10 Punk Songs to Jumpstart Your Week (Curated by DS Editor The Torchbearer)

Ever wonder what the folks who run Dying Scene have been listening to lately?  We’re going to pretend you said “yes” to that question and feature a curated playlist from a different DS editor each week with the intent of exposing you to some new kickass punk bands.  This week’s playlist is brought to you by DS editor The Torchbearer.

Discover some great new tunes, and find out what makes him tick by streaming The Torchbearer’s personal picks below.

1.  Wipers – “No Fair”

I’m going with a loose theme for my playlist, and that’s dark punk music, which has been my favorite super specific sub-genre lately.  It all starts with late 70’s Portland punk act Wipers.  They’ve been getting a bit more attention lately due to some vinyl repressings and some more modern bands picking up right where they left off (more on that later).  So check out the original dark punk sound here.

2.  Radioactivity – “Silent Kill”

Radioactivity is one of many Marked Men side projects.  They’re essentially The Marked Men with more minor chords, so expect catchy as hell garage punk that you can listen to on a grey and rainy day where you still want to get out and do stuff instead of being holed up inside.

3.  Terrible Feelings – “Black Water”

Organ and witchy vocals are the first things that will jump out at you on this one.  This Swedish act sounds like a 70’s occult rock band played over a simple garage punk foundation.

4.  Nervosas – “Temporary Address”

No band on this list is a more accurate representation of modern Wipers style punk than Nervosas.  Dual male and female vocals anxiously belt out the lyrics over wiry and restless guitar and ever-pounding drums.  This was a break up album between the two leads and their unfortunate heartbreak luckily lead to a passionate, emotional, barn-burner of an album.

5. The Estranged – “Faces Stare”

Post-punk and power pop that sounds straight out of the 80’s.  The guitars are reverb and chorus heavy, the bass pulsing, and the drums driving, all with shivery but powerful vocals.  Everything they do is catchy as hell too.

6.  Hysterese – “Vogue”

This is the most hardcore influenced group on the list.  You got your basic fast drums and distorted power chords, but the coolest thing this mysterious German band has to offer is the dual male and female vocals that often overlap each other.  This makes it harder to sing along to at times but adds to the anxious sound these guys and gals do so well.

7.  Daylight Robbery – “Rememoration”

This group offers pretty straightforward garage and power-pop influenced punk, of course with a dark twist. They sound like a modern version of X and the album this song comes from might be the catchiest of the bunch.

8.  UV-TV – “Take It All”

Another band that uses dual male and female vocals and big reverb heavy guitars to perfect effect.  The female vocals are dreamier here than on most of the other songs on the list.  This Gainesville band popped up on my radar late last year, and I was lucky enough to catch them at FEST.  I’m excited for everything they have to offer in the future.

9.  The Creeps – “Cancer”

As I’ve forced all you readers into my world of dark punk obsession, I feel I should go back to what started this for me.  A few years ago, I discovered the band Crusades, and have been (probably unhealthily) obsessed with them since then.  The Creeps features Skottie Lobotomy from Crusades, who I still maintain has one of the best voices in punk rock right now.  The Creeps have a more traditional pop-punk sound than their Satanic counterpart, and this is a song I can listen to on repeat for hours.

10.  White Lung – “Paradise”

White Lung started their musical career mixing hardcore punk with weird and wiry post-punk instrumentation.  As they’ve released more albums, their sound has gotten bigger, more experimental, and slower at times.  But at the same time, every album has been better than the one before it.  Their last album Paradise was no exception, and the title track is the perfect representation of the band’s past, present, and hopefully future sounds.


Add Radioactivity to My Radar   Add to My Radar

Leave A Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.