Search Results for: festival

Search Archives Only

Brakrock Festival issues statement about SOIA/No Fun At All incident, SOIA also responds

Earlier this week, there was an incident at Brakrock fest where the guitar tech for Sick Of It All stated that she was assaulted by the singer of No Fun At All during NFAA's set. The NFAA camp stated that while there was an incident, it did not take place as described by the SOIA camp. More details on that can be found here. Last night, Brakrock fest issued their own statement on the incident. You can read that below. Thereafter, Sick Of It All posted a short statement on instagram addressing the specific issue of the alleged hitting and assault. You can also see that statement below.

DS Festival Review: Slam Dunk Festival (North)

In 2001, I moved to the Northern English city of Leeds, in part because of the live music venue, The Cockpit. This small venue put on all my favourite bands of the time, and had a long history of putting on great live music. I worked in another venue in the city on weekends, so […]


In 2001, I moved to the Northern English city of Leeds, in part because of the live music venue, The Cockpit. This small venue put on all my favourite bands of the time, and had a long history of putting on great live music. I worked in another venue in the city on weekends, so Tuesday night was my big night out, and Tuesday nights were Slam Dunk at The Cockpit. A solid mix of ska punk, pop punk, emo, rock, metal and whatever else alternative kids were listening to in the early 2000’s. 

So here I am, 21 years later. The Cockpit has long since shut down and whilst the Slam Dunk Club Night plays on at its new home, the Key Club, it’s the festival that I am at today. Now held across two cities with more than 50 bands, across five stages, things have really grown from that two room sweaty Tuesday night under a railway arch.

The lineup covers a wide range of punk and alternative music, but because I’m old and stuck in my ways, I’m mostly staying at the Dickies stage, which is the main stage this year, hosting The Suicide Machines, The Bronx, Hot Water Music, The Vandals, Streetlight Manifesto, Pennywise, The Interrupters, The Dropkick Murphy’s and headliners Sum 41. 

I’d originally bought tickets on the basis that Rancid were headlining, but they pulled out for undisclosed reasons. Then support from the Mighty Mighty Bosstones collapsed along with the band. Things were looking bleak, and I actually looked into selling my ticket, only to have two of my close friends and original Slam Dunk allies to buy tickets, so it was to be a big day out for us old guys.

The venue for the festival is Temple Newsam House. For further personal historic links, this was the site of the first music festival I ever went to (V98), and a big part of my musical taste was formed in these park lands. The benefit of this location for me is that it is close to home, the downside is that it still takes an hour and a half to get in, as traffic is not well managed and everything is already getting expensive (£10 to park in a field, £10 for a bus), I’d planned to ride my bike to the event, but for three of us, that didn’t make much sense.

Inside the arena, the stages are far enough apart that there is little noise mix from bands and practicalities like bars, toilets and food concessions are plentiful, the addition of a separate “real ale” bar was a pleasant surprise, and I managed to spend an impressive amount in this tent after and before every band. The tent also provides some welcome shade from the unexpected sun that I was totally unprepared for!

So, on to the music…

Hot Water Music, a band that I’ve discovered backwards through Chuck Ragan’s solo work, come out impassioned and full of energy, although the crowd are a little flat with it being an early set. Despite this we get a solid effort from the band, though possibly things are held back a little by a lack of catchy hooks and sing along choruses in the songs performed. Finishing with “Trusty Chords” gets the crowd interested from hearing a song they know. Whether they know the song from Epitaph‘s Punk-o-Rama compilation, or it’s just a favourite is hard to say, but in a pre-internet world, compilations from Independent punk labels are how a lot of us discovered new bands, especially those that didn’t tour the small northern venues like the Cockpit!

A quick trip to the bar revealed the sound of Punk Rock Factory carrying on the wind from the Rock Sound Stage. I was familiar with the band from their Youtube videos of punked up, harmonized pop covers, and as a father of small children, I found myself singing along to “Let It Go”, whilst appropriately stood at a urinal. If I have to play Disney songs on long journeys, then at least they can have crushing guitars as well, and hopefully, like some kind of gateway drug, this leads my kids down the path of home made tattoos and living in a van (or some other punk cliché).

The Vandals took to the stage with a not too reassuring “We’ll do our best”, and whilst I appreciate their honesty and openness, first song “Café 405”, is out of time and out of tune. 

Three songs in, things are starting to tighten up, “People That Are Going To Hell” gets people moving a little, but on the whole, the crowd remain static. “And Now We Dance” raises the energy, “The New You” keeps it going, but there’s just not enough there to hold the attention of the majority of the crowd. My friends desert me to hit the real ale bar, I hate myself for giving up on the mighty Vandals, but cold beer and the Cancer Bats on the Jagermeister stage lure me away. I’m not massively familiar with the Cancer Bats, but the wall of noise, that I could feel through the ground and see vibrating through my pint has led me to listen to more of their back catalogue.

I had a dream the night before Slam Dunk that I took all my family to see Streetlight Manifesto, but instead of their usual set list, they played a really challenging, four hour Jazz set, stopping only to enjoy a sit down meal, where they served soup from tea pots. I was trying desperately to convince my family that really, they’re a great band, whilst simultaneously enjoying the weird spectacle. 

Fortunately, there’s no Jazz today as Streetlight Manifesto, a later addition to the bill, take to the stage. There’s a clear sense of excitement in the crowd as the eight piece tear through classic hits “We Will Fall Together” and “The Three Of Us” along with lesser known tracks with a level of energy normally reserved for headline shows. The crowd sings along, dances, moshes; it’s a perfect blend of everything you want on a summers day. The only slight letdown is Tomas Kalnoky shouting “this is the big finish!” and then promptly not playing “Keasbey Nights.” I get the reasons, and I support them in letting go of a song that doesn’t really represent the band, but for many in the crowd it’s the song they came to hear and there’s visible confusion as the band leave the stage, though encores aren’t really a thing at 16:30 on a festival stage are they?

I last saw Pennywise in 1999. So its been a while. Late last year I read Jim Lindberg’s book “Punk Rock Dad,” which renewed my interest in the band, so I’m excited to see this set, and if the number of Pennywise T-shirts I’m seeing are anything to go by, so are the crowd.

From the get go, the band are on full attack. There’s no sign of age in the band and the crowd are loving it. Covers of AC/DC’s “TNT” and “Breed” by Nirvana continues the energy. Early songs “Pennywise” and “Society” lead to Lindberg lamenting to having been “doing this for thirty years,” but it’s not slowing them down. 

The crowd holds middle fingers aloft for “Fuck Authority,” and whilst it feels cheesy, a load of middle aged men swearing at the sky, its kind of cathartic, and hey, it’s a great song! Who doesn’t enjoy feeling like an angry teenager (teenagers maybe?).

A cover of “Stand By Me,” which closed 1992 album Wild Card/ A Word From The ‘Wise surprised me, as I was certain it was Lagwagon, so I learned something important today if nothing else. 

Set closer “Bro-Hymn” has exactly the effect you’d expect. Huge “wooahs” from the crowd, that epic bass riff and impassioned singing along. Obviously it’s a great song, but I think it hits harder now, after the last few years and I think everyone can take some strength from this song and apply it to someone they’ve lost.

The Interrupters carry a strange position in my mind. I love their songs, they’re great live, but there’s just something not quite right. Something doesn’t sit right with me, and I hate myself for being so negative, but its all a bit too clean cut for me. Like it’s the soundtrack to Disney film where some hopelessly good looking, talented young people form a ska punk band and take over the world with a weird crusty mentor behind them (Called Tim?).

Opener “Take Back the Power” feels stronger than normal. Maybe its that they’re more established, or maybe my cynicism is fading? Either way I enjoy it for what it is, well polished, perfectly-performed ska pop-punk. 

Ignoring a weird segue about how they all used to bathe together… “She got arrested” gets a great crowd sing along, and is probably my favourite of their songs, not least as it was my introduction to the band back in 2017 and a great example of the quality story telling in the lyrics of some of their songs.

A cover medley of “Keep ‘Em Separated”/ “Linoleum”/ “Ruby Soho” gets the crowd going before surprise high point for me, a cover of Bad Religion‘s “Sorrow,” which goes down well with the crowd (For reference Bad Religion played Slam Dunk in 2019, as did the Interrupters).

The band finishes with “She’s Kerosene,” keeping the party going, the crowd moving and generally capturing the moment nicely. People are drunk, its sunny, the people want to dance and the Interrupters deliver.

The Dropkick Murphys take to a stage with a full length riser, done out to look like a stone wall, but there is a notable absence. Al Barr, it is announced, has stayed home to care for his sick mother. Ken Casey steps up for lead vocal duties and the evening begins with the sound of bagpipes on the cool evening breeze. 

“State of Massachusetts” gets the kind of crowd reaction you’d expect from a classic pop hit or a song about Yorkshire, such passion for such a challenging subject is strange, but hey, it’s a great song and the drunk, bouncy, dancey crowd are loving it.

“Barroom Hero” is introduced as the first song the band ever wrote, which is a bit of trivia I didn’t know, but I remember it from way back in the 90s, so I guess that makes sense. The crowd offer weak “Oi! Oi! Oi!” effort which is a disappointment, maybe the crowd aren’t as au fait with shouting Oi! as I’d like? Though I accept my drive to shout “Oi!” is probably higher than most.

The slip up begins with the instruction to sing along to the 1937 hit “I’ve Still Got Ninety-Nine” by the Monroe Brothers, which although an undeniably good song, probably isn’t too familiar to the crowd today. On the upside, we’re promised an acoustic album in September, which is one to look out for. Whether it’s new material or reimagined classics has not been confirmed, but hopefully there will be an associated tour.

“Rose Tattoo” brings the sing along from the crowd, but lacks the momentum to get the crowd moving. This is exacerbated by the big screen showing bored, static faces in the crowd for the first time. Fortunately, “I’m Shipping Up To Boston” brings the party back before the end of the set. I’ve never seen such passion for a missing wooden leg, as the crowd goes nuts, with crowd surfers from all directions riding above the waves of the crowd. All parties appear to have legs intact, so that’s good.

Headliners Sum-41 were a bit of a quandary for me. The first album was an important soundtrack to my late teens/ early 20s and I saw them play in Leeds twice in 2002, but I haven’t listened to their music since Does This Look Infected from the same year.

A bit of pre-show research suggested they have had seven further releases, including 2019s Order In Decline, but in the spirit of openness, I’ve not felt inspired to check these out.

The band come out to a stage with blood-soaked Marshall speaker cabinets, a giant skull, jets of fire and “Motivation” from the first album, All Killer, No Filler. More people than I expected are really into it, though competition with Deaf Havana and the Nova Twins is limited and the other stages have closed.

The stage is set for a night of big rock and I’d like to say I invested more effort into rediscovering Sum 41, but too much sun, too much beer and a designated driver who wanted to beat the traffic meant we made an early exit.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Show Review and Photos: The Beths, SASAMI & Charlotte Cornfield Live At BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn

I will be the first to admit that my main (aka only) interest in venturing over to Prospect Park on a hot & humid Friday night was to see New Zealand’s one and only The Beths. I knew next to nothing about the 2 opening acts, Charlotte Cornfield and SASAMI. I can only say now […]

I will be the first to admit that my main (aka only) interest in venturing over to Prospect Park on a hot & humid Friday night was to see New Zealand’s one and only The Beths. I knew next to nothing about the 2 opening acts, Charlotte Cornfield and SASAMI. I can only say now that am I REALLY glad I got to The Lena Horne bandshell early enough to witness one of these sets.

Cornfield took the stage promptly at 7 PM and proceeded to treat the crowd to a steady and competent set of rather quiet and subdued indie folk to which the NPR types in the crowd thoroughly enjoyed. For my ears, however her set just didn’t resonate all that much with me and after the 3 song photo allotment was met I found myself chatting with some of the other photogs in attendance for what seemed like a rather long time considering Charlotte was an opener on a three-band bill at an outdoor show that had a strict New York City mandated 10 PM curfew. Before I go any further, to be clear, Cornfield’s set did seem to be quite good but it just wasn’t my thing and I just kind of lost interest. That’s not to say that she didn’t make a lot of those in attendance very pleased with her set.


Next up was SASAMI who hit the stage shortly after 8 PM.  Truth be told, I had given SASAMI a bit of a listen on Spotify prior to the show and was merely lukewarm about what I had heard. Their first (self-titled) album released in 2019, was a quite polished indie pop album which while very listenable, didn’t exactly get my juices flowing.  And then there is this year’s second full-length LP, Squeeze which hit the shelves back in February. You’d have to do some serious searching in order to find a sophomore LP which takes as strong a departure from its predecessor as does Squeeze

The set started off with Sasami Ashworth’s “The Greatest” off the new album. And while the song on the album is rather subdued, the band came out and raged. They took what already sounded like a homage or at least a response to Whitney Houston’s “The Greatest Gift Of All” and turned it into Whitney’s Greatest Gift from an alternative (much less hospitable) dimension.  From here the set only got darker, darker in a heavy metal kind of way with thundering bass lines and loud abrasive guitar chords coming from both Ashworth’s axe as well as the other guitarist who’s name I did not get. To say the least I was almost completely shocked. From here the band ripped through song after song with a fiery electric vengeance which I for one was 100% unprepared for. 


SASAMI

Sticking with a setlist comprised entirely of titles off the new one, SASAMI’s set was absolutely mesmerizing. The energy set forth by Ashworth and the rest of the band was transfixing. A combination metal hell fest combined with an almost performance art presentation made for a show to which I (and virtually every other photographer in the pit) was paralyzed to stop clicking the shutter button. Every moment following every moment felt like something that needed to be captured.  

SASAMI’s set lasted roughly 40-45 minutes yet it flew by in a flash. I for one felt winded after witnessing the whirlwind of a set which they had treated us all to. My initial reaction when it was done was, “I can’t believe it’s over so soon”.  Looking at their other setlists online however, it looks like we got pretty much their entire show.

Which brings me to the headliner, The Beths. It wasn’t all that long ago, you read from me that they were the only real impetus for me being at Prospect Park in the first place. And now as I stood and waited for them to take the stage, I couldn’t help but ponder, “How the hell are they going to top THAT?!?”  Having seen the band make a steady progression from DIY venue, Alphaville to 400-person Music Hall Of Williamsburg to 1000-person capacity Webster Hall, they were now faced with the unenviable task of playing (BY FAR) their most high-profile show ever in New York at the 5000 to 7000 person capacity Lena Horne Bandshell AND having to do that following an absolutely blistering set from the opener, not to mention their backs against the wall relative to a 10 PM curfew.


With it already being after 9, it appeared that we were most likely going to get a truncated set.  The band came on about 9:15, opening with “I’m Not Getting Excited” but clearly they were because they came out answering the call.  Despite what appeared to be some lighting irritations, Liz Stokes was exactly that, STOKED. She, along with guitarist, Jonathan Pierce, bassist, Ben Sinclair and Tristan Deck on drums hit the stage running. Barreling through stalwarts ” Happy, Unhappy” and “Out Of Sight” before offering up the lead single and title track to the upcoming album, “Expert In A Dying Field” due to drop in mid-September.


It was right about here in the set that it dawned on me that the band had figured out how they were going to get their entire set done in roughly three-quarters the normal length of the set. They were speeding everything up and HOLY SHIT, it was working masterfully!  I mean they were almost approaching Ramones kind of tempos and the songs and the vibes and the atmosphere were just perfect.

After “Dying Field” we got three more older songs before they cracked open another new one called “Knees Deep”, a bright sun-shiney rocker (come to think of it a Beth’s song and sun-shiney is just redundant…aren’t they all like that?)

Attacking each upcoming song at a breakneck pace which seemed different yet also quite right.  “Jump Rope Gazers” into “Uptown Girl” into “A Real Thing”, all done fast but not quite furious.

When all was said and done, The Beths managed to come out of the evening having sleighed the dragon. They overcame the adversity which faced them and finished the evening around 10:10 after a two-song encore of “You Are A Beam of Light” and “Little Death” to the delight of all. Liz and crew put on a masterful show which while certainly sped up, never felt rushed. As a matter of fact it appeared that the band had as much fun as the packed crowd. The normally stoic Jon on guitar was flashing a big grin much of the evening. Liz showed off a little Chuck Berry-esque duck walk and the rhythm section of Tristen and Ben were amazing keeping the sped up pace at bay and even keeled.

When all was said and done, all I could possibly say was, “What a night!”

NOTE:  For those in the NY/NJ area The Beths will be at The Asbury Lanes on August 26th and for those in or around western MA, they will be at Courtney Barnett’s Here and There Festival at MassMoca in North Adams on August 13th.

  • SASAMI
  • The Beths

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Album Review: Gimp Fist – “Isolation”

Despite being British, I never really bonded with UK punk music when I was younger. It wasn’t my sound, it wasn’t my history. To me The Pistols were a cliché of what punk was meant to be and I never truly invested in the growing British punk scene, favouring more accessible American bands over local […]


Despite being British, I never really bonded with UK punk music when I was younger. It wasn’t my sound, it wasn’t my history. To me The Pistols were a cliché of what punk was meant to be and I never truly invested in the growing British punk scene, favouring more accessible American bands over local heroes, much to my detriment.

Gimp Fist though. Gimp? Fist? Those two words alone make me a little uncomfortable, together they make a threat of something quite unpleasant, and naïvely the name makes me think this is something I should avoid, but the singer in my band has several Gimp Fist T-shirts so I persevere, and through perseverance we find strength, as despite the name, Gimp Fist truly are a hidden gem of British street punk. 

Isolation is the eighth album from Gimp Fist. Over fifteen tracks they show no indication of slowing down, and whilst its immediately recognisable as Gimp Fist, there’s no negativity in being more of the same. No prizes for guessing the inspiration for the title, this being the first album since 2019’s Blood, but the band haven’t been resting, playing all over the country, a slot on the “…Calling” one day festival with the Ruts DC and eight other bands, that travels the UK and an upcoming set at the huge four day punk festival, Rebellion.

Jonny, Mike and Chris have a solid reputation for producing sing along, working class anthems across their back catalogue and are well regarded by all who see them. Having seen the band perform numerous times I’m well aware of the energy they carry, but it was seeing singer Jonny perform solo that really caught my attention to the strength of the song writing behind the music. The driving bass and drums of the full band just pushes this forward harder.

The opening track, “Ambition” starts with a stern telling off from an embittered wife before exploding into a clear statement of the bands feeling around any criticism of lack of drive or determination, and who doesn’t enjoy singing along with a hearty “I don’t give a fuck”? This one really sets the tone for the rest of the album. The anger of earlier Gimp Fist is still there, still presented with sing along choruses, and a surprisingly big sound for a three piece, but the anger feels more personal, more targeted. I’d hate to be on the receiving end of singer Jonny’s pen at the moment. 

The next few songs continue in a similar vein, with sing/shout along chorus, lyrics touching on injustice, identity and integrity in the manner that Gimp Fist fans will be used to. “Fuel To The Fire” brings a big solo, and bigger sound, fit for the larger venues the trio find themselves playing.

The very next song “Skinhead Heart” follows the tradition of setting out the staples of skinhead punk imagery in song, but in a mocking manner, for the unnamed skin with “all the gear, but no idea”.

Though there is nothing particularly new to the songs on this album, that is not a bad thing in of itself. Street punk is hardly a genre open to evolution, development or change. What Gimp Fist provides, is more of what the fans want, keeping the genre alive and making accessible, enjoyable and memorable music for punks everywhere.

Album closer, “Bring on the Good Times” feels like an optimistic end to isolation, lockdown and the nightmare of the last few years, let’s hope things keep getting better, both for the band and for everyone.

Available now from Sunny Bastards.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Radio Special Edition- Punk In Drublic Festival – Band Spotlight: Hilltop Rats and John Feldmann of Goldfinger

In this special edition of Dying Scene Radio, we sent the boys down to Orange County for the SoCal leg of Fat Mike's Punk in Drublic Festival. Luckily, they left the free beer lines long enough to meet up with Washington punks, Hilltop Rats to talk about what it's like to be shorn by Guttermouth and the perils of working in a porno distribution warehouse, among other things. If that isn't enough to pique your interest (although we doubt it wasn't), Bob also managed to snag a quick interview with the always dapper Goldfinger front man, Mr. John Feldmann as he made his way to the stage! All of that and much more in this special episode of the official podcast of Dying Scene!

You can also stream us on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play at Dying Scene Radio (Official). Head over to our Facebook and Instagram for more news, updates, show & fest pics and articles!
*Let us know what you think at dyingsceneradio@dyingscene.com
 
Punk in Drublic Playlist
Ignite – “Know Your History”
DI – “OC Life”
Less Than Jake – “Black Coffee”
Bad Cop/Bad Cop – “Why Change A Thing”
Hilltop Rats – “Get Fucked”
The Dickies – “Manny, Moe and Jack”
Get Dead – “No High Road”
Goldfinger – “Get Up”
Strung Out – “Bring Out Your Dead”
Bad Religion – “Fuck Armageddon”
NOFX – “6 Years on Dope”

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (Descendents, Rancid, Joe Strummer & more)

Hello, loyal readers! Thank you for joining us for this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar, where we cover all things in the world of punk rock vinyl. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, because it’s time to run through this week’s releases. I hope you’re feeling spendy, because there’s […]

Hello, loyal readers! Thank you for joining us for this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar, where we cover all things in the world of punk rock vinyl. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, because it’s time to run through this week’s releases. I hope you’re feeling spendy, because there’s a lot of good stuff that might find its way into your record collection. Let’s get into it!

Up first, we’ve got 1-2-3-4 Go! Records with another killer exclusive pressing of a classic record. This time it’s the DescendentsEverything Sucks, limited to 1,000 hand numbered copies on blue vinyl. This will be available on their webstore Friday, August 5th at 8am Pacific (11am Eastern). Join 1-2-3-4 Go!’s mailing list to be among the first to know when it goes up.

Rancid‘s Let’s Go is getting repressed, this time as a red and black splatter LP. It’s limited to 1,000 copies, and is only available from Newbury Comics. Head over here to get your hands on this one.

Brooklyn Vegan has an exclusive green 2xLP pressing of Social Distortion‘s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes up to pre-order on their webstore. It’s limited to 300 copies and the color is pretty cool. Not a huge Social D fan myself, but this album’s alright. Also, if you join Brooklyn Vegan’s mailing list, you’ll get 10% off your order! Very nice.

Asian Man Records has brand new pressings of two classic Alkaline Trio LPs available right now. These new variants of Goddamnit and Maybe I’ll Catch Fire are limited to 1,000 copies each. Head on over to Asian Man’s webstore to order.

It’s been a long time coming but No Trigger has finally announced a follow-up to their fantastic sophomore album Tycoon. The new record’s called Dr. Album, and it’s being released next month on Red Scare. Check out the first single below, and pre-order the LP here.

Power pop singer/songwriter Geoff Palmer has re-recorded Dee Dee Ramone’s “rap” album Standing In The Spotlight. The first single, his cover of “Emergency” (my favorite song off the record), can be heard below. Stardumb Records is releasing this on vinyl; head over here to pre-order it.

The Mugwumps just released a new live album, recorded at Italy’s premiere punk festival Punk Rock Raduno in 2021. Check it out below – it kicks ass! My fellow Americans can get this here; our European friends can buy it here.

Mom’s Basement Records has announced their upcoming Queers tribute compilation God Save The Queers Vol.2 will be available to pre-order this Friday, July 29th, at Noon Eastern. Head over to their webstore to grab your copy. Canadians can get this one from Insipid Records, and our Bri’ish mates will wanna hit up Council-Pop Records.

Hardcore punk supergroup OFF! has announced a new record! Free LSD is the band’s first new studio album in eight years. They’re describing it as “a heavy punk industrial free jazz soundtrack recording”. Watch the music video for the first single “War Above Los Angeles” below, and pre-order the record here. There’s also an orange variant available from Brooklyn Vegan.

Making their second Record Radar appearance in three weeks, it’s the Dropkick Murphys with a Newbury Comics Exclusive variant of their upcoming album This Machine Still Kills Fascists. This one’s due out on September 30th, it’s limited to 500 copies on red vinyl, and you can pre-order it here.

British punk pioneers The Vibrators have announced their final album Fall Into the Sky will be released on August 12th through Cleopatra Records. Listen to the first single below, and pre-order the record on pink or blue vinyl here.

Santa Cruz pop-punks Too Bad Eugene just announced their first new album in 20 years! Distance is due out September 14th on People of Punk Rock Records. Listen to the title track below, and pre-order the record here.

Italy’s Radiation Records has reissued two LPs from Los Angeles punk veterans The Generators: 2005’s The Winter of Discontent, and 2007’s The Great Divide. Get ’em here. These are available in the US through Merchbar, too, but the price after shipping is basically the same as importing from Italy.

A decade after the downfall of The Clash, frontman Joe Strummer would spend the last three years of his life making new music with his band The Mescaleros. A box set compiling the band’s three albums and a bonus LP of demos, outtakes, rarities, has been announced. This is due out on September 16th, and can be pre-ordered here. These records go for $100+ each on the resale market, so this is actually a pretty great deal.

Reminder! If you are attending SBAM FestBrackrock Festival, or Punk Rock Holiday over the next few weeks, Fat Wreck Chords is going to have exclusive new variants of a shitload of records at their merch booth. Titles include Lagwagon‘s Hoss, Strung Out‘s Suburban Teenage Wasteland Blues, the new Face to Face album, and many others. These European festivals are the only place in the entire world these will be available. Check out Fat’s Instagram for more info.

Canadian friends, check out Forbidden Beat! They’re a punk distro that always has good shit going up on their Instagram page, at very good prices. They also seem to be the only place in North America with copies of the new Screeching Weasel LP in stock, so if you’re looking for that, hit ’em up!

Now that all the new and upcoming releases have been covered, I thought I’d share what I’ve been listening to lately! I saw my favorite band Less Than Jake for the 19th(?) time last week, so I’ve been on a LTJ kick lately. I got Losers, Kings, And Things We Don’t Understand at a show in Orlando back in… 2012? And this red pressing of See The Light was one of two Christmas variants limited to 100 copies. It had been a while since I listened to either of these, so I gave them a few spins.

That’s all, folks! Thanks as always for tuning in to the Dying Scene Record Radar. If there’s anything we missed (highly likely), or if you want to let everyone know about a new/upcoming vinyl release you’re excited about, send us a message on Facebook or Instagram, and we’ll look into it. Enjoy your weekend, don’t blow too much money on spinny discs. See ya next week!

*Wanna catch up on all of our Record Radar posts? Yype “Record Radar” in the search bar at the top of the page!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Record Radar: New punk vinyl releases & reissues (NOFX, Danzig, Angry Samoans & more)

Hello, friends! Welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight the new releases, as well as those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. Open […]

Hello, friends! Welcome to the latest installment of the Dying Scene Record Radar. If you’re new here, thank you for joining us! This column provides a weekly round up of all things punk rock vinyl. We highlight the new releases, as well as those ultra limited reissues that get the collector nerds’ hearts racing. Open up your wallets, fire up your Paypal account, and let’s get into it…

Danzig‘s 6:66 Satan’s Child is getting its first official pressing since 1999. Cleopatra Records is handling this reissue, and there’s a bunch of different variants (some with the uncensored version of the cover art) available on their webstore (sign up for their mailing list and save 10%). Pay up, people! Glenn needs to stock up on kitty litter.

Fat Wreck Chords has announced European festival exclusive variants of some of their classic releases, including Good Riddance‘s For God and Country, No Use For A Name‘s Making Friends, and Swingin’ UttersA Juvenile Product of the Working Class. The only place in the entire world these will be available is the label’s merch booth at SBAM Fest, Brackrock Festival, and Punk Rock Holiday. Think of it like an Easter egg hunt, but much more expensive! Follow Fat on Instagram for more info.

Keeping their recent hot streak alive, Epitaph Records is back at it with even more reissues! Up first is NOFX‘s White Trash, Two Heebs, and a Bean, which turns 30 this year. They’re pressing TEN new variants of the fuckin’ thing. Links to where you can purchase all of these can be found here.

Also from Epitaph: some new pressings of Dropkick MurphysDo Or Die and Blackout, both on white vinyl. These are limited to 500 copies each, and are only available on their European webstore.

And their third and final reissue this week is a 25th Anniversary edition of the Refused album Songs to Fan the Flames of Discontent, featuring bonus tracks and demos. This is available as a clear 2xLP on their webstore. There’s also an Indie Exclusive blue variant; hit up your local record store for that one.

Knock knock! Who’s there? Another god damn reissue, that’s who! This is a really good one though. It’s the Angry Samoans‘ classic Back From Samoa. You can grab this one on green vinyl from Puke ‘N’ Vomit Records, or from Garageland if you like you’d rather have an orange plastic disc.

Surprise! Here’s another new pressing of an old-ass record. The Vandals reissued 1988’s Slipper When Ill (also known as their country album) on red marble vinyl, available through their Bandcamp page. I’m not big on this one personally, but hey, maybe it’s your favorite Vandals record. If that’s the case, I urge you to seek professional help.

Okay, these are the last of the reissues… I promise. Psychobilly icons Reverend Horton Heat are repressing their first three LPs on colored wax. Due out on September 9th, this is the first time these records have been in print since their initial release in the early 90’s. Get ’em here.

Finally, some new music! MU330 frontman Dan Potthast has a new solo record out, and as the title suggests, it’s pretty good! Each LP has a unique outer sleeve, hand made by Dan P himself. You can give the album a listen below, and grab it on vinyl on his Bandcamp.

Next up we have another solo album, this time from former ALL frontman Scott Reynolds. Chihuahua in Buffalo is his first solo acoustic release, and it’s quite enjoyable! This came out on CD/digital last year, but Thousand Islands Records is now releasing it on vinyl. Listen below, and go here to get the wax.

Something To Do Records has announced a new After School Special LP titled Lost Episodes. For those who are unfamiliar, this was Enemy You frontman David Jones’ (RIP) original band. This release will be available to preorder on the label’s webstore starting Friday, July 15th.

And last but not least, Less Than Jake just released a new single titled “Fat Mike’s on Drugs (Again)”. The song is great, and it’s getting a physical release as a flexi disc. Watch the music video below, and preorder the flexi here.

Well, it’s getting late, so I’ll wrap things up. If you’re still reading this for some reason, thank you once again for tuning in to this week’s edition of the Dying Scene Record Radar! Is there a new record you think should be highlighted in next week’s column? Suggestions are always welcome – send us a message on Facebook or Instagram and we’ll look into it!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Fest Review & Gallery: Punk Rock Saves Lives Fest 2022 – Day 1 (Ratio Beerworks – Denver, CO)

Punk Rock Saves Lives has been doing some incredible shit in our beloved community for a few years now and during that time, they’ve come to be one of the largest non-profit scene related charity organizations, focusing on Health Concerns (both physical and mental), Equal Rights, Human Rights, and so much more. If you’re not […]

Punk Rock Saves Lives has been doing some incredible shit in our beloved community for a few years now and during that time, they’ve come to be one of the largest non-profit scene related charity organizations, focusing on Health Concerns (both physical and mental), Equal Rights, Human Rights, and so much more. If you’re not familiar with them, check them out, give them a follow and stop by their tent at pretty much any large punk fest in North America and say ‘Howdy’!

This year the ever growing charity decided to throw their first ever Punk Rock Saves Lives Festival in Denver, CO. The terrific, two day event (not counting the pre-party show at EastFax Tap on Friday night) was held at Ratio Beerworks (Overland) to help raise awareness and funding to allow them to continue providing vital resources to our comrades in punk (anyone really, they just lean towards us filthy lowlifes for some reason 😛). Since The Masked Moron, Anarchopunk lives in the Mile High now, we dispatched him to take some pics, drink some locally brewed beer, eat some great food truck grub (those CFH Sliders from Brutal Poodle truck slapped), party with a whole slew of awesome people…..and get Covid. We hear that he successfully accomplished his mission (especially the getting Covid part), so check out his report below!


Local solo act, Sputnik Slovenia started things off, promising to be the tamest act of the night and even though I think he was right, we were still treated to some pretty raucous tunes including a rousing cover of the theme to “Gilligan’s Island” which scored major fan participation points, because who doesn’t sing along to that one, even if it’s just the “…threeeee hour toooouuuur” part?


Next to hit the stage was Adams County’s premiere appliance repairmen/punk rock band, Dryer Fire. Some bands have political messages, others may speak on cultural/social issues, some just sing about having fun. But for this group, appliance safety is paramount, taking ample time between songs to remind everyone to clean their lint traps and check their dryer exhausts on a regular basis. Sooooo……go clean your lint trap and check your dryer exhaust.


Tacoma, WA based pop punks, Let Me Downs flew in on short notice to cover for a band that had to fall out and I think the crowd appreciated them a little extra for that because the energy level spiked significantly during their thirty minute set, which was supposed to be the last indoor set of the night (that’s called foreshadowing, kids).


Time for some fresh Rocky Mountain air! Local favorites, Discomfort Creature (fresh off of a Euro Tour) kicked things off on the outdoor stage. The extra space on the lawn was quickly filled with a humble yet aggressive circle pit and the band fed off of the power that was generated by the constant swirl of the denim and leather clad cyclone.


Denver based super-group, Record Thieves were up next and the crowd definitely knew it as they started slowly creeping towards the stage area, in small waves prior to the band taking the stage. Musically speaking, these guys probably hit the highest mark on the ‘Talent Meter’ for Day One and always bring a pretty high level of intensity. But the highlight for me was hearing the first live performance of their new single “Fault Lines”. Stellar work as always, comrades!


Thousand Island Records representing hard at PRSL Fest! Chicagoland residents, Counterpunch took the stage next. The Windy City punks played through some songs from their most recent LP (and AoTY Contender?) Rewire. But they also tipped their hat to the local scene by inviting The Gamits‘ ex-frontman Chris Fogal to provide vocals for their cover of the defunct band’s most popular tune, “Dotted Lines”. Side Note: I think I have a new favorite basser. That cat fucking briiiings it!


Yes, everybody enjoyed all of the other bands. Yes, everyone had a fabulous day, all around. But let’s be real, everyone was ultimately here to see Chicago hardcore stalwarts, The Bollweevils. Before the set even started, the pit was starting to form and it got more fervid as the band took the stage. After the first song, the weather started to shift and Dr. Daryl, as expected, took his secondary position down in the middle of the ever swelling pit, thrashing around with the fans. The weather continued to deteriorate and as the winds picked up to 25+ MPH 98Gotta love Denver weather), a large tent that was affixed the pergola caught air and nearly flew away. At that point, it was determined that for eh safety of everyone involved, the show had to move back indoors. The sound crew did an amazing job and had the show back in operation inside in about twenty mins. As the set recommenced, The Good Doctor asked the crowd if they could remember where they had left off before Mother Nature interrupted, to which the reply was a hearty “Start Over!”. The band complied and we were treated to a bonus ‘extended set’! It’s been four years since I’ve been tossed that badly down in the pit. Damn, it felt good!

*Check out the rest of the day’s action in the below slideshow! Keep an eye out for Day Two coverage, coming soon!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Fest Review & Gallery: Punk Rock Saves Lives Fest 2022 – Day 2 (Ratio Beerworks – Denver, CO)

Anarchopunk has recovered from the Covid he picked up at this awesome inaugural Fest and finally got around to posting his Day Two coverage, which saw a return to Ratio Beerworks. But, with the prospects of more inclement weather, the show which was previously slated to take place mostly outdoors, moved indoors for everyone’s safety. […]

Anarchopunk has recovered from the Covid he picked up at this awesome inaugural Fest and finally got around to posting his Day Two coverage, which saw a return to Ratio Beerworks. But, with the prospects of more inclement weather, the show which was previously slated to take place mostly outdoors, moved indoors for everyone’s safety.


First up, Jukebox Hardknocks who are a little bit country a little bit….actually…no…these guys are a lot country and not much else and unapologetically so. Their short but entertaining set was filled with covers of country classics from legends like George Jones. Hell, even their TSOL cover had plenty of twang to it!


System Restore ventured all the way down from Wyoming to play a set and they brought their A-game with them! The only thing better than the performance itself was their Merch Game. Top fucking notch. Well done! My bank account is now a bit lighter, gents!


Local lads, The Frickashinas were the third act of the day and were a perfect mid day, pick-me-up! These guys are talented, fun, full of energy and all around, good dudes. It was awesome to see guitarist, Jeramiah’s kids jamming out to the set from up in the balcony. I’ve never seen such cute lil devil horns! 🤘🤘


Egoista has quickly become one of the more ubiquitous punk bands in The Mile High, playing shows almost on a weekly basis, if not more. So, there was no way this terrific trio was gonna pass up an opportunity to play this Fest! No diggity!


By the time Tsunami Bomb hit the stage for their fist live set in about four or five years, the crowd had filled out the room to near capacity and it seemed they were all there to see the pop punks from Petaluma (only the finest things come from Sonoma County). Of all of the sets, this one was definitely the most tangibly intense. You could tell that the band had been chompin’ at the bit for the past few years. It probably felt nice to unload!


Sure, I love all of the bands and I I was so extremely happy to hang out with all of them, but just like our Lord and Savior, Jeebus H. Christ, I have favorites and Makewar is one of them. I’ve been a fan since the old acoustic, Sad & French days and it has been so much fun watching them get more and more recognition. There’s everything to love in this act. The writing is next level, the musicality is near perfection, the guys themselves are genuine, caring individuals and…..they smell nice….wait…that one slipped…If you haven’t seen them live, please do so, STAT!


Here’s where astute readers will realize that there’s no coverage of Rocky Mountain alt-rockers, Inthewhale. That, dear comrades, is because I’m a loser. And even worse, I’m an old loser. Because the weekend was starting to take it’s toll, I split a little early. Luckily, this dynamic duo plays Denver pretty often so I’ll have ample opportunity to make it up to them. The rest of the day’s action however, is captured in the slideshow below!

Be sure to check out the galleries from the Pre-Party Show and Day 1, too!

  1. Thanks for hanging out with the Frickashinas. We love you. And the shout out to my kids is awesome. Xoxo

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Fest Review & Gallery: Punk Rock Saves Lives Fest 2022 – Pre-Party (EastFax Tap – Denver, CO)

Before the Festival proper kicked off, EastFax Tap (in the stunningly beautiful East Colfax corridor) hosted a Pre-Party. Full disclosure, The Masked Moron, Anarcopunk had to bounce a lil early to prep for the festival proper, so no pics of Reno Divorce or Dylan Walshe. This is also where we would normally provide you hyperlinks […]

Before the Festival proper kicked off, EastFax Tap (in the stunningly beautiful East Colfax corridor) hosted a Pre-Party. Full disclosure, The Masked Moron, Anarcopunk had to bounce a lil early to prep for the festival proper, so no pics of Reno Divorce or Dylan Walshe. This is also where we would normally provide you hyperlinks to the band pages for each of those incredible acts but our site still isn’t fully functional and apparently won’t be until we spend more money. However, all of the acts mentioned in this article should still be searchable on our Band Index page, where you can find links to all of their Socials and Music Pages, sooooo….do that. Related Side Note: Do we know any good web developers?

Sammy Kay started the night’s festivities with an energetic acoustic set inside, near the bar (perfect placement for me). The music was fantastic as one would expect but the stories he wove between the songs were just as entertaining and were a great way to make the crowd fall in love with him, which they inevitably did. Fun Fact: Sammy and I are ‘tattoo twins’!


For the second set of the evening, things moved out to the back patio where the volume (and partying) increased significantly. America’s Most Haunted kicked the outdoor sets off and did so with enough fervor to keep the audience’s energy stoked to it’s maximum level. And while Horror Punk isn’t my favorite sub-genre, this group had enough chops to keep me tappin’ my toes through the entire set.


Back inside for another acoustic set (and another beer). Billy Herring from Irish Punk act 1916. sang some Irish inspired ballads and the folks that had squeezed into the meager interior of the bar loved every second of it.


BACK TO THE PATIOOOOOOO! Reno skate punks, Boss’ Daughter hit the stage next and the crowd started gathering closer to the stage, preparing for the #maximumpartytime that was to ensue. If you’ve never caught a live set from this tremendous trio, you’re doing yourself a disservice. Talent, intensity, fun, it’s all there in one single, perfect set. Go see ’em. If you have a bad time, Dying Scene will refund your admission cost. That’s right! If you go to a Bossy D show and hate it, just send an email to gofuckyourself@dyingscene.com and we’ll get right back to. Honest.


Check out the rest of the night’s activity in the below slideshow!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.