Search Results for "Ska"

Mephiskapheles announce US tour

Satan’s favorite ska punk band Mephiskapheles are embarking on a massive tour of the US that takes them through the end of the year. This tour sees them share the stage with Streetlight Manifesto on about half the dates.

Mephiskapheles last released their self-titled album in 2015.

Check out the tour dates below.



Kill Lincoln (Ska, DC) End Hiatus With a Load of Release News

DC ska punks Kill Lincoln are back in action after a brief hiatus. They’ve just announced pre-sales for the vinyl pressing of their 2015 EP, Good Riddance to Good Advice. The release will be combined with single “Second Cities” which has a collection of live tracks on the B Side. 

The band has also announced that the pressing will be on their newly formed label Bad Time Records which will focus exclusively on ska and punk releases. 

In addition to all of the above, Kill Lincoln will be on tour this August with the New Orleans ska punk outfit Joystick, hitting the East Coast and Midwest from August 10-18.  

You can pre-order “Good Riddance to Good Advice” now here and the tour dates are below.


DS Photo Gallery: The Mighty Mighty Bosstones at The Regent Theater (Los Angeles, CA)

The best dressed band in punk rock graced the stage of The Regent Theater in Los Angeles nearly two weeks ago to play one of their most influential albums in its entirety. That’s right, friends, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, came to the West Coast to play Let’s Face It from front to back, in addition to a number of other classic tunes. The entire set clocked in at a little over 90 minutes – and it was 90 minutes full of infectious sing-alongs, camaraderie, and dancing. It was a night this crowd would not soon forget.

The opening bands, Buster Shuffle & Los Kung Fu Monkeys, brought a ton of energy and got the crowd ready for the main event. The Regent was packed full of fans, young and old alike, all waiting to hear all of the hits from one of the best ska-punk albums released in the 90s. The big surprise was original guitarist Nate Albert joining them on stage to play their biggest hit. If you’ve seen the Bosstones before, you know that “The Impression That I Get” is typically the closer – but on this night, the boys from Boston stayed true to the album order, making it the 4th song of the night. MMB came out swinging as they ripped through the track list, making this album feel as relevant today as it felt 20 years ago. Hearing Let’s Face It was worth the price of admission alone.

Lucky for us, they still had some tricks up their sleeves (suitcoats?). While their set at Punk Rock Bowling in May was pretty standard (lots of hits & crowd favorites, along with one new song), they took the opportunity to play a more eclectic set for this LA crowd, including a few tracks from their latest album, While We’re At It.

To sum it up, MMB never disappoint they put on an amazing show – the kind of show that makes you want to throw your arm around your neighbor at the show as you sing along at the top of your lungs. The Let’s Face It show in LA was no exception – I can’t wait for the next chance to be in the pit with them again!

Check out the full gallery from the show below!



The Bar Stool Preachers (ska-punk) release new video for “Warchief” and announce tour dates

Brighton’s The Bar Stool Preachers have released a video for their tune “Warchief” off their upcoming album Grazie Governo due out August 3rd. The video is said to be the first in a trilogy of videos they will be releasing from the new album.

The band are also hitting the road for a few European shows. Check out the video and see the tour dates below.

Grazi Governo is the band’s first album since the 2016 LP Blatant Propaganda.



The Big News (ska/punk) announce dates for Can’t Remember September tour

OKC-based ska/punk band The Big News have announced the dates for their upcoming U.S. tour. Check out the dates and locations below.

The band’s most recent release was last year’s full-length Welcome to the Weird Kids Table.



DS Exclusive: Fighting The Good Fight with Kevin and Aimee of The Interrupters

Let’s say, hypothetically, that you were a band that had achieved some modicum of success in a relatively brief period of time. For argument’s sake, our definition of “success” here includes the following parameters: signed to one of the most successful independent labels in the music game; put out not one or two but three albums on that label, all of whom were produced by one of the bigger and most recognizable personalities in the the punk music scene; headlined a couple of your own successful cross-country club tours; played the main stage at a handful of wildly successful punk rock festivals; toured several continents with one of the last quarter-century’s largest rock bands on the planet; got added to regular rotation at your hometown (Los Angeles) rock radio station which, in spite of prevailing trends, remains a taste-making force in the game. Oh, and let’s also say that all of these accomplishments – and more – happened within your first half-dozen years as a band. It would be natural, maybe even expected, if some of that love and those accomplishments went to your head, and you maybe started to take some things for granted, right?

Not if you’re The Interrupters.

We caught up with Aimee and Kevin from the band over the phone the Friday before last, which happened to coincide with the release date for their third – and best – studio album, Fight The Good Fight (Hellcat/Epitaph). Amidst the hustle and bustle that an album release date can entail, and after exchanging our usual pleasantries, we got interrupted (pun largely intended) by the duo receiving an incoming call that they couldn’t ignore, as it was from none other than Tim Armstrong. Armstrong is not just one of the godfather’s of the last three decades of punk rock, he’s been a constant big brotherly presence in The Interrupters’ career, signing them to his Hellcat label imprint right out of the gate, producing and appearing on all three of their albums to date, imparting his unique wisdom on the quartet along the way. For more than just the obvious reasons, The Interrupters are a band that considers itself and its crew a family, and Armstrong is as big a part of that family as anybody. And so the sheepish excitement in Kevin Bivona’s voice when we returned to our call and explained why they had to break standard informal phone-interview protocol and put me on hold was not only palpable, it was downright refreshing.

It would certainly not be the last time that our conversation would trend into events that were notably surreal. Any fan of the Interrupters knows that they spent a great deal of time touring Australia, Europe and South America as direct support for Green Day over the last year. It found the band not only getting to play their upbeat blend of punk and third-wave ska to a large number of new ears, it also created a situation where a different high-profile Armstrong, Green Day’s inimitable Billie Joe, ended up with writing credits on a song (“Broken World”) on the newest Interrupters album. Here’s how Kevin Bivona explains it: “We were in Santiago, Chile, and we played a show, and there were a couple of hours before we had to go to the airport, so we were hanging out with Green Day and their families. It was an amazing experience. And (Billie Joe) goes “hey, I have an idea for a song that I think could be a really cool Interrupters song.” And he grabbed a guitar, and he kinda pulled Aimee and I aside and he played it for us, and he said “I don’t know, I think this would just be a kind of cool thing for you.” And he played it for us and we said “Yes! We love it!” Upon returning to the States, the band got to work on filling out the remainder of the song, and doing so in a manner that would do right by the Green Day frontman.  “I wanted him to be proud, because he thought enough of us to give us this riff that he could have obviously turned into an amazing song for any one of his bands. We sent the song back to him right when we were done with it, and he texted us back that night and he was so excited about it and happy to be a part of it. It’s so surreal, too, to have a song with a riff written by Billie Joe Armstrong and produced by Tim Armstrong…”

If you’ve had a chance to dig in to Fight The Good Fight yet, you’re probably aware that Billie Joe’s involvement wasn’t the only surreal part of the album-making process. While Tim Armstrong has lent his iconic vocal stylings to a track on each of the first two Interrupters albums, FTGF’s “Got Each Other” finds each of Rancid’s members chipping in, an idea that came from Armstrong himself. “Matt and Lars are in the Bay Area, and Branden lives in Utah,” explains Bivona. “When it came time to get the actual recording done, we were kind of down to the wire, so we actually had Jesse and Justin get in our tour van, drive up to San Francisco, and set up a mobile studio to record Matt and Lars’ verses and run them back down. Simultaneously, I’m on the phone with Branden in Utah, and he has a studio in his house…He sang on the choruses with us, and he sent it to us to mix that night. It was really down to the wire.”

The result of the last-minute collaboration is textbook Interrupters: an infectiously danceable, high energy rallying cry preaching the timeless notions of friendship and unity. “I cried my eyes out when I heard all of Rancid singing with us on that song,” says Aimee. “The first time I ever heard Rancid in my life, when I was in high school, I cried when I heard “…And Out Come The Wolves.” I felt like I wasn’t alone in the world, and that other people understood me. We brought that message on “Got Each Other,” and to hear all of Rancid sing that message not just to me but through my speakers with me…”We don’t have much, but we’ve got each other”…I was so happy and so grateful, and I can’t really describe how full circle and surreal that moment was.

While many of the tracks on Fight The Good Fight deal with themes that we’ve come to know and love from The Interrupters circa 2018, we also find the band digging a little deeper, turning their mirror inward in ways that were missing on the first two albums. Tracks like “Gave You Everything,” “Room With A View,” and “So Wrong” resonate as the band’s most personal – and arguably most compelling – tracks to date. Says Aimee: “I feel like when you write a song that moves you and touches you, and you’re going through an authentic experience and writing your truth, a lot of times for me that’s therapy. I’m writing to get things out and I need to process this stuff and this anxiety that’s happening in my heart and my mind. When I process that and put that into lyrics, if that helps me and gets me through it, then hopefully that can help somebody else. That’s what this is all about…loving people and helping people and connecting with people through your music.”

The band’s quest to bring their music and their positive energy to as many people as possible has generated numerous unforgettable experiences. As they get set to head out on the last leg of the final installment of the Warped Tour this coming weekend, they’re sure to add a few more to the list. “Just when we think we’ve checked everything off the bucket list, some new opportunity presents itself and we are blown away with gratitude,” says Bivona, the sincerity palpable in his voice. “Even doing the Amoeba Records in-store performance a couple nights ago was surreal. Getting added to our local radio station, KROQ, which is what we all grew up listening to, is surreal. There’s never going to be a time where there isn’t an amazing opportunity that we will be thrilled with.

Head below to check out our full Q&A with Kevin and Aimee, and stay tuned for upcoming tour announcements in the very near future!



“Pick It Up! Ska In The 90s” documentary launches kickstarter campaign

A new documentary being made about ska in the 90s is currently the number one project in Kickstarter’s music section.  The film has already reached it’s goal and is working towards its stretch goals.  If you want to contribute and get some awesome stuff, you can do so here!

Pick It Up! Ska In The 90s will tell the story of ska’s history throughout the first two waves in the 60s and 80s and how the third wave turned ska into an entirely new sound in the 90s and became wildly popular all around the world for a brief moment in music history.  Bands interviewed will include Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, No Doubt, Save Ferris, Hepcat, Goldfinger, The Aquabats, The Mad Caddies, Fishbone, Sublime, The Toasters, The Specials, and many many more.



311 and The Offspring get busted by the Super Troopers

311 and The Offspring are currently co-headlining The Endless Summer tour.  A 29 date stretch that will take them into September and features Gym Class Heroes as the openers.  In a recent Funny or Die promo, the two bands get pulled over by America’s favorite Super Troopers tag team Car Ramrod.

311 latest release is 2017’s Mosaic. While we have seen some studio updates from The Offspring, they have not had an album since 2012’s Days Gone By.

Check out the shenanigans below.



The Interrupters stream new album “Fight The Good Fight

LA ska punks The Interrupters are now streaming their new album “Fight The Good Fight” on Hellcat Records. The entire album is recorded mostly to tape in order to capture the energy of their live shows.

According to guitarist Kevin in regards to their approach on recording the album, “There’s a certain feeling you get from that process that you can’t really get digitally. There’s no overthinking anything—everyone’s got to be fully present and committed. It was definitely high-pressure, but also really fun.”

The Interrupters last released Say It Out Loud  in June of 2015.

Check out the new album below.



The Main Street Sweep (ska rock and roll) release “Ladies Drink for Free” EP

Lancaster PA’s The Main Street Sweep have released a new four song EP Ladies Drink for Free on Darth Fader Records. If you enjoy your ska blended with rock and roll and a touch of soul this EP will keep you on the dance floor.

Stream the EP below.



Popes Of Chillitown release video for “No Manners In Ireland”

London, UK ska-punks Popes Of Chillitown have released a video for “No Manners In Ireland”. The track is from recent album “Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard”,  ‪which was released back in May.

You can watch the video below – and buy the album from the band’s Bandcamp.



Millie Manders and The Shutup to release new EP via Kickstarter Campaign

Norwich, UK based ska punks Millie Manders and the Shutup are to release a new EP, the follow up to last year’s “Obsession Transgression”. The EP is being funded by a KickStarter campaign, which has a few days to go. You can help pay for the record by pledging on a variety of merch options.

The band’s back catalogue, including Millie’s recent acoustic EP, is available on the band’s Bandcamp page.



Album Review: Mad Caddies – “Punk Rocksteady”

“Punk Rocksteady” is a neato concept cd. From what I gather, the Mad Caddies and Fat Mike came up with the idea of doing some Rocksteady, Reggae, Ska, etc. covers of classic Punk songs. And, if you come at this cd from the angle of enjoying it for what it is, you’ll love it. Weeks ago, I was on social media and I read that the Mad Caddies did a Reggae cover of Green Day’s She. I listened to it and thought: “Nope. Nice try, but will everyone quit stroking Green Day’s ego? They’re claiming that they are God’s favorite band.” Tho, to listen to the entire “Punk Rocksteady” album, it makes sense..all the songs do. Individually, they are open to criticism…but as a collective they are poignant.

The cover of Bad Religion’s Sorrow is moving, to say the least. The lyrics really work well in the genre setting. A couple years ago I lived in Florida for a winter. I worked at a pizza restaurant with a bunch of Haitian refugees…who listened to Reggae all day long. It was like a Music History/Appreciation class. Sorrow really gives me the same vibe as real Reggae. Seriously, if you kinda don’t give a crap about this sort of thing but wanna be Punk-woke, at least listen to Sorrow from “Punk Rocksteady”.

The second song’s bass is just phenomenal. We all know that the whole Rocksteady/Ska/Reggae realm of music is good for bassists and bass lovers. But Sleep Long is splendiferous. I sat in my car in a parking lot just enveloped in that bass tone. Sure, the rest of the tunes have stellar bass recordings, but Sleep Long just sticks out like a fat female vocalist in a Pop Country video.

The funnest tune is Sink, Florida, Sink. If that doesn’t make you wanna dance, then you probably don’t like dancing.

I dunno…initially, I listened to this cd 3 or 4 times in a row. Not just cuz I have to for this gig…nope. I just really took to it. I was in a mood where I just wanted something uplifting. It was a nice day. Bright enough for sunglasses but not hot enough to sweat while standing around…so I took a drive. Ended up in a parking lot eating chips listening to “Punk Rocksteady”. It seemed to make me agree with the world. I had that “F-it, it’s almost summer…I don’t see any civil unrest..people are just coexisting in harmony from what I can tell…I’ll just listen to this here cd and not worry about what opinions journalists are editorializing about” mentality. It was a fine time. I even had to pick up a family member…who leans Right, so to speak. The album seemed to make him mad. Like it wasn’t American enough to be worthy of listening to. So that made me chuckle to myself. Not that I’m some whiny Leftist that wants to make it to where we can’t laugh at Daniel Tosh’s humor, no. I’m just saying that Punk Rocksteady has the potential to frustrate fools. So yeah. #PunkRock

I then spent a few days not listening to but thinking about the cd. I thought about how I’ve never been a Mad Caddies fan. I always respected them as a band. You know how it goes…some bands are around and you’ve heard a few songs and were like: “Okay. Not bad. Maybe one day I’ll wind up a super-fan.” but that day never comes. Lots of the 3rd Wave Ska was…well…it seemed to linger. Even upon first coming out, bands like the Mad Caddies just seem to linger. They didn’t seem to punctuate anything…just exist knowingly.(Think of how Jughead’s Revenge was to Punk.) I honestly wish I liked them more…along with a lot of the 3rd Wave stuff but it’s just so meh.

After days of not listening to “Punk Rocksteady”, I couldn’t will myself to listen to it. I lost myself to the idea that Punk is basically a traveling carnival. You pay your way to get in to the show, for a few hours you get to act like it’s actually part of reality, and then you leave, go home, and the world isn’t a carnival. I don’t know about you, but I never see punkers. We’re so rare that when I see one of us in public I think: “Why are you out and about? You should be inside. Don’t you know that society hates us?” Sure, we can start Punk bands but what is that other than living in poverty and trying to impress those above glass ceilings? Any unsigned Punk and/or Ska bands that don’t want to burn Fat Wreck and Hellcat to the ground at least a little bit aren’t anti-establishment at all.

Ever since ol’ what’s-his-face became president, I consider poverty differently. I look at most products and think: “Is this more important than feeding the starving?” As neato as “Punk Rocksteady” is, I think the money that went into making it would have been better spent feeding the starving. But, the cd exists. If you go to the Fat Wreck store on their website, you can download the album for $10…or you can buy the cd w/ digital download for $10.

I’ll let you think about that for a moment.

Understand that I have a bit of the Asperger’s Syndrome…so sometimes what makes sense to most people is just lost to me. When I was a younger human being, a cd cost about $12. I got into my own band when I was older than the previous younger. We recorded a cd. I realized that cds cost around $12 cuz you had to pay for recording, legal fees, packaging/distribution, and a few other things. When the MP3 craze took over Pop and helped MTV convince the masses that music isn’t worthy of attention, it seemed like the cost of a digital copy of an album would be much less. Even if the labels/bands were still trying to recoup costs (don’t think about paying $1 for a download of something off Blink 182’s Enema of the State these days…seriously, don’t)….even if recouping is still a concern, wouldn’t the price of packaging/distributing be taken out of the price of digital downloads?

I’m sure you’re like: “Well, logically yes. But people can charge whatever they want for the products they create. That’s capitalism.” Yes, and capitalism is ruining America faster than bipartisanship. I, personally, have contacted pros about this mathematical disaster and they act like I’m crapping on Punk. I’m all like: “Look it: You’re the ones that are supposed to be creating an image of self-sufficiency in the industry. Don’t come at me with terrible math acumen and complain about how song sales aren’t as high as you’d like. Sell your product for a reasonable price and people won’t feel ripped off and complacent, you knuckleheads.” But I sperg. I go nowhere.

So yeah, you can spend a ten dollar bill on digital or click the other button and get an actual physical copy of the cd also…and don’t you dare believe the hype shoved down our throats by the tech companies. People still have cd players. There are people that still have their record players from the 1970s…you gonna tell me that absolutely everyone that ever owned a cd player just up and threw them out because our phones are supercomputers? C’mon.

I woke up this morning and had to run a quick errand. I turned on the local Alternative Rock station in the car and instead of some histrionic, loudmouth morning dj, they were playing Rancid’s Ruby Soho. I guess it set the tone for my day. A blast from the past. Here’s to never having a blast of the present.

The Mad Caddies’ “Punk Rocksteady” is a decent buy…but I’d say it’s only worth $3 digitally…and it’s an album that deserves to be bought on sale. So like $2.25. That’s not me devaluing the songs, no. I think that’s more of a rational valuation of digital music. Charging as much for digital as you would a cd is highway robbery and we punkers have been getting screwed over so much by the pros over the years that we just plain enjoy being ripped off.

“Punk Rocksteady” seems like a cd that could be important to music.

Here’s to overwhelming amounts of importance.

4/5 Stars



Early stream of “New Beginings” from Sweet Babylon (punk reggae ska)

Just in time for summer Fall River, MA’s Sweet Babylon (punk reggae ska rock) has allowed us an early stream of their new album New Beginnings. From the opening ode to Massachusetts to the rocking “New Years’ Rez” this album is full of heart and dance-able rhythms.

Sweet Babylon last released Ideal Personality in the summer of 2015. Which can only mean that summer time is Sweet Babylon time.

Be sure to catch them at their album release party this weekend and check out the stream below.



New video from the Hub City Stompers for “Hard Place to Be”

Hub City Stompers showcase some sweet dance moves in their new video for “Hard Place to Be” from their album Haters Dozen which was released earlier this year. An album that has to be considered for one of the best ska albums of the year, in a year stacked with great releases.

Check out the sweet moves below.