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Hub City Stompers, Kyle Trocolla, Babe Patrol, Riverside Odds and more to play free show at Mole Mole Restaurant in Poughkeepsie

Hub City Stompers, Kyle Trocolla, Babe Patrol, Riverside Odds and more to play free show at Mole Mole Restaurant in Poughkeepsie

What? A free all ages show? Who does that anymore??… The good people over at Altercation Records do, that’s who! Yes our friends at at Altercation have teamed up with Mole Mole Restaurant in Poughkeepsie, New York to deliver some kick ass punk rock, paired with some dynamite tacos, and have dubbed the show…What else? […]

What? A free all ages show? Who does that anymore??… The good people over at Altercation Records do, that’s who!
Yes our friends at at Altercation have teamed up with Mole Mole Restaurant in Poughkeepsie, New York to deliver some kick ass punk rock, paired with some dynamite tacos, and have dubbed the show…What else? PUNK & TACOS.

Headlining this to good to be true event are the East Coast’s premiere Ska/Punk outfit, HUB CITY STOMPERS, who will be sharing the stage with KYLE TROCOLLA AND THE STRANGERS, BABE PATROL, RIVERSIDE ODDS, ZOMBII, and JENNIE ANGEL.

There will also be some interesting vendors hawking some cool music-oriented wares.

The date for this shindig is: Sunday September 15th
The time is: Noon-7pm
The Location is: Mole Mole Restaurant, 357 Hooker Avenue Poughkeepsie NY

You can check out the Facebook page for this event here.

And as my friend from New York would say- “Not for nuttin, Dat looks like a great show…and it’s effin’ free!”

So if you are anywhere near New York’s Hudson Valley on Sunday, September 15th get yourself over to Mole Mole on Hooker Avenue in Poughkeepsie for two of the best things in the world…Punk & Tacos.

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Riverside Odds R.W. Hellborn Talks Speed Punk and their Roots

Riverside Odds R.W. Hellborn Talks Speed Punk and their Roots

I first saw Riverside Odds in March of 2018 opening up for The Split Seconds at little punk venue called Connie’s Ric Rac in Philadelphia and they tore the stage apart with their fast aggressive sound. The self dubbed it “Speed-Punk Rock & Roll”, and they deliver it fast hard and without mercy to their […]

I first saw Riverside Odds in March of 2018 opening up for The Split Seconds at little punk venue called Connie’s Ric Rac in Philadelphia and they tore the stage apart with their fast aggressive sound. The self dubbed it “Speed-Punk Rock & Roll”, and they deliver it fast hard and without mercy to their adoring fans.

Below are a few words I was recently able to share with front man R.W.Hellborn.

[Read more…]

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Exclusive Interview: Success is never realized with Houston and The Dirty Rats, Confessions of a DIY band with world record aspirations

Exclusive Interview: Success is never realized with Houston and The Dirty Rats, Confessions of a DIY band with world record aspirations

Houston and The Dirty Rats is out to set a record. They’ve recently applied to Guinness for the category of “Longest Documented DIY Tour” – or something like that 🙂 – in reference to their current tour, of which they should be right around the halfway mark, dubbed “The Dirty 100” or “100 shows in […]

Houston and The Dirty Rats is out to set a record. They’ve recently applied to Guinness for the category of “Longest Documented DIY Tour” – or something like that 🙂 – in reference to their current tour, of which they should be right around the halfway mark, dubbed “The Dirty 100” or “100 shows in 100 days” tour.  I stopped by and spoke with the band as they came through Dallas, at the only place left for a cheap drink in Deep Ellum, Reno’s Chop Shop. We all met up and decided to chat it up for a bit in the bed of my truck parked right out back. It was a beautiful night with a near-howling wind that spoke just enough to rustle up the sensors in my phones microphone a bit, The city was wide awake on a Thursday and there were plenty of folks that took interest in our little motley anomaly in the bed of a truck in back of Renos.

A bit more than halfway through we breaked for their set, and I was thrilled with the band’s performance, and stage presence. I mentioned to Houston that he was lucky to have such a great rhythm section, and that the Dirty Rats throughout the night had expressed a level of brotherhood and comraderie that made me extremely excited to write about them. We talked about the usual stuff: DIY ethics, running your own label, dreams of being signed, ungodly amounts of malt-liquor consumption, and of course the 100 shows in 100 days. It’s a bit of a read but I’ll be damned if we didn’t just make the most adorable little punker quartet you ever did see. Also, if you or any of your friends are in a band, there’s about a 50% chance that it gets a shout in this piece as a bunch of our favorites get a mention.

This conversation was a blast and I’m stoked I got to relive it again in transcription. From my table to yours young scenesters. Here’s a band that’s going places. Read the interview below.

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Album Review: Lost Love – “Good Luck Rassco”

Album Review: Lost Love – “Good Luck Rassco”

Sometimes a good band meets band description can be all you need to get through the door. Montreal’s Lost Love were pitched to me as Menzingers meet Jeff Rosenstock meet Weezer. That’s three different bands making up a sort of melodic alt-rock/punk Venn diagram of influences, and supposedly, in the center, overlapping, there is Lost […]

Sometimes a good band meets band description can be all you need to get through the door. Montreal’s Lost Love were pitched to me as Menzingers meet Jeff Rosenstock meet Weezer. That’s three different bands making up a sort of melodic alt-rock/punk Venn diagram of influences, and supposedly, in the center, overlapping, there is Lost Love and their latest album Good Luck Rassco. As luck would have it, Bomb the Music Industry! and the Menzingers are two of my favorite bands, and while I’ve never been a big Weezer guy (they’re aw-shucks factor has always been teetering on too much for me, thankyouverymuch), I have always admired Rivers Cuomo’s distinctive, sometimes heavy, always smooth, and very knowingly rock ‘n roll fretwork. From a couple words, I found myself wondering what Lost Love sounds like, so there it is—Good Luck Rassco was now an object of intrigue.

And believe it or not, it’s a sensible description. From the get-go, with “Sexting Across America,” you hear the sort of bendy lead that forces a thousand music reviewers to collectively type Weezer-esque. Chords chug, choruses are backed by more Cuomo-ish shredding, and the melodies are sugary and at least as sticky. The songs on Good Luck Rassco are filled with gang vocaled ba-bas and lyrics forged of hooks and hurt. It’s easy to see where Lose Love’s influences intersect and songs like “Gospel Tabernacle” bring the band around to something akin to hyper-competence, and even better, a unique sound. Heavy bass roils around in the background of the verse, punctuating the opening with heavy, gravelly buh-dums, juxtaposed by the pure surfy sweetness of its chorus.

“Clay Turris” is a standout on Good Luck Rassco, another bass driven track (reminiscent of some of Rosenstock’s arrangements, with heavy, thundering bass and guitars as more or less a dash of seasoning). It’s mid-tempo and catchy—defined by its sunniness as well as its self loathing with lyrics like, “You say I’m lousy when I’m drunk, but when I’m sober I feel like I’m ten years older and I’m bored.” It all comes together into something that feels honest, a little painful, and expertly constructed.

Good Luck Rassco has the nerve to end on another high note. “Burrito Kind of Guy” is the sort of fun bluesy stomper that mixes some of the earnest working-through-shit stuff with the whimsy and fun of a big-ass shout-along that goes, “Na na na na na, I need a burrito.” AJJ played a similar game back in their Jihad days with Christmas Island, but I think Lost Love might have improved on the idea here. Usually, this move signifies something. Art is full of choices, right? It’s constructed by people continuously making choice after choice after choice. So, ending an album on a note like this gives the audience a taste of punk irreverence, a middle finger to Important Albums, while also simultaneously, being kinda important. The song builds to its refrain with some great lyrical nuggets, finding a sense of humor within the tire treads of rough patches, closing the album with a sense of absurd resolution.

So—why isn’t this my album of the year? Well, it’s good. And a lot of times it’s great, but the record stops dead in its tracks at the starting line. There’s something cool about the Venn diagram of influences Lost Love have carved out for themselves, and I think at their best, they do justice to those influences while also having a sound that feels distinct. But—listen to “Sexting Across America.” Anything sound familiar? You don’t have to look far to find where you’ve heard that saccharine, rhythmic melody before; Lost Love does half the work for you by wearing their influences so prominently. For Jeff Rosenstock fans, the problem is obvious—”Sexting Across America” has lifted the verse melody from We Cool?’s “Hall of Fame.” And ss soon as I figured it out, I couldn’t unhear it. I started wondering: was this intentional? I listened to the lyrics, and heard no tip of the hat, no clever line about stolen melodies or living in the shadows of your heroes. So, the next question was: is this plagiarism?

Well, no. Probably not. And just as I can acknowledge that it was distracting—and ultimately, unfortunately, detracting—I can also acknowledge that this was probably an accident of humming melodies over a common chord progression, hearing something you like, and then moving forward too rapidly to consider where it came from. But in a band like this, nearly defined by their mish-mash of influence, a misstep like this, fairly or unfairly, highlights a dependence on what’s been done before.

Good Luck Rassco might take more hurt than it deserves for an honest mistake. Lost Love have a lot of talent going on here, a lot of great songwriting, and a pretty good feel for how an album should be put together. Eleven songs at thirty minutes is about perfect for a punk record, and each of these eleven have an individuality that prevents the album from blurring together into a sour mash of woahs, Cuomo-solos, and power chords. But, Lost Love put themselves into a box with their own Venn diagram, and a lifted melody keeps them from pushing outside of it. Good Luck Rassco is a good eleven songs of Menzingers meet Rosenstock meet Weezer, but at ten, it’d have been Lost Love’s, and better for it.

3.5/5 Stars

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Boston punks Rebuilder and Rooftops announce April tour dates

Boston punks Rebuilder and Rooftops announce April tour dates

Massachusetts-based punk rock homies Rebuilder are gassing up Tessie the Tour Van and heading out on the road for a quick ten day run next month that’ll take them to the Mississippi River and back. Fellow Boston-based solo act Rooftops will be along for the ride. Check out the full rundown and tour flier below. Rebuilder’s latest […]

Massachusetts-based punk rock homies Rebuilder are gassing up Tessie the Tour Van and heading out on the road for a quick ten day run next month that’ll take them to the Mississippi River and back. Fellow Boston-based solo act Rooftops will be along for the ride. Check out the full rundown and tour flier below.

Rebuilder’s latest album is, as you should well know by now, last year’s Songs From The Massachusetts Turnpike EP, released last year on Panic State Records.

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DS Exclusive: Typhoid Rosie premieres “Diamonds in the Snow” from upcoming album “This Is Now”

DS Exclusive: Typhoid Rosie premieres “Diamonds in the Snow” from upcoming album “This Is Now”

Brooklyn’s Typhoid Rosie are releasing their third album, “This Is Now,” on Friday, March 23rd. They’re indie punk with pop hooks, and “Diamonds in the Snow” is catchy as hell. Rosie explains the origin of the song: “I can’t think of a more perfect song to kick off Spring than “Diamonds In The Snow.” It’s […]

Brooklyn’s Typhoid Rosie are releasing their third album, “This Is Now,” on Friday, March 23rd. They’re indie punk with pop hooks, and “Diamonds in the Snow” is catchy as hell.

Rosie explains the origin of the song:

“I can’t think of a more perfect song to kick off Spring than “Diamonds In The Snow.” It’s about that moment when Old Man Winter gives us one last encore before it melts away into Spring. I feel so lucky to be a New Yorker and to watch the Seasons change. Diamonds in the snow is about that change.

One winter morning we went on a hike in the Catskill Mountains. We got to this hill that was hard to climb because the ground was a solid sheet of ice. It took us a long time to get up this hill. But we finally get up there and it was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen in my life. There were these tiny raindrops frozen in the trees and the ground was covered in pure ice. The morning sun was shining down from the East that created tiny rainbows shining through the ice. It looked like the ground and all of the trees were covered in Diamonds. I couldn’t believe how beautiful it was – it was like Heaven on Earth. But by the end of the day, it warmed up – almost so much that we could take our coats off. We descended back down the mountain later that day to the same spot, and the snow had melted so fast that It was all gone by the time we got back. The moment was gone. The seasons changed that day. I thought about the mountain ice melting into a spring, and into a fresh water river that flows into the Hudson and into the salty sea.

When you think about life in that way, it doesn’t seem so sad to let go because it’s flowing so sweetly.  I see the entire circle of life and death every year in my garden and in the Seasons. When I think about death in that way – like the seasons changing, it feels so much easier to cast off your chains and to let go. But how beautiful is this planet, and all the life it brings fourth? What a gift – water – and life is – I hope that we can do everything in our power to save this beautiful planet. We made it through another beautiful and cold Winter, but I am so happy to welcome Spring!”

Typhoid Rosie will be playing a record release show at Kingsland Tavern in Brooklyn on March 23rd.

You can preview a couple of other tracks off the album and preorder it at bandcamp. In the meantime, check out the exclusive premiere of “Diamonds in the Snow” below! [Read more…]

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DS Exclusive: “I’ll Love You ‘Til The End” – The Loved Ones Look Back On Ten Years Since “Build + Burn”

DS Exclusive: “I’ll Love You ‘Til The End” – The Loved Ones Look Back On Ten Years Since “Build + Burn”

When The Loved Ones released their debut full-length album, Keep Your Heart, in early 2006, it seemed at the time to be a welcome bit of fresh air in the punk scene. Here was a new band that, though its members were known entities in the punk rock scene, seemed to transcend any specific label; […]


When The Loved Ones released their debut full-length album, Keep Your Heart, in early 2006, it seemed at the time to be a welcome bit of fresh air in the punk scene. Here was a new band that, though its members were known entities in the punk rock scene, seemed to transcend any specific label; a bouncy, East Coast sound run through a West Coast, Fat Wreck Chords filter. The album was an opening salvo from a band that seemed destined for a lengthy and blindingly bright future. Inspired (for lack of a better word, because that honestly feels like the wrong word to use) by the death of frontman Dave Hause’s mother a few years prior, the baker’s dozen tracks on Keep Your Heart found the Philadelphia-based trio (Mike Sneeringer on drums, Michael “Spider” Cotterman on bass) nearly perfecting a high-octane, melodic punk rock sound that was all their own right out of the gate. The album was nearly universally well-received by critics, fans and fellow bands alike, and set a trajectory for the band that seemed, on paper, to trend infinitely upward.

On the surface, things seemed to be heading in a positive direction in the Loved Ones camp, but there was tension in the ranks. By the time they were ready to record a follow-up to Keep Your Heart, Spider had left the band and the relationship between Hause and Sneeringer was tenuous at best. Touring guitar player David Walsh was brought in as a permanent member, as was Chris Gonzalez, Walsh’s former bandmate in Boston-area punk band The Explosion after that band itself went belly up. The situation was unsteady, but the new lineup had displayed a great deal of chemistry on the road. With that and the momentum from Keep Your Heart still providing wind in their sails, the band teamed up with Bouncing Souls’ Pete Steinkopf and Bryan Kienlen to get to work on a new album that would find the band branching in different directions while trying to not abandon their punk rock roots.

The end product, Build & Burn, was released ten years ago today (February 5, 2008). Backed by a rock solid rhythm section, the album maintained many of the melody-rich, uptempo punk rock sounds that made its predecessor so beloved. But the album also stretched in a variety of musical directions that, at the time, didn’t immediately resonate with fans in the same coherent way that Keep Your Heart had. Layers of added texture and an increased desire to tap into some broader musical influences, from Foo Fighter-esque radio ready rockers to mid-90s radio alternative Lemonheads grooves to Oasis style stadium anthems made for an enjoyable and challenging listening experience to the punk rock ear. In retrospect, the album very much finds not only the band and its members – collectively and individually – at a crossroads, but came at a time in which the scene and the music industry and the nation were very much the same place.

The band aimed high, and while opinions may vary as to how successful they were (yours truly thinks its the superior, more relatable Loved Ones full-length), it’s undeniable that they built a bridge to what was to come for its members. To mark the album’s tenth birthday, Dying Scene caught up with its main players – Dave Hause, Mike Sneeringer, David Walsh, Chris Gonzalez, Pete Steinkopf and Bryan Kienlen – to dig deep into the closets and talk about the build up, and subsequent burn out, that produced this misunderstood gem. Check out our two-part story (The Build and The Burn) and track-by-track revisit below!

[Read more…]

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The 27 Greatest Pop Punk Records According to Ben Weasel

The 27 Greatest Pop Punk Records According to Ben Weasel

This morning Screeching Weasel released two holiday songs titled “Christmas Eve” and “New Years Eve”, they also announced that they will be kicking off 2018 with two intimate shows on Friday, February 16th and Saturday February 17th at Reggies in Chicago (tickets on sale December 15th at 10am CST). Frontman, Ben Weasel has also taken the time to address […]

This morning Screeching Weasel released two holiday songs titled “Christmas Eve” and “New Years Eve”, they also announced that they will be kicking off 2018 with two intimate shows on Friday, February 16th and Saturday February 17th at Reggies in Chicago (tickets on sale December 15th at 10am CST). Frontman, Ben Weasel has also taken the time to address the recent Rolling Stone “Pop Punk” list with his own list and we got our our hands on it! Check it out (along with a playlist of his picks) below!

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Theatrics and Poise: World/Inferno Friendship Society bring the house down at Brooklyn Bazaar

Theatrics and Poise: World/Inferno Friendship Society bring the house down at Brooklyn Bazaar

The World/Inferno Friendship Society have really only been playing New York three or four times a year as of late, which makes every one of their hometown performances a must see. Their music is complex and beautiful, their sound is raw and powerful, and they bring a level of showmanship and theatricality to the stage […]

Photos by Jeff Schaer-Moses Photography
Jack Terricloth serenading one lucky fan at Brooklyn Bazaar.

The World/Inferno Friendship Society have really only been playing New York three or four times a year as of late, which makes every one of their hometown performances a must see. Their music is complex and beautiful, their sound is raw and powerful, and they bring a level of showmanship and theatricality to the stage that no other punk band on the planet does.

For their last hometown performance before their annual Hallowmas, Mr. Terricloth and his cohort invited Philly ska/punks Teenage Halloween up to the Big Apple to open the evening in Brooklyn Bazaar’s ballroom. They played well and announced that they would be dropping a new record soon on Philadelphia-based Fistolo Records.

Next on the bill was Slackers frontman Vic Ruggiero, who may just be the single most New York human being on the planet (under the age of 60 at least). Vic’s solo sets are like watching New York blues history unfold right before your eyes, and it’s really a thing of beauty. He’s an engaging storyteller, a tremendous guitarist, and a genuine guy.

Vic Ruggiero of The Slackers doing his solo thing.

It’s hard to fill up a stage like Brooklyn Bazaar’s as a solo act, but Vic actually made the room feel full with his electric guitar, a kick drum, a tambourine, and his chest-mounted harmonica. He played his solo stuff, took requests, and even workshopped a new song entitled “Garlic is the Sun” for his hometown crowd. Not all the requests were honored, however, as Vic pointed out to one fan that “if you wanna hear dat one, you’ll need to come to a Slackers show” in his droll New York accent.

As great as Vic was, the crowd was there for one reason and one reason only: to fuck shit up with World/Inferno. The room went bonkers with the first notes of “Tattoos Fade,” and Mr. Terricloth raised a full bottle of Coppola wine to toast the WIFS faithful. The crowd roared along to every lyric of World/Inferno’s opening score, and the ever friendly World/Inferno moshpit sprang into existence. There are punks to help you up in every pit, but something about the WIFS pit is just far more inviting than any other band’s.

Mr. Terricloth raising a toast to his World/Inferno faithful.

In a pre-show interview, Mr. Terricloth had said that Saturday night’s show would be “off the hook,” and he delivered on his word with a big-time performance. The group, which sometimes swells to more than thirteen members, was a lean eight-piece in Greenpoint, but they still packed a mighty punch when performing hits off of Red Eyed Soul like “The Velocity of Love,” “Your Younger Man,” and “Let’s Steal Everything,” among a slew of others.

They went through damn near half their catalogue in a performance that ran nearly two hours, and they did it all with panache. When they left the stage for their admittedly planned encore, the giant who was standing next to me in a denim vest (complete with Choking Victim patch on the back left and Grateful Dead patch on the front right pocket) lept onto the stage and led the crowd in a rousing chant of “tonight we’re gonna fuck shit up” until the band came back.

Ms. Malak

The encore opened with “Politics of Passing Out,” which required Mr. Terricloth to play a little acoustic guitar — in this case, one that he acquired from his old friend Sly Stone back when he was Sly’s driver — and closed with a tune I just don’t know the name of that was selected by WIFS bass player Ms. Malak.

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The Dirty Nil – ‘Minimum R&B’

The Dirty Nil – ‘Minimum R&B’

Since the birth of punk, numerous fledgling bands have learnt their craft through the release of limited edition 7” and EPs. In this, the internet age, platforms such as bandcamp have made it fundamentally easier and more economically viable for bands and smaller labels to release these offerings and gradually build a following before launching […]

Since the birth of punk, numerous fledgling bands have learnt their craft through the release of limited edition 7” and EPs. In this, the internet age, platforms such as bandcamp have made it fundamentally easier and more economically viable for bands and smaller labels to release these offerings and gradually build a following before launching into the critical and commercial minefield that is releasing your debut album. This is exactly the path followed by Canadian rockers, The Dirty Nil. Their phenomenal debut album Higher Power was the culmination of everything they had learnt from five years of recording and, for many, it was their first introduction to a band who are quickly forging a reputation as one of the most exciting rock bands around. Thankfully, Dine Alone and Fat Wreck Chords have joined together to offer a fascinating insight into the creative growth of the band by releasing this compilation of all of their 7”s and EPs to date. Now those who have had their appetite whetted by Higher Power  can take a trip through their history to find a band who, from the very beginning, have been making nose-bleed inducing, scuffed up, perfect slacker anthems.

Debut single “Fucking Up Young” saw the band come out swinging with a thrillingly raw and infectious single that has to rank as one of the best debut singles of the modern era. The bare bones production and the rough and ready scuzzy guitars are refreshingly gritty and authentic, coming across like an old, dusty artifact of the band’s origins. It perfectly captures that moment in time where the band threw themselves into what (for all they knew) could have been their only shot at cutting a single. The band hadn’t had to time to overthink things, just plug in and play. It helps that their sound had already been honed through years of touring as the take sounds live with stop-start, wigged out guitars and short sharp bursts of percussion. The B-side from the single “Verona Lung” is a similarly spiky, unpolished gem of an alt-rock song which combines the deceptive simplicity of Pixies and the vulnerable howl of Rivers Cuomo.

Next up comes “Little Metal Baby Fist” and “Hate is a Stone” from their “Little Baby Fist” EP – “Little Baby Fist” blends together equal parts Husker Du, The Replacements and Fugazi to leave an uncompromising, explosive punk song with a hook you could hang a T-Rex from. Their 2014 7”, “Cinnamon” b/w “Guided By Vices”, their first for Fat Wreck Chords, has a grungier feel but is anything but derivative, coming across like a lost Nirvana cover of the Vaselines from their Incesticide album. “Guided by Vices” in particular has a riff that could instantly oxygenate your blood as the band coil a classic rock n roll riff into an incendiary ball of noise.

“Nicotine”, “Beat”, “New Flesh” and “Pale Blue” all come from 2014’s “Smite” EP. “Nicotine” distorts a standard blues shuffle  while“Beat” kicks in the door, taking the classic punk sound of The Damned and views it through the prism of 80’s DC Hardcore. “New Flesh” shows a more hardcore side to the band with the band kneeling at the altar of hardcore legends Minor Threat. Original bass player Dave Nardi takes over vocal duties to scream himself inside out as the band pummel through a full throttle slab of abrasive, caustic hardcore. Closer “Caroline” is a mid-tempo waltz which sees the band combine their sound with classic 60s melodies. It builds to a swirling whirl of biting guitars with singer Luke Bentham howling and lamenting through the din.
This compilation acts as the perfect introduction for those taken in by their hook-laden, riff-heavy, fiery debut and are thirsty for more. It’s an exhilarating flick through their discography to date and after repeated listening it doesn’t feel so much a compilation as an early greatest hits record.

4.5/5 Stars

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