Search Results for "Interview"

40 Years of Mania with The Vibrators: Past, Present, and into the Future

Wow! Here’s a straight-up EXCLUSIVE… and only a couple years late, but hey, we’re all on punk rock time anyway.

We caught up with Eddie from The Vibrators at Three Links on their 40 year anniversary tour. We talked music, tacos, debauchery and bamboozling David Bowie fans back in the day after the shows. Great stuff! Read more on the past, present and future of the band below.



Social Distortion to begin pre-production of new album around January

In a recent interview with Edmonton Journal, Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness offered an update on the band’s long-awaited new album. When the interviewer assumed that touring through the summer and into the fall means that new music isn’t expected too soon, Mike said:

“Yeah, it’s tough. I’ve put a few new songs in the set just to let people know that we’re not sitting on our asses at home. It gets people talking, which is nice. But yeah, once we stop touring in November, we’ll be ready. I’m thinking that by January we’ll be pre-production, but I don’t want to rush something out just to get it out.”

Ness also stated, “I don’t want to rush something just to get it out for a Thanksgiving release. It’s not like Epitaph is on me to get a new record out, though I imagine they’d be happy with a new Social D album.”

We’ll keep you posted once we get more details on the new Social D record, which will be the band’s one since 2011’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes.



Interview: This Obsession talks band history, new album, and everything in between

If you’re not already aware, This Obsession is a quickly rising star in the Chicago pop-punk scene. They recently put out an amazing full-length, A Confrontational Effort, via Wiretap Records and I was lucky enough to corner Mark and Jess from the band to chat about it.

We talk band history, Wiretap, influences and everything between. Read the interview below.



Agnostic Front in pre-production with new album

Agnostic Front frontman Roger Miret was asked in a recent interview with Heavy New York if the band has started work on the follow-up to 2015’s The American Dream Died. Transcribed by Blabbermouth.net, this is what he said:

“Absolutely. We started pre-production on a couple of new songs. They’re coming out pretty badass; I’m happy with them because a lot of stuff is happening in the Agnostic Front camp. I just released my book, ‘My Riot’, that’s been a big thing and I did a tour around it, which is awesome. Now we have that film, ‘The Godfathers Of Hardcore’, which is going to be another level. There’s a lot of positive, good stuff coming out, but not just Agnostic Front, but New York hardcore, but hardcore worldwide. All this stuff is positive for our message, people that follow us, it’s good for hardcore, period.”

Check out the interview below.



Interview: Rob Castellon of Wiretap Records talks inspiration, artist signings, the state of the music industry and more

In a time where record labels are slowly on the brink of extinction, there are still smaller, independent labels out there putting out great bands and working to ensure the survival of independent music. One such record label is Wiretap Records. Based out of Los Angeles, this label is releasing some of the best new music in the scene today. Bands like Harker, Wolves&Wolves&Wolves&Wolves, and This Obsession, among many others are keeping the spirit of independent music alive with the help of Wiretap Records.  The driving force behind this is owner Rob Castellon, whose “treat the bands like a family” mentality is something that is sorely lacking within the music community today.  We got a chance to talk with Rob about how he started the label, his inspirations, his own musical ability (or lack thereof), and the process he uses to run his business.

Read the interview below.



NOFX working on new music?

In a recent interview with Pittsburgh City PaperFat Mike of NOFX hinted that new material from the band is in the works and will be played on their ongoing Punk in Drublic Festival dates:

“People want to hear new songs. Our newest record has gotten better reviews than we’ve gotten in over 10 years.”

Of course the “newest record” Mike is referring to is their most recent studio album First Ditch Effort, which was released in October 2016 via Fat Wreck Chords. We’ll keep you posted as more details on new music from NOFX come to light. They released one new song last March “There’s No ‘Too Soon’ If Time Is Relative“.



The Offspring’s Noodles talks new album, reveals they’re working on music video

The Offspring guitarist Noodles was recently interviewed by Rock Titan, where he offered an update on their long-awaited new album, which will be their first since 2012’s Days Go By. He stated:

“We don’t have [a name for the album] yet. [But] we’ve got a out 10 to 12 songs done, and we’re gonna, you know, take stock and see…we don’t, we’re also just kinda free agents right now, we don’t know what we’re doing. So we’re…we don’t know how we’re gonna put out, that’s the other thing.”

Noodles also revealed that The Offspring have been working on music video for at least one song from the new record, “We’ve actually got one in the can, kinda ready to go, for one of the songs on the new record. It’s slowly coming out this fall.”

You can now watch interview below.



Interview: Gillian McGhee of Turnspit talks influences, new album, the Chicago music scene and more

Formed in 2014, Turnspit is a Chicago-based pop-punk outfit that recently released their LP Desire Paths on February 16 via Dodgeball Records.

I recently had a chance to speak with Gillian McGhee (singer/guitarist) from the band. We discussed the band in general, their influences, the meaning behind some of the songs on the album and what drives her personally.

Read the interview below.



DS Interview: Skottie Lobotomy (The Creeps) talks new album, songwriting, and confrontational escapism

In a matter of weeks, after lamenting a drought of new music, I received three albums that I couldn’t stop spinning. There was The Penske File’s Salvation, Spanish Love Songs’ Schmaltz, and The Creeps’ Beneath the Pines. I’ve purged my thoughts in reviews, countless listens, and dozens of personal recommendations, but still, these are the records I can’t shake—three distinct visions of what modern punk rock can be, built on the foundation of expert songwriting.

Beneath the Pines isn’t out yet, but it has a special place among the three. It shares members with Crusades, a fantastic band that shocked the punk community by announcing their departure earlier this month; and comes as the follow-up to Eulogies, an album that allowed the Creeps to stretch their chops and become known as one of pop punk’s foremost songsmiths. While the connection is inevitable, to say that The Creeps is Crusades’ little brother—a near consolation prize to fans—is to ignore the band’s twenty years playing, releasing, and evolving. Beneath the Pines is a great album, no matter its relation—a singular vision, powered by introspection, killer melodies, and the sort of songwriting that marks you for life. It’s at once melancholy and hopeful, and with a few deft lyrics, will endear the hardest hearts into a singalong.

I was lucky enough to exchange emails with vocalist/guitarist Skottie Lobotomy on the new album, his songwriting process, and what it means to be punk through introspection. Check out the interview below.



The Offspring almost finished recording new album, to debut new song on tour

The Offspring guitarist Noodles revealed in a recent interview with Q103’s Candace that the band is not only in the process of finishing their long-awaited new album, but will likely debut a new song when they go on tour this summer with 311. Here’s what he had to say:

“The record is almost done — legitimately almost done. I think we have 10 songs done and a couple of more we’re working… just writing lyrics for. And then we might do one or two more on top of that.”

As for when fans can expect to see the release of the record, Noodles said: “It looks like it’s gonna be fall. We were hoping to have it out this summer. I was recently informed it looks more like fall now.”

And lastly, he said that fans may get a chance to hear a new Offspring track during the band’s live shows this summer, “We’ve got one of the new songs already ready to go. It’s one of the upbeat ones. The working title is ‘Ripping’. So it kind of gives you an idea of what the song is about. And I think that we’ll be playing that over the summer.”

You can listen to the interview below.

The new record will be The Offspring’s first one since 2012’s Days Go By.



The Offspring to release new album this fall, have about ten songs done

The Offspring guitarist Noodles revealed in a recent interview with WRIF’s Meltdown that the band is in the process of finishing their long-awaited new album, which is expected to be released this fall. This is what he had to say:

“This record is taking us a long time, but I think it’s gonna be well worth the wait. We’ve been in the studio working a lot recently with [veteran producer] Bob [Rock] and finishing it up. We’ve got about ten songs done, a couple of more that just need lyrics. And then we may do one or two more, and it’s gonna be a done deal.”

Noodles was also asked when the record’s coming out, and his response was, “This fall. Definitely this year, hopefully fall. We were hoping for summer, but it looks like fall now.”

You can listen to the interview in full right here.

The new record will be The Offspring’s first one since 2012’s Days Go By, and they will be on tour with 311 around the same time it comes out.



DS Exclusive: Brian Fallon on “Sleepwalkers,” Growing As A Solo Artist, and, of course, Gaslight Anthem

I’m not entirely sure if “journalistic integrity” is one of the hallmarks that Dying Scene is known for when we conduct artist interviews, but it’s worth mentioning that I’m going to jettison whatever notions of it there may have been and insert myself right into the middle of this story. The Gaslight Anthem are one of the very few bands that I can not only vividly remember my first exposure to them, but can equally vividly remember being stopped in my tracks about what I was hearing and seeing. It was 2008 and I was a 28-year-old new dad, and the video for “The ’59 Sound” and it was on MTV (remember that?!?) as I was getting ready for work in the morning. I knew nothing about the band, and yet I instantly felt like I knew exactly who they were. Led by their Telecaster-and-patchwork-scally-clad frontman, Brian Fallon, the band presented a look and a sound that combined the best parts of my parents’ favorite artist (Springsteen) and my favorite band growing up (Pearl Jam), and ran it all through a ‘child of the 90s’ punk rock filter.

In the decade since, Fallon’s voice and words have been a constant steadying factor in my life. His lyrics have shifted away from telling other people’s stories and have instead become intensely personal, though each album somehow contains a song that either presently or in hindsight make you wonder if he’d somehow been following you around, telling your own story better than you could. There were rumblings probably five years ago that Fallon would work on a solo album after the release of the band’s 2012 album Handwritten, but those plans were shelved in favor of what became 2014’s Get Hurt. The dark, visceral album (a personal favorite) rather notoriously chronicles Fallon’s then-recent divorce, but it’s in many ways also a chronicle of the drifting away of the band’s members themselves; an indefinite hiatus would begin the following year.

Fallon himself would not be out of the game for long, as 2016 would see the release of his debut solo album, Painkillers. Recorded in Nashville with Butch Walker at the helm, the album was a stylistic departure, largely rooted in folk and Americana music. Still, there were more than enough threads to connect the listener – and the artist – to his past; Gaslight Anthem guitarist Alex Rosamilia joined Fallon’s touring band, The Crowes, on guitar and keyboards, alongside Fallon’s longtime friend and frequent collaborator Ian Perkins, and Jared Hart of fellow Jersey punk band The Scandals.

Which brings us to 2018 and Fallon’s sophomore solo album, Sleepwalkers. We caught up with Fallon by phone earlier this week, hours after the US leg of the album’s tour kicked off in Nashville, to chat about all things Sleepwalkers and, of course, Gaslight Anthem. Released February 9th (Island Records), the new album finds Fallon in a happier, more uplifting mood, having slogged for a few years through some pretty dark places. It can be viewed as a bit of a bookend to an unintentional trilogy that marks the most personal music of Fallon’s career, with 2014’s Get Hurt lamenting the demise of relationships and 2016’s Painkillers playing as a guy trying to figure out what comes next, in myriad levels. That trilogy was not, as you might imagine, by design. “I think that if I planned it out like that to be a trilogy, I’d be pretty smart,” jokes Fallon, pointing out that it was more realistically a natural progression. “It makes the point that records are true to life. I was following exactly where I was at the time on all three records, and it’s funny how it worked out like that, where it seems like it follows a trajectory. It did, although the trajectory wasn’t a planned record, it was my life.” 

Stylistically, Sleepwalkers is more straight-forward, R&B-infused, punk-tinged rock-and-roll than Painkillers or than his 2011 side project The Horrible Crowes. Fallon has long been a student of rock music and has not shied away from referencing his influences directly, especially in the earlier part of the Gaslight catalog. Soaked in references to The Beatles and The Clash and Etta James, Sleepwalkers is the most early-Gaslight thing that Fallon has done since, well, since the early Gaslight period. That’s at least partially by design. Gaslight Anthem, you see, was obviously one-fourth Fallon. “You can’t take away who you are and what your style inherently is and remove it just because you’re doing a new project, you know? I decided that instead of running from that, I’m just going to be myself, and if some people say “well, that sounds like Gaslight,” of course it does, because I’m the one doing it. The parts that don’t sound like the band are the parts that came from the other three people in the band, and now there are new people, so those parts will sound different and I’m the part that sounds the same. I finally was just like “yup, I’m okay with that! That’s fine!” Songwriting choices came quicker and freer after that realization was made. “I got to put my own shoes on again,” he explains, adding only half-jokingly that “I like Bruce Springsteen, I like old movies, I like New Jersey, I don’t care what you say about it!” 

In large part, the remarried, father-of-two Fallon drew motivation to move forward through some of the earlier darkness from his young children. “I didn’t have the luxury of just being a lunatic!” he laughs, adding “I was like ‘you have children, and you have clearly messed yourself up to the point where you don’t know what’s going on, and you’ve got to put your head back together. Your kids deserve better than that’.” While it took a lot of work — therapy, reading, doctors, etc — to come out the other side, Fallon is refreshingly not afraid to talk about that work, and has been inspired by the recent trend, particularly in the punk community, toward shedding light and awareness on mental health issues. It’s a trend that didn’t exist in earlier parts of his career, but that he certainly would have taken advantage of. “I know there’s this site I’ve been following (on social media) called Punk Talks, and they’ve got a number where you can call them and talk to them. I was amazed when I first saw it.” The organization would have come in handy, Fallon says, when dealing with the rapid ascent that Gaslight Anthem found themselves on a decade ago, where they went from playing their first shows in their home state of New Jersey to having The Boss himself join them on festival stages within the span of barely two years. “The speed at which that went and the inability to be prepared for it, whether it was my age or inexperience or expectations or just something that was inside of me,” Fallon explains, “created a lot of anxiety in me, to the point of not being even really able to enjoy a lot of it, because I was so nervous about everything all the time. It really was a hard, hard thing. I wasn’t prepared for the level of anxiety it would cause.”

That’s not to say, however, that Fallon is complaining. Far from it in fact. “It was awesome! We totally went for it. I feel like I was (just) ill prepared for it. I didn’t do the homework on myself to catch up. I was 27 then, now I’m 38, and I have much more — it’s funny to say “wisdom” — but I have much more of a perspective on how to handle something like that now.” Fallon is also not afraid to pass his teachable moments on to younger bands that might find themselves on the type of rapid ascent that Gaslight found themselves on a decade ago. “You have to break this thing down. If your band is getting successful and you’re starting to come up and get more recognition and to get it quicker than you thought and that’s getting to you mentally or emotionally, break it down into small, in-the-day things.” If taking the stage in front of any number of people can be enough to rattle some people’s nerves, taking the stage in front of five- or ten- or twenty-thousand can be downright overwhelming. “You have to remember that those people are not there to crucify you and they’re not there to criticize you,” says Fallon. “There might be one or two, but they’re always going to be there, whether you’re playing to twenty people or twenty thousand people. Most of the people there just love what you’re doing, and they’re trying to have a good time, and they’re just like you. They’re no different than you.”

Head below to read our full chat with Fallon. I had roughly nine years worth of questions to ask, but this was a good start. And yes, there’s plenty of insight on what happened – and is happening – with Gaslight, including the ’59 Sound anniversary shows, but you’ll have to read it to find out. Also, head here to find out where you can catch Brian Fallon and his new band, The Howling Weather, on tour over the next month!



It’s official: there will be new music from Jawbreaker!

After months of speculation of new music, Jawbreaker frontman Blake Schwarzenbach confirmed on the latest episode of the Going Off Track podcast that they are indeed planning to work on what will be their record since 1995’s Dear You. Here’s what he had to say:

“Our summer is just gonna be trying to write, jam. What we really wanna do is just riff out and see what comes. I’m spending the next month writing at home, and then we’re gonna converge in San Francisco and go in a studio and see what happens.”

He was also asked what the new Jawbreaker would sound like, “I like the more band-like jams that we have [like “Bivouac”] or “Jet Black” or songs like that, that could only be as a unit.”

And then Blake was asked why the band decided to work on new music for the first time in more than two decades since their breakup, and his response was, “It’s for our own excitement. We can’t keep playing these same songs. I mean, they’re wonderful for people who have not seen it — we’re lucky there are people that wanna see it — but we need some new songs to make it exciting.”

You can listen to the podcast right here. Talk about new music from Jawbreaker comes in around the hour and 37-minute mark.

Jawbreaker broke up in 1996, but reunited a year ago and have been playing shows sporadically ever since then.



The Exploited explain why they haven’t released an album in over 15 years

The Exploited frontman Wattie Buchan recently explained to Metal Underground why it’s taken so long for the band to release a follow-up to 2003’s Fuck the System. He says:

“We told the label six years ago that we had an album almost ready. We’ve got at least sixteen brilliant songs written, I just need to put lyrics to them, but with my health problems I’ve not been able to do it. We’ve got a couple of songs written but it’s hard to get us together once a week for practice because we all live far away and our guitarist and bassist have jobs. Hopefully with my health being better, we’ll try and get something done, but I’ll never do anything unless it’s a hundrsd percent. We could go into the studio tomorrow and I could throw out some some lyrics, but it wouldn’t be hundred percent and that would be exploiting the punks.”

You can watch the interview in full below.



The Aggrolites announce first album in 7 years

California reggae rockers The Aggrolites have announced in a special interview that they will be releasing their first album in 7 years in the near future. In the interview, the band says that they are producing the new record all on their own and recording in their own studio. They also mentioned that fans can expect a sound closer to their earlier releases – a style they diverted from later on in their career.

The band is just about half way finished recording the release, so stay tuned for more details as they come to light. In the meantime, check out the full interview below.

The album will serve as a follow-up to the band’s 2011 album, Rugged Road.