Search Results for "Rise Records"

BL’AST! to release new album soon

In a posting on their official website, California punk legends BL’AST! announced that they will release their long-awaited new album sometime soon. The band simply wrote:

“New BL’AST! record in the works! Coming atchya soon! Quoted:”We don’t want to rush it, it’s going to be brutal” 2017″

We’ll keep you posted as more details (including the title and official release date) on the new BL’AST! record come to light. It will be their first studio album since 1989’s Take the Manic Ride. The band recently released their first song in more than 25 yearsCut Your Teeth”. They also previously released the album Blood! in 2013, which was a previously-unreleased album recorded in the 1980’s and remixed by Dave Grohl.



Dave Hause and the Mermaid announce upcoming tours with The Bronx, Frank Iero and the Patience

As you may have learned in our recent lengthy interview with Philly-turned-Californian songwriter Dave Hause, it’s fixing to be a pretty busy year for him and his new backing band, The Mermaid (which features, among others, his brother Tim on guitars and Jay Bentley’s son Miles on bass). Today, we’re getting a peak at just what that entails.

Hause will kick off a few weeks of mostly Canadian tour dates on a co-headlining tour with The Bronx in Vancouver on April 4th. That run extends through April 15th in Ottawa, at which time the band will head south and join up with Frank Iero and the Patience in Brooklyn on April 18th for a US tour that runs until May 11th in San Francisco. Check out full details of all of the band’s aforementioned tour dates below.

Hause is touring in support of his stellar third full-length, “Bury Me In Philly,” which was released last Friday (February 3rd) on Rise Records.



T.S.O.L. release music video for “I Wanted to See You”

California punk legends T.S.O.L. have released a music video for “I Wanted to See You,” taken from their new album The Trigger Complex. You can check it out below.

The Trigger Complex came out on January 27th through Rise Records. It is the follow-up to 2009’s Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Free Downloads.



DS Interview: Dave Hause Goes West and Gets Hopeful on “Bury Me In Philly”

This might be a bit of an abnormal way to start a lengthy feature piece about the pending release of an artist’s latest album, but in the interest of full disclosure, yours truly considers Dave Hause’s sophomore album, 2013’s Devour, to be the pinnacle of his personal list of ‘desert island’ albums. Very few, if any, albums have had the kind of immediate impact on me that that one did, and it’s only become more compelling — and more deeply personal — due to a variety of real-life issues that have transpired since its release. (Quick anecdote: the first time I heard Devour standout track “Autism Vaccine Blues” was live in concert when Hause opened for Flogging Molly in Boston, and I vividly recall my brother and I looking at each other when the track was over, each only able to mutter an awe-struck “Whoa…” — that’s the only time that’s ever happened in the many hundreds of band performances I’ve ever seen).

And yet, to paraphrase what a wise man once said, you don’t really exist as an artist until the release of album number three. And so it is that on February 3rd, Hause will release his third full-length album as a solo artist, a feat he has not accomplished with any prior musical endeavor (The Loved Ones went on indefinite hiatus after two albums. Paint It Black released three albums, but Hause appears only on the band’s 2003 debut, CVA). The idea that this is his third album with any one musical project seems to resonate especially loudly to the Philly-turned-Cali songwriter “It’s interesting to be hitting the point where I’ve had more releases and more time spent and more records sold and more shows played as a solo guy than I did in the Loved Ones,” he points out, adding that it would take twenty years for some of his musical peers who’ve undertaken similar solo endeavors  (Chuck Ragan, Tim Barry, Brian Fallon, etc) to accomplish.

To say that there was a chance that solo album number three never saw the light of day is not overstating the matter. “I struggled for a while to get the record done,” explains Hause, adding that he “struggled with, well, did I want to continue making music or go back to being a carpenter?” For all of its immense virtue, Devour tugs on some weighty, dark heartstrings, telling equally of the tale of the demise of Hause’s marriage and the realization that our generation was sold a bill of goods by our immediate predecessors. Following up the gravity of that subject matter represented tough, uphill sledding to say the least.

But a lot has happened for Hause since 2013, not the least of which are a new engagement, a cross-country move to the California coast, and a deepening personal and professional relationship with his kid brother, Tim. Ever the razor-sharp observational songwriter, it was only a matter of time before the creative juices got flowing, though the path may have been a little more circuitous than normal. “The producer that I was working with (in the early post-Devour days) was not hearing what I was hearing in any of the demos,” says Hause. “He was, like, unpleasable. So that part of it was really frustrating.”

So ho better to bring in when you’re feeling stuck and frustrated, then, than…your kid brother, Tim, who’s more than a decade your junior? For the unaware, Tim made his touring debut playing keyboards and guitar on the 2014 tour in initial support of Devour, and fulfilled the same role on the two-month nationwide tour that Hause did alongside Chris Farren in support of Rocky Votolato the following year. While it initially fell during that aforementioned period of songwriting frustration, the tour proved fruitful in more ways than one. “I was complaining on that tour,” says Hause, “and I was like ‘I don’t know about this whole Santa Barbara thing; I feel like I haven’t seen a black girl in twenty-eight days’ and (Tim) said ‘that’s what you need to be writing about!‘” As Farren astutely pointed out at the time, such stuck points in writing tend to be followed by a flood of ideas, and that proved to be the case here, albeit eventually.

I’ve always been pretty jealous of guys who have musical soulmates,” says Hause, explaining that while he felt lucky to have such counterparts in his earlier bands The Curse and Step Ahead, those partners were “lost to the crush of working class pressure!” (One owns a beer distributor outside Philly, the other is a teacher.) He found that Lennon/McCartney — or at least Steinkopf/Keinlen or Ragan/Wollard — connection again — hopefully once and for all — in his brother, Tim. “He has this really old soul,” says the elder Hause, a certain sense of wisdom that comes from having lived through the death of his mother when he was a child and his best friend in rather public fashion in more recent years. That wisdom “helps us relate on most matters,” says big brother, quickly continuing that “he’s also got this youthful energy that impacts on ways that I wouldn’t necessarily look at things…. He doesn’t have any punk rock guilt, he’s just fierce and he’s really creative.”

Once Hause brought his brother in the fold, a chance introduction to a childhood musical hero, Eric Bazilian of Philadelphia-based rock band The Hooters (best known for their 1985 radio staple “And We Danced,” and less well known for being the band that a then-seven-year-old Hause saw as his first concert) led to Hause’s renewed passion for songwriting. “I played the material I had for Eric and also for Dan Andriano and Pete Steinkopf, because I was driving myself crazy…and all of a sudden it became clear that I was just not working in the right environment.” Hause severed ties with the producer he’d been frustrated with, and Bazilian and William Wittman subsequently signed on to engineer and produce Hause’s third album. Collectively, Bazilian and Wittman have worked with a veritable “Who’s Who” of rock musicians who maintain melodic pop sensibilities: Cyndi Lauper, The Outfield, The Hold Steady, Scorpions, and on and on and on. While certainly not household names in the punk rock scene, they proved to be the ideal collaborators to pull on Hause’s strengths as a songwriter without shying away from Hause’s punk sensibilities. “They were very vigilant with the punk roots thing,” says Hause, explaining that he has “definitely heard over the course of making the first two solo records that ‘you really need to dial back your punk roots.’ Bill and Eric were not afraid of bands like The Clash or Green Day or The Buzzcocks as reference points in the studio.”

Once principle work with Bazilian began, things took shape quickly. “The biggest learning experience with this album is to trust your gut,” says Hause, “to do the work and not second-guess yourself. Some of those songs (that ended up on Bury Me…) are exactly the way they originally spilled out on the first try, so it’s a lesson you’ve got to keep learning I guess as a creative type.” What resulted was not only the end product that is Bury Me In Philly, Hause’s most wide-ranging album to date, but also a whole lot more. “I wrote a ton of songs,” he explains, “I have another whole record that’s already tracked, it just needs to be mixed.” There’s also another All Brights EP in the can and due for release this coming Spring, plus another EP worth of what Hause calls “post-Devour malaise,” and “what could end up being a new Loved Ones record.”

Moving to California and falling in love seem to have inspired our friend Dave in new directions, ways that he hasn’t been inspired in quite some time, and the lyrics on Bury Me In Philly reflect that bit of newfound optimism. “Sadness and frustration and all of the things that (Devour) was squeezing out give you a false sense of being more compelling than joy and happiness do,” reflects Hause. “I think I’ve learned that that is A) not true and B) (joy and happiness) pull on a different set of heartstrings.” On songs like “The Mermaid,” “Helluva Home,” and “Divine Lorraine,” Hause branches out, incorporating different sonic elements than we might be used to, while still maintaining those elements that make a Dave Hause song a textbook Dave Hause song. He explains: “I think there’s a thing that you would identify, if you were playing a Dave Hause song, whether it’s a Loved Ones song or a solo song, that’s my thing. That straight-up, “No Surrender” influenced punk rock thing that a lot of us in our genre are pretty good at. Whether it’s “Lean On Sheena” or whatever, we all do that thing. But I’m never all that interested in just cranking out ten of those. None of my favorite bands did that.”

There’s also a sense of gratitude that comes through on songs like “The Ride,” gratitude not only from his new relationship but fueled at least in part by Hause quitting booze and drugs. That latter decision came at the beginning of the aforementioned tour with Votolato and noted O’Douls connoisseur Farren, and has continued in the eighteen months that have followed. “Touring is grueling, and drinking heavily is grueling on your ability to get more than one thing done,” he states. “It’s just easier to get all kinds of things done when your goal is not to get to the party or to get fucked up, and then the next morning you’re sort of shaking that goal off and trying to get other things done…with that off the table, your plate starts to clear up a little.” 

Quintessentially Californian references to twelve-dollar juices aside, Hause’s newfound penchant for cleaner living doesn’t quite take center stage on Bury Me In Philly, and that’s by design. “There’s a handful of songs that I wrote that lyrically deal head on with that, and we didn’t put them on the record on purpose,” Hause explains, instead choosing to take his time letting that particular music see the light of day once it’s been aided by the context that only time can provide. “It’s such well-worn ground lyrically that I’ve got to figure out what the angle is on it that’s compelling to me.” Hause explains that while he’s not working a specific program of sobriety, he’s been inspired personally and professionally by the idea of taking things one day at a time. “The clarity that has come (from that mentality) allows me to compress in a different way, and I have a lot of gratitude for being able to do that…Instead of reaching for a bottle of Jameson when the thought of all that pressure comes on, it’s kind of like “okay, let’s just figure out the first problem and we’ll tackle the rest of it as it comes”.” 

With kid brother Tim by his side, Hause is gearing up to hit the road as a solo artist accompanied by a full band for the first time. Named The Mermaid, the band also features Miles Bentley on bass. If the last name sounds familiar, he’s the son of Bad Religion bass player and de facto manager Jay Bentley. Jay proved inspirational to the Hause brothers on their recent nationwide tour together (along with Against Me!), and it was Tim’s decision to carry that family feeling forward when it came time to put together a band. They’ll all combine to give the album its full due; tours of Europe, the States, Canada and Australia are in the works, and Hause seems fired up to get rolling, just like he was in his early, post-Loved Ones days as a solo artist. “I hustled, and that comes from my working-class background,” says Hause. After the economy collapsed a half-dozen years ago, Hause’s construction business dried up. “I couldn’t swing a hammer because there was no money left in it, so I said ‘well, I guess I’ll go strum’.”

That mentality continues to fuel Hause’s artistic fire. “I approach this record just like I approached (his debut solo album, Resolutions). I think that maintaining that sense that there’s a lot of great music out there and I’m not entitled to any of your ears (is vital),” meaning that if he found his way into your ears and, by extension, your hearts, he’s more than earned it. “I think that’s the way to go, because you can’t assume anything these days.” The full-band accompaniment raises the stakes for Hause, but he seems hellbent on doing the work it’ll take to succeed. It’s a little bit scary, but we’re gonna do the work that it takes to take on whatever comes next. In general, socially, I need to be thinking that way as an adult with the current political climate. Like I don’t know what’s next, but where’s the shovel, I’ll get digging!

Head below to read our admittedly lengthy interview. We cover quite a bit of the current political climate as you might imagine, all while extolling the wide-ranging virtues of Bad Religion, The Hold Steady, and 80’s radio gods Bryan Adams and Rick Springfield. There’s also a story about how Chuck Ragan, Brian Fallon and Dan Andriano are responsible for the lack of recent Loved Ones material, and how in spite of living in California, he may be more of a Philadelphian than ever. And as you might have guessed for an artist from the City of Brotherly Love, there’s plenty about Tim and his influence.

Bury Me In Philly is out February 3rd via Rise Records.

 



Dave Hause streams new album “Bury Me In Philly”

Dave Hause is streaming new Rise Records album “Bury Me In Philly”, ahead of Friday’s release. Physical pre-orders are up now.

You can listen to the 11 track record below.



Bouncing Souls release new song “Battleground”

New Jersey punk veterans The Bouncing Souls have released a new song titled “Battleground.” The band will be donating a portion of proceeds from the sale of this track to the Indigenous Environmental Network.

You can give “Battleground” a listen below, and buy it on iTunes.

The Souls’ latest album Simplicity was released in July, 2016 through Rise Records. They will soon be embarking on a west coast tour.



T.S.O.L. releases lyric video for “Satellites”

California punk legends T.S.O.L. have released a lyric video for their new song, “Satellites,” and you can check it out below.

The song will appear on the band’s new album, The Trigger Complex, which comes out tomorrow (January 27th) via Rise Records.  This will be T.S.O.L.’s first album since 2009’s Life, Liberty and the Pursuit Of Free Downloads.



New Music: T.S.O.L. – “Satellites” from upcoming album, “The Trigger Complex”


So Cal punk legends T.S.O.L. are streaming another new track from their upcoming album, “The Trigger Complex.” It’s called “Satellites,” and you can check it out here.

“The Trigger Complex” is the band’s eleventh studio album, and their first release since 2009’s “Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Free Downloads.” It’s out on Rise Records this coming Friday (January 27th); pre-orders are still available here.



Hot Water Music will release new album, first in 5 years

About six months ago, we reported on the rumblings of new material from Hot Water Music, and now it looks like it’s official!  Chuck Ragan recently told The Punk Site that the band is officially in the studio, working on new music for a 2017 release.  This will be the band’s first album since Exister came out five years ago.

Ragan had this to say about the new music:  “Energy is high, vibes are good so to say the least, we’re stoked to have this new record underway. We owe everything to our loved ones for standing by us all these years of us continuing this path. Without their support, we would’ve run out of fuel quite some time ago. Our fans have been a constant inspiration as well. A beautiful community of music lovers that share the same vision and ethics that this band was born into and continues to share through songs. Thank you for all the years of support and always going above and beyond the call whenever it came to making it to our shows to sing your hearts out. Our gratitude is much more than what I could ever put into words. We’ll be trucking along in the studio and looking forward to getting everyone some new music soon.”

Needless to say, we’ll keep you posted as more information about the new album comes out.



The Bouncing Souls announce West Coast tour

New Jersey punk icons The Bouncing Souls have announced dates for a west coast tour, which will take place this March. The band will be supported by AJJ, Get Dead and The Bombpops.

Dates and locations can be found below.

The Bouncing Souls released their latest album Simplicity in July, 2016. It was their first album in 4 years, serving as the follow-up to 2012’s Comet.



Brakrock Eco Festival 2017 announces first bands

As if Belgium didn’t already offer enough festivals for the punk rock fan already, they just had to go and make at least one 2017 trip to their small nation completely unavoidable by adding yet another. Brakrock Eco Festival will be celebrating their fifth year as a festival with a truly amazing lineup. The artists announced so far include but are not limited to: 7Seconds, 88Fingers Louie, Real Mckenzies, Chixdiggit, DOA and Pears.

We think you’ll agree that the lineup is already starting to give Groezrock a run for its money. You can check out the full list of artists and get information about the festival at their official website.



Aim Higher (Kevin Seconds) debut 7″ released

Kevin Seconds’ home recording hardcore project, Aim Higher, has its debut EP release – a 4 song, 7″ out on Rise Records. The “Homemade EP” is up now on iTunes, with a splatter vinyl version, limited to 500 copies, up for order now.

Stream EP track “Mouth Of A Stranger” below.

 



A Loss For Words stream new song “I Feel An Army In My Fist” (feat. Andrew Neufeld of Comeback Kid)

Boston pop-punk band A Loss For Words are streaming a brand new song called “I Feel An Army In My Fist”, the second single from the band’s upcoming album, Crises. The song features guest vocals from Comeback Kid’s Andrew Neufeld, you can check it out below.

The band will be releasing their final album, Crisis, on December 27th via Rise Records, exactly one year after the bands final show. It will follow their 2013 full-length, Before It Caves, which was released on October 8, via Velocity Records and Rise Records.



Dave Hause announces new solo album “Bury Me In Philly,” streams lead single “With You”

Dave Hause has announced he will be releasing his third solo album Bury Me In Philly on February 3rd, 2017 through Rise Records. He has also premiered the lead single “With You,” and announced a European tour in support of the LP.

You can give the new song a listen and find more details on the album and tour below.

Bury Me In Philly will serve as the follow-up to Hause’s 2013 full-length Devour. Head over here to get your pre-orders in for the album.



A Loss For Words announce final album, premiere new music video

Boston pop-punk group A Loss For Words will be releasing their final album, Crisis, on December 27th via Rise Records, exactly one year after the bands final show.

The band has also released a video for the new song “Existential Crisis at the Cask ‘n Flagon,” which you can check out below.

A Loss For Words last released Before It Caves on October 8, 2013 via Velocity Records and Rise Records.