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Interview: Steven Fairweather (Gob) discusses how he joined the band, new music, and more

Hey punk fans, I recently caught up with Gob bassist Steven Fairweather and we discussed all things Gob, his radio show, Star Trek and a lot more.

You can check it out below!

Gob released Apt. 13 on August 26, 2014 through New Damage Records.



The Bouncing Souls to celebrate 30th anniversary with new album

In a recent interviewThe Bouncing Souls frontman Greg Attonito revealed that they are in the works to begin writing a new album, which will be released to coincide with the band’s 30th anniversary next year. Greg stated:

“We’re in the works to start writing, and we’re preparing for our thirty-year anniversary in 2019. We’re writing and planning, and brainstorming what our thirty-year project will be. Is it some sort of retrospective and some new songs, and some touring? This week, everybody’s connected via email. It’s time to start making a plan. We have lots of ideas that have been kicking around for six months, so it’s time to start getting the ball rolling. We’re digging up old photos, fan stories… . We’ve been doing this thing on Instagram called #SoulSunday, getting fans to tell stories about their past — anything Souls-related. We’ve been getting great stories, and we’re trying to think of ways to incorporate that into some sort of career retrospective.”

The Bouncing Souls’ latest studio album, Simplicity, was released in July 2016 through Rise Records.



Troy Zak (The Real McKenzies) discusses working with Fat Mike, Dan Garrison, and Fat Wreck Chords on Intergalactic Interviews

Troy Zak of The Real McKenzies ventured on over to Intergalactic Interviews to talk about working with punk legend Fat Mike of NOFX, writing with Dan Garrison, and being on Fat Wreck Chords.

The episode is about two hours, so prop your feet up with some popcorn and get ready for some laughs.

Scope out the interview below.



Pennywise finish new album, spring 2018 release expected

Pennywise guitarist Fletcher Dragge recently told OC Weekly that the band has finished recording their long-awaited new album, soon to be mixed for a potential spring 2018 release. He stated:

“It’s already done, just waiting for it to be mixed. We have about 15 songs in the can. One of them is called “American Lies,” if you want some inspiration it’s right there, a song Jim wrote and I think you can probably figure out what the song is about from the title alone. We’ve got a raging fast album that I feel like is our best work since Full Circle and Straight Ahead. We’re able to go back to the old school vibe and that’s hard to do. Bands try to go back and recreate their first or second albums and somehow this time we stumbled across an old formula that really worked. It’s aggressive and has a lot of cool lyrics. We’re looking forward to getting it out there around March. We don’t have a title for it yet but we’re meeting this week to put the finishing touches on it and get another one out there for the masses.”

Pennywise’s recent most recent album, Yesterdays, was released in 2014 on Epitaph. The band last released the compilation album, Nineteen Eighty Eight, in May 2016 via Hardline Entertainment.



Interview: World/Inferno Friendship Society’s Jack Terricloth on the origin of Hallowmass

All Photos By Jeff Schaer-Moses Photography
Mr. Terricloth giving his all at Hallowmas 19.

It’s been 20-years since The World/Inferno Friendship Society put on their first “official” Hallowmas at Maxwell’s in Hoboken, New Jersey and it was a spectacle to behold. The group had only been together a short while, they’d released three-singles, and they even managed to get some love from the Village Voice. Not a bad kick off party for a new band’s new event. However, according to Jack Terricloth W/IFS has been celebrating Hallowmas since well before 1997.

“In a very real way, Inferno had been celebrating Hallowmas long before we were making music. Back in Jersey, we were a mischief gang long before our musical ambitions usurped the name.A lot of the gang members could play something, the ones who couldn’t we gave a drum. So instead of having a private bacchanal, we had a public one. Worked out.” said Terriclcoth.

From those humble Garden State roots sprang what has become one of New York City’s best Halloween celebrations. It’s not just a celebration of a fun holiday, but one of New York’s last standing cult phenom’s The World/Inferno Friendship Society.

“It is our holiday, It is the way we mark time, it is the holiday unmarked by a patriarchal tyrant and if you ask people for candy they give it to you. A gift!” Says the eccentric Terricloth.

He has been the proprietor of Hallowmas for its entire two-decade run, and even after running the show for so long Terricloth remains the central force behind the growth of Hallowmas from a little show in Jersey to one of New York Cities best Halloween events.

“It is still very DIY. I’m over at Warsaw twice a week checking out the projections, up all night writing Hallowmissives and filling out postcards and in clubs every weekend ducking and a weaving your shot glasses. Like life this job does not get any easier, just different,” said the Pumpkin King.

The main difference from year one to year 20 has to be the growth in the venue. While Maxwell’s is no hole in the wall the northern New Jersey launching pad is nowhere near the size of W/IFS current Hallowmas venue, The Warsaw in Green point which is cavernous in comparison. Also presumably the good folks over at Scenic Presents like ‘ole Jack Terricloth and the World/Inferno a little better than the promoter at Maxwell’s did back in the late 90’s.

“The booker at Maxwell’s really didn’t like my previous band Sticks and Stones but I had changed my name and band so I don’t think he cared enough to care (there are knowns and known unknowns). His name was Todd Abramson, I used to call him every other day in SAS to get a gig! He finally gave in and gave us a Thursday night. Todd called a couple days before the show and said ‘The Hoodoo Gurus are playing Thursday’ and I said ‘Oh cool, I’d love to play with the Hoodoo Gurus! ‘mars needs guitars!’ to which he replied ‘No, you don’t understand. The Hoodoo Gurus are playing. You’re not’ and hung up. I had to tell this to the band who of course blamed me and not The Hoodoo Gurus. Decades later I told this story doing the acoustic thing in support of Kevin Second’s acoustic thing at Maxwell’s and was promptly told I was banned from Maxwell’s again,” said Terricloth.

Hallowmas is going down on Oct. 31 at The Warsaw and tickets are still very much available.



PEARS and Direct Hit! cover each others songs

PEARS and Direct Hit!! had a chat with the folks over at New Noise Magazine today. They spoke about their lives, their music and the upcoming split Human Movement. They also covered each others songs; Direct Hit! played PEARS’ song “You’re Boring” while PEARS cover Direct Hit!’s “The World Is Ending (Sorta)”. You can give it a read and listen to the tracks here.

Human Movement is due out on November 3rd via Fat Wreck Chords.



Fat Mike hints at Bad Religion and NOFX tour next year

In a recent interview with The Inertia, Fat Mike talked about the Punk in Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival, co-headlined by Bad Religion and his band NOFX.

When asked if there were any bands he wanted on the bill that couldn’t participate in the festival, Mike hinted at NOFX and Bad Religion doing an 18-date tour next year. He said, “I just talked to the Bad Religion guys an hour ago and we’re going to do 18 shows together next year because Tacoma this year was so fun. And Boise.”

It’s been almost a full year since NOFX released their latest album First Ditch Effort, which was their first in four years, following 2012’s Self Entitled. Bad Religion have been promising a new album for a while, which will be their first since 2013’s True North, and is expected to come out next year.



The Offspring releasing new album in 2018

In an interview at this year’s Rock in Rio in Brazil, The Offspring‘s Dexter Holland and Noodles confirmed that their long-awaited follow-up to 2012’s Days Go By will be released next year.

Dexter stated, “It is true! We’re working on it.”

Then Noodles chimed in: “We have been, yeah, for a while. We’ve got a few songs already done. We wanna do a couple more, and we definitely want to get something out soon. Our fans have waited long enough, I think, so we wanna get something in their hands that they can listen to and hold, and put in their ears.”

On a possible release date, Dexter said, “2018, for sure!”

You can watch the interview below.



DS Exclusive: Tim Barry talks “High On 95,” performing with the Richmond Symphony, and detaching from social media

It’s become redundant — and probably a sign of downright journalistic laziness — to refer to singer-songwriters like Tim Barry as being of the “heart on their sleeve” variety; the scene is not just full of them bit is outright defined by their presence. With the release of High On 95 last month, Barry has now amassed six studio full length albums (seven, if we’re including the Laurel Street Demos, which coincidentally now means that the Richmond, Virginia native has released more studio albums as a solo artist than he did in his past life as one of the scene’s most posthumously beloved bands) that truthfully don’t find him wearing his heart on his sleeve. Hell, just the idea of Tim Barry even sporting sleeves on his trademark, road-battered Conrail Twitty t-shirt in general seems almost laughable. Sure, as with his other albums, High on 95 contains it’s share of up-tempo, foot-stomping, front porch rockers, a few that take the piss out of himself and his surroundings, and of course a few introspective tales of frustration and catharsis. But if you’ve truly immersed yourself in Barry’s solo catalog, you’re no doubt aware that each album contains at least one track that your heart out of your chest and uses it to punch you directly in the midsection. As Rivanna Junction had “Exit Wounds,” Manchester had “South Hill”, 28th & Stonewall had “Walk 500 Miles,” 40 Miler had “Driver Pull,” and Lost & Rootless had “Solid Gone.”

Continuing on in that theme, High on 95 has it’s own such moment 9/10ths of the way in, on a track called “Running Never Tamed Me.” The weight of the song can perhaps best be told in an anecdote from Barry himself. Not one to normally listen to his own music, Barry was minivan-bound, sorting through mixes in the High On 95 recording process while taking his girls — Lela Jane, now 5, and Coralee, who’s soon-to-be three — to school. Generally a time reserved for singing children’s songs or fighting in the way only siblings can, one day in particular found the van eerily silent. “I realized,” says Barry, “that both of my kids were peering out their respective windows just fucking bawling while the song Running Never Tamed Mewas on, and I just thought “What have I done?!” Now, if you’ve not availed yourself of the album, and the song, yet, you should know in advance that it finds Barry channeling some of the most genuine and heart-wrenching feelings of regret and desperation he’s put on record to date. His daughters, it seemed, had noticed. “I had to pull over and hug them both and ask them what it was about this that made them feel this way. And we had to talk about it, and Lela, my oldest daughter, was hysterical about it. Coralee started loudly crying too. So we just sat on the grass for a second, and they just said that I sounded sad, and they don’t like hearing me sound sad.

While “Running Never Tamed Me” is not necessarily written with present-day Barry as the narrator and central character, the parallels are obvious. Pour through Barry’s catalog and you lose count of the times that a sort of directionless running and wanderlust factor highly among the recurring themes, no matter the album. Much of that is driven by a similarly recurring sense of seemingly not always knowing where he fits in to the world, in either a micro or a macro sense. Hell, his last album was called Lost & Rootless for a reason.

Yet perhaps more than ever before, what High On 95 also contains is a tone of what may be hope but what is probably more accurately described as contentment. Running, it seems, may not have tamed Barry, but maybe age and the wisdom that comes with it have at least helped rewire him. And no, that’s not just due to the obvious fact that he’s raising two daughters now. “I just don’t love being that far from home anymore,” says Barry. “I like to go camping, I like to get cabins in the woods, and I like that kind of stuff, but I don’t like riding on the back of a freight train with a backpack and never knowing where I’m going anymore. I don’t like being in Europe and not being able to check in at home and knowing that I have to take three flights to get back there. I don’t know what happened, I think it just comes with age.”

It’s not that Barry doesn’t have the same stressors or the same reasons to run now as he did in his younger years. Far from it, in fact. “There’s an element of stress constantly on my shoulders, like you have, like everyone has,” he explains, noting the weight in his situation as an individual trying to provide for a family as an independent, working musician. “Because money isn’t easy to come by in my position – or enough of it to sustain a family with the parameters of health insurance and all the other bills and all the other stuff that all of us have.” So what used to be a life of running — drifting, really — is now more of a life that contains periodic, temporary breaks, ways to step back and process life and hit the proverbial reset button on his brain — just not the literal button on his cell phone. Technology has obviously woven its way into the most minute details of most of our lives, but it brings with it a particular set of challenges when you rely on it to put food on the table. “Technology is such a blessing but it’s really not healthy if used constantly. Especially for someone like me who’s trying to provide for a family by doing music which makes me a businessperson or my own boss, which is kind of incredible but it’s also just weird and it’s nothing that I intended on doing.  – it becomes an obsession to check your fucking email! Check your email, check your socials! It’s this false urgency that induces this incredible stress that’s really completely irrelevant!” He adds, rather poignantly, something that most of us raising children in 2017 have struggled with: “Before you know it, your kids aren’t going to give a flying shit about you again, so am I going to miss this beautiful moment of my two-year-old sitting on my lap eating her butter pasta because I’m lurking on Instagram?! Really?!

Still, it was through particularly well-timed call on his cell phone that Barry was presented with an offer to participate in one of the more unique experiences of his professional career: his recent performance with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra at the legendary Carpenter Theater, right in his own hometown. Because the story is so perfectly “Tim Barry,” it’s better off if he just tells it: “I was in the dressing room in Garwood, New Jersey, with Brian Fallon, getting ready to play a show during a series that he was holding where he was playing small club shows for a week. So we’re sitting in the dressing room and I get a phone call from the Executive Director of the Symphony, and he invites me to play with the full symphony backing me, and I almost kind of choked and laughed at how absurd it was. I think I got off the phone and Brian inquired who it was, and he said “what are you going to do?”. And I said “I’m not going to do it – fuck that, that’s crazy! I’m not talented enough!” And he was like – to paraphrase –  he said “if you go on stage tonight and talk about challenging yourself and scaring yourself and doing things out of the ordinary, then I’m going to call you on it!” So, I consented to doing a show with the Richmond Symphony that night, right after that.”

Even though Barry hammers away at an acoustic guitar night in and night out on the road, he is punk rock ethos personified, creating some interesting issues when translating things for the different environment. If we can peel back the curtain a little bit, a lot of the time that you hear Barry (or any rock musician, really) engage in stage banter or play a few seemingly random between-song chords, there’s usually a reason for that: radio silence. “Growing up in punk, the worst thing you can ever do at a house show or a small club show or a squat or whatever is have radio silence. So instinctively, the second you finish, the guitar player hits feedback or the singer starts babbling or the drummer hits the cymbals. There’s nothing worse than a song ending and everybody going “Chirp. Chirp. Chirp.” I instinctively finish songs and hit an open note and then take a sip of water, and then hit an open note and maybe say some stuff, and then hit an open note!

Take a song like “Church of Level Track,” for example. The song has long been a staple — and a crowd favorite — in a typical Tim Barry live set. “(The song) starts “I was drunk as hell with a friend way back…” and to get the key, so I don’t just start signing in the wrong key, I hit a C chord, which is the first chord of the song (and let it ring) and then whenever the fuck I feel like it, I’d say “I was drunk as hell…” Barry explains. But in an arena like the symphony, which is predicated on military-like precision and all things being properly, meticulously graphed and charted, there’s no room for a random chord to help you find a pitch. He continues: “In her sheet music, the song starts with me singing on the first note, that C chord. So she’s standing in front of a million players and she hears me (*briiiing*) which is just me playing the key, and she starts to count there, and the whole fucking song is completely off. And they’re all just like “what the fuck???We had to meet in the middle, we had to make compromises. I was like “Chia-Hsuan, look, I can’t sing this fucking song without hitting that chord!

When all was said and done, Barry worked with the director and the conductor of the Richmond Symphony to pull together a small batch of songs that kicked off a showcase that found the RSO backing a handful of Richmond-based musicians in a variety of genres. While the other artists may have found the event to be noteworthy for good reason, you’d be hard-pressed to find one that it left such a personal mark on. “For years, I worked for this symphony unloading their trucks and setting stuff up, and I worked for the Richmond Ballet driving their trucks and unloading them setting stuff up and for IATSE Union 87 doing the same sort of thing,” says Barry. And while it might be easy to get wrapped up in the whirlwind of the performance, Barry was able to find a way to step back and absorb all that was going on.

I did the song “Exit Wounds” and when I play it live at club shows, I end it before this big musical break, because that would be boring and redundant for me to play on an acoustic guitar,” he explains. “So I think that was one of my favorite parts of the symphony show when we included that. I just stepped off to stage right as far as I could and let Chia-Hsuan Lin who’s the conductor just fucking handle it. She was like “I’m going to be paying attention to your timing” and I said “no, I’m just going to play as quietly as I can. I want you to blow this fucking place out. Get loud!” And she did! I could see that she gave me a little smirk in the middle of it.” If there’s a moment that more perfectly encompasses the entirety of the Tim Barry Experience, of standing back and absorbing the gravity of an overwhelming situation that came from a period of self-doubt and personal challenge to a moment of triumph and appreciating all that you have when you have it, it simply hasn’t been written yet.

High On 95 came out on September 8th through Chunksaah Records. Head over here to grab your copy of the album. While you’re at it, head here to see where you can catch Tim on his upcoming tour dates, including a handful with the likes of Roger Harvey and Off With Their Heads. Check out our full, wide-open and far-ranging interview below.



Dying Scene Radio Special Edition – It’s Not Dead Fest

In this Special Edition of the new and improved Dying Scene Radio, the boys get out of the city and head out to sweltering San Bernardino, CA for the second annual It’s Not Dead Fest. We told the new hosts that if they came back empty handed, we’d cut their funding and whaddaya know?!? It worked!  Not only did they miraculously pull off an interview with the stalwarts of ska, Buck O Nine, they also managed to somehow dupe canadian pop punk phenoms The Flatliners into talking to them! So congrats, gentlemen! For your herculean efforts your existing budget of $0 will remain in place in perpetuity. Now, get back to work! And you dear listener, enjoy the fruits of their labor! Interviews, a fantastic playlist featuring some of the many incredible acts to play the festival and much, much more, below!



DS Exclusive: Derek Zanetti (Homeless Gospel Choir) on new album, the importance of punk rock and working with Frank Turner

Derek Zanetti, aka The Homeless Gospel Choir embodies everything that makes punk great. He is a punk musician to the core who embodies a D.I.Y punk aesthetic where every song drips with authenticity and truth. He is that rare artist who can deliver a more affecting, relatable message in one single line than most bands manage on an entire album. His vulnerable lyrics and almost painful honesty often deal with his own mental health issues yet he can also be almost cruelly self-deprecating and uproariously funny. Similarly, his music is overtly political, following a proud tradition of folk-punk musicians such as Billy Bragg, Frank Turner, Davey Dynamite etc who use their voice to address the injustices, inequalities and general intolerance that sadly infects modern society.

Since releasing his 2010 debut album “Some People Never Go Anywhere”, Zanetti has built a dedicated following both in his native Pittsburgh and further afield. 2014’s “I Used To Be So Young” garnered him a degree of critical acclaim as well as some famous fans in the shape of Frank Turner and former My Chemical Romance guitarist Frank Iero. New album, “Normal” features the same poignant, soul-stirring lyrical nous you would expect but also showcases a greater mastery of song craft as songs move from folk-punk to Americana to anthemic pop punk in the form of “Crazy”, “1983” and the defining and triumphant “Normal”. A beautifully succinct statement to the world about what it means to suddenly find yourself part of the all encompassing, life-changing scene that is punk rock.

Before Zanetti embarks on a huge tour with Beach Slang and Frank Iero and the Patience, Dying Scene had the chance to talk with the always gracious and engaging Zanetti about the “Normal” album, the influence of folk-punk great Frank Turner, working with Frank Iero as well as why the very ideals that punk embodies still coarse through his veins.

Check out the interview below.



Bad Religion working on new album

Bad Religion bassist Jay Bentley stated in a recent interview with Krone that they have started working on a new album but haven’t booked studio time yet. He explains (thanks to Ultimate-Guitar.com for the translation):

“We have not even talked about when we go to the studio. We are still on the starting line. We do not have a plan to go where the trip is, but we want to go on the journey. Every single Bad Religion album was created exactly like this. It was never about having to do something, but to do it. I can not be forced into anything else in life.”

We’ll keep you posted as more details on the new Bad Religion album come to light. It will be their first full-length studio album since 2013’s True North as well as their first with Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



Jack Terricloth Really Wants to Hear From Sly Stone, Talks New World/Inferno Record, and How He Met Stza Crack Through Their Dealer

Photo by Jeff Schaer-Moses Photograpjy
Jack Terricloth of World/Inferno Friendship Society at Hallowmas 2016.

The World/Inferno Friendship Society is more like a punk circus than it is a band, and Jack Terricloth has been the unquestioned ringleader for more than twenty years. It’s hard to believe that a sound so bizarre has endured for more than two decades, especially among the New York punk scene which has very little tolerance for nuance. But WIFS has carved out their niche in the Big Apple with a mix of otherworldly talent and theatrical pageantry unmatched by any of their contemporaries.

The group has truly graduated some greats, like Brian Viglione of the Dresden Dolls, Yula Beeri, and Franz Nicolay (to name just a few). But no matter who they have to replace, they continue to bring the same level of tenacity, talent, and showmanship, due in large part to their diabolical leader Mr. Terricloth.

WIFS has an imminent big-time show at one of Brooklyn’s up-and-coming punk venues, Brooklyn Bazaar, and they are working tirelessly on their new record. But preparatory to unleashing their 13-piece carnival of horrors onto New York, Jack Terricloth sat down with Dying Scene to talk about the new record, how he hopes to one day reunite with Sly Stone, and meeting the members of Leftover Crack through their mutual drug dealer.

Read the full interview below.



Social Distortion’s Mike Ness talks new album, studio plans

In a recent interview, Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness stated that, in the next six-to-nine months, the band will begin pre-production and the recording process of their long-awaited new album, due for release sometime next year. He explains:

“Once this tour ends, we’ll spend six to nine months in pre-production. Then we’ll record the album. I’ll do some reference recordings at our studio, but they’ll be pretty crude. For arrangements and experimenting with stuff, the recordings don’t need to be high-quality.”

Mike also explained why the band takes a long time to make records, “Journalists will say, ‘It’s been seven years since your last record.’ But it didn’t take seven years to write the record. It probably took seven years to wind down from five years of touring. And I have a family, I have responsibilities. Sometimes I need five years to live life, so I have stuff to write about. Sometimes I don’t pick up a guitar for six months, but when I do pick it up, the past six months pour out of me.”

He was also asked if it’s too early to offer a preview of the new record, and his response was, “There are things about Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes I want to keep, but the next album may have more of a garage feel to it. I want it to have a little bit more high energy. And for this new record, unfortunately, I feel like I have to write the album of my career. There’s going to be a lot of thought put into it.”

Social Distortion’s recent album, Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes, was released in 2011. That was the band’s first release on Epitaph Records, and their first studio album since 2004’s Sex, Love and Rock ‘n’ Roll.



DS Interview: 88 Fingers Louie’s Denis Buckley discusses new album Thank You For Being A Friend

88 Fingers Louie formed in 1993 in Chicago. Now, as in earlier incarnations, 88 Fingers Louie is an often intensely personal, politically astute band. Also, the kind of band that could somehow take those two things and make them fun. When they dissolved in 1999, they were one of a handful of bands from that time period I always felt had at least another great album left in them. Thank You for Being a Friend, released by Bird Attack Records in June, proved that to be the truth. I had a chance to speak with vocalist Denis Buckley as the band was gearing up for their European tour.

Check out the interview below