralee, who’s soon-to-be three — to school. Generally a time reserved for singing children’s songs or fighting in the way only siblings can, one day in particular found the van eerily silent. “I realized,” says Barry, “that both of my kids were peering out their respective windows just fucking bawling while the song Running Never Tamed Mewas on, and I just thought “What have I done?!” Now, if you’ve not availed yourself of the album, and the song, yet, you should know in advance that it finds Barry channeling some of the most genuine and heart-wrenching feelings of regret and desperation he’s put on record to date. His daughters, it seemed, had noticed. “I had to pull over and hug them both and ask them what it was about this that made them feel this way. And we had to talk about it, and Lela, my oldest daughter, was hysterical about it. Coralee started loudly crying too. So we just sat on the grass for a second, and they just said that I sounded sad, and they don’t like hearing me sound sad.

While “Running Never Tamed Me” is not necessarily written with present-day Barry as the narrator and central character, the parallels are obvious. Pour through Barry’s catalog and you lose count of the times that a sort of directionless running and wanderlust factor highly among the recurring themes, no matter the album. Much of that is driven by a similarly recurring sense of seemingly not always knowing where he fits in to the world, in either a micro or a macro sense. Hell, his last album was called Lost & Rootless for a reason.

Yet perhaps more than ever before, what High On 95 also contains is a tone of what may be hope but what is probably more accurately described as contentment. Running, it seems, may not have tamed Barry, but maybe age and the wisdom that comes with it have at least helped rewire him. And no, that’s not just due to the obvious fact that he’s raising two daughters now. “I just don’t love being that far from home anymore,” says Barry. “I like to go camping, I like to get cabins in the woods, and I like that kind of stuff, but I don’t like riding on the back of a freight train with a backpack and never knowing where I’m going anymore. I don’t like being in Europe and not being able to check in at home and knowing that I have to take three flights to get back there. I don’t know what happened, I think it just comes with age.”

It’s not that Barry doesn’t have the same stressors or the same reasons to run now as he did in his younger years. Far from it, in fact. “There’s an element of stress constantly on my shoulders, like you have, like everyone has,” he explains, noting the weight in his situation as an individual trying to provide for a family as an independent, working musician. “Because money isn’t easy to come by in my position – or enough of it to sustain a family with the parameters of health insurance and all the other bills and all the other stuff that all of us have.” So what used to be a life of running — drifting, really — is now more of a life that contains periodic, temporary breaks, ways to step back and process life and hit the proverbial reset button on his brain — just not the literal button on his cell phone. Technology has obviously woven its way into the most minute details of most of our lives, but it brings with it a particular set of challenges when you rely on it to put food on the table. “Technology is such a blessing but it’s really not healthy if used constantly. Especially for someone like me who’s trying to provide for a family by doing music which makes me a businessperson or my own boss, which is kind of incredible but it’s also just weird and it’s nothing that I intended on doing.  – it becomes an obsession to check your fucking email! Check your email, check your socials! It’s this false urgency that induces this incredible stress that’s really completely irrelevant!” He adds, rather poignantly, something that most of us raising children in 2017 have struggled with: “Before you know it, your kids aren’t going to give a flying shit about you again, so am I going to miss this beautiful moment of my two-year-old sitting on my lap eating her butter pasta because I’m lurking on Instagram?! Really?!

Still, it was through particularly well-timed call on his cell phone that Barry was presented with an offer to participate in one of the more unique experiences of his professional career: his recent performance with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra at the legendary Carpenter Theater, right in his own hometown. Because the story is so perfectly “Tim Barry,” it’s better off if he just tells it: “I was in the dressing room in Garwood, New Jersey, with Brian Fallon, getting ready to play a show during a series that he was holding where he was playing small club shows for a week. So we’re sitting in the dressing room and I get a phone call from the Executive Director of the Symphony, and he invites me to play with the full symphony backing me, and I almost kind of choked and laughed at how absurd it was. I think I got off the phone and Brian inquired who it was, and he said “what are you going to do?”. And I said “I’m not going to do it – fuck that, that’s crazy! I’m not talented enough!” And he was like – to paraphrase –  he said “if you go on stage tonight and talk about challenging yourself and scaring yourself and doing things out of the ordinary, then I’m going to call you on it!” So, I consented to doing a show with the Richmond Symphony that night, right after that.”

Even though Barry hammers away at an acoustic guitar night in and night out on the road, he is punk rock ethos personified, creating some interesting issues when translating things for the different environment. If we can peel back the curtain a little bit, a lot of the time that you hear Barry (or any rock musician, really) engage in stage banter or play a few seemingly random between-song chords, there’s usually a reason for that: radio silence. “Growing up in punk, the worst thing you can ever do at a house show or a small club show or a squat or whatever is have radio silence. So instinctively, the second you finish, the guitar player hits feedback or the singer starts babbling or the drummer hits the cymbals. There’s nothing worse than a song ending and everybody going “Chirp. Chirp. Chirp.” I instinctively finish songs and hit an open note and then take a sip of water, and then hit an open note and maybe say some stuff, and then hit an open note!

Take a song like “Church of Level Track,” for example. The song has long been a staple — and a crowd favorite — in a typical Tim Barry live set. “(The song) starts “I was drunk as hell with a friend way back…” and to get the key, so I don’t just start signing in the wrong key, I hit a C chord, which is the first chord of the song (and let it ring) and then whenever the fuck I feel like it, I’d say “I was drunk as hell…” Barry explains. But in an arena like the symphony, which is predicated on military-like precision and all things being properly, meticulously graphed and charted, there’s no room for a random chord to help you find a pitch. He continues: “In her sheet music, the song starts with me singing on the first note, that C chord. So she’s standing in front of a million players and she hears me (*briiiing*) which is just me playing the key, and she starts to count there, and the whole fucking song is completely off. And they’re all just like “what the fuck???We had to meet in the middle, we had to make compromises. I was like “Chia-Hsuan, look, I can’t sing this fucking song without hitting that chord!

When all was said and done, Barry worked with the director and the conductor of the Richmond Symphony to pull together a small batch of songs that kicked off a showcase that found the RSO backing a handful of Richmond-based musicians in a variety of genres. While the other artists may have found the event to be noteworthy for good reason, you’d be hard-pressed to find one that it left such a personal mark on. “For years, I worked for this symphony unloading their trucks and setting stuff up, and I worked for the Richmond Ballet driving their trucks and unloading them setting stuff up and for IATSE Union 87 doing the same sort of thing,” says Barry. And while it might be easy to get wrapped up in the whirlwind of the performance, Barry was able to find a way to step back and absorb all that was going on.

I did the song “Exit Wounds” and when I play it live at club shows, I end it before this big musical break, because that would be boring and redundant for me to play on an acoustic guitar,” he explains. “So I think that was one of my favorite parts of the symphony show when we included that. I just stepped off to stage right as far as I could and let Chia-Hsuan Lin who’s the conductor just fucking handle it. She was like “I’m going to be paying attention to your timing” and I said “no, I’m just going to play as quietly as I can. I want you to blow this fucking place out. Get loud!” And she did! I could see that she gave me a little smirk in the middle of it.” If there’s a moment that more perfectly encompasses the entirety of the Tim Barry Experience, of standing back and absorbing the gravity of an overwhelming situation that came from a period of self-doubt and personal challenge to a moment of triumph and appreciating all that you have when you have it, it simply hasn’t been written yet.

High On 95 came out on September 8th through Chunksaah Records. Head over here to grab your copy of the album. While you’re at it, head here to see where you can catch Tim on his upcoming tour dates, including a handful with the likes of Roger Harvey and Off With Their Heads. Check out our full, wide-open and far-ranging interview below.



Tim Barry streams new album “High On 95”, announces US tour dates

Tim Barry has made his new album High On 95 available stream, and has announced US tour dates in support of the release. You can give the track a listen and check out the dates below.

High On 95 came out today, September 8th through Chunksaah Records. Head over here to grab your copy of the album.



New Video: Tim Barry – “High on 95” (w/camera work from his 4-year-old daughter, Lela Jane)

Tim Barry has unveiled the latest video from his forthcoming full-length album, and this one’s pretty damn special.

It’s for the title track to High On 95, and it was shot almost entirely by Barry’s four-and-a-half year-old daughter, Lela Jane, on an old VHS camcorder. If you’ve followed Barry’s career as a solo artist, you’ve no doubt gotten the chance to watch Lela and her little sister, Coralee, grow up in front of the camera lens via Instagram, so it’s a unique — and heart-warming — thing to see her on the other side of the camera pointing it at her old man.

Check out Lela’s video-making debut below. High on 95 is due out this coming Friday (September 8th) via Chunksaah Records. Some pre-order options are available here; others will be up on Barry’s website in a couple days! And happy early birthday, Lela Jane!



Tiger Army and Murder By Death announce upcoming tour

Los Angeles psychobilly punks Tiger Army has announced that they will be touring with Murder By Death along with Tim Barry starting in June.

Check out tour dates and locations for the upcoming tour below.

The band released their last album, ‘V •••–’, via Rise Records on May 20, 2016.



Against Me! add Tim Barry to upcoming North American tour

Former Avail frontman-turned-solo artist Tim Barry has been announced as a support act for Against Me!‘s North American tour with Texan punk band Fea. You can find more info on when and where they’ll be playing below below.

Barry’s latest album Lost & Rootless was released in 2014 through Chunksaah Records. Against Me! released a live album titled 23 Live Sex Acts last year on Total Treble Records, and according to a press release we recently received, details on their follow-up to Transgender Dysphoria Blues are coming soon.



Initial lineup for Fest 15 announced (Propagandhi, Less Than Jake, OWTH and more)

Well well well…one of the more anticipated news days of the spring is finally upon us, and it’s a damn good one!

The initial lineup for the 15th installment of annual Gainesville-based gathering of the punks known as Fest has been announced!

Today’s announcement revealed the likes of Propagandhi, Less Than Jake, Off With Their Heads, Tim Barry, Braid, The Flatliners, A Wilhelm Scream, Samiam, Small Brown Bike, PEARS, toyGuitar, AJJ, and a crapload more. Check out the full, up-to-the-minute lineup here, and stay tuned for more details, slated to be announced on May 13th.

Fest 15 takes place October 28-30 in, you guessed it, Gainesville, Florida.



Bouncing Souls announce lineup for Home For The Holidays 9

New Jersey legends The Bouncing Souls have announced the lineup for their 9th annual Home For The Holidays festival.

This year will feature bands like The World/Inferno Friendship Society, Tim Barry, The Loved Ones, and more.  You can get all the details here.

The Bouncing Souls last released “Comet” in 2012 via Rise Records & Chunksaah Records.



Tim Barry releases music video for “Solid Gone”

Former Avail frontman and current folk-rocker Tim Barry has just released a music video for the song “Solid Gone”. The track appears on his latest album, Lost & Rootless, which was released last November through Chunksaah Records.

Check out the video as well as his upcoming tour dates (including those with Two Cow Garage, Northcote and Allison Weiss) below.



Tim Barry (Avail) releases lyric video for “No News From North”

Former Avail frontman and current folk-rocker Tim Barry has just released a lyric video for the song “No News From North”. The track appears on his latest album, Lost & Rootless, which was released last November through Chunksaah Records.

Check out the video as well as his upcoming tour dates (including those with Northcote and Allison Weiss) below.



Tim Barry announces Northeast US/Canada tour dates with Northcote & Allison Weiss

RVA-based singer-songwriter-asskicker Tim Barry recently completed a quick run of  Northeastern US/Canada tour dates for this coming June. The jaunt kicks off June 18th in Philly and runs through June 27th in Tim’s hometown of Richmond, Virginia, playing places like Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Cambridge and Montreal along the way. Support on this run comes from Northcote and Allison Weiss. Check out the full, up-to-date rundown of Tim Barry tour dates to find out where you can catch him on the road!

Tim Barry is presently touring in support of Lost & Rootless, released in November 2014 on Chunksaah Records. Here’s our interview with him about the making of that album!



Tim Barry releases music video for “The James” off latest album “Lost & Rootless”

Former Avail frontman and current folk-rocker Tim Barry has just released a new music video for his song “The James”. The track appears on his latest album “Lost & Rootless”, which was released last November through Chunksaah Records.

Check it out below.

Additionally, Barry is getting ready to head to the UK next month before heading to the West Coast of the US for a run of tour dates. You can check out the full list of dates and locations here.



DS Staff Picks – Jay Stone’s Top However-many Albums of 2014

Hey gang!

This is the fourth year I’ve done one of these lists at Dying Scene, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that it was the hardest year yet to come up with some sort of a “Top Ten” list. I’ve spent a long time looking at my list, and realizing that it’s not just that I have more than ten albums that I really dig, but that any of the top baker’s dozen albums are almost interchangeable depending on mood. That’s the best thing about music, really.

Anyway, here’s what I came up with for a list. Last year I included non-Dying Scene albums, but this year we’re back to sticking to the script. As such, you won’t see Teeth Dreams by The Hold Steady, Rocco Deluca’s self-titled masterpiece, Joshua Black Wilkins’ best album yet (Settling The Dust), Bob Mould’s stellar Beauty & Ruin, Cymbals Eat Guitars’ Lose or the latest, greatest Tom Petty album.  As usual, I don’t include 7-inches, live albums and EPs, because there’d be just too many to list. But if you’re interested, the Street Dogs‘ split with Noi!se is a pretty great one, as is the long-awaited (by me, anyway) new one from The Reveling.

Check out my list below.



Tim Barry streams “Solid Gone” ahead of Friday’s album release

If you’re like me, then you just can’t wait to hear some new Tim Barry.  The good news is, he just released a new track called “Solid Gone,” which you can check out here.

The new album, Lost and Rootless, is out on Friday via Chunksaah Records.

 



DS Interview: Tim Barry on being “Lost and Rootless”

Tim Barry has a well-earned, albeit Chuck Ragan-esque larger than life reputation of being a bit of a vagabond, the living embodiment of a character from a Tom Waits song. Hell, his last studio album, 2012’s 40 Miler (Chunksaah Records), is a tongue-in-cheek, self-deprecating nod to his pastime of riding the rails.

Dying Scene caught up with Barry in early November to chat about Lost & Rootless, and it seems unquestionable that a lot has changed in the years since 40 Miler. Barry’s assumed new roles as a husband and a father; his wife, Sarah, and now-two-year-old daughter Lela Jane appear on the cover of his upcoming release, Lost & Rootless (due November 28th on Chunksaah), and a second daughter, Coralee, was born two weeks ago (editor’s note: Tim and I talked two days before Coralee was born, hence a couple of the references in the conversation below). If there were a time in his professional life where Barry should feel anything but lost and rootless, at least on paper, that time should be now, no?

“I don’t know where I stand. Like, voting day was yesterday. Who the fuck do I vote for? You know what I mean?” Barry asks rhetorically. “In so many aspects of contemporary life in the United States or life in music, who are my peers? I have very close road friends, but I’m lost and rootless. I don’t know…what genre of music do I play? In what group of train riders do I fit with? In what group of workers in Richmond do I fit?”

Those questions are at the core of a number of tracks on Lost & Rootless. This time around, though, the story songs and the scorched-earth vitriol that are part-and-parcel of much of Barry’s traditional work are replaced by what can only be referred to as lighter, happier fare. Marriage and fatherhood will do that to a man, and songs like “Older and Poorer” and “Lela Days” are prime examples of that. Still, it’s not all joy in Mudville: “While I was just on tour, we lost our fucking health insurance,” Barry tells me.  “We have a baby due in two weeks. So what the fuck do we do? We’ve got a two-year-old, an insulin-dependent diabetic family member, which will bankrupt a family right there, and then you have a baby on the way with all the risks involved. And then someone presents to you this unrealistic fucking charge of $1850 a month for insurance? That’s why people lose their fucking insurance. That’s why people start hustling. That’s why you start doing anything you can to get by.”

Better than perhaps most songwriters going nowadays, Barry has an ability to tap directly into the vein that provides depth and feeling to any situation, and many examples of that abound throughout our conversation. Check out the full text of our interview below. It’s a long one, but it may well be the most candid, compelling read to appear on the pages of Dying Scene.