Search Results for "Interview"

The Offspring’s Noodles hopes new album will be released this year

It’s been approximately five years since The Offspring released their last album Days Go By, but in a recent interview, guitarist Noodles expressed hope that their long-awaited follow-up to that album will be released this year, and revealed that they have tracked down four new songs.

He said, “We’re hoping to get it out this year, yeah! We’ve been working on it. It’s going real slow. [laughs] We’ve been in and out of the studio for a few years now. We want to get some songs out before we did the whole record. Like, “Coming for You,” whenever that was released.”

Noodles was also asked if the new album has a title yet, and his response was, “No, not until we have a bunch of songs that are kind of cohesive. We’re not really far enough along to figure out a vibe or concept. We have about four songs that are done. Not even at the halfway point yet.”



Social Distortion to hit the studio this fall?

Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness recently gave Phoenix New Times an update on the band’s long-awaited new album, revealing that his goal is to enter the studio by fall. He explains:

“It has to be organic. You know it’s like ‘I want to finish three songs by this tour’, and then I do that and I can’t even think anymore. ‘Is that the best line I can write or am I trying to meet a deadline?’

“My goal is to be in the studio by Fall. Unfortunately, I have to write the record of my career right now. That’s the pressure I put on myself.”

This isn’t the first of recent updates on the new Social D record that we’ve covered. Nearly a month ago, Mike said that the band had approximately 20 new songs completed, and then a week-and-a-half ago, he hinted at entering the studio in about six months. Whenever the new record arrives, it will be the band’s first since 2011’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes.



Mike Ness offers (yet another) update on new Social Distortion album

After reporting a-week-and-a-half ago that they were working on approximately 20 new songs, Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness gave The Pacific Northwest Inlander another update on the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that they might have enough songs and hinted at entering the studio in about six months. He states:

“I’ve been reading and writing, and kind of wrapping my mind around the self-imposed challenge that I’ve put on myself: that I’ve got to write the record of my career. So I’ve got to raise the bar. That’s just something that I put on myself because I don’t like to just go, ‘Time to put out another record’ and go through the motions.

I mean, yeah, we might have enough songs right now. But I want to see what can happen over the next six months. Can I outdo this? What direction do I want to go in? What do I want to say?”

When the new Social D record will be released is unknown, but we’ll be sure to keep you posted when more information comes to light. The band’s most recent album, Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes, was released in 2011.



DS Interview: Nick Woods (Direct Hit!) talks new Direct Hit! album, “Domesplitter” reissue, Galactic Cannibal, and more

In a wide, wide world of sick bands doing sick things, Direct Hit! is at the top of the heap, banging out killer albums like clockwork. I was lucky enough to catch up with frontman Nick Woods on all sorts of juicy subjects including plans for a new Direct Hit! album, the Domesplitter reissue, potential for a new Galactic Cannibal LP, lyrics, and our Dying Scene head honcho’s claims that he “discovered” Direct Hit!.

Read all about it and more in the interview below.

Domesplitter will hit the streets April, 14th courtesy of Fat Wreck Chords.



Greg Graffin talks about Bad Religion’s future, Brooks Wackerman leaving for Avenged Sevenfold

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin, who released his new solo album Millport about a week ago, recently spoke to Loudwire about the future of the band, which includes a new album and a 40th anniversary celebration, which will be in 2020. He explains:

“There’s no end in sight. In fact, in two-and-a-half years, there’s a very important 40th anniversary milestone. Another album is on the horizon, but True North was such a good album that I don’t want to put out something that indicates we’re aging, so it’s gotta be as good as True North. [Laughs] We do plan on getting another record out there, hopefully before that 40th anniversary.”

Graffin also talked about drummer Brooks Wackerman’s decision to leave the band for Avenged Sevenfold, saying, “It wasn’t until he announced it [that I knew he was joining Avenged Sevenfold] but he did tell us he was leaving for greener pastures, but he didn’t put it that way. He gave us ample notice. It was not at all bitter, it was wishing him the best of luck.”

Wackerman was replaced by Jamie Miller, who has played in many bands such as …And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, Snot and Souls at Zero (formerly Wrathchild America). He was, however, not the only member of Bad Religion to have left the band in recent years; longtime guitarist Greg Hetson left the band shortly after the release of their latest album True North in 2013 and was replaced by Mike Dimkich, formerly of The Cult.



Mike Ness says Social Distortion have completed about 20 songs for new album

Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness recently gave Las Vegas Review-Journal an update on the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that there are about 20 songs in various stages of completion, which range from garage punk to the gospel-inspired. He explained:

“I kind of want the next record to have a little more variety. If there’s ever a time to try new stuff, it’s right now, because I want to show people that we’ve grown: ‘Wow, that’s different.'”

The new Social D record will be the band’s first since 2011’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes, and last month, we reported that they were planning to hit the studio to begin recording or finishing it right after the conclusion of their current U.S. tour.



DS Interview: John of Dead Bars talks new album, slice-of-life songwriting, and dreamin’ big

For years now, Seattle’s Dead Bars have been releasing killer music on a small scale. Now, the band is poised to release their first full-length on No Idea Records, joining a legacy that includes Radon, Against Me!, Hot Water Music, The Tim Version, and many, many more.

I was lucky enough to hear the new record and talk to chief songwriter and vocalist John Maiello via e-mail. Click here for the interview.



Greg Graffin on the next Bad Religion album

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin just released his new solo album Millport, but earlier this week, he spoke to OC Register a little bit about the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that they are always talking about new music, but a new record could “take some time”. He added:

“As you get older you want to put stuff out that’s of higher quality than what came before it. Our last album, ‘True North,’ that was a benchmark for us. It was a fantastic album and surprisingly set a new standard for Bad Religion that we’re going to have to do better than.”

When the new Bad Religion album will be released is unknown, but we’ll be sure to keep you updated as more details come to light. Not only will it be their first since 2013’s True North, but their first one with new members Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



DS Exclusive: Greg Attonito on the Bouncing Souls new single, “Battleground,” and maintaining a thirty-year music career

A little over a month ago and with little in the way of advanced fanfare, New Jersey punk icons The Bouncing Souls released a brand new single, “Battleground.” Included in the information distributed about the song at the time was a note that a portion of the proceeds from the single would be donated to the Indigenous Environmental Network, particularly surrounding that agency’s help in the fight in Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Inspired by the song and the corresponding video (watch it here), we caught up with the band’s frontman, Greg Attonito, for a chat about the unique song’s origin and message.

It’s important to mention rather prominently that “Battleground” was not a leftover track from the recording sessions for the band’s most recent album, last year’s Simplicity. It was, instead, inspired by much more recent events, and came from a source that should be familiar to most fans of the Souls, whether they realize the name Garrett Reppenhagen at first listen or not. “It all came about very quickly,” says Attonito. “It was December (2016), and a good friend of ours (Garrett Reppenhagen), was a sniper in the Iraq war and ended up becoming friends with the band…he was the person who provided lyrics to the song we wrote in 2006, “Letters From Iraq.” 

Reppenhagen has remained prominent in the activist community since returning from Iraq, and had launched a Kickstarted campaign to help raise money to buy supplies for a trip to Standing Rock. The band donated money to the cause, but it became apparent in relatively short order that they wanted to — and were able to — do more. “I was just thinking about how it would be cool to let the world know how we feel somehow, and literally the next day the lyrics came to me. I wrote them down and had a little guitar part. I texted to the guys, and right away they were like “this is a great idea.” 

From there, things moved quickly. The band were already set to get together to play a few shows in New York late last year, so Attonito and drummer George Rebelo changed their flights and the full Voltron that is the Bouncing Souls convened at guitarist Pete Steinkopf’s Asbury Park studio to flesh out the idea. We worked the song out in the early afternoon (of the first day back together). We set up the drums and started recording that night, and by the next afternoon, the song was recorded — vocals finished and everything.” 

The band enlisted the help of frequent collaborator Matt Gere to put together a video, and Gere decided to delve outside his normal comfort zone, making his first real foray into the process of animation. The result is a video that is unique in the Bouncing Souls canon, and syncs up well with the song’s overall message of standing together in the face of opposition. The finished product was actually ready for release early in January, but the band chose to table it’s release until just after the Presidential inauguration, for reasons that should be obvious. It’s a political song, it is not, for example, “Holiday In Cambodia.” Instead, it’s a quintessential Bouncing Souls, so it’s melodic and uplifting. Says Attonito, “the political songs for us have really been weird territory. Man, I love a good “Holiday In Cambodia” – those kinds of songs are just amazing, but we never could write songs like that. Not many people can.

Head below to read our full Q&A with Greg. We touch on a lot of material, but particularly focus on the changes in the band that occurred post-Comet, specifically once longtime drummer Michael McDermott parted ways with the band and their resulting — almost instantaneous — decision to recruit Hot Water Music drummer George Rebelo into the fold.

The Souls kick off a ten-day run in the western US alongside with support from Get Dead and The Bombpops next week, and just announced that they’ll be opening half of the upcoming Rancid/Dropkick Murphys co-headlining dates this summer. Check out dates here.



H.R. hopes Bad Brains will tour again later this year

Right before his brain surgery last week, Bad Brains frontman H.R. was interviewed by Loudwire, where he stated that he hopes to return to the stage with the band for a tour later this year. He stated:

“I was talking with the bass player and we were looking at the fall, in autumn, maybe. We’ll do some rehearsals, rehearsing a setlist that they had wanted to play and I decided to go ahead and play it with them. Darryl had come to me through the telephone and said, ‘I’m committed to you,’ and I said, ‘Well, I’m committed to you.'”

The rest of the interview can be watched below.

In addition to a tour, Bad Brains recently announced that they will begin work on their next album, titled Mind Power, this fall, and have hinted that it will be their last one.



The Split Seconds’ Drew Champion talks about getting into punk and how it shaped his life

Washington DC’s The Split Seconds front man Drew Champion tells us how he got into punk and how it has influenced his life.

I’ve been listening to punk rock my whole life. My Dad was into The Ramones and a lot of alternative rock. I remember hearing Sheena is a Punk rocker in the car when I was a little kid and having it stuck in my head for days. Later on I got into Green Day and Nirvana because all of my friends older siblings were into that stuff. I had no idea they were singing about doing meth and heroin and stuff, I just thought it sounded cool. After I heard Blink 182’s Dammit I started playing guitar. That catchy riff and the chunky palm mutes just hooked me. I got bored of listening to the super radio-friendly pop punk after a few months and started digging down below the mainstream of punk rock. I wasn’t really into the whiny screamo stuff coming out at that time so I ended up getting into DC Dischord bands like Minor Threat and U and not U, and 70’s bands like The Dead Boys and The Buzzcocks.

Punk rock has been really important in shaping my life. The individualism in punk rock taught me to think critically and to distrust groups of people under the influence of bad ideas. The irony is that it’s often the punks whose group think I find myself rejecting. The DIY ethos of punk rock taught me self reliance. I know that nobody is going to just hand something to me and I need to make things happen myself. That’s the Ian MacKaye influence. The democratic streak in punk rock taught me to treat people without regard to race, sex, sexuality, etc. That’s pretty basic but some people seem to have a hard time with that. Finally the minimalism of punk rock taught me to reject fancy and complicated solutions when something simple and solid will get the job done. The way that Johnny Ramone approached guitar is a good way to approach life I think. Just keep it simple and go for it.

The Split Seconds’ upcoming album Center Of Attention, is set to be released on March 10th via Altercation Records.



DS Exclusive: Crusades premiere new song and video, plus interview with singer Dave Williams

Sweet news! Crusades have released a lyric video for “1713 (The Scorching Fevers)” off their upcoming This is a Sickness and Sickness Will End, out March 7th through Anxious & Angry (US) and Countless Altars (Canada/World).

Even better news! I was lucky enough to sit down (via e-mail) with Crusades singer and guitarist Dave Williams to talk about songwriting, heavy music, and cathartic art. Click here to check out the video and the interview!



Slick Shoes are guests on latest episode of Mike Herrera Hour

Slick Shoes are guests on the newest episode of Mike Herrera’s podcast. The band discuss their history as they approach their 20th anniversary. The episode, which originally aired on Friday, is available to listen to/download from the Mike Herrera website.



Travis Barker teases new music from Goldfinger, Blink 182 and Transplants

Travis Barker recently appeared on KROQ’s Kevin & Bean Show to talk about this year’s edition of his annual music and tattoo festival Musink. During the interview, Barker mentions he and John Feldmann recently began recording a new Goldfinger album, Blink 182 have recorded 13 new songs for a deluxe edition of California, and a Transplants covers album is on the way.

Check out the full interview below, and stay tuned for more info on these releases.



Davey Dynamite (Dying Scene Records) talks new album, new sound and new plans

There’s a moment in a short school project film about the Chicago folk punk scene where Davey Dynamite stands, legs apart, a battered guitar around his neck, locking eyes with a bearded man less than a meter away as he sings his heart out for all he’s worth. The man bellows the lyrics back with the same amount of intensity and gusto, as if the lyrics mean as much to him as to the young man who wrote them. Rather surprisingly, that bearded man turns out to be a professor of Anthropology which seems to be a fitting summary of Davey Dynamite the artist. He is a singer with that rare ability to connect with his audience on their level no matter who they are or where they come from. He has that uncanny ability to frame instantly relatable lyrics around passionate and powerful punk songs.

Davey grew up in and around Chicago and has been playing as “Davey Dynamite” since 2010 when he discovered the city’s thriving and nurturing punk scene. After a number of solo acoustic albums sprinkled with a handful of “plugged-in” tunes, his new album “Holy Shit” finds him supported by a full band on every track. It is without doubt one of the most inspiring, raw and dynamic releases of the last 12 months. 11 taut, anthemic punk songs replete with irresistible hooks and seismic choruses that sit somewhere between Frank Turner and Against Me! Just like those artists he has an exceptional ability to write lyrics that describe the human condition in new and interesting ways. Below, Davey tells us more about the recording of “Holy Shit”, his influences and what inspires him to write songs that rally against injustice and intolerance in contemporary society.