Search Results for "DS Editorial"

Save WhySound (Or, On the Importance of Small Town DIY)

Adam Stiletto (center) with Melodic Hardcore act Lifelink
All photos by Sativa Evans

One of the many joys of this gig is getting to meet awesome people from all over the world who have a passion for this Scene as much as me. Not that I’m bursting at the seams with punk pride or anything, it’s just that I grew up in a small town where people weren’t like me. So, I always embrace the chance to meet like minded individuals. One such individual sent me an unsolicited Facebook friend request a year or two ago (see, some people actually find me charming). I passively watched my daily feed fill up with his posts about incredible shows he was putting on at his venue or promoting some band that no one had ever heard of with the fervor of a six year old on Christmas morning. I didn’t even realize for months that this guy was in Logan, Utah until we started interacting a little more. ”How is there such an active scene in B.F.E, Utah?” I thought to myself. What is this kid? The Johnny Appleseed of punk, spreading seeds of the scene throughout the Cache Valley, nurturing them with all his might in hopes that they will one day bear fruit? Well, the short answer, surprisingly is yes! This Johnny AppleScene (no?) has been proving for years, that the DIY ethos that makes our community so great can get shit done against heavy odds and under unlikely circumstances. Now, it’s time for our community to show that the same self sufficient, “circle the wagons” attitude can keep this small but thriving scene in Northern Utah alive. If you are a punk at heart, you will really want to give this one a read. Check out more on this story and find out how you can help below!



A first timer’s impressions of Punk Rock Bowling 2016

Punk Rock Bowling came and went this Memorial Day weekend in a sun-seared flash and for the first time, I was burning with it. I dragged my pretty green eyes out of the pretty green city I call home and took my first step to a weekend of firsts. First fest, first plane trip, first time in Vegas.

This won’t be a thorough recount of setlists. I don’t know enough of every band’s catalog to make that happen. This is intended as a way to capture what Punk Rock Bowling is, for those of us who haven’t themselves to first yet. This is about the experience, because the experience transcends a festival lineup.

You can read the tale of my first trip to Punk Rock Bowling in its entirety below.



Show Review: Spanish Love Songs, Melted, Rayner, Born Rivals – Los Angeles 5/20/2016

Spanish Love Songs

Some of the best shows in Los Angeles can be found in the San Fernando Valley. Not that the crowds are huge or the acts are world renowned. It’s more about intimacy and the quality of the performances. The smaller shows in bars and pubs aren’t usually things to highlight unless you’re in a large city like LA or New York. Places where the talent pool is so deep that loads of promising young artists (and even some well known acts) hone their craft at tiny venues on a consistent basis in their time off between touring. A few weeks back, we were invited to attend one of these inconspicuous events on the ‘wrong side of the hills’. So, to prove our point, we dragged LA based staffer, AnarchoPunk out of his gutter, scrubbed him up a bit and sent him over to The Surly Goat in Encino to check out some of the biggest names in up and coming punk acts at this cozy concert in the 818. Check out his full review (and some shitty pictures) below!



Musings and stuff to watch for at Punk Rock Bowling

Two of our Scenesters are going to Punk Rock Bowling this year with big plans to lose some hearing and party till Memorial Day is yesterday. As one would suspect, they are pretty stoked. We had them write out what they were looking forward to this year to share with you the excitement and spectacle of one of punk rock’s biggest fests. If you plan on going yourself, or just want to gaze longingly from afar, here are some thoughts, musings, hopes, and dreams from our two Vegas-bound writers.

So, here it is: Carson Winter and AnarchoPunk weigh in on what to be amped about at this year’s Punk Rock Bowling.



Fifteen Years of Raising Hell: Part I – Revisiting “Lucero”

We’ve all got those bands. Bands that not only have a way of writing songs that strike us right in our respective emotional cores, but have a fundamental way in altering how we listen to music. Hell, if you’ve been actively listening to music long enough (and let’s be honest, if you’re reading a story about a band like Lucero on a site like Dying Scene, you’re probably an active music listener), you’ve undoubtedly got a metric ton of those bands. The band that first made you fall for punk rock. The band that first broke you from your childhood love of manufactured pop music. The band whose style you copied and adopted as your own. The band that wrote songs that made you realize that music could be intense and personal and still make you laugh your ass off. The band that first got you to care about politics/social causes or made you break out the thesaurus/dictionary/Google search bar. The band that first wrote songs that made you understand…like, really understand…pain and loss and heartache.

Which brings us to Lucero. The genre-bending Memphis band just rounded the corner on fifteen years since the launch of their self-titled debut full-length. Released May 22, 2001 (MadJack Records), Lucero marked the result of three years of cutting their collective teeth as songwriters and, perhaps most notably, one of the hardest-drinking, hardest-working bands in the game. The album dropped with relatively little fanfare, at least by today’s standards; looking back, there was never really a clear moment when the band burst on the national stage or took the scene by comparative storm. What the album’s release did do, however, was put an official time and date stamp on the beginning of what would become a slow build of a career rooted in earnestness and authenticity that would find them a home in myriad genres. Or, perhaps more accurately, eschewing labels and creating their very own genre.

To honor the occasion, Dying Scene decided to revisit Lucero’s self-titled debut album. From there, the project took off, thus the reason this particular installment is labelled “Part I.” You see, over the course of the last decade-and-a-half, Lucero the band has taken on a level of importance that long since eclipsed the relative importance of Lucero, the album. So what happened as this story developed was a shift in ideas, from a story celebrating Lucero as an album, to a story celebrating Lucero as a band and all of the things that that entails; their continually evolving sound, their devoutly loyal fanbase, their rightful place at the flash point of some rather sizable changes in the punk rock landscape. To do Lucero justice, it’s certainly not enough to hear the long-winded ravings of a Dying Scene editor and Lucero fanboy (don’t you worry, though, there will still be plenty of that in the space below). Throughout the process, however, we called on some singer/songwriter friends to have them chime in on what sets Lucero, the band and the album, apart from the rest of the field.  So grab a whiskey and head below to view our revisit of Lucero (with a little help from Dave Hause and Sal Medrano), and stay tuned later in the week for a longer, entertaining piece on the band at large!



Long Live the Stabb!

Stabb on the MicOn May 7th, the music world said goodbye to the self-described “Clown Prince of Punk.” John “Stabb” Schroeder, frontman of hardcore band Government Issue (G.I.), lost a four month battle with stomach cancer.

Like many DC punk musicians, Stabb started performing in his teens and continued to create new music throughout his lifetime. From recording one of Dischord’s first releases in G.I., to his more recent acts Weatherhead, Betty Blue, Factory Incident, and History Repeated, John continually performed, recorded, and influenced others. He proved punk music’s support of individuality by trading the leather and jeans uniform for a business suit in an effort to become, “The David Letterman of punk rock.” His energy at live show and his mix of politics and humor helped make G.I. a staple in 80’s DC hardcore.

Stabb endlessly supported and contributed to the music scene and, after becoming ill and facing huge medical bills, the scene returned the favor. A gofundme page was set up which raised over 50 thousand bucks from online auctions, including gems like a GI skate deck signed by GBH and the autographed Damned poster that’s still available. The long-established DC music venue, The Black Cat, also hosted a Boycott Cancer fundraiser two Sundays ago. Unfortunately, it became one that John would never see, passing away two days before the show. The fundraiser instead turned into a wake. GIVE, Jawbox’s J. Robbins (who played bass in G.I.), and Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth, took the stage to pay respects to a DC legend.

Though the 54 year old no longer lives, his contributions to music continue through every band and fan inspired by his work. Pay your respects by putting on some Government Issue today, then going to Johnstabb.com and www.gofundme.com/Boycottcancer to help support his wife Mina cover funeral costs.



Albums Punk Forgot: Million Dead – ‘Harmony No Harmony’

Albums Punk Forgot is a look back at excellent or important records within our community that, for one reason or another, have been lost or forgotten. It’s a tribute to those bands and releases that deserved to be heard, but maybe for some reason dropped off our radars too soon. We at Dying Scene hope to give these records the credit they deserve.

Today DS writer Robolitious takes a look back at Million Dead’s Harmony No Harmony and its underrated place in post hardcore history. You can read his take on the album below.



March’s Hidden Gems of Bandcamp

Thirteen Towers

As the country thaws from the tedious, cold Winter and daylight starts seeping into the evening hours, we’re reminded that the coming months will be filled with freshness and new life as Spring slowly begins to roll in. Flowers will bloom, animals will emerge from their caves after extended lengths of time spent in slumber and the long frozen, brown earth will gently change hue to a more virile, lush green. It’s with this same sense of rejuvenation and rebirth that we present you with this month’s Hidden Gems of Bandcamp! Time to spruce up that playlist a little with some fresh new tunes for your listening portals! This month, our punk rock prognosticators have returned with seven, slick, burgeoning bands that they’re betting you’ve never heard of. Check ‘em out below!



Why I Miss Leathermouth (And You Should Too)

25 mentions of murder. 16 mentions of suicide. 23 mentions of self-loathing. 2 mentions of school shootings. 1 song title threatening the president. 5 dudes. 1 album. An endless amount of morbid fun.

If you’re unfamiliar with Leathermouth, the Jersey band was what your worst nightmares are made of. Fronted by Frank Iero, the guitarist of now defunct My Chemical Romance, Leathermouth spent a hot three years shredding faces in New Jersey basements and beyond, eventually branching out to the Skate and Surf Festival. It’s been 6 years since the band has played together, and I haven’t been able to shut up about it since.

Read the rest below.



An Evening with the Honorable Chris Fox – Part Three (or, The Big Letdown)

From L to R: John Underwood of Dirty Kid Discount; Staff Writer AnarchoPunk; Chris Fox of Vampirate’s & Boss’ Daughter

Night had unfurled it’s inky tendrils across the Central Basin and to no surprise, the rain had still ceased to fall on the desperately dry City of Angels when last we left our plastered, punk rock protagonists. The backyard was almost at capacity as the main acts of the night, John Underwood and Chris Fox, were nearing their performances. Everything was going according to plan, but one of the drawbacks to hanging with a schlub like AnarchoPunk is the constant, looming presence of Murphy and his stupid Law that seems to follow him around. So, if you’re a fan of disappointment in general, disgruntled neighbors who obviously don’t appreciate good music or ‘Nilla Wafers, join us for the infuriating finale below!



An Evening With The Honorable Chris Fox – Part Two

From L to R: John Underwood of Dirty Kid Discount; Staff Writer AnarchoPunk; Chris Fox of Vampirate’s & Boss’ Daughter

Evening had set in and the first act of the night had just left the stage when last we left our intrepid and inebriated Los Angeles correspondent, AnarchoPunk and his bearded brethren, John Underwood and Chris Fox. The backyard was beginning to fill in with punks of all types, a thin layer of marijuana smoke hovering ever so slightly above their heads and the faint aroma of cheap beer in the cool night air, raising up from golden puddles, where 40 oz bottles had been carelessly kicked over. If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to hang out with legit, up and coming punk artists midway through a tour at a back yard pot luck folk punk show in the Greater Los Angeles area, you’ve come to the right place (although that’s a very specific thing to ponder about). Continue the saga below!



DS Editor Bizarro Dustin on why “My First Punk Song” misses its mark and spreads the wrong ideas

Is there anything worse than a bad song on a nearly perfect album? Probably, but for the sake of our series, Seeing Red, there isn’t. In Seeing Red we ask our staff writers to talk about the songs that they hate on albums that they love.

Today we have Dying Scene Content Manager Bizarro Dustin dissecting the supposed humor of Box Car Racer’s “My First Punk Song” off their 2002 debut, Box Car Racer. You can read their over-analyzed opinions below.



An Evening With The Honorable Chris Fox – Part One

From L to R: John Underwood of Dirty Kid Discount; Staff Writer AnarchoPunk; Chris Fox of Vampirates & Boss’ Daughter

Reno, Nevada gets cold as hell in the winter. So, it’s no surprise that John Underwood from the folk punk troupe Dirty Kid Discount (profiled in September’s Hidden Gems of Bandcamp) was looking to get down to SoCal to avoid the doldrums of the frigid, grey confines of The Biggest Little City in the World for a few weeks to thaw out. Thus was born The Winter West Tour, which started up in Washington state in Mid-January and worked its way down the Pacific Coast before making its way back up to Reno for the finale on February 10th. Halfway through the tour, John was joined by fellow Reno resident and frontman of the up and coming punk act, Boss’ Daughter, Chris Fox. While I don’t get paid monetarily for the (exceptional?) work I do here at the Scene, I do get compensated in other ways. Getting into shows for free is a pretty cool perk, access to the press pit is a useful benefit as well. My favorite perquisite by far though is getting to meet people I wouldn’t otherwise have the chance to.  Sometimes, through those connections, I even find people that I share so much in common with that we hit off pretty well. Such is the case with Mr. Fox and myself. After getting to know him through email for an article I was writing, we became fast friends. So needless to say, when I noticed that the boys had a scheduled stop in LA, I knew it was a “can’t miss” show for me. Check out part one of my hybrid show review/interview below in this DS Exclusive!



Albums Punk Forgot: Osker – ‘Idle Will Kill’

Idle Will Kill

Albums Punk Forgot is a look back at excellent or important records within our community that, for one reason or another, have been lost or forgotten. It’s a tribute to those bands and releases that deserved to be heard, but maybe for some reason dropped off our radars too soon. We at Dying Scene hope to give these records the credit they deserve.

Today DS writer Robolitious takes a look back at Oskar’s Idle Will Kill and its vast, if not subtle, influence on modern punk. You can read his take on the album below.



DS Writer Matmoksik On Why Rise Against’s “Last Chance Blueprint” Makes Him Cringe

Is there anything worse than a bad song on a nearly perfect album? Probably, but for the sake of our series, Seeing Red, there isn’t. In Seeing Red we ask our staff writers to talk about the songs that they hate on albums that they love.

Today we have Dying Scene writer Matmoksik, who brings up his problems with the unnecessary movie samples in Rise Against’s “Last Chance Blueprint” from their 2003 record, Revolutions Per Minute. You can read his thoughts below.