Search Results for: Fat Mike

Search Archives Only

Bad Cop / Bad Cop

Bad Cop Bad Cop has done angry. The band’s 2017 full-length, Warriors, was recorded in the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election. The Los Angeles quartet’s new full-length, The Ride (Fat Wreck Chords, June 19th), shows what happens when you come out the other side of that anger.

“It’s not that I am just stoked or blind to suffering,” says singer-guitarist Jennie Cotterill. “I think anger is a legitimate and understandable reaction to injustice and wrongdoing. It’s just that for myself, I am trying to move past ‘reaction’ into productive ‘response.’”

The message BCBC is sending this time around is less about wagging your finger at others, or giving the middle one to the Man, than it is about self-love and acceptance. As Cotterill puts it, “Love is a more powerful truth than anger.” That positivity fuels many of The Ride’s tracks: “Originators,” “Simple Girl,” “Community,” “I Choose,” “Perpetual Motion Machine,” and “The Mirage” exude confidence, gratitude, and compassion. In 2020, such things qualify as contrarian.

“These are political statements—self-love is a huge fucking statement,” affirms singer-guitarist Stacey Dee. “Self-love means putting a fix on the problems at home before trying to fix everything in the world. It’s asking people to find it in themselves to create the life that they really want to have so they’re not in turmoil, so they’re not in a place of stress and sickness.”

Dee speaks from experience. In 2018 she was hospitalized twice for different ailments, then discovered she had stage one breast cancer at the end of the year. Fortunately it was highly treatable, but the experience was life-altering. Dee captures it with brutal frankness on “Breastless,” whose bright melodies belie the struggle described in the lyrics.

“Certain Kind of Monster” and “Pursuit of Liberty”—both written and sung by bassist Linh Le—are blistering repudiations of the current administration’s treatment of immigrants.

The former is an imagined conversation with an ICE agent, and the latter juxtaposes her family’s immigration to the U.S. from Vietnam in 1975 to current events, something she’s never explored musically.

The perspective behind The Ride lends it an undeniable maturity, without losing its power. Recorded throughout much of 2018 and 2019 by Johnny Carey and Fat Mike of production team the D-Composers, the album boasts all of the elements of BCBC’s sound: big guitars, lock-step bass and drums (the latter by powerhouse drummer Myra Gallarza), intricate vocal harmonies, and plenty of attitude.

It’s just that this time, the attitude is encouraging, not raging. Nowhere is that more apparent than lilting album closer “Sing With Me.” Built around acoustic guitar, piano, and Cotterill’s voice, it’s an exhortation to “sing with me / or sing your own song / I don’t mind, just as long as you find / a voice.”

Dee adds, “If people are listening to our songs and they’re going to sing along to them, they’re going to start owning some of those words. And in owning some of those words that gives them some strength and power going forward. That’s really the biggest gift that I could give to anybody.”
“Stronger in every way” aptly describes Bad Cop Bad Cop in 2020. The anger may have taken a back seat on The Ride, but what’s taken its place is even more powerful.

DS Show Gallery: NOFX, Descendents, Face To Face and more rock the Punk In Drublic Fest, Worcester, MA

Late September in New England is, for all intents and purposes, quite literally perfect. It’s that glorious time of year where the air is crisp and the leaves are starting to turn a wide array of warm colors and the sun is still high enough in the sky to keep you from freezing but not […]

Late September in New England is, for all intents and purposes, quite literally perfect. It’s that glorious time of year where the air is crisp and the leaves are starting to turn a wide array of warm colors and the sun is still high enough in the sky to keep you from freezing but not too high in the sky that you don’t need a light hoodie layered with probably a heavier hoodie and/or maybe a flannel/denim combination when the wind picks up or the shadows get long. And on one such spectacularly picture-perfect Saturday afternoon recently, the rolling hills of central Massachusetts were filled with the dulcet, three-chord sounds of a daylong music and libations festival. Okay, so it was a parking lot in downtown Worcester…but actually now that I think about it, that’s quite honestly just about the ideal locale for a punk rock and beer festival…

That’s right, the liberty-spiked masses descended upon the parking lot behind the Worcester Palladium for the 2022 installment of the Punk In Drublic festival. By yours truly’s count, it was the festival’s third stop in Massachusetts since it kicked off in 2018 (the initial stop was in Brockton of all places, while this marked the second annual stop in The Heart Of The Commonwealth – yes that’s Worcester’s real nickname and no, that’s not intended to be ironic. I know, right?)

ANYWAY, speaking of Worcester, the city’s beloved No Trigger kicked off the festivities in the middle of the afternoon. I think it’s a pretty smart move by the festival’s management (read as: Fat Mike and crew) to open the gates and start the beer testing well before the music starts; it gets a decent sized crowd to turn out at a comparatively early time to begin what will be a long day of rocking and rolling. The Worcester-based sextet No Trigger, fresh off the heels of the release of their dynamite new album Dr. Album (Red Scare Industries), set a pretty high bar for the rest of the bands that were to follow with a dynamic, full throttle, tight-as-a-drum set.


Night Birds were next out of the shoot and kept the energy level at an equally high level. In what came as a bit of a surprise to more than a few of us in the crowd, the band announced that this particular show would serve as their second-to-last show as a band. Effing bummer, because the five-piece lineup (which I’d never seen) played as tight a show as I’d seen their previous four-man editions play. Maybe they found a different level knowing that it was the last show on the books (plans for a final show are as yet unannounced) but it seemed pretty special from where I was standing.


Hitting third in the order on this particular day were TSOL. In my experience, it can be a bit of a coin-flip how a comparatively younger crowd will receive a band of 70s/80s stalwarts, but I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by how the crowd fist-pumped and circle-pitted along as the inimitable Jack Grisham and his band of melody makers (longtime partners Ron Emory on guitar and Mike Roche on bass along with more recent addition Antonio Val Hernandez on drums) tore through a set comprised largely of decades-old punk rock classics. Seriously, check Hernandez’s Instagram – old school Worcester showed up!


Batting cleanup were none other than SoCal punk icons Face To Face. In the interest of full disclosure, Face are the band I’ve seen more than any other, no matter the genre. I’ve seen a half-dozen different versions of the lineup over the years, including about a dozen shows in the current Trever/Scott/Danny/Dennis version. With that in mind, Punk In Drublic was the best I’ve heard them sound in quite a while. No doubt fueled by the thousands of avid punk rock fans in attendance, the band played an hour-long set that did a pretty good job of mixing in ‘the old’ (“I’m Trying,” “No Authority”) and ‘the new’ (“No Way Out But Through,” a surprising “Farewell Song”) all with a vintage, early 90s energy.


The evening’s penultimate spot belonged to none other than Descendents. I’m having a tough time finding the correct words to use to describe the legendary band’s set and honestly, what I keep coming back to is that it made me happy. To call the quartet anything less than iconic is to do them a tremendous disservice, and performances like this one prove exactly why. Not only was the crowd opposite the band (across what had to have been a thirty-foot-deep security/photographer pit that I both greatly appreciated and found to be tremendous overkill) fully engaged in the band’s set, but the stage itself was more full of revelers than at any other point in the festival. The band plowed through more than two dozen songs in an hour-and-change, representing all parts of their four-plus decade career together. (Personal highlight: “I’m The One” into “Bikeage” into “Thank You.” Good grief.)


The grand finale spot of course belonged to none other than NOFX. In many ways, the quartet have been the clown princes of punk rock for three decades, and that’s more than a little by design (are they breaking up next year or aren’t they?). That can lead to some pretty memorable and certainly widely-varied live performances; it is “punk rock” after all. Yet on this night (and I know I’ve said this a lot in this article but that doesn’t make it untrue), the band were as tight as I’ve ever seen them. The setlist of somewhere around thirty songs pulled from all points of their storied career, from “Stickin’ In My Eye” up through “I Love You More Than I Hate Me” and was interspersed with the requisite banter especially from Fat Make and El Hefe, who riffed on everything from the aforementioned breakup rumors to the fact that people allegedly live in Ogunquit, Maine, to the fact that they were actually playing well, all in rapid-fire succession.


It really was an awesome and fun and in many ways picture-perfect day that was well worth the trek out to the fart of Massachusetts, filled with good times and great energy from bands and crowd alike. Check out more pictures below!


NOFX Slideshow


Descendents Slideshow


Face To Face Slideshow


TSOL Slideshow


Night Birds Slideshow


No Trigger Slideshow

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (new NOFX, Bad Religion, The Vandals, Dropkick Murphys & more)

Whaddup, fuckers! Thank you for joining us for this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar, where we cover all things new in the world of punk rock vinyl. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, because it’s time to run through this week’s releases. I hope you’re feeling spendy, because there’s […]

Whaddup, fuckers! Thank you for joining us for this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar, where we cover all things new in the world of punk rock vinyl. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, because it’s time to run through this week’s releases. I hope you’re feeling spendy, because there’s a lot of good stuff that might find its way into your record collection. Let’s get into it!


Bad Religion continues to reissue their back catalog. The latest is a 40th Anniversary reissue of How Could Hell Be Any Worse?. Once again, there are a billion variants, with regional and retailer exclusivity. Links to where you can buy all of these can be found here.


The Vandals have re-pressed their debut LP When In Rome (Do As The Vandals) on pink and black splatter vinyl. Head over to their Bandcamp page to grab it.


Punk Rock Radar and Cat’s Claw Records are releasing a Split LP from two great German pop-punk bands Lookit, Martians! and The Cheap Pops. There are two very creatively named color variants, each limited to 100 copies. If you enjoy 90’s pop-punk even half as much as I do, this shit’s right up your alley. Check out a few tracks below, and pre-order here (US) or here (EU).


Celtic punk veterans The Real McKenzies have announced a new covers album. Songs of the Highlands, Songs of the Sea is due out in November on Fat Wreck Chords. Check out their cover of “Scotland the Brave” below. Pre-order the record here (US), here (CA), here (EU), or heeeeeeere (AUS).


Speaking of Celitc punk, Newbury Comics has a new exclusive pressing of the Dropkick MurphysThe Gang’s All Here. This one’s limited to 500 copies on blue vinyl. Grab it here.


Earache Records has announced a new crowdfunding project called Earache on Demand. Every month they will be announcing a few new releases, each with its own funding goal. If enough people pre-order and the goal is met, the release gets pressed. If the goal is not met, you get your money back. Very cool! My favorite record from their first round is Municipal Waste‘s Hazardous Mutation. This has been out of print since 2005. Head over here to pre-order and help make this reissue a reality.


Next up is the much-anticipated new album from NOFX. It’s the follow-up to Single Album, which was released back in February. This one is called…you guessed it…Double Album! The lead single is “Darby Crashing Your Party” and it’s full of the kind of self-deprecation and wordplay you’ve come to know and love from Fat Mike. The video is below and vinyl pre-orders through Fat Wreck Chords are here.



Last but not least, Big D and the Kids Table have announced a 15th anniversary edition of their 2007 SideOneDummy debut Strictly Rude. The updated edition comes with five previously-unreleased tracks. It’s also a double LP with one record coming in an exclusive color. Oh, and there’s updated artwork and a poster. Pre-orders are available here, and it looks like it’ll ship in December 2022. Tell your mom to add it to your Christmas list!



And that’s all, folks! Another Record Radar in the books. As always, thank you for tuning in. If there’s anything we missed (highly likely), or if you want to let everyone know about a new/upcoming vinyl release you’re excited about, send us a message on Facebook or Instagram, and we’ll look into it. Enjoy your weekend, and don’t blow too much money on spinny discs. See ya next week!

*Wanna catch up on all of our Record Radar posts? Type “Record Radar” in the search bar at the top of the page!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (No Use For A Name, Gogol Bordello & more)

Good day, fellow humanoid beings! Welcome to another installment in the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight new releases, as well as all the ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ palms […]

Good day, fellow humanoid beings! Welcome to another installment in the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight new releases, as well as all the ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ palms sweaty. Open up your wallets, fire up your Paypal account, and let’s get into it…

Fat Wreck Chords gets us started with an awesome full discography box set for the almighty No Use For A Name. Black Box includes 13 LPs and a bonus 7″, and for $275 this beast can be yours. Lots of pretty colors, lots of great tunes. Grab it here.

Hot Water Music has repressed their latest record Feel the Void. Three new splatter variants (each limited to 250 copies) are now available here. The yellow and red one is my favorite 🙂

SBÄM Records will be releasing California hardcore punks Dead Fucking Last‘s 1997 album Grateful on vinyl for the first time. There are two variants, limited to 200 copies each. Grab it here.

Gogol Bordello has announced a new record! Solidaritine is due out on September 16th. You can listen to two songs from the album below, and pre-order the vinyl here (split blue/yellow), here (solid yellow), or here (yellow w/ blue splatter).

Sound Speed Records has a new release up pre-order. It’s the debut LP from Los Angeles melodic punk band Failing Up. Check the record out below, and buy it on vinyl here.

Hardcore punk supergroup Dead Cross have announced their sophomore album II. For those who are unfamiliar, this band features Mike Patton (Mr. Bungle, Faith No More, etc.) and Slayer’s Dave Lombardo, among others. The record’s first single can be heard below. Links to pre-order all the different vinyl variants can be found here.

The good people at Pirates Press Records are having a summer sale! Tons of great records for very, very cheap. I’m talkin’ dirt cheap. Seriously, head over to their webstore and just look at how cheap this shit is!

Melodic hardcore vets Stretch Arm Strong are reissuing their 1999 LP Rituals of Life. There are a bunch of variants for this one, but Revelation Records seems to be the only place that still has any in stock. Hit up their store to get it on yellow vinyl.

Independent record store chain Zia Records has announced a new exclusive pressing of Millencolin‘s classic Pennybridge Pioneers. It’s limited to 300 copies, so act fast and grab it here.

Modern Baseball‘s 2016 LP Holy Ghost has been repressed. This one’s also limited to 300 copies on “olive green smoke” vinyl. It’s also a Zia Records exclusive, so if you want it, that’s the only place you’re gonna get it!

Now, for the segment where I show you what records I got this week! I’m putting my collection’s expansion on hold for a bit. Rent’s going up fucking 18% and having shelter is slightly more important than collecting colorful music discs. But I did get some stuff I ordered a while ago in the mail, including 1-2-3-4 Go! Records‘ reissue of my favorite Pinhead Gunpowder record Shoot the Moon, and an awesome repress of Satanic Surfers‘ skate punk classic Hero Of Our Time from Chase the Glory Records. Both of these look and sound fantastic, and will be in my regular rotation for a bit.

Time for me to get outta here! I’ve got places to go and people to meet (not really, but you get the point). Anyway, I’m sure there’s some stuff I missed, but hey, nobody’s perfect. As always, I need your help to make these weekly recaps of new colorful plastic discs to waste your money on. So if there’s a new record you think should be highlighted in the column’s next installment, send us a message on Facebook or Instagram, and we’ll look into it. Thanks again for tuning in to the Dying Scene Record Radar. See ya next week!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (NOFX, Danzig, Angry Samoans & more)

Hello, friends! Welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight the new releases, as well as those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. Open […]

Hello, friends! Welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight the new releases, as well as those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. Open up your wallets, fire up your Paypal account, and let’s get into it…

Danzig‘s 6:66 Satan’s Child is getting its first official pressing since 1999. Cleopatra Records is handling this reissue, and there’s a bunch of different variants (some with the uncensored version of the cover art) available on their webstore (sign up for their mailing list and save 10%). Pay up, people! Glenn needs to stock up on kitty litter.

Fat Wreck Chords has announced European festival exclusive variants of some of their classic releases, including Good Riddance‘s For God and Country, No Use For A Name‘s Making Friends, and Swingin’ UttersA Juvenile Product of the Working Class. The only place in the entire world these will be available is the label’s merch booth at SBAM Fest, Brackrock Festival, and Punk Rock Holiday. Think of it like an Easter egg hunt, but much more expensive! Follow Fat on Instagram for more info.

Keeping their recent hot streak alive, Epitaph Records is back at it with even more reissues! Up first is NOFX‘s White Trash, Two Heebs, and a Bean, which turns 30 this year. They’re pressing TEN new variants of the fuckin’ thing. Links to where you can purchase all of these can be found here.

Also from Epitaph: some new pressings of Dropkick MurphysDo Or Die and Blackout, both on white vinyl. These are limited to 500 copies each, and are only available on their European webstore.

And their third and final reissue this week is a 25th Anniversary edition of the Refused album Songs to Fan the Flames of Discontent, featuring bonus tracks and demos. This is available as a clear 2xLP on their webstore. There’s also an Indie Exclusive blue variant; hit up your local record store for that one.

Knock knock! Who’s there? Another god damn reissue, that’s who! This is a really good one though. It’s the Angry Samoans‘ classic Back From Samoa. You can grab this one on green vinyl from Puke ‘N’ Vomit Records, or from Garageland if you like you’d rather have an orange plastic disc.

Surprise! Here’s another new pressing of an old-ass record. The Vandals reissued 1988’s Slipper When Ill (also known as their country album) on red marble vinyl, available through their Bandcamp page. I’m not big on this one personally, but hey, maybe it’s your favorite Vandals record. If that’s the case, I urge you to seek professional help.

Okay, these are the last of the reissues… I promise. Psychobilly icons Reverend Horton Heat are repressing their first three LPs on colored wax. Due out on September 9th, this is the first time these records have been in print since their initial release in the early 90’s. Get ’em here.

Finally, some new music! MU330 frontman Dan Potthast has a new solo record out, and as the title suggests, it’s pretty good! Each LP has a unique outer sleeve, hand made by Dan P himself. You can give the album a listen below, and grab it on vinyl on his Bandcamp.

Next up we have another solo album, this time from former ALL frontman Scott Reynolds. Chihuahua in Buffalo is his first solo acoustic release, and it’s quite enjoyable! This came out on CD/digital last year, but Thousand Islands Records is now releasing it on vinyl. Listen below, and go here to get the wax.

Something To Do Records has announced a new After School Special LP titled Lost Episodes. For those who are unfamiliar, this was Enemy You frontman David Jones’ (RIP) original band. This release will be available to preorder on the label’s webstore starting Friday, July 15th.

And last but not least, Less Than Jake just released a new single titled “Fat Mike’s on Drugs (Again)”. The song is great, and it’s getting a physical release as a flexi disc. Watch the music video below, and preorder the flexi here.

Well, it’s getting late, so I’ll wrap things up. If you’re still reading this for some reason, thank you once again for tuning in to this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar! Is there a new record you think should be highlighted in next week’s column? Suggestions are always welcome – send us a message on Facebook or Instagram and we’ll look into it!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Fat Mike, Stacey Dee, John E Carey Jr., Pete Steinkopf, more cover Op Ivy's "Jaded" & "The Crowd"

Fat Mike, Stacey Dee of Bad Cop/Bad Cop, John E Carey Jr of Youth Brigade, Pete Steinkopf of Bouncing Souls, Mikey Hawdon of Fairmounts, and Justin and Jesse Bivona of The Interrupters, have teamed up to cover "Jaded" and "The Crowd" by Operation Ivy. The video features a cameo from Tim Armstrong of Op Ivy and Rancid along with footage of Tony Hawk shot by Tim Olson. The video was created by Crusty Media. The cover is a part of Mikey Hawdon's Mikey and His Uke YouTube series. Check out the video below.

From The DS Vault: On The Passing Of Tony Sly (originally appeared August 2, 2012)

Thanks to everyone who has checked out all of the new content we’ve been cranking out since the relaunch of Dying Scene! We’re stoked to be back, and we’re even more stoked that you’ve been checking in! Because we have an awful lot of material from the old site in the Archive, we thought it […]

Thanks to everyone who has checked out all of the new content we’ve been cranking out since the relaunch of Dying Scene! We’re stoked to be back, and we’re even more stoked that you’ve been checking in! Because we have an awful lot of material from the old site in the Archive, we thought it would be cool to take a look back at some of the posts from our past.

First up is a story from August 2, 2012. My memories of writing it are still very vivid. We’d just had it confirmed the night before that Tony Sly had passed away. I remember messaging Dying Scene’s old head honcho (and still head honcho emeritus) Johnny X that I know we had run a news story about it, but that I wanted to say more about what his death meant. I took a little time to process my initial shock, and sat at my desk in my old office and wrote the following post stream-of-consciousness style.

As humans, we’re social creatures, conditioned by nature to thrive off of connections with others. We like to know that other people share in our emotions, both good and bad. So it’s a weird thing when a public figure dies. In trying to make sense of a public loss, it is not uncommon for people to insert themselves in the tragedy of others, searching for connections where none may really exist. The punk rock community can be a jaded one at times, so we turn a condescending eye toward those who vocally mourn the passing of the Whitney Houstons, the Michael Jacksons and the Dick Clarks of the world. But then we lose one of our own, and somehow it feels different.

The punk community is a finite thing, built on a shared set of experiences and beliefs. It goes without saying that to become more than just a gimmick or a passing voice in the annals of punk rock history, your voice has to be one of honesty and integrity. False celebrity and pretension get snuffed out pretty quickly. Tony Sly’s voice resonated for a lot of reasons.  More than anything, Sly’s voice was genuine. Tony Sly wasn’t one of a kind; like most great punk rock poets, he was one of us.

It seems that there’s a common thread for a lot of people who might be of a certain age (let’s say 33 for argument’s sake) while reading this page. For many of us, it was the Green Days and the Offsprings who ushered us into this punk rock community roughly twenty years ago; it was the No Use For A Names that kept us here. Inspired by the Bad Religions and the Social Distortions who blazed the trail a decade earlier, NUFAN were one of the pillars in the skate punk community that exploded in the early 90s, thanks in no small part to Tony Sly’s unique voice and heartfelt lyrics. To many of us, there are less than a half-dozen voices from that pivotal era of our formative punk rock years whose ability to connect with their listeners via their storytelling abilities continues to resonate and has left a lasting impression: Fat Mike, Joey Cape, Trever Keith, Jim Lindberg, and Tony Sly. That foundation crumbled a little with the all-too-untimely passing of Tony Sly.

While Fat Mike’s voice served to take the piss out of people who took themselves too seriously and Lindberg pointed his middle finger directly at the establishment, Sly (along with his later counterpart Cape) was more introspective, directing a lot of that same vitriol toward the man that reflects in the mirror. Sly expressed fear, doubt and insecurity in ways that were very real and relatable, easily allowing the listener to identify with every word. And yet, I always got the sense that Tony wasn’t looking for that sort of connection; instead that he was writing for himself, using his music as a therapeutic tool, actively trying to process and make sense of what he saw unfolding around him in the world around him.

As he progressed as a songwriter, Sly’s frame of reference seemed to narrow, with lyrics that became more personal release-by-release, dealing less with trying to fit into the bigger picture (as on the bulk of the material on the 1995 NUFAN classic Leche Con Carne) and more on trying to make sense with feelings like disappointment and resignation along with the stagnation and inertia that can creep in to long-term relationships. The two solo albums that closed out Sly’s career were perhaps the two most appropriately-titled albums in recent memory (2010’s Twelve Song Program and 2011’s Sad Bear). The former album tells the tale of a man trying to keep a brave (or at least upbeat) face while coping with emotional turmoil; the latter, while very similar in almost every way, adopts the tone of someone who remains stuck in a persistent rut, yet without some of the tongue-in-cheek optimism of its predecessor.

Like most lasting punk rock voices of his era, he wasn’t about gimmicks or style. Tony Sly wasn’t a bondage-pants-and-pink-mohawk type, nor was he a leather-jacket-and-eyeliner type. From afar, Tony Sly seemed like one of the good guys, but equally as important, he seemed like one of the regular guys. He seemed like someone who used his musical platform to cathartically express a lot of the things that many of us go through, particularly with middle age and growing responsibilities that come with it. As he reminded us, Tony Sly wasn’t our savior. Rather, he was one of us. That’s what makes his untimely passing all the more troubling. It means not just losing a made-up face on a television screen or a studio-created voice capable of belting out words that were written in a pop music laboratory. Instead, it makes our own mortality just a little more real.

“Please remember…it must go on…”

  1. I still remember that terrible day and I remember the DS tribute to Tony. No Use was one of my favorite bands growing up (still is). They were just that little bit under the radar from the bands that were blowing up like Rancid, Green Day, Offspring and Bad Religion, that we felt like they were are own, despite being a coast away from where No Use formed. Still one of my favorite memories is being drunk as shit outside the Paradise in Boston where No Use just killed with a great set. Me and my buddy left after No Use played knowing that the Dance Hall Crashers just couldn’t compete with No Use. It was awesome that we saw Tony and Dave Nassie outside the bar that was next to Paradise. They were busting our balls cuz of our thick Boston accents and sayings. I told Tony, in pure Boston bro form, “Hey Tony, fuckin’ Postcaaahd was f’n pissah kid!”. Baffled, Tony turned to Dave and was like, does that mean he liked it or hated it?!! He was awesome to talk to and genuinely loved interacting with the fans it seemed as much as we loved talking to him and listening to his music. I still miss that band. I heard Fat Mike had some recordings of Tony but that they were so unfinished that he’s not sure he can do anything with them. Too bad. Would love to hear some new stuff for sure. Thanks for posting the tribute DS. And thank you so much for coming back.. I missed your site 😉

    • No Use opened for Dance Hall Crashers? At Paradise? Wow, I don’t remember that. I know I saw them both (separately) but it was always at Middle East downstairs. Actually wait, no, I saw DHC (and Unwritten Law) open for Bad Religion at…Axis? Avalon? Anyway, thanks for checking in! I’m glad we’re back too! We’ll have the kinks worked out soon. I hope.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Me First and the Gimme Gimmes

Me First and the Gimme Gimmes are a punk supergroup cover band, formed in San Francisco in 1995. The band’s rotating lineup has featured members of NOFX, Lagwagon, No Use for a Name, and the Ramones, among others.