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The Offspring complete four new songs for new album, expected to hit the studio later this year

Ned-Rock 108 recently conducted an interview with The Offspring frontman Dexter Holland, who revealed that they have four songs completed for their long-awaited new album, which they expect to finish later this year. Here’s what he had to say (as transcribed by Ultimate-Guitar.com):

“Well, I’ve been busy doing homework. But now that’s done, so we’re…now we’ve been working in the studio a bunch, it’s kinda weird now because you don’t really do an album the way you used to. ‘Cause people kinda…they look at your album and you go, “OK, what’s next?”. So you’re almost like better off releasing songs here and there kind of. So we put out “Coming For You”. It was just last year, I think? Something like that. And we’ve got like three songs done, and a fourth song almost done, so we’re just gonna get back in the studio as soon as we can. So how will it take us to do eight more songs? I don’t know. We should be able to do that this year.”

You can watch the rest of the interview below.

The new Offspring album will be the band’s first since 2012’s Days Go By. No word on a release date yet, but we’ll keep you posted as more details come to light.



DS Interview: Ryan Patterson on the end of Coliseum and the birth of his new Fotocrime solo vehicle

All Break ups can hurt. Band break ups can really hurt. Some breakups can be met with a shrug, some can hit you hard and some can hit you completely out of the blue. On 19th April 2017, progressive punks Coliseum quietly released a statement on their Facebook page announcing their split after a 12 year career which saw the band play over a 1,000 shows and release 5 albums ranging from the bruising hardcore of their debut through to their most realized final 2 albums, the almighty Sister Faith and the post-punk influenced Anxiety’s Kiss. For those who have followed the band over the years it came as a complete shock. Nevertheless, to soften the blow, the aforementioned statement also announced the arrival of frontman Ryan Patterson’s new solo vehicle, Fotocrime. Dying Scene spoke to Ryan about the split, why the time was right to try something new and about the challenges of creating music as a solo artist.

Despite the continued romanticism, making a success of a band relies on a mixture of good will, good fortune and ceaseless endeavor. 3 principles that undoubtedly defined the career of Coliseum, as Patterson explains,“With a band like Coliseum, that was a band that worked really really hard for a really long time and accomplished an unbelievable amount of stuff but a lot of it was through sheer force of will. That and the support of people like record labels who believed in us and invested a lot of money where we weren’t going to be their most popular band.”

With so much effort and resolve required it becomes easier to understand the band’s reasons for calling it quits. In the end it was a sober realization of where they found themselves as a band at the end of the touring cycle for Anxiety’s Kiss, as Patterson explains, “It was pragmatic. It was a pragmatic decision that we made after a lot of thought and I think it was bouncing around in the back of my head for a little bit and once we all started talking about it it just seemed like the best route for all of us and for the band.”

For Patterson, the band had achieved everything that they wanted to do, “We had done more than we could ever hoped to and my only goal in Coliseum was, when I started, was to tour a lot and to craft some legacy and we absolutely did both of those things. We played over 1,000 shows in 4 continents. We put out a lot of music. Most of which I am extremely proud of. Some of which I think is absolutely great for us.” states Patterson emphatically before continuing:

“Certainly we felt with Sister Faith and Anxiety’s Kiss we accomplished what, I think, the band was always leading up to and absolutely what I wanted to do with that band. We just thought ‘where do we go from here?’” We’ve kind of done all of this. We accomplished goals. Sister Faith and Anxiety’s Kiss were really on top of each other in terms of how quickly we wrote and recorded them. I think that’s it, we’re all happy with each other and we’re all happy creatively; let’s not push it to a point where we are not happy creatively and don’t like each other.”

Coupled with the collective acknowledgement of their accomplishments was the recognition that the band weren’t overly eager to work on new music, “For one thing, we didn’t all have a burning desire to work on new material at the time and that kind of seemed to become evident.” Rather than take a break Patterson realized that the most natural thing to do was to call a halt to the band that had become the dominant force in his life for such a long time, as he explains, “We probably could have taken a few years off but with Coliseum I was never really able to slow down. I was always wanting to move forward and I needed time away to clear my head and manage some things in my perception of music and in life. In 12 years I had never had a time in my life when something was not scheduled in terms of a tour or travel or writing or recording and it was kind of time to have a break from that and it was always a kind of uphill struggle.We never kind of broke through so there was a lot of work.”

Naturally, the question asked by fans of the band is whether there is any chance of the band getting back together. While it isn’t something that is going to happen anytime soon, Patterson is keen not to rule it out completely, “The door is shut but it’s not locked. We’re all still close. We’re all still in touch and proud of what we did and I kind of see Coliseum as a living breathing thing that was a part of my life and it still is. It’s still there and there are things that will still happen with it. There’s music that we haven’t released that I’m sure will come out one day. There’s just nothing new happening although there might be one day.”

All told it was not an easy decision to reach but ultimately Patterson is confident that it is the right one for him in the long run, “I never thought I’d say this but it is nice to put an end to something. To close a book. I thought it would be what I would do forever. That Coliseum was always me and my mind. It was difficult to let that go but it’s nice to have it be a thing that ended in a good way.”

While one door closes, another opens and Patterson has announced his intentions with the release of the phenomenal Fotocrime EP featuring the darkly warped, post-punk epic “Always Hell”. A song that acts as the perfect bridge between the sound of Anxiety’s Kiss and Patterson’s new material under the Fotocrime moniker, “The more post-punk vibe kind of continued because that is what I am most into and feels right. When we were done with everything I felt that that song (“Always Hell”) in particular was a good transition from Coliseum to Fotocrime. I don’t think it is wholly indicative of every sound Fotocrime has made. I don’t think it is exactly what the album material I have finished sounds like but it does kind of set the tone and it’s more of a guitar rock song so ties in with Coliseum so it works well in that way. I think it was a good step.”

While that song might sound like a natural progression, it took a long time for Patterson to achieve what he wanted with the new material, “This is not exactly the sound I started off trying to make. When I started, I was trying to make this music that would become Fotocrime and it just wasn’t working. It was pleasing to the ear and the songs were cool but my voice wasn’t where I wanted it to be,” Patterson reveals, “I threw out a bunch of material I wrote immediately after Coliseum did our last tour. Even before we made the decision to stop I started writing things with the idea that it would be my own thing. It just didn’t work.” Naturally, his approach to writing differed tremendously from working with a band mainly due to the absence of one particular instrument, “The nature of having a drum machine and programmed drums is so different from playing with a real drummer and that alone creates a completely different vibe and sound.”

Understandably, the process of creating music alone rather than as part of a band wasn’t an easy transition, “It was a challenge, for sure to make it feel like something that sounded right and fit the bill while still having the vibe that I wanted.” Notably, synthesizers feature more prominently in the Fotocrime material, and despite becoming more a part of Coliseum’s sound on Anxiety’s Kiss, as Patterson points out, understanding how to get the best from them proved to be the biggest test, “The synthesizer stuff was slowly entering Coliseum songs here and there but to do it a lot more was a challenge and certainly synthesizers are entirely their own thing and you’re kind of learning how they work. You have to learn how to work mechanically before you can make them work musically and that’s a challenge” explains Patterson, “Sometimes you get something and I’m so overwhelmed by it that I don’t know how to make music out of it and you have to learn the basics of getting that machine to make musical sounds. So it’s really exciting and it’s challenging and it’s fun in a way that is unique in a different way to the guitar.”

With the EP acting as the perfect appetizer for more material, when exactly listeners can enjoy the main dish is a little more uncertain, “We are trying to take things as it comes. After the release of the EP we are going to start approaching labels. It could be later this year, it could be next year.  We might release it ourselves. It’s kind of entirely unknown at this moment. Getting the EP out first was the goal.” That said, Patterson reveals that the album is in the can and good to go, “It’s done. It’s completely finished and I’m very proud of it and excited about it. I think that inherently it’s the strongest stuff that I’ve done. It is exciting to have new sounds and to share Fotocrime with the world.” With that in mind, it’s clear that some break ups can be for the best after all.



DS Exlcusive: Phil Marcade (The Senders) on The Ramones, Nancy Spungen and the cast of characters on “Punk Avenue”

 

If we were running down a list of the most famous, and infamous, figures from the epicenter of the fledgling punk rock scene in New York City’s Lower East Side in the mid-1970’s, we’d have to scroll pretty deep into the annals to find the name Phillipe Marcade. Marcade fronted the high-energy blues punk band The Senders that were staples at such legendary venues as CBGBs and Max’s Kansas City for the bulk of the late 1970s and early 1980s, and yet neither the man nor the band really got the credit that they deserved outside a twelve-block radius.

Yet Marcade was every bit as entrenched in the 1970s Lower East Side as any of the Ramones or Debbie Harry or Johnny Thunders or Legs McNeil or any of the others whose names come more easily to mind. In fact, to hear one-and-only McNeil tell it in the Foreward to Marcade’s brand-new book, Punk Avenue: Inside The New York City Underground 1972 – 1982, Marcade, “while not a household name, was friends with everyone at CBGB and Max’s Kansas City, and a bona fide member, in good-standing of the New York Punk Rock Scene.”

We caught up with Marcade over the phone from his home in Italy to discuss Punk Avenue and the early NYC punk scene in more detail. Still the purveyor of a heavy Parisian accent, Marcade is equal parts humble and engaging. That he ended up with this particular story to tell is the result of a series of profoundly fascinating circumstances. A native of France, Marcade took a trip to Amsterdam as a teenager that led to a chance encounter with a American traveler named Bruce, which, in turn, eventually resulted in Marcade spending several decades in the Lower East Side, but not before stopovers in Boston, a longer stay in Amsterdam, a hog farm in New Mexico, and…his eighteenth birthday “party” in a Federal Penitentiary in Florence, Arizona. It seems that even in the 1970s, the feds frowned on shipping large quantities of straight hash across state lines…

Marcade might have ended up in the gritty, tough-as-nails Lower East Side in the early 1970s by happy accident, and yet that’s not an entirely bad way to describe the foundation of the scene itself. Given the transient, underground nature of the close-knit, artistic community that found itself magnetically pulled to that neighborhood at that time, it’s not a stretch to say that punk music as we came to know and love it would not — could not — have started anywhere else and come out the same. The thing about living and thriving in the geographical center of a once-in-a-generation social and cultural and artistic movement is that you don’t realize you’re there until you’re gone and the moment has passed. That’s especially true when you’re viewing said geographic center from the wide eyes of an outsider. “I thought it was so magical and exciting,” says Marcade, quickly adding on that he “thought that was probably because I was new in New York, and to everybody else I thought it had always been like that. Only years later did I realize that no, that was a true revolution going on at the time!

While perhaps unaware of the importance of the movement that he was a direct witness to at the time, Marcade did, at least, recognize sheer talent when he saw it. “I think that the first very important band of the movement, without being in the movement really, was Dr. Feelgood in England. They really changed things around.” Once the music moved toward this side of the pond, the cream quickly rose to the top. Says Marcade: “The Ramones and the Heartbreakers and The Cramps were just amazing groups. I’m so glad I got to see them.” And see them, he did. Especially The Ramones, whom he estimates he saw roughly “a hundred times.” When asked of his insider’s perspective on whether or not Ramones were, indeed, worthy of what’s become iconic, almost mythological status, Marcade answers an emphatic yes. “They were just amazing! They were so good. I never went to a Ramones show and left thinking “eh, that wasn’t that great.” They never ceased to amaze me!”

On the other hand, perhaps not as worthy of her iconic, mythologized status was Nancy Spungen. Marcade knew knew Spungen prior to, and in fact had a hand in encouraging, her fateful 1976 move to London. “I always thought Nancy was kind of a sad soul, a lonely girl,” says Marcade with a hint of sadness present in his voice for the first time in our conversation. “Everybody was so fucking mean to her,” a fact that led to her leaving her heroin-addicted cat (“Oh, that fucking cat!”) with Marcade and heading to London, where she’d eventually, infamously, cross stars with the Sex Pistols’ Sid Vicious. “I think a lot of people misjudged her because of the way she carried herself, and because of the whole heroin thing. But knowing her before, she was a sweet girl. She was as much a victim as Sid. She was not that “evil woman” that turned poor Sid Vicious on to drugs… I don’t subscribe to that theory!”

There are no shortage of memorable characters and stories and moments peppered throughout Punk Avenue. Truth be told, the four-page glossary of supporting characters is almost overwhelming (and would probably better serve the reader if it appeared as a reference index to refer back to). That Marcade can recall such a large volume of names and faces and coincidences is no small feat in and of itself. “It’s funny,” says Marcade, “because I seem to have a very, very good visual memory, and when I think back to an anecdote like that, I can really remember it well.” As the project neared completion, he fact-checked and cross-referenced some of the stories and their corresponding dates with some of his surviving companions, though most stories required only little tweaks.

Yet the real noteworthy feat is not simply remembering stories, but weaving them together in a way that is fun and funny and sad and personal and gripping, whether you’re a fan of early the early NYC punk scene or not. Marcade not only does exactly that in expert fashion with Punk Avenue, but he does it in a language that’s not his first. It is perhaps that wide-eyed outsider’s perspective that keeps everything fresh and exciting and new and real to the reader, especially when the stories involve such Herculean figures. Aside, maybe, from Please Kill Me, it’s hands-down the best read about the Who, What, When, Where, Why and, especially, the How of the origins of the punk rock scene as we know it. Punk Avenue is out now, and you can pick it up at Amazon or Barnes & Noble or Target but hopefully at an independent bookseller near you!

Head below to read the text of our full half-hour conversation with Marcade. Aside from what’s touched on above, we cover a lot of ground, including the changes (read as: gentrification) in the Lower East Side in the forty years since the dawn of punk civilization, which bands from the scene got unfortunately overlooked, and which more recent bands have carried the torch most surprisingly. The results may surprise you!



The Offspring’s Noodles hopes new album will be released this year

It’s been approximately five years since The Offspring released their last album Days Go By, but in a recent interview, guitarist Noodles expressed hope that their long-awaited follow-up to that album will be released this year, and revealed that they have tracked down four new songs.

He said, “We’re hoping to get it out this year, yeah! We’ve been working on it. It’s going real slow. [laughs] We’ve been in and out of the studio for a few years now. We want to get some songs out before we did the whole record. Like, “Coming for You,” whenever that was released.”

Noodles was also asked if the new album has a title yet, and his response was, “No, not until we have a bunch of songs that are kind of cohesive. We’re not really far enough along to figure out a vibe or concept. We have about four songs that are done. Not even at the halfway point yet.”



Social Distortion to hit the studio this fall?

Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness recently gave Phoenix New Times an update on the band’s long-awaited new album, revealing that his goal is to enter the studio by fall. He explains:

“It has to be organic. You know it’s like ‘I want to finish three songs by this tour’, and then I do that and I can’t even think anymore. ‘Is that the best line I can write or am I trying to meet a deadline?’

“My goal is to be in the studio by Fall. Unfortunately, I have to write the record of my career right now. That’s the pressure I put on myself.”

This isn’t the first of recent updates on the new Social D record that we’ve covered. Nearly a month ago, Mike said that the band had approximately 20 new songs completed, and then a week-and-a-half ago, he hinted at entering the studio in about six months. Whenever the new record arrives, it will be the band’s first since 2011’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes.



Mike Ness offers (yet another) update on new Social Distortion album

After reporting a-week-and-a-half ago that they were working on approximately 20 new songs, Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness gave The Pacific Northwest Inlander another update on the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that they might have enough songs and hinted at entering the studio in about six months. He states:

“I’ve been reading and writing, and kind of wrapping my mind around the self-imposed challenge that I’ve put on myself: that I’ve got to write the record of my career. So I’ve got to raise the bar. That’s just something that I put on myself because I don’t like to just go, ‘Time to put out another record’ and go through the motions.

I mean, yeah, we might have enough songs right now. But I want to see what can happen over the next six months. Can I outdo this? What direction do I want to go in? What do I want to say?”

When the new Social D record will be released is unknown, but we’ll be sure to keep you posted when more information comes to light. The band’s most recent album, Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes, was released in 2011.



DS Interview: Nick Woods (Direct Hit!) talks new Direct Hit! album, “Domesplitter” reissue, Galactic Cannibal, and more

In a wide, wide world of sick bands doing sick things, Direct Hit! is at the top of the heap, banging out killer albums like clockwork. I was lucky enough to catch up with frontman Nick Woods on all sorts of juicy subjects including plans for a new Direct Hit! album, the Domesplitter reissue, potential for a new Galactic Cannibal LP, lyrics, and our Dying Scene head honcho’s claims that he “discovered” Direct Hit!.

Read all about it and more in the interview below.

Domesplitter will hit the streets April, 14th courtesy of Fat Wreck Chords.



Greg Graffin talks about Bad Religion’s future, Brooks Wackerman leaving for Avenged Sevenfold

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin, who released his new solo album Millport about a week ago, recently spoke to Loudwire about the future of the band, which includes a new album and a 40th anniversary celebration, which will be in 2020. He explains:

“There’s no end in sight. In fact, in two-and-a-half years, there’s a very important 40th anniversary milestone. Another album is on the horizon, but True North was such a good album that I don’t want to put out something that indicates we’re aging, so it’s gotta be as good as True North. [Laughs] We do plan on getting another record out there, hopefully before that 40th anniversary.”

Graffin also talked about drummer Brooks Wackerman’s decision to leave the band for Avenged Sevenfold, saying, “It wasn’t until he announced it [that I knew he was joining Avenged Sevenfold] but he did tell us he was leaving for greener pastures, but he didn’t put it that way. He gave us ample notice. It was not at all bitter, it was wishing him the best of luck.”

Wackerman was replaced by Jamie Miller, who has played in many bands such as …And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, Snot and Souls at Zero (formerly Wrathchild America). He was, however, not the only member of Bad Religion to have left the band in recent years; longtime guitarist Greg Hetson left the band shortly after the release of their latest album True North in 2013 and was replaced by Mike Dimkich, formerly of The Cult.



Mike Ness says Social Distortion have completed about 20 songs for new album

Social Distortion frontman Mike Ness recently gave Las Vegas Review-Journal an update on the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that there are about 20 songs in various stages of completion, which range from garage punk to the gospel-inspired. He explained:

“I kind of want the next record to have a little more variety. If there’s ever a time to try new stuff, it’s right now, because I want to show people that we’ve grown: ‘Wow, that’s different.'”

The new Social D record will be the band’s first since 2011’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes, and last month, we reported that they were planning to hit the studio to begin recording or finishing it right after the conclusion of their current U.S. tour.



DS Interview: John of Dead Bars talks new album, slice-of-life songwriting, and dreamin’ big

For years now, Seattle’s Dead Bars have been releasing killer music on a small scale. Now, the band is poised to release their first full-length on No Idea Records, joining a legacy that includes Radon, Against Me!, Hot Water Music, The Tim Version, and many, many more.

I was lucky enough to hear the new record and talk to chief songwriter and vocalist John Maiello via e-mail. Click here for the interview.



Greg Graffin on the next Bad Religion album

Bad Religion frontman Greg Graffin just released his new solo album Millport, but earlier this week, he spoke to OC Register a little bit about the band’s long-awaited new album, saying that they are always talking about new music, but a new record could “take some time”. He added:

“As you get older you want to put stuff out that’s of higher quality than what came before it. Our last album, ‘True North,’ that was a benchmark for us. It was a fantastic album and surprisingly set a new standard for Bad Religion that we’re going to have to do better than.”

When the new Bad Religion album will be released is unknown, but we’ll be sure to keep you updated as more details come to light. Not only will it be their first since 2013’s True North, but their first one with new members Mike Dimkich (replacing Greg Hetson) on guitar and Jamie Miller (replacing Brooks Wackerman) on drums.



DS Exclusive: Greg Attonito on the Bouncing Souls new single, “Battleground,” and maintaining a thirty-year music career

A little over a month ago and with little in the way of advanced fanfare, New Jersey punk icons The Bouncing Souls released a brand new single, “Battleground.” Included in the information distributed about the song at the time was a note that a portion of the proceeds from the single would be donated to the Indigenous Environmental Network, particularly surrounding that agency’s help in the fight in Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Inspired by the song and the corresponding video (watch it here), we caught up with the band’s frontman, Greg Attonito, for a chat about the unique song’s origin and message.

It’s important to mention rather prominently that “Battleground” was not a leftover track from the recording sessions for the band’s most recent album, last year’s Simplicity. It was, instead, inspired by much more recent events, and came from a source that should be familiar to most fans of the Souls, whether they realize the name Garrett Reppenhagen at first listen or not. “It all came about very quickly,” says Attonito. “It was December (2016), and a good friend of ours (Garrett Reppenhagen), was a sniper in the Iraq war and ended up becoming friends with the band…he was the person who provided lyrics to the song we wrote in 2006, “Letters From Iraq.” 

Reppenhagen has remained prominent in the activist community since returning from Iraq, and had launched a Kickstarted campaign to help raise money to buy supplies for a trip to Standing Rock. The band donated money to the cause, but it became apparent in relatively short order that they wanted to — and were able to — do more. “I was just thinking about how it would be cool to let the world know how we feel somehow, and literally the next day the lyrics came to me. I wrote them down and had a little guitar part. I texted to the guys, and right away they were like “this is a great idea.” 

From there, things moved quickly. The band were already set to get together to play a few shows in New York late last year, so Attonito and drummer George Rebelo changed their flights and the full Voltron that is the Bouncing Souls convened at guitarist Pete Steinkopf’s Asbury Park studio to flesh out the idea. We worked the song out in the early afternoon (of the first day back together). We set up the drums and started recording that night, and by the next afternoon, the song was recorded — vocals finished and everything.” 

The band enlisted the help of frequent collaborator Matt Gere to put together a video, and Gere decided to delve outside his normal comfort zone, making his first real foray into the process of animation. The result is a video that is unique in the Bouncing Souls canon, and syncs up well with the song’s overall message of standing together in the face of opposition. The finished product was actually ready for release early in January, but the band chose to table it’s release until just after the Presidential inauguration, for reasons that should be obvious. It’s a political song, it is not, for example, “Holiday In Cambodia.” Instead, it’s a quintessential Bouncing Souls, so it’s melodic and uplifting. Says Attonito, “the political songs for us have really been weird territory. Man, I love a good “Holiday In Cambodia” – those kinds of songs are just amazing, but we never could write songs like that. Not many people can.

Head below to read our full Q&A with Greg. We touch on a lot of material, but particularly focus on the changes in the band that occurred post-Comet, specifically once longtime drummer Michael McDermott parted ways with the band and their resulting — almost instantaneous — decision to recruit Hot Water Music drummer George Rebelo into the fold.

The Souls kick off a ten-day run in the western US alongside with support from Get Dead and The Bombpops next week, and just announced that they’ll be opening half of the upcoming Rancid/Dropkick Murphys co-headlining dates this summer. Check out dates here.



H.R. hopes Bad Brains will tour again later this year

Right before his brain surgery last week, Bad Brains frontman H.R. was interviewed by Loudwire, where he stated that he hopes to return to the stage with the band for a tour later this year. He stated:

“I was talking with the bass player and we were looking at the fall, in autumn, maybe. We’ll do some rehearsals, rehearsing a setlist that they had wanted to play and I decided to go ahead and play it with them. Darryl had come to me through the telephone and said, ‘I’m committed to you,’ and I said, ‘Well, I’m committed to you.'”

The rest of the interview can be watched below.

In addition to a tour, Bad Brains recently announced that they will begin work on their next album, titled Mind Power, this fall, and have hinted that it will be their last one.



The Split Seconds’ Drew Champion talks about getting into punk and how it shaped his life

Washington DC’s The Split Seconds front man Drew Champion tells us how he got into punk and how it has influenced his life.

I’ve been listening to punk rock my whole life. My Dad was into The Ramones and a lot of alternative rock. I remember hearing Sheena is a Punk rocker in the car when I was a little kid and having it stuck in my head for days. Later on I got into Green Day and Nirvana because all of my friends older siblings were into that stuff. I had no idea they were singing about doing meth and heroin and stuff, I just thought it sounded cool. After I heard Blink 182’s Dammit I started playing guitar. That catchy riff and the chunky palm mutes just hooked me. I got bored of listening to the super radio-friendly pop punk after a few months and started digging down below the mainstream of punk rock. I wasn’t really into the whiny screamo stuff coming out at that time so I ended up getting into DC Dischord bands like Minor Threat and U and not U, and 70’s bands like The Dead Boys and The Buzzcocks.

Punk rock has been really important in shaping my life. The individualism in punk rock taught me to think critically and to distrust groups of people under the influence of bad ideas. The irony is that it’s often the punks whose group think I find myself rejecting. The DIY ethos of punk rock taught me self reliance. I know that nobody is going to just hand something to me and I need to make things happen myself. That’s the Ian MacKaye influence. The democratic streak in punk rock taught me to treat people without regard to race, sex, sexuality, etc. That’s pretty basic but some people seem to have a hard time with that. Finally the minimalism of punk rock taught me to reject fancy and complicated solutions when something simple and solid will get the job done. The way that Johnny Ramone approached guitar is a good way to approach life I think. Just keep it simple and go for it.

The Split Seconds’ upcoming album Center Of Attention, is set to be released on March 10th via Altercation Records.



DS Exclusive: Crusades premiere new song and video, plus interview with singer Dave Williams

Sweet news! Crusades have released a lyric video for “1713 (The Scorching Fevers)” off their upcoming This is a Sickness and Sickness Will End, out March 7th through Anxious & Angry (US) and Countless Altars (Canada/World).

Even better news! I was lucky enough to sit down (via e-mail) with Crusades singer and guitarist Dave Williams to talk about songwriting, heavy music, and cathartic art. Click here to check out the video and the interview!