Search Results for "SideOneDummy Records"

David McWane (Big D + The Kids Table) publishes first novel, “Kringle”

Well here’s a fun little story just in time for the holidays (and yes, I’m mindful that this is not a place that people usually frequent for “fun little holiday stories,” but we think you’ll dig this one).

David McWane, frontman for long-running Boston-based band Big D & The Kids Table, has published his first novel. It’s called “Kringle: The Story of a Young Toymaker,” and it’s published under the moniker “D.P. McWane.” Here’s the official blurb about the book:

A young carpenter starts a new life in a small New England town where he makes toys for an unscrupulous boss. He meets a single mother and helps her sons’ gang, The Airlords, build “Buck Rogers spaceships” looking sleds to race. They expose the boss’s sham and on Dec. 24th he delivers toys to every child so they can “feel fortunate, even if it’s for just one day”. Along the way he earns the love of the single mother and sons.

“Kringle” is officially available for purchase today. You can order it in hardcover here or in soft cover here, and we’re told it’ll be available on Amazon in the near future. Pick it up, and stay tuned; we’ll try to pick Dave’s brain about it in the next week or so and report back!



PUP release new music video – “Sleep In The Heat”

Toronto punk group PUP have a new music video out for their track, “Sleep In The Heat.” You can watch said video below.

The new video stars Stranger Things actor Finn Wolfhard, and will really hit animal lovers right in the feels. The video shows a stray dog going on tour with a younger version of the band, and singer/guitarist Stefan Babcock says the song itself is about his chameleon, who died while the band were writing their latest record. “Losing a friend is something so many of us have had to deal with, which is why I think this video is so powerful,” said Babcock.

The song comes from PUP’s latest full-length, The Dream Is Over, which came out in May via SideOneDummy Records.



Jeff Rosenstock releases music video for “Blast Damage Days”

Jeff Rosenstock has just released a music video for his new song “Blast Damage Days” off his newly released album “Worry” and you can check it out below.

WORRY was released October 14th through SideOneDummy Records. It  marks Rosenstock’s 3rd solo album, following 2015′s We Cool?.



Album Review: Jeff Rosenstock- WORRY.

The question that always comes to mind when I hear a new Jeff Rosenstock record is, “How does he come up with all of these wonderful melodies?” Time and time again, the man delivers the catchy goods like no other can. When Vacation was released, I thought it was a beautiful, beautiful fluke. Then I Look Like Shit came along, then We Cool?, and now we have WORRY.– the next logical step in Jeff Rosenstock’s game of chicken with an apparently infinite creative well.

WORRY. is an album that’ll get accolades. We can get that out of the way early. It’s a damn good record. It succeeds in ambition and scope as a sort of left hook when we were all expecting another album of songs about having trouble growing up (although there’s still a little bit of that). The record sprawls in a way that it almost begs us to talk about the structure over the music. It begins in earnest as a typical album, before shifting gears in the latter half to a musical suite.

The songs, however, are a definite return to form of a form I nearly forgot. So much of Jeff’s solo career has been laser focused on himself, Bomb the Music Industry’s political and anti-corporate philosophy almost feel like the tenets of a different person. That’s not to say they were ever abandoned, but the artist can only be known through their art. On WORRY., Rosenstock spits venom. It’s as if it was decided, early in the writing stage of this record, that punk rock was the definite aim. Songs like “Festival Song,” probably one of the best on the record takes umbrage with punk rock becoming a commoditized entity, through fashion and large-scale festivals. Lines like, “this is not a movement, it’s just careful entertainment for an easy demographic in our sweatshop denim jackets,” are just one of the many piercing lyrics that can make us reevaluate the Venn diagram where punk rock and complacency overlap. And ultimately, I think that’s what Rosenstock is primarily trying to do with a song like this. He’s shaking us by the collar and saying, “If we want punk rock to mean something to us we gotta take it from the people who want it to mean money.”

Just how pointed the lyrics are, across the entirety WORRY., is almost a little daunting. I could pick out caustic couplets from any number of the songs on this album, and that’s why it feels so damn punk. This is an angry album. Rosenstock is pissed about classism, slumlords, and how consumer focused society has become. There’s a lot of stuff going on here, and its never delivered in a less than convincing way. Never lapsing into conspiracy theory and self-congratulations, it instead, comes off as sarcastic and a little sad. And maybe that’s why its all the more effective. On “To Be a Ghost…” Rosenstock sings, “Born as a data mine for targeted marketing and no one will listen up until you become a hashtag or a meme.” When I heard that line, I didn’t care about political cabals and dynasties; the depressing truth is the one we opt in to ourselves, every day.

Where WORRY. falters slightly is in one of the same areas it succeeds magnificently. This is without the doubt the most Bomb the Music Industry! record Rosenstock has made since going solo. Bomb is my favorite band, without a doubt, but they weren’t ever faultless. Sharing the politics and ambition of BTMI! also opens WORRY. to some of the same hangups. What’s strange about this record is that it is both cohesive and woefully not. The first half is made up of traditional songs, the type you wouldn’t be surprised to see on any other Jeff album, and then the albums switches up at about the halfway point and offers this amazing suite of short songs (featuring ska, hardcore, and the shout along refrain, “we don’t wanna live inside a hellhole!”). It’s a great album, but at times it feels like two.

I wasn’t sure where WORRY. was going to end up in my personal ranking of Jeff Rosenstock related albums. Maybe, I’m still not sure. The fact remains, that this is a big album of big ideas delivered as viciously as they are catchily. What small faults I can find with the album are the result of the best of intentions. This is an album of chaotic creativity and unbridled talent, less about what punk rock is than what it could be at its best.

4.5/5



David McWane (Big D And The Kid’s Table) stars in short film “We Gotta Eat” (streaming for Halloween)

Big D vocalist David McWane has starred in a spooky short horror flick, titled “We Gotta Eat”. McWane stars alongside Brian Mcdonald and Ryan O’Connor in his latest  ”happening” which has been directed by Craig Shannon.

If you’re not out trick or treating, pumpkin carving or eating candy apples tonight, why don’t you check it out below.



Safe To Say release new music video for “Tangerine”

Toronto’s Safe To Say have a new music video out for their song “Tangerine,” and you can watch it below.

The track comes from the band’s latest full-length album, Down In The Dark, which came out this past July on SideOneDummy Records.



Jeff Rosenstock releases ‘making of’ video for new album “WORRY.”

Jeff Rosenstock has released a ‘making of’ video for his new album WORRY. The 22-minute video gives you a behind-the-scenes look at the recording of the LP. Check it out below.

WORRY. is set to release on October 14th through SideOneDummy Records. It will be Rosenstock’s 3rd solo album, following 2015′s We Cool?.



Microwave stream new album “Much Love”

Atlanta post-hardcore/punk act Microwave are streaming their new album, Much Love, in its entirety below.

The album was officially released September 30th, 2016 through SideOneDummy Records.



Jeff Rosenstock releases music video for new song “Planet Luxury”

Jeff Rosenstock has released a music video for a new song from his upcoming solo album WORRY. Check out the video for “Planet Luxury” below.

WORRY. is set to release on October 14th through SideOneDummy Records. It will be Rosenstock’s 3rd solo album, following 2015′s We Cool?.



Allison Weiss releases music video for “Back To Me” ahead of headlining tour

Pop-punk singer/songwriter Allison Weiss just put out a new music video for her song “Back To Me.” Check it out below.

The track comes from her album, New Love, which came out in October 2015 on SideOneDummy Records. About the song, Weiss says, “I love/hate that pop music makes you feel like everything is going to be okay… In my song, the narrator is ready to give up hope when suddenly a song comes on the radio that makes them believe again.”

The new video comes out just as Weiss hits the road for a string of shows with Josiah And The Bonnevilles and Thin Lips. You can see those dates/locations, along with the full tour poster, below the video.



Jeff Rosenstock announces new album “WORRY.” & releases video for single

Jeff Rosenstock has announced he will be releasing a new album titled WORRY. on October 14th through SideOneDummy Records. You can check out the cover art and tracklist, as well as the music video for a new song titled “Wave Goodnight to Me,” below.

WORRY. will be Rosenstock’s 3rd full-length album, serving as a follow-up to 2015′s We Cool?. Listen to another song from the record here, and head over to SideOneDummy’s webstore to get your pre-orders in.



Music Video: Microwave – “Vomit”

Atlanta post-hardcore/punk act Microwave have released a video for their song “Vomit.” You can check it out below.

“Vomit” comes from the band’s upcoming album, Much Love, which will be released September 30th, 2016 through SideOneDummy Records.



Album Review: Chris Farren – ‘Can’t Die’

Yes baby, yes yes baby. Chris Farren’s full length debut album, baby come on!

It’s true: the inevitable has happened. After a few years of releasing solo splits and EPs (and a Christmas album), and becoming an innovative fashion designer (did you see Will Smith receive a “The Smiths” shirt on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon?) as well as being one half of the perfect friendship/power-pop duo Antarctigo Vespucci, dear friend and punk celebrity Chris Farren has finally released Can’t Die, his proper full length solo album. Allegedly influenced by the realization that death isn’t just something that happens to other people, and he will, in fact, one day die, Can’t Die is the most fun funeral soundtrack you’ll ever hear.

Anyone who has been keeping up with Farren’s music over the last few years won’t be surprised by the pop-heavy direction he takes on Can’t Die. Since the last Fake Problems album, Farren has become somewhat of a master pop songwriter (and even back then he was writing songs like “Soulless,” a prototype of the mega anthemic hits he churns out today) and the songs that make up Can’t Die are no exception. It finds a balance between everything that Farren has done over the past several years- some tracks are more Vespuccian than others (“Human Being,” “Everything’s My Fault”), while others feel like secular gifts from God (or whatever) (“Brighter,” “Flowers”) but all the way through the album screams “Chris Farren.”  There are even a few tracks that mostly serve as transitional pieces between songs much like “IV” or “Chris Farren’s Disney’s Frozen” have done on previous releases.

Can’t Die is light and breezy, particularly for an album rooted in the fear of death. The result is a rather optimistic listen; one that can, and should be, enjoyed several times over to fully take in everything. With his main project having fallen into some kind of limbo (Strange Emotions was great but where’s the follow-up?), we should only be so lucky that Farren has continued to make music. It’s almost like one could say that he’s turned his lack of a band into some kind of a non-problem.

4 / 5

RIYL: Jeff Rosenstock, Allison Weiss, MouseRat



Chris Farren streams new album “Can’t Die”

Chris Farren (Fake ProblemsAntarctigo Vespucci, etc.) has made his new album Can’t Die available to stream, and you can give it a listen below.

Can’t Die is set to release on September 2nd through SideOneDummy Records. It will be Farren’s first full-length solo album.



Album Review: AJJ – “The Bible 2″

There’s a certain level of goodness that makes things hard to talk about, and maybe even harder to fully digest. There’s the very good, where perfection is attained and you’re left with the rather dull prospect of pounding out what sounds like hyperbole for four to six paragraphs. There’s very bad, that while more fun to write, is often a dedication of time and energy to describe something you most likely never cared about in the first place. And then, there is the pretty good– the okay– which leaves you sorting through tracks looking for the exact moment a listenable album just didn’t do enough to make you love it.

It’s never fun to write the latter. Because, for me, it oftentimes becomes a chronicle of when one of your favorite bands ceases to be your favorite. You all know the Frost line, “This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang but a whimper.” That’s how it always goes. A great band doesn’t just turn in an album that wrecks your appreciation of them in one mighty display of incompetence, usually it’s a simpler and subtle deviation from the roots that made you love them in the first place. Against Me! was one of those bands for me. Where I loved the first three, really liked the fourth, uncomfortably liked the fifth, and then Transgender Dysphoria Blues came out and finally solidified my alienation: this band isn’t mine anymore. And it wasn’t. But it wasn’t a bad record either, it just wasn’t for me. That was my whimper– no satisfying bang of hatred and confusion, just a whine and a “move along, folks, nothing to see here.”

AJJ (formerly Andrew Jackson Jihad) was my band for awhile. I remember watching videos of them with buddies, cringing and laughing aloud at some of their more cutting lyrics. They were an introduction into a punk I didn’t know existed. Watching them play on trains, on sidewalks, and wherever else they could was watching someone make good on all the promises punk made. People Who Can Eat People…, Can’t Maintain, and my favorite, Knife Man became veritable classics for me and my close group of friends. It just clicked.

And then Christmas Island came out and I liked most of it. It came burdened with production choices I couldn’t quite jump on board with, along with an increasing diminishing of their folk punk early days. But still, this was my band, damnit! I loved them still, and I met them halfway and ended up finding a bunch of songs I really dug.

And now, we have The Bible 2– a continuation of latter-day AJJ as much as it is a rebranding– packaged with the same codifying authority as a self-titled record. It calls in a deep booming voice: “Behold ye mighty and despair, we were Andrew Jackson Jihad, but now we are AJJ.” The new name comes with a new identity and it wouldn’t even be unfair to call this a first album by a new band. And while, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that the band would welcome this consideration, the similarities and love of what once was might be too hard to shake for some listeners.

This problem rears its head immediately, as a lot of The Bible 2’s faults are holdovers from Christmas Island. The vocal distortion effects are present, and they once again open the album with a fast punk track covered in them. “Cody’s Theme” (name checking the “kid who is most-likely named Cody” from “Angel of Death”– further solidifies the kinship between Christmas Island and The Bible 2) throws some synth melodies in too, but isn’t catchy or specific enough (save for the chorus, which I like decently enough) to form an attachment to.

And the thing is, everything is still there. Nothing has quite changed enough to say that they have turned their backs to their roots or have decided to go soft to get love from the kids. I believe the decisions they made were made in earnest. AJJ has a different focus than Andrew Jackson Jihad, and it maintains elements of the latter, but diminishes others. The greatest example is The Bible 2’s mission statement, detailed in the song title: “No More Shame, No More Fear, No More Dread.” They’ve switched gears into something vaguely positive and inspirational, like Christian rock for misfits. Of course, it is most likely agnostic and probably irreligious, but it carries the same sense of affirmation. No More Shame, No More Fear, No More Dread is the YOLO for teenagers who feel like they don’t belong.

If I’m being fair though, I have to admit that Sean Bonnette’s lyricism has grown on this album (while the more cynical part of me would say it has simply changed, politely excluding for better or for worse). Christmas Island was mostly decent, but it showed a trend of Bonnette giving into some of his worst tendencies as a songwriter, leaning hard on non-sequitur lists and free association surrealism. The Bible 2 feels more personal and focused overall, even adhering pretty well to its own themes, where Christmas Island felt a little scattered and less cohesive than the epic concept album that was Knife Man.

And, despite my whimpers, there are some great lyrics across The Bible 2, and some of the best songs here are the best AJJ has ever written. “Goodbye, Oh Goodbye” is one of its catchiest, and its bridge has one of my favorite lines across the album. “7th grade was hard enough/ Someone thought that they knew me/ If I stay in bed long enough/ They’ll go to church without me.” It’s packed with honest pathos and relatable imagery, while continuing the album’s themes of childhood, and how childhood experience forms us.

This theme is established early on in “Cody’s Theme,” but is brought to a satisfying conclusion with “Small Red Boy.” On it, Bonnette describes cutting a “small red boy” out of his stomach and uses it as a metaphor for the worst parts of all of us, and how they define, destroy, and ultimately provide us with beauty. Reading through the lyrics, while listening to its rumbling crescendo, it would be hard to believe that AJJ has or will ever write a better song.

And that’s what makes The Bible 2 disappointing in some respects. Where “Small Red Boy” is the AJJ I want, the one that I get is weighed down with forgettable songs and unpalatable effects. The best compliment I ever heard the band get was from one of my friends. He said, “Listening to them makes me uneasy.” That’s the AJJ I want, the band that finds beauty in destitution and depravity, that takes long unbroken gazes into the eyes of families on the verge of breaking, on the emotional collateral damage that’ll splatter brains across floral print wallpaper. This is the band that wrote, “Backpack,” a song that you’d probably choose to skip more times than not– and it might still be your favorite off Knife Man. Horror writer Jack Ketchum wrote this essay on violence in fiction, and it boiled down to the idea that as a writer, you shouldn’t “look away.” Violence is real and it is awful, and doing anything less than presenting it and everything it touches does it a disservice. Looking away makes it too easy, it makes it not real. The Bible 2 doesn’t share the same obsession with with transgression that made me fell in love with the band, it dips its toes every once and awhile, but it doesn’t want to tell us how drowning people’s lungs fill with water– it wants to pull them out of the ocean. I think both are valid. But, its not what I want to hear. Which brings us around to an uncomfortable truth worthy of the band at their most gnarly: maybe I’m not the audience anymore. They switched gears and I’m left wanting something they’re not really that interested in anymore. The album is chock-full of their new perspective and direction and the themes of rebirth and perseverance are enough to say that the move was intentional. Like after years of negativity and bullshit, someone just said, “Enough, enough, enough. This is no way to live.” Then one of them grabbed a self-help book, tried to find religion, and then did their best to reconcile it all with who they are and what they know.  There’s still a lot to like, even if its not what I wanted. But for me, it’s summed up as follows: AJJ was a band that didn’t look away. And on The Bible 2, they sometimes still don’t.

 

3.5/5