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The Offspring to release new album this fall, have about ten songs done

The Offspring guitarist Noodles revealed in a recent interview with WRIF’s Meltdown that the band is in the process of finishing their long-awaited new album, which is expected to be released this fall. This is what he had to say:

“This record is taking us a long time, but I think it’s gonna be well worth the wait. We’ve been in the studio working a lot recently with [veteran producer] Bob [Rock] and finishing it up. We’ve got about ten songs done, a couple of more that just need lyrics. And then we may do one or two more, and it’s gonna be a done deal.”

Noodles was also asked when the record’s coming out, and his response was, “This fall. Definitely this year, hopefully fall. We were hoping for summer, but it looks like fall now.”

You can listen to the interview in full right here.

The new record will be The Offspring’s first one since 2012’s Days Go By, and they will be on tour with 311 around the same time it comes out.



DS Exclusive: Brian Fallon on “Sleepwalkers,” Growing As A Solo Artist, and, of course, Gaslight Anthem

I’m not entirely sure if “journalistic integrity” is one of the hallmarks that Dying Scene is known for when we conduct artist interviews, but it’s worth mentioning that I’m going to jettison whatever notions of it there may have been and insert myself right into the middle of this story. The Gaslight Anthem are one of the very few bands that I can not only vividly remember my first exposure to them, but can equally vividly remember being stopped in my tracks about what I was hearing and seeing. It was 2008 and I was a 28-year-old new dad, and the video for “The ’59 Sound” and it was on MTV (remember that?!?) as I was getting ready for work in the morning. I knew nothing about the band, and yet I instantly felt like I knew exactly who they were. Led by their Telecaster-and-patchwork-scally-clad frontman, Brian Fallon, the band presented a look and a sound that combined the best parts of my parents’ favorite artist (Springsteen) and my favorite band growing up (Pearl Jam), and ran it all through a ‘child of the 90s’ punk rock filter.

In the decade since, Fallon’s voice and words have been a constant steadying factor in my life. His lyrics have shifted away from telling other people’s stories and have instead become intensely personal, though each album somehow contains a song that either presently or in hindsight make you wonder if he’d somehow been following you around, telling your own story better than you could. There were rumblings probably five years ago that Fallon would work on a solo album after the release of the band’s 2012 album Handwritten, but those plans were shelved in favor of what became 2014’s Get Hurt. The dark, visceral album (a personal favorite) rather notoriously chronicles Fallon’s then-recent divorce, but it’s in many ways also a chronicle of the drifting away of the band’s members themselves; an indefinite hiatus would begin the following year.

Fallon himself would not be out of the game for long, as 2016 would see the release of his debut solo album, Painkillers. Recorded in Nashville with Butch Walker at the helm, the album was a stylistic departure, largely rooted in folk and Americana music. Still, there were more than enough threads to connect the listener – and the artist – to his past; Gaslight Anthem guitarist Alex Rosamilia joined Fallon’s touring band, The Crowes, on guitar and keyboards, alongside Fallon’s longtime friend and frequent collaborator Ian Perkins, and Jared Hart of fellow Jersey punk band The Scandals.

Which brings us to 2018 and Fallon’s sophomore solo album, Sleepwalkers. We caught up with Fallon by phone earlier this week, hours after the US leg of the album’s tour kicked off in Nashville, to chat about all things Sleepwalkers and, of course, Gaslight Anthem. Released February 9th (Island Records), the new album finds Fallon in a happier, more uplifting mood, having slogged for a few years through some pretty dark places. It can be viewed as a bit of a bookend to an unintentional trilogy that marks the most personal music of Fallon’s career, with 2014’s Get Hurt lamenting the demise of relationships and 2016’s Painkillers playing as a guy trying to figure out what comes next, in myriad levels. That trilogy was not, as you might imagine, by design. “I think that if I planned it out like that to be a trilogy, I’d be pretty smart,” jokes Fallon, pointing out that it was more realistically a natural progression. “It makes the point that records are true to life. I was following exactly where I was at the time on all three records, and it’s funny how it worked out like that, where it seems like it follows a trajectory. It did, although the trajectory wasn’t a planned record, it was my life.” 

Stylistically, Sleepwalkers is more straight-forward, R&B-infused, punk-tinged rock-and-roll than Painkillers or than his 2011 side project The Horrible Crowes. Fallon has long been a student of rock music and has not shied away from referencing his influences directly, especially in the earlier part of the Gaslight catalog. Soaked in references to The Beatles and The Clash and Etta James, Sleepwalkers is the most early-Gaslight thing that Fallon has done since, well, since the early Gaslight period. That’s at least partially by design. Gaslight Anthem, you see, was obviously one-fourth Fallon. “You can’t take away who you are and what your style inherently is and remove it just because you’re doing a new project, you know? I decided that instead of running from that, I’m just going to be myself, and if some people say “well, that sounds like Gaslight,” of course it does, because I’m the one doing it. The parts that don’t sound like the band are the parts that came from the other three people in the band, and now there are new people, so those parts will sound different and I’m the part that sounds the same. I finally was just like “yup, I’m okay with that! That’s fine!” Songwriting choices came quicker and freer after that realization was made. “I got to put my own shoes on again,” he explains, adding only half-jokingly that “I like Bruce Springsteen, I like old movies, I like New Jersey, I don’t care what you say about it!” 

In large part, the remarried, father-of-two Fallon drew motivation to move forward through some of the earlier darkness from his young children. “I didn’t have the luxury of just being a lunatic!” he laughs, adding “I was like ‘you have children, and you have clearly messed yourself up to the point where you don’t know what’s going on, and you’ve got to put your head back together. Your kids deserve better than that’.” While it took a lot of work — therapy, reading, doctors, etc — to come out the other side, Fallon is refreshingly not afraid to talk about that work, and has been inspired by the recent trend, particularly in the punk community, toward shedding light and awareness on mental health issues. It’s a trend that didn’t exist in earlier parts of his career, but that he certainly would have taken advantage of. “I know there’s this site I’ve been following (on social media) called Punk Talks, and they’ve got a number where you can call them and talk to them. I was amazed when I first saw it.” The organization would have come in handy, Fallon says, when dealing with the rapid ascent that Gaslight Anthem found themselves on a decade ago, where they went from playing their first shows in their home state of New Jersey to having The Boss himself join them on festival stages within the span of barely two years. “The speed at which that went and the inability to be prepared for it, whether it was my age or inexperience or expectations or just something that was inside of me,” Fallon explains, “created a lot of anxiety in me, to the point of not being even really able to enjoy a lot of it, because I was so nervous about everything all the time. It really was a hard, hard thing. I wasn’t prepared for the level of anxiety it would cause.”

That’s not to say, however, that Fallon is complaining. Far from it in fact. “It was awesome! We totally went for it. I feel like I was (just) ill prepared for it. I didn’t do the homework on myself to catch up. I was 27 then, now I’m 38, and I have much more — it’s funny to say “wisdom” — but I have much more of a perspective on how to handle something like that now.” Fallon is also not afraid to pass his teachable moments on to younger bands that might find themselves on the type of rapid ascent that Gaslight found themselves on a decade ago. “You have to break this thing down. If your band is getting successful and you’re starting to come up and get more recognition and to get it quicker than you thought and that’s getting to you mentally or emotionally, break it down into small, in-the-day things.” If taking the stage in front of any number of people can be enough to rattle some people’s nerves, taking the stage in front of five- or ten- or twenty-thousand can be downright overwhelming. “You have to remember that those people are not there to crucify you and they’re not there to criticize you,” says Fallon. “There might be one or two, but they’re always going to be there, whether you’re playing to twenty people or twenty thousand people. Most of the people there just love what you’re doing, and they’re trying to have a good time, and they’re just like you. They’re no different than you.”

Head below to read our full chat with Fallon. I had roughly nine years worth of questions to ask, but this was a good start. And yes, there’s plenty of insight on what happened – and is happening – with Gaslight, including the ’59 Sound anniversary shows, but you’ll have to read it to find out. Also, head here to find out where you can catch Brian Fallon and his new band, The Howling Weather, on tour over the next month!



It’s official: there will be new music from Jawbreaker!

After months of speculation of new music, Jawbreaker frontman Blake Schwarzenbach confirmed on the latest episode of the Going Off Track podcast that they are indeed planning to work on what will be their record since 1995’s Dear You. Here’s what he had to say:

“Our summer is just gonna be trying to write, jam. What we really wanna do is just riff out and see what comes. I’m spending the next month writing at home, and then we’re gonna converge in San Francisco and go in a studio and see what happens.”

He was also asked what the new Jawbreaker would sound like, “I like the more band-like jams that we have [like “Bivouac”] or “Jet Black” or songs like that, that could only be as a unit.”

And then Blake was asked why the band decided to work on new music for the first time in more than two decades since their breakup, and his response was, “It’s for our own excitement. We can’t keep playing these same songs. I mean, they’re wonderful for people who have not seen it — we’re lucky there are people that wanna see it — but we need some new songs to make it exciting.”

You can listen to the podcast right here. Talk about new music from Jawbreaker comes in around the hour and 37-minute mark.

Jawbreaker broke up in 1996, but reunited a year ago and have been playing shows sporadically ever since then.



The Exploited explain why they haven’t released an album in over 15 years

The Exploited frontman Wattie Buchan recently explained to Metal Underground why it’s taken so long for the band to release a follow-up to 2003’s Fuck the System. He says:

“We told the label six years ago that we had an album almost ready. We’ve got at least sixteen brilliant songs written, I just need to put lyrics to them, but with my health problems I’ve not been able to do it. We’ve got a couple of songs written but it’s hard to get us together once a week for practice because we all live far away and our guitarist and bassist have jobs. Hopefully with my health being better, we’ll try and get something done, but I’ll never do anything unless it’s a hundrsd percent. We could go into the studio tomorrow and I could throw out some some lyrics, but it wouldn’t be hundred percent and that would be exploiting the punks.”

You can watch the interview in full below.



The Aggrolites announce first album in 7 years

California reggae rockers The Aggrolites have announced in a special interview that they will be releasing their first album in 7 years in the near future. In the interview, the band says that they are producing the new record all on their own and recording in their own studio. They also mentioned that fans can expect a sound closer to their earlier releases – a style they diverted from later on in their career.

The band is just about half way finished recording the release, so stay tuned for more details as they come to light. In the meantime, check out the full interview below.

The album will serve as a follow-up to the band’s 2011 album, Rugged Road. 



Baseball Punx interview with Steve Sladkowski (Pup) and Rob Taxpayer (The Taxpayers)

With the recent release of the pretty sweet documentary Baseball Punx, I had the opportunity to interview Steve Sladkowski of PUP and Rob Taxpayer of The Taxpayers. The interview focuses on the similarities between punk rock and baseball, and the general social impact both have on modern-day society.

Check out the wicked cool Baseball Punx documentary here, the Baseball Punx Compilation here, and the interview below.



DS Interview: Erik Garlington (Great Wight) talks first album, outsider status, and what makes a good song

The Suburbs Have Ruined My Life is the sort of debut to turn heads. Yeah, it’s raw, vulnerable, and catchy as all Hell— but it comes with an under-documented perspective that serves as a breath of fresh air in a scene so often defined by its straight whiteness.

Enter: Great Wight, a three piece from the Big Apple playing emo tinged pop punk in the spirit of Sorority Noise and Modern Baseball with lyrics that explore what it means to be gay and black in today’s punk scene. It’s a killer album that pulls you in with big hooks and conversational poetics, and I liked it so much, that after my first listen, I did what all unpaid (but impressed) music journalists do— I reached out over Facebook and asked for an interview.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Erik Garlington via e-mail, where he told me about how Great Wight started, how he writes songs, and whether the punk rock scene is still a place for outsiders.

Check it out here.



Interview: Steven Fairweather (Gob) discusses how he joined the band, new music, and more

Hey punk fans, I recently caught up with Gob bassist Steven Fairweather and we discussed all things Gob, his radio show, Star Trek and a lot more.

You can check it out below!

Gob released Apt. 13 on August 26, 2014 through New Damage Records.



The Bouncing Souls to celebrate 30th anniversary with new album

In a recent interviewThe Bouncing Souls frontman Greg Attonito revealed that they are in the works to begin writing a new album, which will be released to coincide with the band’s 30th anniversary next year. Greg stated:

“We’re in the works to start writing, and we’re preparing for our thirty-year anniversary in 2019. We’re writing and planning, and brainstorming what our thirty-year project will be. Is it some sort of retrospective and some new songs, and some touring? This week, everybody’s connected via email. It’s time to start making a plan. We have lots of ideas that have been kicking around for six months, so it’s time to start getting the ball rolling. We’re digging up old photos, fan stories… . We’ve been doing this thing on Instagram called #SoulSunday, getting fans to tell stories about their past — anything Souls-related. We’ve been getting great stories, and we’re trying to think of ways to incorporate that into some sort of career retrospective.”

The Bouncing Souls’ latest studio album, Simplicity, was released in July 2016 through Rise Records.



Troy Zak (The Real McKenzies) discusses working with Fat Mike, Dan Garrison, and Fat Wreck Chords on Intergalactic Interviews

Troy Zak of The Real McKenzies ventured on over to Intergalactic Interviews to talk about working with punk legend Fat Mike of NOFX, writing with Dan Garrison, and being on Fat Wreck Chords.

The episode is about two hours, so prop your feet up with some popcorn and get ready for some laughs.

Scope out the interview below.



Pennywise finish new album, spring 2018 release expected

Pennywise guitarist Fletcher Dragge recently told OC Weekly that the band has finished recording their long-awaited new album, soon to be mixed for a potential spring 2018 release. He stated:

“It’s already done, just waiting for it to be mixed. We have about 15 songs in the can. One of them is called “American Lies,” if you want some inspiration it’s right there, a song Jim wrote and I think you can probably figure out what the song is about from the title alone. We’ve got a raging fast album that I feel like is our best work since Full Circle and Straight Ahead. We’re able to go back to the old school vibe and that’s hard to do. Bands try to go back and recreate their first or second albums and somehow this time we stumbled across an old formula that really worked. It’s aggressive and has a lot of cool lyrics. We’re looking forward to getting it out there around March. We don’t have a title for it yet but we’re meeting this week to put the finishing touches on it and get another one out there for the masses.”

Pennywise’s recent most recent album, Yesterdays, was released in 2014 on Epitaph. The band last released the compilation album, Nineteen Eighty Eight, in May 2016 via Hardline Entertainment.



Interview: World/Inferno Friendship Society’s Jack Terricloth on the origin of Hallowmass

All Photos By Jeff Schaer-Moses Photography
Mr. Terricloth giving his all at Hallowmas 19.

It’s been 20-years since The World/Inferno Friendship Society put on their first “official” Hallowmas at Maxwell’s in Hoboken, New Jersey and it was a spectacle to behold. The group had only been together a short while, they’d released three-singles, and they even managed to get some love from the Village Voice. Not a bad kick off party for a new band’s new event. However, according to Jack Terricloth W/IFS has been celebrating Hallowmas since well before 1997.

“In a very real way, Inferno had been celebrating Hallowmas long before we were making music. Back in Jersey, we were a mischief gang long before our musical ambitions usurped the name.A lot of the gang members could play something, the ones who couldn’t we gave a drum. So instead of having a private bacchanal, we had a public one. Worked out.” said Terriclcoth.

From those humble Garden State roots sprang what has become one of New York City’s best Halloween celebrations. It’s not just a celebration of a fun holiday, but one of New York’s last standing cult phenom’s The World/Inferno Friendship Society.

“It is our holiday, It is the way we mark time, it is the holiday unmarked by a patriarchal tyrant and if you ask people for candy they give it to you. A gift!” Says the eccentric Terricloth.

He has been the proprietor of Hallowmas for its entire two-decade run, and even after running the show for so long Terricloth remains the central force behind the growth of Hallowmas from a little show in Jersey to one of New York Cities best Halloween events.

“It is still very DIY. I’m over at Warsaw twice a week checking out the projections, up all night writing Hallowmissives and filling out postcards and in clubs every weekend ducking and a weaving your shot glasses. Like life this job does not get any easier, just different,” said the Pumpkin King.

The main difference from year one to year 20 has to be the growth in the venue. While Maxwell’s is no hole in the wall the northern New Jersey launching pad is nowhere near the size of W/IFS current Hallowmas venue, The Warsaw in Green point which is cavernous in comparison. Also presumably the good folks over at Scenic Presents like ‘ole Jack Terricloth and the World/Inferno a little better than the promoter at Maxwell’s did back in the late 90’s.

“The booker at Maxwell’s really didn’t like my previous band Sticks and Stones but I had changed my name and band so I don’t think he cared enough to care (there are knowns and known unknowns). His name was Todd Abramson, I used to call him every other day in SAS to get a gig! He finally gave in and gave us a Thursday night. Todd called a couple days before the show and said ‘The Hoodoo Gurus are playing Thursday’ and I said ‘Oh cool, I’d love to play with the Hoodoo Gurus! ‘mars needs guitars!’ to which he replied ‘No, you don’t understand. The Hoodoo Gurus are playing. You’re not’ and hung up. I had to tell this to the band who of course blamed me and not The Hoodoo Gurus. Decades later I told this story doing the acoustic thing in support of Kevin Second’s acoustic thing at Maxwell’s and was promptly told I was banned from Maxwell’s again,” said Terricloth.

Hallowmas is going down on Oct. 31 at The Warsaw and tickets are still very much available.



PEARS and Direct Hit! cover each others songs

PEARS and Direct Hit!! had a chat with the folks over at New Noise Magazine today. They spoke about their lives, their music and the upcoming split Human Movement. They also covered each others songs; Direct Hit! played PEARS’ song “You’re Boring” while PEARS cover Direct Hit!’s “The World Is Ending (Sorta)”. You can give it a read and listen to the tracks here.

Human Movement is due out on November 3rd via Fat Wreck Chords.



Fat Mike hints at Bad Religion and NOFX tour next year

In a recent interview with The Inertia, Fat Mike talked about the Punk in Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival, co-headlined by Bad Religion and his band NOFX.

When asked if there were any bands he wanted on the bill that couldn’t participate in the festival, Mike hinted at NOFX and Bad Religion doing an 18-date tour next year. He said, “I just talked to the Bad Religion guys an hour ago and we’re going to do 18 shows together next year because Tacoma this year was so fun. And Boise.”

It’s been almost a full year since NOFX released their latest album First Ditch Effort, which was their first in four years, following 2012’s Self Entitled. Bad Religion have been promising a new album for a while, which will be their first since 2013’s True North, and is expected to come out next year.



The Offspring releasing new album in 2018

In an interview at this year’s Rock in Rio in Brazil, The Offspring‘s Dexter Holland and Noodles confirmed that their long-awaited follow-up to 2012’s Days Go By will be released next year.

Dexter stated, “It is true! We’re working on it.”

Then Noodles chimed in: “We have been, yeah, for a while. We’ve got a few songs already done. We wanna do a couple more, and we definitely want to get something out soon. Our fans have waited long enough, I think, so we wanna get something in their hands that they can listen to and hold, and put in their ears.”

On a possible release date, Dexter said, “2018, for sure!”

You can watch the interview below.