Search Results for "Emo"

Say Anything sign to Dine Alone Records for upcoming album

California’s Say Anything have announced that they have signed to Dine Alone Records for their upcoming album, which will be produced by Will Yip.  Here’s what Say Anything lead singer Max Bemis had to say about the signing:

“It is surreal to have a new home for Say Anything. It’s been a minute since that’s been the case and I’m totally excited that we’ll now be working with the wonderful Dine Alone Records. I’ve been a fan of the label for a long time and am full on stoked to release our new Will-Yip-produced LP with them. The record is a bit different from the last one (blah blah as always) and is going to be an involved, weird organism, but one I am glad to entrust to Dine Alone.”

Say Anything last released I Don’t Think It Is in 2016 via Equal Vision Records.

The Maple State release video for “Winner”

Recently reformed Manchester, UK indie punks The Maple State release their new album “The Things I Heard At The Party” this Friday (23rd March), with pre-orders for both the vinyl and digital downloads up now on the band’s Bandcamp. Ahead of the album, the band have released a video for “Winning”.

You can watch it below.

Locate The Harbour (emo, UK) releases debut EP

Southampton, UK based emo project Locate The Harbour, aka Robbie Pemberton, has released his debut EP. The self-recorded, self-released, seven song affair, entitled ” I’m Still A Gribly”, is up now on Bandcamp. It’s available as a free download.

You can have a listen below.

Elm Tree Circle (Emo, Germany) stream new song “The Lease”

German emo act Elm Tree Circle are streaming their new song “The Lease.”

You can give it a listen below.

“The Lease” comes from the bands’ upcoming debut full length, The Good Life, which is set to be released on May 11th via KROD Records.

Long Way Down (emo punk) stream new song “Cobwebs” off upcoming album “Swinging For Fences”

Dutch emo punk band Long Way Down have premiered a brand new track off of their upcoming album, Swinging For The Fences. The track is one of seven on the new record, which is set for official release on April 20th. The album is a result of doubts, hardships on the road, and the ups and downs of being in a band – “Cobwebs” is a little peak in to that.

According to singer Leon Derksen:

We’ve been a band for over twelve years now, of course there’s ups and downs. We’ve done seven European tours – highlights, absolutely! – but we’ve also came to the point we wanted to throw the towel a few times. Therefor, the fact that we’re presenting some of our best efforts ever on “Swinging For The Fences” makes us extra proud.

You can stream the song below.

American Pleasure Club stream new album “A Whole Fucking Lifetime Of This”

Maryland emo act American Pleasure Club are streaming their new album A Whole Fucking Lifetime of This.

You can give it a listen below.

A Whole Fucking Lifetime of This was released on February 16th via Run For Cover Records.

Album Review: Great Wight – ‘The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life’

When it comes to emo, I like all the stuff that runs with the pack, but not necessarily what runs in its center. In other words, I like everything that gets swept along with the genre’s associations– Hot Water Music, Sorority Noise, Modern Baseball– but I rarely spin American Football, Foxing, or Tiny Moving Parts. Great Wight is another of those bands, one that could tour with emo bands, or sad-sack pop punk bands and straddle labels enough to spark arguments for the rest of their career. The truth is, Great Wight write catchy, confessional punk jams with an afro/queer focus. Their album, The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life is a tribute to punk rock’s continued (but under-realized) foundation as a genre for outsiders, as well as a showcase to Great Wight’s expert, emotive songwriting.

What captured me immediately were how easily the words formed melodies, maintaining an intimate and conversational tone, while still being musical. There’s something so effortless about the composition across The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life that you can’t help but feel you’ve already belted them out at show by the time the proverbial needle lifts off the last track. In this sense, they remind me of Sorority Noise, who have always excelled at that sort of easy, natural sounding cadence. Using this songwriting mode, vocalist Erik Garlington, talks about depression, the scene, being black, being atheist, and being queer. This may sound too specific to relate to on a larger scale, but as a straight white male, I found it had an immediate honest quality that made me think of the unsettling openness of early Against Me! It’s great stuff, that appeals to a common experience, all of the minutiae hanging under an umbrella labeled ‘Being Different.’

The songs are great all around, from opener “Curtain’s Up! It’s Showtime,” a beacon for like minds that cements a lot of Great Wight’s musical elements early on, to ending track “The Come Up,” a sort of spunky cowboy chord send-off where Garlington sings, “I hope I never have to write these songs again.” Good stuff, from start to finish. Authentic and vulnerable; sometimes confrontational in songs like “Not Black Enough,” a standout track that begins with “hey man, we need to talk,” and goes on to talk about the black experience, and what it does and doesn’t entail.

One of my favorite songs on the album was “Starring Michael Fassbender.” For how much punk likes to talk about sexuality, the genre clams up like an eleven year old having the ‘changing body’ talk when it comes to sex. “Starring Michael Fassbender” is presented as a sultry, unabashed, slithering conversation with a lover. There are so many great lines on this track, that I could probably quote the whole song, but it’s easy to imagine it as an intimate moment where two people begin to reach out of their repression and acknowledge, “what makes your back sweat and your fingers wet,” “….the things that won’t make your parents proud.”

The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life is a stunning debut. When an original voice like this comes out of nowhere, with such a developed songwriting talent to boot, one has to take notice. Great Wight has the potential to be spoken of in the same breath as all the other great emo bands of the day, and it’s hard to imagine a day when they won’t have just as rabid fans, packed into a club and hell-bent on transcendence. These are words meant to be sung back by the crowd, melody and lyrics joined in the holiest communion– the completion of a conversation.


Moose Blood release video for new song “Have I Told You Enough”

UK emo-rockers Moose Blood are getting ready to release their new album, I Don’t Think I Can Do This Anymore, and have released a music video for their new song “Have I Told You Enough.”

You can check it out below.

I Don’t Think I Can Do This Anymore is set to be released on March 9th via Hopeless Records.  It will follow up Blush which was released in 2016.

Elm Tree Circle (Emo, Germany) sign to release new album “The Good Life”

German emo exports Elm Tree Circle have signed to Berlin based label KROD Records to release their upcoming debut full length. “The Good Life” is released May 11th. Ahead of the album, the band have released a video for first single “Feel The Burn”.

You can watch the video below.

DS Interview: Erik Garlington (Great Wight) talks first album, outsider status, and what makes a good song

The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life is the sort of debut to turn heads. Yeah, it’s raw, vulnerable, and catchy as all Hell— but it comes with an under-documented perspective that serves as a breath of fresh air in a scene so often defined by its straight whiteness.

Enter: Great Wight, a three piece from the Big Apple playing emo tinged pop punk in the spirit of Sorority Noise and Modern Baseball with lyrics that explore what it means to be gay and black in today’s punk scene. It’s a killer album that pulls you in with big hooks and conversational poetics, and I liked it so much, that after my first listen, I did what all unpaid (but impressed) music journalists do— I reached out over Facebook and asked for an interview.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Erik Garlington via e-mail, where he told me about how Great Wight started, how he writes songs, and whether the punk rock scene is still a place for outsiders.

Check it out here.

The Maple State (Indie Punk, UK) release “Something In The Water” ahead of new album

Recently reformed Manchester, UK indie punks The Maple State have detailed their upcoming album “The Things I Heard At The Party” and are streaming “Something In The Water”, the second single ahead of the album.

The ten song affair is out on 23rd March, with pre-orders for both the vinyl and digital downloads up now on the band’s Bandcamp. You can see the album details and have a listen to “Something In The Water”, along with the album title track, below.


American Pleasure Club debuts ‘This Is Heaven and I’d Die for It’

We’ve always rated Run For Cover an A+ quality record label, and we can continue to do so thanks to this next release.

American Pleasure Club dropped their new emotionally charged track ‘This Is Heaven and I’d Die for It’. Third single from the band’s upcoming full length ‘a whole fucking lifetime of this’ out February 16th.

Give ‘This Is Heaven and I’d Die for It’ a spin below.

Teenage Wrist debuts ‘Dweeb’

In the category “most simple yet fun song title I’ve come across all day”. LA based garage rock trio Teenage Wrist premiered their brand new track ‘Dweeb’. The latest single from the band’s debut album ‘Chrome Neon Jesus’, out march 9th via Epitaph Records.

Head down below to give ‘Dweeb’ a spin.

Tiny Moving Parts premiere ‘Warm Hand Splash’

Master shredders Tiny Moving Parts have dropped a brand new track. ‘Warm Hand Splash’ is the third single from their up and coming full length ‘Swell’, out January 26th via Triple Crown Records.

If you’re excited to catch the new songs live, don’t sleep on getting tickets for their winter tour with Mom Jeans and Oso Oso. Full dates for that and an easy playable link to ‘Warm Hand Splash’ below.

DS Interview: Tom Mullen of Washed Up Emo Podcast on his new book, “The Anthology of Emo: Vol. 1”

When one eventually looks back on whatever chapters in the annals of punk rock history encapsulate the last couple of decades, there will undoubtedly be more hand-wringing over the sections labeled “emo” than in the remaining portions combined. No term, or genre, within the collective umbrella of the punk and DIY and indie rock worlds has been more maligned, more ostracized, more negatively stereotyped than that of “emo.” Seriously; run an “emo” Google image search or run the term through the search feature on such varied websites as Buzzfeed and Pinterest and Wikihow and and the results, while redundant in their theme, will be seemingly relentless in the lack of seriousness with which they approach the style or the culture or, most importantly, the music.

But that wasn’t always the case. Somewhere along the the way to the Forum, something happened to the term and the image and the subculture. Through mainstream media outlets and suburban shopping mall-based clothing stores of the early aughts, “emo” got bastardized, stripped of its original context and transformed into something wholly unrecognizable from its origins.

The last small handful of years, however, have seen a bit of not only an emo resurgence, but an emo reclamation. Not the emo of the Hot Topic era, mind you, but from an earlier time. The Get Up Kids and Braid and Rainer Maria got back together, put out new albums, and continue to tour periodically. Texas Is The Reason reunited for a while. American Football reunited. Knapsack and The Promise Ring reunited and then reunited again. Cap’n Jazz played for the first time in seven years. Hell, Jawbreaker played Riot Fest a couple months ago and you know this because all 689 people you follow on Instagram were there and live streaming and so-this-happened-ing. And perhaps nobody has been flying the original emo flag higher and prouder over the last decade as Tom Mullen.

Mullen, a native of Vermont, has been working for a variety of labels and entertainment industry outlets by day since the turn of the century. In his spare time and due to an unwavering love of the earlier days of the emo years, he launched the Washed Up Emo podcast in 2007. He’s interviewed well over a hundred scene veterans in the decade since, and recently published his first book, The Anthology of Emo – Volume One, that compiles transcriptions of about a dozen interviews from the podcasts that help shine a light on what the term meant and, more importantly, what the music meant. There are chats with some of the pillars of an earlier time, like Mineral’s Chris Simpson, Christie Front Drive’s Eric Richter, Norman Brannon from Texas Is The Reason and, of course, Mike Kinsella who’s been in basically all the bands. There are also higher-profile, crossover names like Chris Carrabba and Matt Pryor, as well as Rainer Maria, who’ve seen a bit of a resurgence lately, and Blair Shehan from Knapsack, The Jealous Sound, and more recently Racquet Club.

Like the Washed Up Emo podcast and its related offshoots like the hilarious, The Anthology of Emo – Volume One is a labor of love that draws direct inspiration from the creative breeding ground that was Burlington, Vermont, in Mullen’s formative, DIY years. There’s little profit involved — most money made from the sale of Volume One will go directly into the publication of Volume Two, already in the works — but that’s obviously not the point. The conversations are authentic, with Mullen and his subjects thoughtfully and sometimes humorously retelling stories that demonstrate the interconnectedness and passion and creativity and – I can’t stress the point enough – the authenticity that drove the scene in the early days and that have inspired a groundswell of not just Emo Nights at your local club but a new legion of bands flying the emo battle flag.

Head below to check out our full conversation with Mullen. He and I are roughly the same age and grew up in neighboring (some might say Shrine Bowl arch-rivaling) states and have a lot of overlapping experiences in spote of the different, circuitous routes we took to get to this conversation. Oh, and make sure you pick up Anthology of Emo: Volume One here!