Search Results for: Bad Religion

Search Archives Only

Bad Religion

Bad Religion is an American punk rock band that formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1980. The band’s lyrics cover topics related to religion, politics, society, the media and science. Musically, they are noted for their melodic sensibilities and extensive use of three-part vocal harmonies. The band has experienced multiple line-up changes, with singer Greg Graffin being the band’s only constant member, though fellow founding members Jay Bentley and Brett Gurewitz have also been with the band for most of their history while guitarist Brian Baker has been a member of the group since 1994. Guitarist Mike Dimkich and drummer Jamie Miller have been members of the band since 2013 and 2015 respectively.

Bad Religion cancel UK and European tour

Bad Religion have canceled their UK and European tour. The reason for the cancellation was a family emergency. You can see the band's post below.

Bad Religion's Greg Graffin to release new book

Greg Graffin of Bad Religion will be releasing a new book. It is called Punk Paradox and will be out November 8 via Hachette Books. The book is described as, A historical memoir and cultural criticism of punk rock’s evolution […] Punk Paradox is Graffin's life narrative before and during L.A. punk's early years, detailing his observations on the genre's explosive growth and his band's steady rise in importance. Greg Graffin released his most recent book Population Wars: A New Perspective on Competition and Coexistence in 2015 and Bad Religion released their biography Do What You Want in 2020.

DS Festival Review: Slam Dunk Festival (North)

In 2001, I moved to the Northern English city of Leeds, in part because of the live music venue, The Cockpit. This small venue put on all my favourite bands of the time, and had a long history of putting on great live music. I worked in another venue in the city on weekends, so […]


In 2001, I moved to the Northern English city of Leeds, in part because of the live music venue, The Cockpit. This small venue put on all my favourite bands of the time, and had a long history of putting on great live music. I worked in another venue in the city on weekends, so Tuesday night was my big night out, and Tuesday nights were Slam Dunk at The Cockpit. A solid mix of ska punk, pop punk, emo, rock, metal and whatever else alternative kids were listening to in the early 2000’s. 

So here I am, 21 years later. The Cockpit has long since shut down and whilst the Slam Dunk Club Night plays on at its new home, the Key Club, it’s the festival that I am at today. Now held across two cities with more than 50 bands, across five stages, things have really grown from that two room sweaty Tuesday night under a railway arch.

The lineup covers a wide range of punk and alternative music, but because I’m old and stuck in my ways, I’m mostly staying at the Dickies stage, which is the main stage this year, hosting The Suicide Machines, The Bronx, Hot Water Music, The Vandals, Streetlight Manifesto, Pennywise, The Interrupters, The Dropkick Murphy’s and headliners Sum 41. 

I’d originally bought tickets on the basis that Rancid were headlining, but they pulled out for undisclosed reasons. Then support from the Mighty Mighty Bosstones collapsed along with the band. Things were looking bleak, and I actually looked into selling my ticket, only to have two of my close friends and original Slam Dunk allies to buy tickets, so it was to be a big day out for us old guys.

The venue for the festival is Temple Newsam House. For further personal historic links, this was the site of the first music festival I ever went to (V98), and a big part of my musical taste was formed in these park lands. The benefit of this location for me is that it is close to home, the downside is that it still takes an hour and a half to get in, as traffic is not well managed and everything is already getting expensive (£10 to park in a field, £10 for a bus), I’d planned to ride my bike to the event, but for three of us, that didn’t make much sense.

Inside the arena, the stages are far enough apart that there is little noise mix from bands and practicalities like bars, toilets and food concessions are plentiful, the addition of a separate “real ale” bar was a pleasant surprise, and I managed to spend an impressive amount in this tent after and before every band. The tent also provides some welcome shade from the unexpected sun that I was totally unprepared for!

So, on to the music…

Hot Water Music, a band that I’ve discovered backwards through Chuck Ragan’s solo work, come out impassioned and full of energy, although the crowd are a little flat with it being an early set. Despite this we get a solid effort from the band, though possibly things are held back a little by a lack of catchy hooks and sing along choruses in the songs performed. Finishing with “Trusty Chords” gets the crowd interested from hearing a song they know. Whether they know the song from Epitaph‘s Punk-o-Rama compilation, or it’s just a favourite is hard to say, but in a pre-internet world, compilations from Independent punk labels are how a lot of us discovered new bands, especially those that didn’t tour the small northern venues like the Cockpit!

A quick trip to the bar revealed the sound of Punk Rock Factory carrying on the wind from the Rock Sound Stage. I was familiar with the band from their Youtube videos of punked up, harmonized pop covers, and as a father of small children, I found myself singing along to “Let It Go”, whilst appropriately stood at a urinal. If I have to play Disney songs on long journeys, then at least they can have crushing guitars as well, and hopefully, like some kind of gateway drug, this leads my kids down the path of home made tattoos and living in a van (or some other punk cliché).

The Vandals took to the stage with a not too reassuring “We’ll do our best”, and whilst I appreciate their honesty and openness, first song “Café 405”, is out of time and out of tune. 

Three songs in, things are starting to tighten up, “People That Are Going To Hell” gets people moving a little, but on the whole, the crowd remain static. “And Now We Dance” raises the energy, “The New You” keeps it going, but there’s just not enough there to hold the attention of the majority of the crowd. My friends desert me to hit the real ale bar, I hate myself for giving up on the mighty Vandals, but cold beer and the Cancer Bats on the Jagermeister stage lure me away. I’m not massively familiar with the Cancer Bats, but the wall of noise, that I could feel through the ground and see vibrating through my pint has led me to listen to more of their back catalogue.

I had a dream the night before Slam Dunk that I took all my family to see Streetlight Manifesto, but instead of their usual set list, they played a really challenging, four hour Jazz set, stopping only to enjoy a sit down meal, where they served soup from tea pots. I was trying desperately to convince my family that really, they’re a great band, whilst simultaneously enjoying the weird spectacle. 

Fortunately, there’s no Jazz today as Streetlight Manifesto, a later addition to the bill, take to the stage. There’s a clear sense of excitement in the crowd as the eight piece tear through classic hits “We Will Fall Together” and “The Three Of Us” along with lesser known tracks with a level of energy normally reserved for headline shows. The crowd sings along, dances, moshes; it’s a perfect blend of everything you want on a summers day. The only slight letdown is Tomas Kalnoky shouting “this is the big finish!” and then promptly not playing “Keasbey Nights.” I get the reasons, and I support them in letting go of a song that doesn’t really represent the band, but for many in the crowd it’s the song they came to hear and there’s visible confusion as the band leave the stage, though encores aren’t really a thing at 16:30 on a festival stage are they?

I last saw Pennywise in 1999. So its been a while. Late last year I read Jim Lindberg’s book “Punk Rock Dad,” which renewed my interest in the band, so I’m excited to see this set, and if the number of Pennywise T-shirts I’m seeing are anything to go by, so are the crowd.

From the get go, the band are on full attack. There’s no sign of age in the band and the crowd are loving it. Covers of AC/DC’s “TNT” and “Breed” by Nirvana continues the energy. Early songs “Pennywise” and “Society” lead to Lindberg lamenting to having been “doing this for thirty years,” but it’s not slowing them down. 

The crowd holds middle fingers aloft for “Fuck Authority,” and whilst it feels cheesy, a load of middle aged men swearing at the sky, its kind of cathartic, and hey, it’s a great song! Who doesn’t enjoy feeling like an angry teenager (teenagers maybe?).

A cover of “Stand By Me,” which closed 1992 album Wild Card/ A Word From The ‘Wise surprised me, as I was certain it was Lagwagon, so I learned something important today if nothing else. 

Set closer “Bro-Hymn” has exactly the effect you’d expect. Huge “wooahs” from the crowd, that epic bass riff and impassioned singing along. Obviously it’s a great song, but I think it hits harder now, after the last few years and I think everyone can take some strength from this song and apply it to someone they’ve lost.

The Interrupters carry a strange position in my mind. I love their songs, they’re great live, but there’s just something not quite right. Something doesn’t sit right with me, and I hate myself for being so negative, but its all a bit too clean cut for me. Like it’s the soundtrack to Disney film where some hopelessly good looking, talented young people form a ska punk band and take over the world with a weird crusty mentor behind them (Called Tim?).

Opener “Take Back the Power” feels stronger than normal. Maybe its that they’re more established, or maybe my cynicism is fading? Either way I enjoy it for what it is, well polished, perfectly-performed ska pop-punk. 

Ignoring a weird segue about how they all used to bathe together… “She got arrested” gets a great crowd sing along, and is probably my favourite of their songs, not least as it was my introduction to the band back in 2017 and a great example of the quality story telling in the lyrics of some of their songs.

A cover medley of “Keep ‘Em Separated”/ “Linoleum”/ “Ruby Soho” gets the crowd going before surprise high point for me, a cover of Bad Religion‘s “Sorrow,” which goes down well with the crowd (For reference Bad Religion played Slam Dunk in 2019, as did the Interrupters).

The band finishes with “She’s Kerosene,” keeping the party going, the crowd moving and generally capturing the moment nicely. People are drunk, its sunny, the people want to dance and the Interrupters deliver.

The Dropkick Murphys take to a stage with a full length riser, done out to look like a stone wall, but there is a notable absence. Al Barr, it is announced, has stayed home to care for his sick mother. Ken Casey steps up for lead vocal duties and the evening begins with the sound of bagpipes on the cool evening breeze. 

“State of Massachusetts” gets the kind of crowd reaction you’d expect from a classic pop hit or a song about Yorkshire, such passion for such a challenging subject is strange, but hey, it’s a great song and the drunk, bouncy, dancey crowd are loving it.

“Barroom Hero” is introduced as the first song the band ever wrote, which is a bit of trivia I didn’t know, but I remember it from way back in the 90s, so I guess that makes sense. The crowd offer weak “Oi! Oi! Oi!” effort which is a disappointment, maybe the crowd aren’t as au fait with shouting Oi! as I’d like? Though I accept my drive to shout “Oi!” is probably higher than most.

The slip up begins with the instruction to sing along to the 1937 hit “I’ve Still Got Ninety-Nine” by the Monroe Brothers, which although an undeniably good song, probably isn’t too familiar to the crowd today. On the upside, we’re promised an acoustic album in September, which is one to look out for. Whether it’s new material or reimagined classics has not been confirmed, but hopefully there will be an associated tour.

“Rose Tattoo” brings the sing along from the crowd, but lacks the momentum to get the crowd moving. This is exacerbated by the big screen showing bored, static faces in the crowd for the first time. Fortunately, “I’m Shipping Up To Boston” brings the party back before the end of the set. I’ve never seen such passion for a missing wooden leg, as the crowd goes nuts, with crowd surfers from all directions riding above the waves of the crowd. All parties appear to have legs intact, so that’s good.

Headliners Sum-41 were a bit of a quandary for me. The first album was an important soundtrack to my late teens/ early 20s and I saw them play in Leeds twice in 2002, but I haven’t listened to their music since Does This Look Infected from the same year.

A bit of pre-show research suggested they have had seven further releases, including 2019s Order In Decline, but in the spirit of openness, I’ve not felt inspired to check these out.

The band come out to a stage with blood-soaked Marshall speaker cabinets, a giant skull, jets of fire and “Motivation” from the first album, All Killer, No Filler. More people than I expected are really into it, though competition with Deaf Havana and the Nova Twins is limited and the other stages have closed.

The stage is set for a night of big rock and I’d like to say I invested more effort into rediscovering Sum 41, but too much sun, too much beer and a designated driver who wanted to beat the traffic meant we made an early exit.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Playlist: ‘Bootlicker’ Isn’t a Subgenre of Punk

From time to time, our intrepid contributors are going to post curated playlists for special occasions/Holidays. For our first ‘Post Resurrection’ installment of this feature, we enlisted our resident Molotov Cocktail Waiter, Anarchopunk to create the perfect tracklist to blast at your 4th of July Cookout! Trust us, your friends and family are gonna dig […]

From time to time, our intrepid contributors are going to post curated playlists for special occasions/Holidays. For our first ‘Post Resurrection’ installment of this feature, we enlisted our resident Molotov Cocktail Waiter, Anarchopunk to create the perfect tracklist to blast at your 4th of July Cookout! Trust us, your friends and family are gonna dig this one, comrades! It’s 55 minutes of pure Anti-American bliss (and when we say ‘American’ we mean the USA, specifically. It’s shorthand. We know, we know. There’s continents, hell whole hemispheres that encapsulate North/South America and the term ‘America’ generalizes all of the many nations and cultures therein….meh….whatever…it makes writing a lil easier. Give us some slack. Now, on with the story…) from lesser known bands from around the world. I mean, sure, anyone can make a playlist like this featuring songs by Propagandhi, Anti-Flag and Good Riddance but that’s low hanging fruit, homie! We hold ourselves to a ‘higher’ standard. Word of caution, if you’re only here for the music and don’t wanna read a buncha lefty, Marxist propaganda, scroll to the bottom for the playlist. We don’t wanna hear you whining in the comments. If you wanna create your own website and feature music that fits your beliefs, go right ahead! With that said let’s get started, shall we?

  1. The Communard – “Death to America” – Let’s just go ahead and start off with a bang to weed out the bootlickers! No ambiguity here with these French pinko-punks! If you don’t like the message of this one, you’re certainly not going to like the rest of this playlist. So, ‘sayonara, suckers!’
  2. Total Massacre – “The State of the Union (Is Weak,Sad) – Ole Cap’n No Fun and his anti-capitalist cronies always bring an appropriate level of anger for having to live in this hellscape of a country.
  3. Allout Helter – “Maximum Helter” – For some reason, Anti-America tunes sound so much better when it’s set to melodic hardcore and no one does this combo better than these anti-fascists from Denver.
  4. Be Like Max – “Time Flies When You’re Having Work” – Ska acts aren’t generally known for being too political but there’s always an exception and these Vegas ska-punks punctuate that fact.
  5. Arms Aloft – “Untitled” – No one writes ’em better than the lads over at Arms Aloft! There really isn’t anything more fitting than some good ole fashioned Blue Collar Punk to anti-celebrate The 4th! Probably no coincidence that they’re signed to Red Scare, huh?!
  6. The Shell Corporation – “Even Bob Villa Couldn’t Fix This Old House” – You haven’t heard lyrics this academic and vitriolic toward the States since Bad Religion! This Los Angeles based political punk act has it all! That’s why we wanna hear some more new music from ’em! C’mon, guys We need you now, more than ever! 😛
  7. Rent Strike! – “Burn It All” – Folk Punk! Yaaay! If you think there’s any subgenre that, as a general rule, is more anti-US than folk punk, you’re a fool. There I said it. Now, you have to live in a reality where some masked yahoo on the internet schooled you in a public forum. Sad…
  8. Soul Glo – “We Wants Revenge” – Oh shit! This shit hits fucking haaaard, dunnit?!? Philly hardcore acts are notoriously brutal but these cats take it to another level! If these fantastic Philadelphians weren’t on your radar before, make sure they are now. No excuses going forward.
  9. Upper Downer – “KKKPD” – One of the newer bands on our list but that doesn’t mean they’re any less worthy of making our list. These angry Angelinos also have a new album coming out later this year via Wiretap Records, so keep an ear out for that! (DS Exclusive???)
  10. Poor Me – “Classwar” – More Melodic Hardcore? Yes Please! This one is probably one of the more powerfully performed tracks on our list but when you’re fed up with the state of your ‘shit hole’ country, is it any surprise that there’s a lil extra ‘salt on the ‘tater chips’?
  11. The Muslims – “Fuck These Fucking Fascists” – Yea, yea, yeeeeaaaa. We know…we said “lesser known bands” and these young guns have recently singed to Epitaph, which makes them the antithesis of ‘lesser known’ but to be fair, we have been high on them since 2017. So we’re making an exception because this track bops!
  12. Amerikan Made – “Amerikan Made” – This Anti-American SoCal act has been around since 2007 and has been pretty silent up until recently when they did a four week residency at the Doll Hut down in San Diego. Hopefully this recent reemergence means some new tunes are coming soon? Guys? Hello? *tap, tap* Is this thing on?
  13. UCAN’TSAYNO – “The Corrupt Politician” – The Land of the Rising Sun checking in! Over the last few decades, Japan and more specifically, Tokyo has became a major hub for new punk music. So, it’s no surprise that a band from the ‘Child of Edo’ makes our list. It’s really just a matter of odds, innit?
  14. The Orphans – “For an Old Kentucky Anarchist” – Look, we know what we said earlier regarding your opinions on folk punk, but we’d like to think that the tough love we dispensed prepared you for this moment. It really did hurt us more than it hurt you. Now, enjoy this Anti-American, Appalachian folk gem and tell us how right we were.
  15. People Corrupting People – “Corporations” – Of course the US is fucked. We let Wal-Mart and CapitalOne vote. What did you think was gonna happen? But hey! At least the proletariat has to financially bail out all of these companies! Let’s hear it for Corporate Welfare!
  16. Cop/Out – “Pinko Commie” – Always more room for Commie punks! (c’mon, it’s an anti-4th playlist, what did you expect?). “buT i LuV CaPitAliSm, AP!”…. I dunno?? Have you tried…ummm…not??
  17. DUMB FUCKS – “a.c.a.b.” – A Los Angeles based band that isn’t fond of cops? You don’t say?!? For a buncha younger lads, they really do nail that old school hardcore sound though, right?? Can’t wait to hear more from this act.
  18. Debt Neglector – “Cult Cult Cult” – I think the name of this one perfectly encapsulates the current state of things here in ‘The Ole US of A’. We “oldies” remember a time when cults were fringy, and tucked away in the shadows of society. Now, they’re catered to on TV on a nightly basis “at 7pm ET right after Wheel of Fortune.”
  19. The Lungs – “Cross Cult” – Mira! Mira! Another song about cults when talking about current events in The United States….imagine that… All religions are cults. Sad about that? Complain in the comments.
  20. Comrades Collective – “Paws Not Laws” – OK, so full disclosure…we’ll automatically include any band on any playlist if they are even slightly ‘cat/pet’ themed. Include a heavy dose of Anarchist views and there you have it folks…the recipe for getting featured on Dying Scene!
  21. Noogy – “Back At It Again” – Hip-Hop/Punk hybrids are here to stay and we’re here for it, 100%. If you’re not a square, you know that punk and hip-hop have been intertwined, even if just loosely for decades. These Texans are just building onto that inseparable marriage.
  22. The Drowns – “Lunatics” – How’s about a lil pop punk to round things out?? If you despise The US but love catchy, radio ready riffs, we proudly present to you, our finest platter of…The Drowns, my lady/sir/non-binary person!! This one’s gonna be stuck in your head the rest of the day. Corn-gratulations!

You know any lesser known punk bands with some radical (read in the voice of Raphael from the early 90’s Teenage mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon) lefty tunes?!? Tell us about ’em and maybe we’ll add them to the list!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Album Review: Mercy Union – “White Tiger”

I don’t normally start album reviews this way but I thought it was maybe sort of important to mention this time that I am, for the record, a big Mercy Union fan and supporter. I’ve known frontman Jared Hart for a long time and have been a fan of his solo work and his Scandals […]

I don’t normally start album reviews this way but I thought it was maybe sort of important to mention this time that I am, for the record, a big Mercy Union fan and supporter. I’ve known frontman Jared Hart for a long time and have been a fan of his solo work and his Scandals work and of sideman Rocky Catanese and his various projects (remember Let Me Run?!?) for quite literally as long as I’ve been involved with Dying Scene, which is to say well over a decade. I was at Mercy Union’s first show billed as Mercy Union (October 2017 supporting Racquet Club at Middle East in Cambridge, MA, if you were wondering) and I was at Mercy Union’s last show before Covid-19 forced us inside for a few years (at O’Brien’s in Boston in March 2020 with Secret Spirit and the Nightblinders and Coffin Salesmen if you were wondering, which I’m sure you weren’t because this is a record review and a not a list of “shows Jay has been too).

ANYWAY, all that is to say that I like Mercy Union a lot. And yet, because I’m a professional (lol) journalist with at least some modicum of integrity (not lol, I actually like to think this latter part is true) I tried to take a 30,000-foot view of the new Mercy Union album and put my personal thoughts about the band aside and listen to it objectively. And so I fired it up on the good speakers in my car went for a drive and about halfway through the album, I got so into the music and the sounds and the textures that I quite honestly got lost, having blown way past my destination. White Tiger is great, kids. Really, really great.


The band’s 2018 debut, The Quarry, laid at least a bare framework of 1990s alternative rock influences through a filter of New Jersey punk sensibility, but White Tiger surpasses it on almost every level. White Tiger, the band’s second full-length, puts any fears about a sophomore slump to bed pretty much from the opening notes of album opener “1998.” It’s an uptempo table setter with swirling guitar riffs and a giant, singalong chorus that combine to serve as an instant revelation that whatever extra time the band spent crafting this album during the doldrums brought on by a global pandemic was put to extremely good use.


The soundscape on White Tiger is both sprawling and crystal clear, and while Hart may the songwriting spearhead, it very much sounds like a collaborative, full-band record (which is not to say that The Quarry wasn’t, necessarily, but when you’ve got multiple accomplished songwriters combining forces in a newer project it’s only natural for some songs to sound like they belong to each individual songwriter rather than “the band.” Hell, The Clash very clearly has Joe songs and Mick songs and Paul songs…but I digress). Even “Basements,” which is a track with roots that extend back to Hart’s 2015 Past Lives & Pass Lines solo record is filled out with a full band treatment that creates an epic, massive feel that would have made the perfect springboard for a wonderfully cinematic video that would have been a staple on MTV back in the years when epic, cinematic videos were actually played on MTV. So, the mid-1990s.

Speaking as a child of the ’90s, there are some very clear throughlines on White Tiger that originate back in that time period, but not maybe in the way you’d expect for an album being covered on your favorite newly-relaunched punk rock website. There were a great many of us that cut our punk rock teeth on the Bad Religions and Rancids and Green Days and other Epitaph/Fat/Lookout bands of the day and who maybe didn’t outwardly state how much we also appreciated the parallel track that was modern alternative rock radio and it’s expertly-crafted, tight and melody-driven power pop goodness. Bands like Gin Blossoms and Soul Asylum and pre-“Iris” Goo Goo Dolls and post-Mats Westerberg and The Wallflowers. Admittedly, it wasn’t “cool” to profess your love for songs like “Counting Blue Cars” or “Desperately Wanting” or “Hey Jealousy” if you also had like a Dead Kennedy’s patch and a NOFX patch on your backpack, but I think those of us “of a certain age” long ago gave up on aspirations of being cool and now don’t mind publically citing our affinity for a well-crafted, mid-tempo, radio friendly, melody driven rock and roll song, and I’m here for it. And White Tiger has a lot of that in spades.

Lead single “Prussian Blue,” for example, is anchored by a fuzzed-out lead bassline from Jorgensen as the guitars weave textured layers of harmonics and swirling melodies, and it’s got a massive arena (or even amphitheater) rock-sounding bridge. “Be Honest” finds Catanese and Hart trading vocal duties, while “Jane Way” puts Catanese solely in the spotlight. the former of those songs…can we call it post-emo? Is that a thing or did I just make that up? It’s got a huge, almost gothic soundscape in the bridge. “Evergreen” could probably stand on its own just fine as a solo acoustic track, but it gradually adds soaring synth and keys and strings (many of which were arranged by the multi-talented Jorgensen) and Benny Horowitz’s massive drums (editor’s note: Horowitz played all of the drums on White Tiger before departing the band and returning to his, uh, full-time day job) and layered guitars all in a full crescendo by the last third of the song.

“The Weekend,” which comes right around the album’s halfway mark, is a track that caught me off guard. It spends the first few minutes as one of those radio-friendly, mid tempo rock songs with a chorus that trends more to the delicate side, before completely switching gears entirely at the halfway point with the riffs getting heavier and Horowitz’s drums in full-on attack mode. This is undoubtedly a standout track and is precisely the moment where I blew well past my exit on the aforementioned evening drive. Other songs, like “Redeye (EWR>SNA)” find Hart taking whatever restrictor plates were left off of his voice, letting it soar to heights we’ve only really ever heard teased before. It’s fair to say that he’s leaned into his voice both a songwriter and a vocalist now, and most of the hardcore-inspired gravel of his earlier works is now a thing of the past.

From a sonic perspective, there is a sort of mid-tempo sameness that serves as a groove that many of the tracks settle into. That’s not bad, necessarily, and the variety of textures, particularly when factoring in the guitars and occasional strings and blended voices keep any particular song from sounding too much like any other, either on the album or in the band’s arsenal. If there’s a song on White Tiger that will inspire high-energy punk-rock style crowd push-and-pull, it’s the singalong, call and response verses on “So Long, Siberia.” And that’s good. Because White Tiger, and really Mercy Union circa 2022 by extension, occupies a space in your record collection that nothing else really does.

Pre-orders for White Tiger are still available here.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (A Vulture Wake, The Network, Adolescents & more)

Yo! What’s going on, friends? Welcome back to the Dying Scene Record Radar, the weekly column where we present you with colorful plastic discs of music to spend your hard earned money on. We’ve got a lot of good shit in store for you this week, so I hope your wallet’s feeling fat, and your […]

Yo! What’s going on, friends? Welcome back to the Dying Scene Record Radar, the weekly column where we present you with colorful plastic discs of music to spend your hard earned money on. We’ve got a lot of good shit in store for you this week, so I hope your wallet’s feeling fat, and your credit limit is nice and high. Enough fucking around, let’s get into it.

Super exclusive, world premiere, breaking news, OMGGGGGGGGG hoooooly fuuuuuuck!!!!!!

1-2-3-4 Go! Records has been on an absolute tear lately with exclusive reissues from Rancid, Bad Religion, and the Descendents, to name a few. In their latest email blast, the Oakland record store announced their next reissue will be an exclusive pink vinyl pressing of Money Money 2020 by The Network (which totally isn’t just Green Day wearing ski masks). This is coming at some point in September; join their mailing list to be among the first to know exactly when it’ll be available.

Former ALL frontman Chad Price’s band A Vulture Wake has announced a new full-length album! One.Kingdom.Animal is set to release in November on Thousand Islands Records. There are two vinyl variants, limited to 250 copies each. Go here to get your pre-orders in, and look out for a new single next week.

New York pop-punk band With The Punches is releasing a new LP that combines their first two EPs Keep it Going and It’s Not the End of the World. Both of these releases have been out of print for over 10 years. Grab yours here.

Lots of exciting stuff going on over at Mom’s Basement Records! Some of their upcoming releases include new LPs from two Canadian pop-punk bands, Avem and The Smelters, and a brand new record from Germany’s Hawaiians. They also have copies of the Punk Rock Raduno 5 compilation. Head over to their webstore for all of this and more. Our Canadian friends can get Avem’s Three Birds Stoned LP from the Forbidden Beat Distro.

Swedish punk veterans Venerea have announced a new album titled Euro Trash, due out August 26th on SBÄM Records. There are two vinyl variants (yellow and blue), each limited to 200 copies. Check out their new single “Blind Faith” below, and pre-order the LP here.

Here’s another one from our friends at Thousand Islands Records. British punks On A Hiding To Nothing released their debut album We’ll Probably Be Fine, last year and it kicked fuckin’ ass. Now, it’s getting the wax treatment, with a super limited red vinyl pressing. Get your hands on this one here.

Epitaph Records has announced a 25th Anniversary reissue for The HivesBarely Legal. There are a few different variants of this one; go here for links to where you can obtain each one in exchange for some form of currency.

The Adolescents have repressed two of their more recent LPs, Manifest Density and Cropduster. You can get both of these records on gold colored vinyl here.

Also from SBÄM Records: a new comp featuring songs by Pulley, Love Equals Death, Snuff, and a bunch of other great bands. This is only available through their European webstore, and is a cool way to grab a slice of everything on the label’s eclectic roster.

Now that all the cool stuff has been covered, here’s what I’ve been listening to… I continue to abstain from spending money on new records; after all, I’ve already got hundreds of the fuckin’ things, why do I need more? This week the Lawrence Arms and Frenzal Rhomb got some play time, along with Sloppy Seconds‘ classic Knock Yer Block Off. I’ve been listening to Sheboygan, WI’s Jetty Boys a lot in the car and at work, so I threw their record Let ‘Er Rip on the turntable, too. This is a fantastic pop-punk album – highly recommended listening!

And that’s all, folks! Another Record Radar in the books. As always, thank you for tuning in. If there’s anything we missed (highly likely), or if you want to let everyone know about a new/upcoming vinyl release you’re excited about, send us a message on Facebook or Instagram, and we’ll look into it. Enjoy your weekend, and don’t blow too much money on spinny discs. See ya next week!

*Wanna catch up on all of our Record Radar posts? Type “Record Radar” in the search bar at the top of the page!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (Against Me!, Frenzal Rhomb, NOFX & more)

Hello, and welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar! If it’s your first time joining us, this is a weekly column where we cover all things punk rock vinyl. So kick off your shoes, grab a few beers, and break out those wallets, because it’s time to run through this week’s […]

Hello, and welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar! If it’s your first time joining us, this is a weekly column where we cover all things punk rock vinyl. So kick off your shoes, grab a few beers, and break out those wallets, because it’s time to run through this week’s new releases and reissues. Let’s get into it!

Swedish punk veterans Millencolin have announced a new LP compiling their first two demo tapes from 1993. Due out in early September, Goofy & Melack will be limited to 500 copies on black vinyl, and 240 copies on red vinyl. Preorder through their webstore starts Thursday, August 4th at 10am Eastern.

Anti-Flag just announced their 13th full-length album Lies They Tell Our Children. It’s due out on January 6th, 2023, and you can pre-order it now here. The record will feature guest appearances from members of Rise Against, Bad Religion, and a bunch of other bands. The cover art’s some avant garde bullshit, which is cool if you’re into that kinda thing. Check out the music video for the first single below.

Asbestos Records has repressed the venerable Against Me!‘s 2007 New Wave LP for the first time in six years. This one’s limited to 1,000 copies on split black/yellow vinyl. Head to the label’s webstore to get yours.

Avail frontman Tim Barry has announced a new solo album titled Spring Hill. This is due out on August 12th, and it sounds like the LP will be available to order the on same day. The “red cloud” variant pictured will only be available at a show he’s playing in Richmond, VA on Friday, August 5th (more details on that here).

Fat Wreck Chords has repressed Frenzal Rhomb‘s incredible Smoko at the Pet Food Factory. Fat doesn’t reveal their colored variants usually, but my super official sources tell me this is what this pressing looks like. Grab your copy here.

British melodic punks Darko just announced a new EP titled Sparkle. It’s due out on October 21st, and you can preorder it here. The first single “Cruel to Be” is really good; check out the music video below!

Zia Records has a new exclusive variant of NOFX‘s Punk in Drublic, limited to to 500 copies on “Transparent Beer With Red Splatter” colored vinyl. Get it here.

New band alert! Bracket‘s Angelo Celli has a new project called Guilty Party and their debut 7″ Imposter Syndrome is coming out next month. Check out “Circling the Truth” below, and go here to get your preorder in. If you like Bracket, you will like this.

The Homeless Gospel Choir‘s 2020 album This Land Is Your Landfill just got repressed. There are two new variants, each limited to 250 copies. Go here to grab this one.

Rude Records is having a summer sale! Records, shirts, and more from bands like Less Than Jake, Guttermouth, and a bunch of others are discounted up to 25%. Head over to their webstore to check it out.

Now that all the cool stuff has been covered, here’s what I’ve been listening to… Saving money by not buying every new release has given me a chance to dig out some stuff I haven’t played in a while. First up this week was Much The Same‘s Quitters Never Win, a very underrated skate punk record that turns 20 years old next year. MxPx‘s The Ever Passing Moment from last year’s box set got some playing time, too. I also revisited one of my favorite Murderburgers records The 12 Habits of Highly Defective People, and Civil War Rust‘s fantastic debut LP The Fun & The Lonely.

That’s all, folks! Thanks as always for tuning in to the Dying Scene Record Radar. If there’s anything we missed (highly likely), or if you want to let everyone know about a new/upcoming vinyl release you’re excited about, send us a message on Facebook or Instagram, and we’ll look into it. Enjoy your weekend, don’t blow too much money on spinny discs. See ya next week!

Wanna catch up on all of our Record Radar posts? Type “Record Radar” in the search bar at the top of the page!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (Green Day, New Found Glory, OFF! & more)

Welcome to the first installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar! This is a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We’ll be highlighting new releases to look out for, as well as all those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. So, let’s get into it… Kicking things off, […]

Welcome to the first installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar! This is a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We’ll be highlighting new releases to look out for, as well as all those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. So, let’s get into it…


Kicking things off, New Found Glory! Back in April they released a 20th anniversary reissue of Sticks and Stones. Well, that shit sold out really quick, so they’re doing a second pressing of the reissue, limited to 2,000 copies. Go here this Friday, July 1st at Noon Eastern time to get your hands on it. Or wait ’til they sell out again and pay some clown $100 for it on Discogs.


Bad Religion is also reissuing two of their classic albums. Up first is Generator getting a 30th anniversary reissue. There are different variants for the US, UK, and Australia. Links to order all of those can be found here.


2002’s The Process of Belief is also getting the same reissue treatment for its 20th birthday. This one was announced a few weeks ago but there’s still plenty available. Links to order those are here.


Up next on the reissue train is the best band to name themselves after a Frenzal Rhomb song, Local Resident Failure, with the 10th anniversary reissue of their debut album A Breath of Stale Air. The variants are quite pretty! Americans and Canadians can get it here, Europeans here, and Aussies right here. And you can listen to it, right here! ∨∨∨


Nitro Records participated in Record Store Day 2022 with a reissue of their classic 1996 comp Go Ahead Punk… Make My Day. The compilation features AFI, The Vandals, Guttermouth, The Offspring and Jughead’s Revenge. 5,000 copies were made, and this is its first release on wax. There are still plenty of these out there. You can even get it on Discogs at a very reasonable price.


Now, here’s something that’s sure to ruffle some feathers: Walmart’s Exclusive pressings of Green Day‘s Dookie, American Idiot, and International Superhits. “Green Day? Walmart? That’s not punk!” No fucking shit, but who really cares? Sure the Waltons are one of the most despised families in America and they don’t need any more of your money, but look at the pretty colors! Help fund Billie Joe’s move to the UK, I’m sure he could really use the money.


The Bouncing Souls‘ self-titled record turns 25 this year, so they’re celebrating with four colorful polyvinyl chloride discs. Links to get all the different variants can be found here. East coast! Fuck you!


More reissues! Keith Morris’ OFF! is offering up new pressings of their back catalog, including the stellar First Four EPs, which is now available as a 12″ LP for the first time. These records kick ass. Buy, buy, buy.


Hey, here’s some new music! Screeching Weasel has a new record coming out on July 15th. It’s called The Awful Disclosures of Screeching Weasel. The LP is pricey at $30, but the two songs Mr. Weasel has put up for streaming have been good (stream below), and I enjoyed their last album a lot. Americans can pre-order here, and Europeans can get it here.


Skate punk veterans Cigar have stepped out of a time machine from 1999 to release their sophomore album. The Visitor is due out on September 9th through Fat Wreck Chords. Colored variants are long sold out, but I urge all self respecting skate punk fans to grab it on black wax here in America, here in Europe, and here in Australia. Listen to the debut single while you order!


1-2-3-4 Go! Records has spent the last year reissuing the entire Pinhead Gunpowder discography. The latest installment includes the Shoot the Moon LP (my personal favorite) and 8 Chords, 328 Words 7″. Everything in this series has been Grade A quality, and these reissues are a lot more affordable than original pressings of these records. You can get your hands on these here.


Pop-punk tastemakers Eccentric Pop Records have a bunch of new stuff up on their webstore. For the ridiculously low price of $16 (seriously Travis, how can you sell shit this cheap?!), you can get your hands on Dan Vapid and the Cheats‘ new LP Escape Velocity (listen below), and a new prepress of Horror Section’s long out of print self-titled record. Support a great label and add some awesome records to your collection!


Here’s a highly recommended pickup for those who worship at the altar of Joey Ramone. The Budweisers are a fantastic pop-punk band from Spain, and their new record Look Out Below is great! Plenty of fan service here for everyone who longs for the days when Lookout! Records ruled the pop-punk universe. Monster Zero has it up for pre-order now.


Target joins the “big box store reissuing classic punk albums” party with an exclusive 40th anniversary pressing of The Clash‘s Combat Rock on red vinyl. I grabbed this from my local Target a few weeks ago, and it sounds fantastic. I even signed up for the Red Card and saved 5% – what a deal! I love this record. “Rock the Casbah” is one of mankind’s greatest achievements. There’s a UK pressing on green vinyl as well – you can get that one here.


And I think that oughta do it! There’s undoubtedly a lot of stuff I missed, but hey, shit happens. The world keeps spinning, and we live to see another day. Like I said earlier, these recaps of new colorful plastic discs to waste your money on should be a weekly thing, but I could use a little help. Is there a new record you think should be highlighted in next week’s Record Radar? Suggestions are welcome – send us a message on Facebook or Instagram and we’ll look into it!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.