Search Results for "Rise Records"

Of Mice And Men release new video “Unbreakable”

Of Mice & Men have released a video for new single “Unbreakable,” the band’s first track without frontman Austin Carlile, who left them back in December. In his place, bassist/vocalist Aaron Pauley has stepped forward as lead vocalist. The track is up for stream/purchase now too, via Rise Records.

You can watch the video below.



The Flatliners release “Hang My Head” video

Toronto punks The Flatliners have released a music video for “Hang My Head”, taken from their new album Inviting Light. You can check it out below.

Inviting Light came out on April 7th and is The Flatliners’ first album on Rise Records. It follows their 2013 LP Dead Language, which was released through Fat Wreck Chords.



Album Review: The Flatliners – ‘Inviting Light’

The Flatliners are the definition of resolve and endurance. After making a splash with their ska-infused debut, 2005’s Destroy to Create, they have steadily honed their craft over 5 subsequent albums with their most recent being 2013’s Dead Language (discounting 2015’s B-sides collection Division of Spoils). Through constant touring and their unwavering adherence to a steadfast punk-rock ethos the band have created a solid fanbase that appreciate their dedicated, no-nonsense approach and unrelenting spirit. However a band cannot run on enthusiasm alone. After spending most of their adult lives touring and promoting, the band quickly came to the realization that they needed a break. Some time away to recapture that spark that made them an enduring punk band of the people.

It soon becomes apparent that that time away has been spent polishing the simple craft of writing tight arena ready rockers. Clearly evident on first song, “Mammals” which, after a brooding opening, states its intentions defiantly as it quickly darts to a razor sharp, buzzing chorus. It contains the bright and spiky pop-punk style they are know for but with a distinct edge, reminiscent of mid-period Against Me!. “Hang My Head” sees the band continue to strike that perfect balance between their poppy and caustic sides. The guitars ring rather than churn with the song quickly bounding to a delirious, anthemic chorus. It sounds supremely confident with the sturt and the swagger of a band who have full faith in what they are doing. “Nicotine Lips” sounds like a carry over from Dead Language, featuring energetic distorted power chords and catchy shout-a-long ‘woahs-woahs’. In the context of the album it provides the connective tissue between this and and their previous work. Nevertheless, it is striking how different the overall sound is on Inviting Light from what the band are known for.

The choppier, heavier songs that made up many of 2010’s Cavalcade’s finest moments are largely absent. Instead, the album is characterised by a fuller, broader sound with the focus on songcraft rather than the foot down, pop-punk that saw them draw comparisons with Dead To Me and Anti-Flag. For example, “Indoors,” rather surprisingly, finds them build a song on similar foundations to those of grunge stalwarts Pearl Jam. It’s a mid-tempo rocker assembled with spacious, echoing riffs and hefty 90s power chords before beating down the door to a yearning, powerful chorus. It’s here that frontman, Chris Cresswell, is really able to demonstrate how his voice has developed into a potent and commanding force whilst retaining that slightly bruised, insecure edge. Those Pearl Jam comparisons continue with “Unconditional Love” with the band channeling the Seattle band’s love of slightly more unorthodox and off-beat arrangements. It sees the band challenging their sound a little, showing a previously unheard experimental side. On the whole, these moments provide the triumphant backbone of the album.

Although, these moments do show the band developing their sound, they still fit the mould of mid-paced rockers, aimed squarely at the heart. While effective, at times they are in danger of feeling a little repetitive and formulaic as strummed guitars quickly lead to another big, rousing chorus. Songs such as “Burn Out Again,” “Infinite Wisdom,” and closer “No Roads” all follow a similarly worn blueprint. They lack the vitality of songs from their back catalogue, too often feeling like the safe option. Remarkably, it is the plaintive, tender punk ballad “Chameleon Skin,” which sees the band wholly succeed in finding a new formula. Cresswell’s wistful cries of “I don’t wanna remember who I am” are a stirring addition that will touch the heart of even the most hardened punk.

While Inviting Light is not a seismic shift, there is an obvious progression from their melodic pop-punk sound. It’s still loud and proud but it sees the band enter a more mature phase of their career. The sound is clearer and more accessible than any of their previous work with the abrasive edges polished down. Everything is carefully constructed with each song crafted to highlight the band’s ability to write hungry, anthemic choruses. However, the over reliance on mid-tempo rockers can get a little wearing. All in all Inviting Light is a testament to taking a step back and re-engaging with what you want from your band. It sees the band entering a new phase of their careers whilst ably demonstrating that they are in it for the long haul.

3.5 / 5 Stars



Eighteen Visions (metalcore) release new video for “Oath,” sign to Rise Records

This story keeps getting more and more real every day! Eighteen Visions have just signed to Rise Records and will be releasing their new album XVIII on June 2nd, 10 years after their breakup. Reunions are so, so sweet. You can pre-order the album here.

Check out the brand new video for “Oath” below.



Racquet Club (The Jealous Sound, Samiam & Knapsack) to release LP through Rise Records

Members of The Jealous Sound, Samiam, and Knapsack have formed a new band called Racquet Club. The group’s debut album will be released later this year through Rise Records. They will make their live debut on May 6th at the Resident in Los Angeles, CA.

You can listen to the band’s first single “Blood on the Moon” below.

We’ll keep you posted as more details on Racquet Club’s debut album come to light.



The Flatliners stream new album “Inviting Light” in its entirety

Today marks the release of Toronto punks The Flatliners‘ new album Inviting Light. The entire record is available to stream, and you can check it out below.

Inviting Light is the band’s first album on Rise Records. The Flatliners last released Dead Language in 2013 through Fat Wreck Chords.



Tiger Army and Murder By Death announce upcoming tour

Los Angeles psychobilly punks Tiger Army has announced that they will be touring with Murder By Death along with Tim Barry starting in June.

Check out tour dates and locations for the upcoming tour below.

The band released their last album, ‘V •••–’, via Rise Records on May 20, 2016.



At The Drive In release video for new track “Hostage Stamps”

At The Drive In have released a video for new track “Hostage Stamps”. The song is from their first new album in 17 years, “in•ter a•li•a”, out on May 5th. The album is out on Rise Records; it is the first since “Relationship of Command” in 2000.

You can watch the video below.



DS Photo Gallery & Show Review: Bouncing Souls in Santa Ana, CA (3.16.17)

As my username may suggest, the Bouncing Souls are my all-time favorite band. Seeing them live is always an amazing experience, but having the opportunity to shoot the show was a dream come true. After nearly 30 years in the punk scene, the Souls’ set it still infused with energy as if it is the first time they are gracing the stage. With 10 full length albums, there is no shortage of songs to comprise the setlist (anyone else lucky enough to catch the “For All The Unheard” shows back in 2011? The LA ones still rank as some of the best shows I have ever seen!).

The Bouncing Souls’ catalogue includes many anthemic sing-alongs for their hour+ long set, and this night at The Observatory in Santa Ana, CA was no exception. New songs were peppered in with all the old favorites, including “Anchors Aweigh,” “Kate Is Great,” “Ghosts on the Boardwalk,” “The Gold Song,” “Sing Along Forever,” “That Song,” “Writing On The Wall,” “Manthem,” and (of course) “Hopeless Romantic.”

I wish I could have seen the opening bands, but unfortunately, the LA to Orange County traffic on a Thursday prevented me from seeing Get Dead (and I walked in at the end of AJJ‘s set). The Souls alone were worth the hours in traffic and I can’t wait until Punk Rock Bowling in Vegas to see them again!

Check out the gallery from the show below.



The Flatliners stream new song ‘Indoors’

Canadian punks The Flatliners premiered their new song ‘Indoors’ today. The track appears on the band’s upcoming sixth studio LP, “Inviting Light”, out April 7 on Rise Records. The album is already up for pre-order here.

The band is heading out for some North American tour dates with LA rock veterans Weezer and some European dates with The Menzingers and The Dirty Nil later this month. You can find ‘Indoors’ and full tour dates below.



The Flatliners stream new song “Infinite Wisdom”

Toronto punks The Flatliners have premiered a new song from their upcoming album Inviting Light. The track’s called “Infinite Wisdom,” and you can check it out below.

Inviting Light is set to release on April 7th through Rise Records. It will be the band’s first release on the label. Their last album Dead Language came out in 2013 on Fat Wreck Chords.



DS Exclusive: Greg Attonito on the Bouncing Souls new single, “Battleground,” and maintaining a thirty-year music career

A little over a month ago and with little in the way of advanced fanfare, New Jersey punk icons The Bouncing Souls released a brand new single, “Battleground.” Included in the information distributed about the song at the time was a note that a portion of the proceeds from the single would be donated to the Indigenous Environmental Network, particularly surrounding that agency’s help in the fight in Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Inspired by the song and the corresponding video (watch it here), we caught up with the band’s frontman, Greg Attonito, for a chat about the unique song’s origin and message.

It’s important to mention rather prominently that “Battleground” was not a leftover track from the recording sessions for the band’s most recent album, last year’s Simplicity. It was, instead, inspired by much more recent events, and came from a source that should be familiar to most fans of the Souls, whether they realize the name Garrett Reppenhagen at first listen or not. “It all came about very quickly,” says Attonito. “It was December (2016), and a good friend of ours (Garrett Reppenhagen), was a sniper in the Iraq war and ended up becoming friends with the band…he was the person who provided lyrics to the song we wrote in 2006, “Letters From Iraq.” 

Reppenhagen has remained prominent in the activist community since returning from Iraq, and had launched a Kickstarted campaign to help raise money to buy supplies for a trip to Standing Rock. The band donated money to the cause, but it became apparent in relatively short order that they wanted to — and were able to — do more. “I was just thinking about how it would be cool to let the world know how we feel somehow, and literally the next day the lyrics came to me. I wrote them down and had a little guitar part. I texted to the guys, and right away they were like “this is a great idea.” 

From there, things moved quickly. The band were already set to get together to play a few shows in New York late last year, so Attonito and drummer George Rebelo changed their flights and the full Voltron that is the Bouncing Souls convened at guitarist Pete Steinkopf’s Asbury Park studio to flesh out the idea. We worked the song out in the early afternoon (of the first day back together). We set up the drums and started recording that night, and by the next afternoon, the song was recorded — vocals finished and everything.” 

The band enlisted the help of frequent collaborator Matt Gere to put together a video, and Gere decided to delve outside his normal comfort zone, making his first real foray into the process of animation. The result is a video that is unique in the Bouncing Souls canon, and syncs up well with the song’s overall message of standing together in the face of opposition. The finished product was actually ready for release early in January, but the band chose to table it’s release until just after the Presidential inauguration, for reasons that should be obvious. It’s a political song, it is not, for example, “Holiday In Cambodia.” Instead, it’s a quintessential Bouncing Souls, so it’s melodic and uplifting. Says Attonito, “the political songs for us have really been weird territory. Man, I love a good “Holiday In Cambodia” – those kinds of songs are just amazing, but we never could write songs like that. Not many people can.

Head below to read our full Q&A with Greg. We touch on a lot of material, but particularly focus on the changes in the band that occurred post-Comet, specifically once longtime drummer Michael McDermott parted ways with the band and their resulting — almost instantaneous — decision to recruit Hot Water Music drummer George Rebelo into the fold.

The Souls kick off a ten-day run in the western US alongside with support from Get Dead and The Bombpops next week, and just announced that they’ll be opening half of the upcoming Rancid/Dropkick Murphys co-headlining dates this summer. Check out dates here.



DS Photo Galley: Dave Hause and the Mermaid with Vapers and Rebuilder (Cambridge, MA)

In the handful of years since The Loved Ones went on their sort of indefinite hiatus (last year’s anniversary shows notwithstanding), Dave Hause hit the ground running as a solo artist, playing shows in the States and abroad as part of the Revival Tour or opening for acts like Alkaline Trio, Gaslight Anthem, Flogging Molly, etc. He added his younger brother, Tim, to the mix on guitar and keyboards when it came time to tour in support of his sophomore album, Devour, four years ago, and the two spent several years touring and eventually writing and recording together since.

For the release of his third album, Bury Me In Philly (February 3rd, Rise Records), Hause has assembled a full band, dubbed The Mermaid, consisting of his brother on (mostly) lead guitar, Bad Religion’s Jay Bentley’s son, Miles, on bass, fellow East-Coaster-turned-Californian Kevin Conroy on drums, and the infinitely talented Kayleigh Goldsworthy on keys and guitars and backing vocals. Prior to heading to Europe for their first official tour as a collective unit, Dave Hause and his newly formed backing band, The Mermaid, played a handful of bi-coastal US record release shows in support of his third solo album, Bury Me In Philly . The shows marked the first-ever time that Hause has performed with a full band since going it alone in the post-Loved Ones years, a very clear — yet potentially nerve-wracking — “next step” in his trajectory as a solo artist. If show #6 as a group is any sign of what’s to come, that trajectory is going to take a marked upturn in the very near future.

The quintet scorched through a sixteen-song set to a sold out crowd upstairs at the legendary Cambridge, Massachusetts, Middle East nightclub last Friday. While tracks from Bury Me In Philly took center stage in the set list, Hause’s first two solo albums were well represented in their own respective rights. It’s fair (and perhaps understated) to say that whether as a solo performer or as the leader of the family duo, the elder Hause has always taken full command of whatever stage he’s graced, engaging the crowd and performing as a full-on, band-leading frontman regardless of the setting or the size of the venue. Part of this ability stems obviously from his punk rock days, but part of it was out of necessity, as his engaging passion and honest intensity as a performer kept him from becoming a dime-a-dozen acoustic-wielding solo performer. And while Hause performing solo (or with only Tim as his accompaniment) will always be compelling, watching The Mermaid in action felt like it was meant to be.

The band gelled quickly, with no obvious signs that they’d been playing together in public for what amounts to less than a calendar week. Conroy and Bentley kept the ship steady and pushed the tempo and Goldsworthy, and accomplished musician in her own right, made her almost constantly changing duties come across almost effortless. The formation of the full band has allowed the younger Hause to take over a more prominent role, and he seems to be truly cherishing it. Tim’s immense talent and youthful energy seem not only increasingly natural on stage but inspirational to his frontman older brother, who appears to be relishing his roles as band leader and big brother in equal parts. Having a capable band at his back allows Hause to finally give older songs like “C’Mon Kid” and “Melanin” and personal favorite “Autism Vaccine Blues” the sort of the sort of full, pedal-down justice they deserve, and the five-piece genuinely seem to be having fun performing with each other in the process.

Direct support on this night (and the rest of the brief East Coast run) was provided by Vapers, a New York-based four piece (officially, though there were five on this night) outfit of semi-mysterious origin. Co-fronted by a couple of familiar faces, “Spanish Maria” Correonero and “Uncle Bernard” (the latter of whom looks eerily similar to Hause’s bud and fellow Loved One David Walsh) and backed by a couple of current and/or former members of Morning Glory, the band play a fun brand of poppy, garagey alternative punk that, at least from a sonic perspective, owes as much to the gritty, post-punk New York City (think Sonic Youth) of a decade ago as it does to the lo-fi hipster punk of present day Williamsburg. The sound is a little bit muddy and angular by design, keeping the band from sounding redundant or formulaic. Fun stuff; check them out.

 Local support on this night came from the mighty Rebuilder. I’m not entirely sure what else I can tell you about Rebuilder that I haven’t told you on these pages before, but they’re obviously my favorite band to come out of this part of the States in recent memory. While no doubt capable of commanding larger stages as will someday hopefully be the case, the five-piece certainly know what they’re doing in the role of local openers. The band got down to business quickly, ripping through eight songs with little downtime, perfectly filling their half-hour slot with a set tailored to the occasion. They ran through a couple of new songs from their upcoming EP, Songs From The Massachusetts Turnpike, that may be among the strongest songs they’ve written to date. Stay tuned for more on that…

…and head below for our full photo gallery from the sold-out, sweat-soaked evening!



River Oaks (Shane Told from Silverstein) announces dates with JT Woodruff (Hawthorne Heights)

Silverstein frontman Shane Told’s solo project River Oaks is to tour with JT Woodruff (Hawthorne Heights) and Heavy Things in May. The list of dates is below.

The tour is in support of River Oaks’ debut self-titled 7”, which came last year on Rise Records.



Knuckle Puck debuts new song, “Indecisive”

Chicago pop-punks Knuckle Puck are giving fans a taste of their latest music with a little ballad called “Indecisive,” and you can check it out below.

“Indecisive” will appear on a 7″ along with the track  “Calendar Days.”  You can keep an eye out for that on March 17th, when it is released by Rise Records.  Knuckle Puck’s debut full-length, Copacetic, came out in 2015 also on Rise Records.