Search Results for: seattle

Search Archives Only

DS Staff Picks: Dylan’s Favorite Punk Albums, EPs & Things of September, 2023 (Presented by Punk Rock Radar)

Hello, and welcome to the September, 2023 edition of Dylan’s Favorite Punk Albums, EPs & Things! This is the column where I, Dylan aka Screeching Bottlerocket, tell you what new punk rock albums, EPs and singles I enjoyed the most this month. Also, I’d like to once again remind you that this is a collaborative effort […]

Hello, and welcome to the September, 2023 edition of Dylan’s Favorite Punk Albums, EPs & Things! This is the column where I, Dylan aka Screeching Bottlerocket, tell you what new punk rock albums, EPs and singles I enjoyed the most this month.

Also, I’d like to once again remind you that this is a collaborative effort with our friends at Punk Rock Radar, with whom I’ll be doing a video version of this Best Of wrap-up each month. If you like discovering awesome new bands as much as I do, be sure to follow Punk Rock Radar on Instagram and YouTube, and keep tabs on their Upcoming Release Calendar.

Here’s our video for September (let us know what your favorite releases of the month were in the YouTube comments):

American Television
Scars

This sophomore album from Washington, DC punks American Television is very nice. Some songs are straight up melodic punk, other songs remind me of the Dopamines, a few are kinda orgcore-ish. Buy the record!

RBNX
Nothing Here Is Yours

By now anyone who reads these monthly columns is aware of my affection for ska, especially that which is of the skacore variety. RBNX messaged me on Instagram to check out their new record. I did, in fact, check out their new record, and it’s quite fantastic. For fans of Against All Authority, Leftover Crack Cocaine, and all things crusty. Buy the record!

CONTRA CODE
Friday Junior

Surprise, surprise – Dylan’s got a skate punk record on his favorite albums list again! Ay listen, this is a bad ass record. Vancouver, BC’s almighty Contra Code returns with their first new album in 8 years! Friday Junior rips; it’s like A Wilhelm Scream meets Megadeth. Buy this record.

THOUSAND OAKS
Remnants

More skate punk! Italy’s Thousand Oaks (ft. ex-members of another great band called Jet Market) put out an insane new record earlier this year – go back and check that one out if you missed it. Remnants is a bunch of old songs from EPs and shit; it’s pretty good! “Nest of Vipers” is my favorite song on here. Get it on CD here / digital download on Bandcamp.

RANDOM HAND
Random Hand

Random Hand is an excellent ska band from the UK. These guys never disappoint and their new album doesn’t buck the trend. It starts strong with “The Cycle” and only gets stronger from there. This is a bad ass record from a bad ass band. Get it on pretty colored wax.

THE SUBJUNCTIVES
Let’s Try Again

The Subjunctives are a pop-pop-punk band from Seattle, fronted by Sicko’s Ean Hernandez. This is their second record. If you like Sicko, early Green Day, or The Muffs, you’ll like this. Buy the record!

WITH HONOR
Boundless

In a surprising turn of events, I have picked a melodic hardcore album as one of my favorites of September. Connecticut’s With Honor has been around a long fuckin time but this is the first album I’ve checked out from them. I’d say it’s a good hopping on point! Balls to the wall, full throttle, whatever contrived saying you prefer to use… this shit makes you wanna run through a wall! Buy the record.

SKEETCH
Skeetch or Die

German skate punks Skeetch pop off on their third EP Skeetch or Die. These four songs are fuckin awesome. No nonsense Epifat style melodic skate punk. These guys even have a theme song – that’s how you know they’re not fucking around. You can’t buy this record anywhere unfortunately 🙁 But you can listen to it:

TRY AGAIN
Still Trying

Here’s another 4 song skate punk EP; these guys are from Quebec City though, not Germany. I think I’ve had a People of Punk Rock Records release on every one of these Best Of lists so far this year. Here’s another one!

NORMY
What The Fuck Planet Are These Guys From?

Normy proves that some good things do occasionally come out of the desolate wasteland of sadness and despair that is Cleveland, I suppose. The band’s new EP What The Fuck Planet Are These Guys From? (early frontrunner for best record title of 2023) picks up where their debut EP left off. More early 2000’s infused melodic punk, with anthemic songs like “Idiot” and fast shit like “Right Place, Wrong Time”. I like this record. You should buy this record.

REASON TO LEAVE
Rise and Grind

Continuing to flaunt my ever-eclectic music taste, I have opted to include one last skate punk EP on my Best of September listicle thingy. Bri’ish punks Reason To Leave have a new EP out now; it’s called Rise and Grind. These guys kinda remind me a lil bit of Consumed. I guess Pennywise would be a more prominent band I could compare them to as well. Buy the compact disc!!!

Ay listen, I know you fuckers already stopped reading. It’s like 2am right now and my ass hurts from this $75 Staples office chair, so I’mma wrap it up here and skip the singles. There really weren’t that many this month anyway! Check out the Spotify playlist down below, we’ve got the singles on there.

Anywho, that concludes the September installment of the column. Thanks for checking it out! Keep your eyes glued to Dying Scene for all things punk rock and follow our friends Punk Rock Radar on InstagramYouTube, etc. Join us again next month!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Exclusive Interview with Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, Thalia Hall, Chicago, Illinois (03/2024).

On 09 March 2024, Otoboke Beaver headlined a sold-out show at Thalia Hall in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood, with Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, and Ovef Ow opening the show! Here’s how it looked! Prior to the show, Dying Scene (Fleurette Estes) and Kyle Decker interviewed Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, where they also took some […]

On 09 March 2024, Otoboke Beaver headlined a sold-out show at Thalia Hall in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood, with Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, and Ovef Ow opening the show! Here’s how it looked!

Prior to the show, Dying Scene (Fleurette Estes) and Kyle Decker interviewed Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, where they also took some photographs. Check out the interview below and go check them out!!!

Megan, Meena, and MJ at Thalia Hall Lounge Room.

Interview has been shortened for clarity and length.

Dying Scene: Tell me about Drinking Boys and Girls Choir. Introduce yourselves and who you are, where you’re from, and your members.  

Myeong-jin Kim (MJ): Drinking Boys and Girls Choir is from South Korea, and we’re based in Daegu City, South Korea. I’m MJ and I’m from Daegu City. I was born in Pohang but currently live in Daegu City. I play drums and sing. 

Meena Bae (MB): I am Meena, I’m the bassist and I also sing. 

Megan Nisbet (MN): My name’s Megan. I live in South Korea, but I’m from Glasgow, Scotland and I play guitar and sing in the band. 

MB: Yeah, we write our own songs, and every member contributes. 

MJ: Yeah. 

MB: There is no main songwriter. 

DS: So, how did you all meet? And were you friends before joining this band? 

MB: Yes. MJ and I were friends from around 2007. Yeah, she was young, just 20, and she just joined the university. At the time she was in a band named the Odeum Starz and it was a cute pop punk band and they just started making their own songs because they couldn’t play well enough to cover other songs. So, it was really kind of cute, but they ended the group because…  

MJ: Army service in Korea and the job career thing. After that, we started a girl band, Chicken and Mayo ABC. 

MB: Chicken and Mayo ABC. A few years later we decided to do a band again. It is Drinking Boys and Girls Choir.  

MJ: Yes. 

Daegu City is conservative, and my parents are super conservative. Nowadays, almost all young people really just like K-pop music, the K-pop scene, and K-pop culture. And in Korea, as you know, the mainstream doesn’t play punk music. They just stream the K-pop music, K-pop things. So that’s why young people can’t know about their taste in music”.

– Meena Bae

DS: Do you still play and do things with the other band? 

MB: No.  

DS: Do you ever want to try to relive that one? 

MB: No. We’re done. That’s just our memory. We don’t want to make it again. We want to make new things. 

DS: How would you describe your music? And who are your influences? 

MB: We really like Sum 41, NOFX, Blink-182, The Offspring. We went to the Bouncing Souls show in Chicago last night and it was very beautiful. And yeah, Alice in Chains… So, many American punk bands really inspired us. 

MN: We describe the music as being fast, aggressive guitar sound, intense drumming, and a powerful bass tone but with angelic vocals over the top of everything. Three-part harmonies. 

MB: I really like harmony. I just sing by myself, and they just start to make harmonies every time, every time… 

MN: I go low, you go high. 

Kyle Decker (KD): For the choir part… 

Earlier in the afternoon, we ate a really good lunch with Kyle at Bang Bang Pie, and I really liked that quiche and chicken pot pie and the other dessert pie. I really liked that. And maybe tomorrow we have lots of time before the show, so I hope to go to some good place and maybe I believe that he will introduce us to so many good things there”.

-Meena Bae

(L-R: Meena, MJ, Megan, and Kyle)

DS: So, you have been on tour with Otoboke Beaver. Did you know them before the tour? How has it been becoming friends with them on the tour? 

MB: Yeah, we are label mates. We are signed to Damnably with them. The Damnably label is based in London. The first time we met them was in 2019 at South by Southwest and then we started doing tours together.  

MN: Yeah. With this lineup, we’ve done two tours with them. We did the UK last year in May and then this year here in the US for the first time. And we get on very well with them. They’re very friendly, lovely people. 

MB: Yes. We really like each other. 

MB: Yeah, we’ve done more shows with them, we even did a show in Korea with them. Before Megan joined, we went to Japan to celebrate their new album. In 2019 and 2020 we toured together in the UK and the Netherlands. So, we really love our songs and our vibe and really respect ourselves and each other. It’s a really good vibe. 

KD: The scene has shifted since I left Daegu City, I know that, but what is it like being the only punk band in a pretty conservative city? How many people come out to shows? 

MB: Yeah, Daegu City is conservative, and my parents are super conservative. Nowadays, almost all young people really just like K-pop music, the K-pop scene, and K-pop culture. And in Korea, as you know, the mainstream doesn’t play punk music. They just stream the K-pop music, K-pop things. So that’s why young people can’t know about their taste in music. Do you know what I mean? 

MN: They don’t have many options for different types of music to listen to because it’s pretty much K-pop or bust. So, they don’t know how to find new artists to listen to and stuff like that. So, at our shows, the audience is, on average, older, late twenties, early thirties. 

DS: So, I heard you guys are paving the way for K-punk.

MB: Yeah, so we use the “K.” Actually, we really hate the “K” things, but we started to use the K-punk because it makes it easier to find our music. And so, we are trying to reach out to younger audiences. So, when we put on our own shows in Korea, we give free tickets to underage youth. But yeah, it’s hard to get a crowd. We never get a crowd of even 100 people in Daegu.

KD: Do you feel like you’re getting more audience response in the United States and Europe than in Korea? 

MJ: So, we’re getting bigger in US, Europe, and the UK but not in Korea. 

MB: So, sometimes we get invited to the (Asia Cultural Center) World Music Festival in Korea and so many members from the audience have told me, “Oh, I didn’t know you are from Daegu. I live in Daegu, but I don’t know you.” So, every crowd has told me that. I don’t know how we can grow our audience in Daegu. Yeah, I don’t know. 

MJ killing it on the drums!!!

DS: I’ve been following you on social media and so many of the shows are sold out. What does that feel like?  

MN: It feels like a huge opportunity really for us. And so far, the audience response has been positive. They come to the merch table, and they tell us how much they enjoyed the show and it’s really encouraging. So, I think we’ve done the right thing coming here.

DS: I absolutely love the fact that every time I look on my Instagram page you’ve had another sold-out show. I just think that’s lovely. 

MJ: Yeah. 

DS: Tours can be busy. Have you had time to do any sightseeing while you’re in any of the cities? 

MJ: Actually, we drive ourselves so we can see a lot. 

DS: At night? 

MN: Actually, during the day. So, when we were driving through Salt Lake City and places like that, we got the full view of everything. Beautiful, snowy mountains and everything like that. So, it’s been lovely. As for sightseeing, we had time in Seattle because we started the tour there and we visited pretty much most of the tourist spots in Seattle, like the Space Needle and MoPOP museum and everything.  

MJ: The Sub Pop store. 

MN: The Sub Pop clothing store. 

MJ: And KEXP. 

MJ: And the market.  

MN: The seafood markets. Pike Place. 

MB: Pike Place Market. Chicago is really the second city we’ve been able to stay in for a few days. Earlier in the afternoon, we ate a really good lunch with Kyle at Bang Bang Pie, and I really liked that quiche and chicken pot pie and the other dessert pie. I really liked that. And maybe tomorrow we have lots of time before the show, so I hope to go to some good place and maybe I believe that he will introduce us to so many good things there. 

DS: There are so many amazing places to eat and to see. Besides playing amazing shows with great crowds, what else do you want to accomplish while you’re in the States? 

MJ: Maybe work on our next tour… 

MN: While we’re here now, I want to have a good bond with the four people in our party…make some close relationships. I want to make some fans in every city and make a good impression on people by being very kind and friendly and open. That’s what I want to do. 

DS: Being from South Korea, do you feel responsible for representing your country?  

MB: Yes. 

DS: What do you want your audience to know about South Korea? 

MB: Yeah, Korea is not just K-pop. Yeah, I hope for them to know about that. We have so many subcultures. And really everything is small because Korea is small, but I hope the audience knows there’s more to Korea than just K-pop. I want the audience to think about Korea a little bit positively. 

MJ: Yeah.

DS: If anyone were to visit your hometown of Daegu City, what are the top three recommendations you have for them to do or see? 

MB: Yeah, like our song that we call the “BIG NINE, Let’s Go,” we introduced three locations. The first one is Daemyeong-dong…it’s really a music neighborhood…in the music scene. There is Club Led Zeppelin. And there is a famous beautiful university there called Keimyung University. Even New Jeans’s music video (for the song “Ditto”) was filmed there. And so many famous Korean dramas were filmed there. So, I want to introduce Club Heavy. They remodeled it and the rooftop is beautiful. Sometimes we have acoustic shows on the roof when the weather is good. Because we have the four seasons and the summer is extremely hot and winter is extremely cold, so we cannot do anything outside in the summer or winter. So, we have just a few days we can do rooftop shows. So, I want to recommend it. And second location is downtown Daegu – Dongseong-ro. And the third one, if you want to go to Suseongmot (Suseong Lake) you can take the monorail. It’s a beautiful lake with many restaurants, but it is a little bit expensive.

Actually, I say in the song (“BIG NINE, Let’s Go”), “makchang, soondae, joonghwa bibimbap.” It is really famous food in Daegu. It’s not vegan but… yeah. And so nowadays I’m trying to say the vegan food in the middle of singing. So sometimes I say different foods. 

MN: Changing the lyrics of the song on the fly.  

DS:  Tell me about your favorite performance as a group so far

MN: Why don’t we talk about the performance from this tour that we liked?  

MJ: As for our performance, I choose LA. 

MN: Me too. 

MB: Me too. 

MJ: And for enjoyability, Pioneertown.  

MN: Yeah. 

MB: Yeah. 

MJ: For perfection level, LA. For enjoyment level, Pioneertown. 

MN: We played well in LA. We just were on the same wavelength. 

MB: The zone! 

MN: We were in the zone, and everybody had a really good time. We felt nervous before the show, but as soon as we got up there, we just really locked in.  

MJ: So much fun! So much fun! So much fun!  

MN: Pioneertown was like this little cowboy-themed town in the desert somewhere in California. We liked that show because it was a smaller, more intimate venue, but it was packed. And, we’re used to playing in a smaller club setting, so it was more comfortable for us, and we could let go and just have a good time. 

MB: Yeah! 

DS: What’s next for you? Are you working on new music? Do you have any tours planned? 

MB: Yeah, during this tour we have had a good response from the audience and really every city’s promoter has been really impressed by us. So, they’re really starting to focus on us. So, maybe we could headline our own U.S. tour later this year. And I hope we could also tour the UK and Europe. We are also planning an Asian tour, so maybe we will visit Taiwan and Japan this year. And we really tried to make a new album, our third album, last year. We’ve already recorded eight songs, so we must finish our third album this year. 

MN: We just released a new single and I think that it showcases the new direction of the band, the new influence maybe that I’m bringing to the table, and we are pulling out of each other. So, you can hear that in the new single. Three-part harmonies. Really fast, aggressive but angelic vocals over the top. The song is called History. And then we’re working on the new album, hopefully.  

MJ: Yeah, and we have a live album soon to be released, maybe in the summer. 

MB: We just recorded the live album in January.  

DS: Oh, that would be exciting.

KD: Megan, how did you become involved in the band? Because I’ve known Drinking Boys and Girls Choir for a while, and I’ve known them to have a rotating cast, so to speak. How did you join the band and what new directions and influences are you bringing to it? 

MN: Right. So, I really love indie music and I’m a huge music fan and I’ve always played guitar. But since I was like 14. And, so, I was just watching KEXP at home in South Korea one night by myself with a bottle of wine. And, so, I’m scrolling through, and I saw Drinking Boys and Girls Choir and I look at the band name and the thumbnail and I’m thinking they look Korean. I think maybe they’re Korean, so let’s check it out. So, I clicked it, it was their session that they did in 2021.  

MN: I totally fell in love with the band, their appearance, the energy, and everything. So, okay, I followed them on Instagram and everything like that.  

MB: We put up a notice that we were looking for new guitarist.

MN: I thought I don’t have anything to lose, I might as well. So, I sent them an email and the rest is history. 

We describe the music as being fast, aggressive guitar sound, intense drumming, and a powerful bass tone but with angelic vocals over the top of everything. Three-part harmonies”.

– Megan Nesbit

DS: So, have you guys toured Scotland, yet? 

MN: Yes, we did. 

MB: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. 

DS: How was that experience? 

MJ: We met Megan’s parents, cousins, aunties, everyone… 

MB: I feel like every town was Megan’s town because people came to see her.  

MN: They were happy to meet the girls. They were kissing and hugging them. I was delighted to introduce them to my family as well. 

MB: Yeah, it was. And because we were born in Daegu and we’ve lived in Daegu our whole lives. So, our parents or family culture is not close to each other in Daegu, and I felt the love from her family. So, I was so happy to be there. 

MN: It was great.  

MJ: Yeah. Maybe more than my parents. 

MB: Yes, exactly. 

MJ: They loved me more than my parents. 

MB: Yes, exactly. Yeah, she calls her father often and every time he asks about how the girls are doing.  

MJ: Yeah, it’s like a family now.  

MB: And he bought lots of beers for us. Yeah, we had a really good time. Maybe if we can arrange our schedule for the next tour, I want to make Glasgow our last city. I want to spend more time in Glasgow after the tour. Yeah, I hope.  

MN: I would love to show them not just Glasgow but other cities and other more rural northern areas in Scotland because it’s a beautiful country. I think they would love it. 

DS: What advice do you have for musicians who are starting out? And those who are touring other countries? 

MJ: Workout.  

MB: Yes. It’s important.  

MJ: Yeah, physical workout is important. It makes you healthier, physically, and mentally. 

MB: Yeah. 

MN: What do you think? 

MB: Don’t think about it, just do it. 

MN: This is where you get the personalities of each of us, right? She says work out is a good and logical answer. Don’t think about it, just do it. Okay. And then for me I would say be personable, be friendly, be honest. Wear your heart on your sleeve and go for it. 

DS: Great. Thank you. What five bands are you guys listening to while on tour? 

MJ: For me, I like Jacob de Haan, a composer from the Netherlands. I love that man. 

MN: In the van, we listen to music mostly in the van because that’s the best time for it. So, I guess I’ve been listening to Bouncing Souls a lot. Hot Water Music… 

MB: On this tour… Smoking Goose

MN: Smoking Goose. I love that band. That’s a Korean band. Okay. They’re from a city called Daejeon and they play skate punk music. They’re a three-piece. They also play fast, have catchy hooks, and play three-part harmonies as well. So, I guess I love that band. And we are three girls. They’re three boys and they’re cool.  

MN. Jaurim. Good, classic Korean rock band. They’re still active today. Very kind. Nice people. 

MB: Yeah, they’re super rock stars in Korea. 

MN: Super rock stars. 

MB: We did we say five? Alice in Chains, The Offspring, Bouncing Souls…Tyler Langley

MJ: NOFX

MB: So, I’d like to introduce some of our friends in Korea. We really like Billy Carter. They are really…blues… 

KD: They’re like psychedelic blues, but they’re rooted in the punk scene, too. 

MN: They have a punk vibe as well. But it is like bluesy. 

MB: Yeah. A really good band. My friends Ohchill and they released a new album last year. And I want to recommend Smoking Goose as well. Who else? 

MJ: We’d like to introduce some other Daegu bands named Sindosi. They’re a post-punk band. There’s a legendary band from Daegu called March Kings. They’re not a punk band but we recommend them. There are female-fronted bands called Igloo and Honz.  

DS: What else would you like to share with Dying Scene’s readers? 

MB: Yeah, just come to our show when we come back here again. And please buy our merch. 

MN: Please check out our music here. Come to the show. And then if you do come to the show, come, and say hi. Because we are selling the merch personally ourselves. We love to talk to people and sign things and take pictures and everything. So, don’t be shy and just come say hello. That’s it.  

MB: Thank you so much.  

DS: Thank you. 

Check out the Otoboke Beaver, Drinking Boys and Girls Choir, and Ovef Ow Photo Galleries below and check out the link for The Korean Times collab with Fleurette Estes and Kyle Decker.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Photo Gallery: Nox Novacula, Black Cross Hotel, and The Feral Ghosts, The Burlington Bar, Chicago, Illinois (08/27/2023).

The Burlington Bar welcomed Nox Novacula and two Chicago bands, Black Cross Hotel and The Feral Ghosts, for a night of death rock, industrial, and darkwave bliss. Hailing from Seattle, Washington, Nox Novacula brought their death rock style to the Windy City. This Pacific Northwestern gothic rock-n-roll band consists of vocalist Charlotte Blythe, bassist and […]

The Burlington Bar welcomed Nox Novacula and two Chicago bands, Black Cross Hotel and The Feral Ghosts, for a night of death rock, industrial, and darkwave bliss.


Hailing from Seattle, Washington, Nox Novacula brought their death rock style to the Windy City. This Pacific Northwestern gothic rock-n-roll band consists of vocalist Charlotte Blythe, bassist and keyboardist Dav Tafoya, guitarist Zu Leika, and drummer Ezra Bolotin. Check them out here.


Black Cross Hotel is a Chicago-based 80’s horror inspired post-punk industrial band featuring vocalist Dee DeEmme, guitarist Marcus Eliopulos, bassist Sanford Parker, drummer Mike Miczek, and keyboardist Andrew Ragin. Check them out here.


Also from Chicago, The Feral Ghosts is a dark post-punk psychedelic band. This dynamic trio consists of guitarist Alex, vocalist/bassist Annu, and drummer Lucy Boots. Check them out here.


Nox Novacula Photo Gallery below.


Black Cross Hotel Photo Gallery below.


The Feral Ghosts Photo Gallery below.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dying Scene Photo Gallery: Off with Their Heads, Dead Bars, Black Cross Hotel, and Brox, Beat Kitchen, Chicago, Illinois (10/14/2023)

Off with Their Heads performed a SOLD OUT show at the Beat Kitchen in Chicago. Opening bands Dead Bars, Black Cross Hotel, and Brox were a great addition to this killer lineup. Chicago’s own Off with Their Heads performed an “All Request Set” where their hometown fans requested the songs that they wanted to hear. […]

Off with Their Heads performed a SOLD OUT show at the Beat Kitchen in Chicago. Opening bands Dead Bars, Black Cross Hotel, and Brox were a great addition to this killer lineup.


Chicago’s own Off with Their Heads performed an “All Request Set” where their hometown fans requested the songs that they wanted to hear. Led by vocalist/guitarist Ryan Young, the band recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of their Home album. Let’s see what the next 10 years bring! It was a great night. Find them near you here.


Seattle-based Dead Bars brought their brand of Pacific Northwest punk rock to a sold out Chicago audience. The band were celebrating their 10-year anniversary and appeared to be having a blast! Many in the crowd were familiar with the band but all went wild for their cover of the Ramones’ “Pet Sematary”! Find them near you here.


Post-punk, industrial band Black Cross Hotel performed songs from their debut HEX album. They were a great local addition to the lineup and it just so happens that their keyboardist, Andrew, is a neighbor of Ryan from OWTH. Find them near you here.


Performing under the name Brox, Chicago-based vocalist/performer Scott Walker delivered a wild show with elements of folk, garage rock, no wave, noise, and pop music, reminding listeners of Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, and Jarvis Cocker. Spicing up their neighborhood, Scott also lives near Ryan from OWTH and Andrew from BCH. Check him out when you can!


Check out the Off with Their Heads photo gallery below.

Check out the Dead Bars photo gallery below

Check out the Black Cross Hotel photo gallery below.

Check out the Brox photo gallery below.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

From The Dying Scene Vault # 6: Phil Marcade (The Senders) on The Ramones, Nancy Spungen and the cast of characters on “Punk Avenue”

Thanks to everyone who has checked out all of the new content we’ve been cranking out since the relaunch of Dying Scene! We’re stoked to be back, and we’re even more stoked that you’ve been checking in! Because we have an awful lot of material from the old site in the Archive, we thought it […]

Thanks to everyone who has checked out all of the new content we’ve been cranking out since the relaunch of Dying Scene! We’re stoked to be back, and we’re even more stoked that you’ve been checking in! Because we have an awful lot of material from the old site in the Archive, we thought it would be cool to take a look back at some of the posts from our past.

It’s a bit of a bittersweet installment of From The DS Vault this time out. Word broke this afternoon that Philippe “Phil” Marcade passed away earlier this week after a relatively brief battle with pancreatic cancer. Here’s the news as relayed on his social media:

With great sadness we share the news that our friend Philippe Marcade has left us.

Phil, who thrilled audiences as the lead singer of The Senders and authored the memoir Punk Avenue, succumbed peacefully among loved ones in Paris on June 5, 2023, following a brief struggle with pancreatic cancer. He was 68 years old.

From 1976 through his final performances in 2017, Philippe remained true to the music and scene he loved, delivering a frenzied mix of rock and roll / R&B intensity and deft, inventive songwriting to audiences of both The Senders and The Backbones.

Those fortunate enough to see him perform know that Philippe Marcade was a rare individual who had true business being a LEAD SINGER. From the late- ‘70s NYC Punk scene onward, Phil would take the stage without the protection of a guitar, grab the microphone, and for an hour or so he’d croon, scream, dance, joke, blow harp and take audiences on a wild ride with easy assurance. No matter where or when, Phil always turned it on.

Phil and I chatted over the phone a few years ago when he was doing press for his dynamite book Punk Avenue: Inside The New York City Underground 1972 – 1982. He was living in Italy so it was very much a long-distance call (remember those!?!) and it was super fun. Phil was funny and engaging and still seemed to display a sense of awe and wonderment about some of the obviously chaotic but certainly legendary times that he was privy to in and around New York’s Lower East Side half a century ago. We stayed in contact via Facebook a few times, and he was always inspiring and interested in what was going on. When I was reading the book and doing research for our talk, I found out that a friend of mine ran in the same circle as Phil in NYC back in the 1970s, and they shared a bunch of mutual acquaintances. In a weird twist of fate, cancer has claimed both of them this calendar year. I miss them both. So without further ado, here’s my chat with Phil from May 2017.

If we were running down a list of the most famous, and infamous, figures from the epicenter of the fledgling punk rock scene in New York City’s Lower East Side in the mid-1970’s, we’d have to scroll pretty deep into the annals to find the name Phillipe Marcade. Marcade fronted the high-energy blues punk band The Senders that were staples at such legendary venues as CBGBs and Max’s Kansas City for the bulk of the late 1970s and early 1980s, and yet neither the man nor the band really got the credit that they deserved outside a twelve-block radius.

Yet Marcade was every bit as entrenched in the 1970s Lower East Side as any of the Ramones or Debbie Harry or Johnny Thunders or Legs McNeil or any of the others whose names come more easily to mind. In fact, to hear one-and-only McNeil tell it in the Foreward to Marcade’s brand-new book, Punk Avenue: Inside The New York City Underground 1972 – 1982, Marcade, “while not a household name, was friends with everyone at CBGB and Max’s Kansas City, and a bona fide member, in good-standing of the New York Punk Rock Scene.”

We caught up with Marcade over the phone from his home in Italy to discuss Punk Avenue and the early NYC punk scene in more detail. Still the purveyor of a heavy Parisian accent, Marcade is equal parts humble and engaging. That he ended up with this particular story to tell is the result of a series of profoundly fascinating circumstances. A native of France, Marcade took a trip to Amsterdam as a teenager that led to a chance encounter with a American traveler named Bruce, which, in turn, eventually resulted in Marcade spending several decades in the Lower East Side, but not before stopovers in Boston, a longer stay in Amsterdam, a hog farm in New Mexico, and…his eighteenth birthday “party” in a Federal Penitentiary in Florence, Arizona. It seems that even in the 1970s, the feds frowned on shipping large quantities of straight hash across state lines…

Marcade might have ended up in the gritty, tough-as-nails Lower East Side in the early 1970s by happy accident, and yet that’s not an entirely bad way to describe the foundation of the scene itself. Given the transient, underground nature of the close-knit, artistic community that found itself magnetically pulled to that neighborhood at that time, it’s not a stretch to say that punk music as we came to know and love it would not — could not — have started anywhere else and come out the same. The thing about living and thriving in the geographical center of a once-in-a-generation social and cultural and artistic movement is that you don’t realize you’re there until you’re gone and the moment has passed. That’s especially true when you’re viewing said geographic center from the wide eyes of an outsider. “I thought it was so magical and exciting,” says Marcade, quickly adding on that he “thought that was probably because I was new in New York, and to everybody else I thought it had always been like that. Only years later did I realize that no, that was a true revolution going on at the time!

While perhaps unaware of the importance of the movement that he was a direct witness to at the time, Marcade did, at least, recognize sheer talent when he saw it. “I think that the first very important band of the movement, without being in the movement really, was Dr. Feelgood in England. They really changed things around.” Once the music moved toward this side of the pond, the cream quickly rose to the top. Says Marcade: “The Ramones and the Heartbreakers and The Cramps were just amazing groups. I’m so glad I got to see them.” And see them, he did. Especially The Ramones, whom he estimates he saw roughly “a hundred times.” When asked of his insider’s perspective on whether or not Ramones were, indeed, worthy of what’s become iconic, almost mythological status, Marcade answers an emphatic yes. “They were just amazing! They were so good. I never went to a Ramones show and left thinking “eh, that wasn’t that great.” They never ceased to amaze me!”

On the other hand, perhaps not as worthy of her iconic, mythologized status was Nancy Spungen. Marcade knew knew Spungen prior to, and in fact had a hand in encouraging, her fateful 1976 move to London. “I always thought Nancy was kind of a sad soul, a lonely girl,” says Marcade with a hint of sadness present in his voice for the first time in our conversation. “Everybody was so fucking mean to her,” a fact that led to her leaving her heroin-addicted cat (“Oh, that fucking cat!”) with Marcade and heading to London, where she’d eventually, infamously, cross stars with the Sex Pistols’ Sid Vicious. “I think a lot of people misjudged her because of the way she carried herself, and because of the whole heroin thing. But knowing her before, she was a sweet girl. She was as much a victim as Sid. She was not that “evil woman” that turned poor Sid Vicious on to drugs… I don’t subscribe to that theory!”

There are no shortage of memorable characters and stories and moments peppered throughout Punk Avenue. Truth be told, the four-page glossary of supporting characters is almost overwhelming (and would probably better serve the reader if it appeared as a reference index to refer back to). That Marcade can recall such a large volume of names and faces and coincidences is no small feat in and of itself. “It’s funny,” says Marcade, “because I seem to have a very, very good visual memory, and when I think back to an anecdote like that, I can really remember it well.” As the project neared completion, he fact-checked and cross-referenced some of the stories and their corresponding dates with some of his surviving companions, though most stories required only little tweaks.

Yet the real noteworthy feat is not simply remembering stories, but weaving them together in a way that is fun and funny and sad and personal and gripping, whether you’re a fan of early the early NYC punk scene or not. Marcade not only does exactly that in expert fashion with Punk Avenue, but he does it in a language that’s not his first. It is perhaps that wide-eyed outsider’s perspective that keeps everything fresh and exciting and new and real to the reader, especially when the stories involve such Herculean figures. Aside, maybe, from Please Kill Me, it’s hands-down the best read about the Who, What, When, Where, Why and, especially, the How of the origins of the punk rock scene as we know it. Punk Avenue is out now, and you can pick it up at Amazon or Barnes & Noble or Target but hopefully at an independent bookseller near you!

Head below to read the text of our full half-hour conversation with Marcade. Aside from what’s touched on above, we cover a lot of ground, including the changes (read as: gentrification) in the Lower East Side in the forty years since the dawn of punk civilization, which bands from the scene got unfortunately overlooked, and which more recent bands have carried the torch most surprisingly. The results may surprise you!

Dying Scene (Jay Stone): Thank you very much for this – I consider it an honor to be able to talk to you. And congratulations on the book. I’ve read it cover-to-cover twice now and I’m now on my third time through because…

Phil Marcade (author, Punk Avenue): You’re joking!

No, I’m not joking at all. I got it in the mail shortly after the holidays and read through it pretty quickly, and then I wanted to read it again to get a little deeper knowing that we might be talking one day. I find it to be raw and uncomfortable sometimes, but you’ve got such a positive and humorous way of writing and talking about things that I find it to be a very fun and compelling read.

Well thank you very much. I’m very touched by that. Thank you!

You’ve obviously had these stories kicking around for a long time…what was the impetus for compiling everything and writing the book in 2017?

Well, what happened is that the idea was kind of turning around in my head for a few years that I wanted to do it. I started by taking a little notebook in my pocket everywhere I went, and I made little notes whenever a funny anecdote would come to mind so I could remember it. I wanted to see if I would have enough to fill up a book, so I just made a whole list of anecdotes, and then I just let time pass by. I wasn’t sure when to start (writing the book). And then, actually, I got motivated by my nephew. His name is Pierre, and he lives in France, and he was asking me questions over email about Max’s and CBGB’s and was very interested by that whole scene. So I started to write a few chapters and sent them to him. He loved them! So having an audience really helped me with getting the work done. I would write about thirty pages and send it to him, and the whole book went like this. It kept me going for about four months.

I was wondering how you were able to — I don’t even want to say recall all of those stories, but there is so much detail and there are so many people involved. The copy that I received has the glossary of who’s who, but I almost wish it had a proper index so I could go back and figure out where everybody overlapped. But I’m glad that you brought up that you started with the notebook, because I was curious how you could possibly recall all of those stories and the people that you came across. It was not just impressive but really staggering.

Thank you! It’s funny, because I seem to have a very, very good visual memory, and when I think back to an anecdote like that, I can really remember it well. The part that I find the most difficult is to put it in the exact time. It was a good job for me to verify all that on the internet afterward. For example, I say at one point that we stopped at the inauguration of Richard Nixon, so I’m checking the dates and yup! I was right. Sometimes I questioned my memory, but it seems that everything that I remembered was right. Little by little I made corrections, or I remembered something slightly wrong. It was really fun to do.

Did you reach out to any of the other people that were involved to verify some of your dates or some of your memories, or see if you got things correct?

Yes, as a matter of fact, there’s a funny incident that happened. One of the main characters is Bruce, my friend that I met in Amsterdam. I wrote the whole thing without talking to him, and since he’s in the book so much and we talk about some stuff that’s…illegal…I wanted his permission. So I called him up on the phone and I told him I wrote this book and he said “that’s fabulous! Read me a little of it!” I didn’t know where to begin, so I just started with the very first page. I read to him that it was my eighteenth birthday and I was transferred from the jail to this other penitentiary in Tempe, Arizona. And he cut me off and said “is this going to be published?” So I thought “uh oh…” I said “yes, why?” And he said “are you out of your mind?” I said “oh, you don’t want me to talk about that we were busted?” And he said “oh no, that’s fine, but the jail was in the town of Florence!” (*both laugh*) I was very relieved that he was fine with the book, and very happy that he had corrected a terrible mistake I made in the third line of the book! (*both laugh*) I talked also to my ex-wife about it and I talked to a few other people who were in the book about it and they were all very happy. I was glad they could confirm some of my stories, so that was cool.

The ‘70s in Manhattan, specifically the Lower East Side, was obviously the epicenter of such a large social and cultural movement, and we really haven’t had a movement like that since then except for maybe Seattle. I’m always curious to hear people that were there, and when they exactly realized that they were in the middle of something that was really interesting and compelling and not like something going on anywhere else. Is that a thing that you were conscious of at the time, or was it not until months or years later…

Not at all! Not at all, and I’ll tell you why. I was not conscious of it because I had just arrived in the States, especially in New York. I thought it was so magical and exciting, but I thought that was probably because I was new in New York, and to everybody else I thought it had always been like that. Only years later did I realize that no, that was a true revolution going on at the time! But since I was brand new to the scene, I was brand new and I didn’t really realize it. But indeed, it was quite incredible, and thinking back on it, what made it so special is that it was such a small scene. Everybody knew each other’s name. There might have been two hundred people, at most, at Max’s and CB’s. It was a small scene of locals. So no, I didn’t realize there was anything revolutionary going on while it was going on…I thought it was just (revolutionary) for me!

One of the things that really comes across in the book is how small but I guess how diverse the scene was. I wasn’t born until the very end of the 1970s so I obviously wasn’t around, but I think we have this romanticized view of that scene and how it revolved around bands that sound like Ramones or like The Dead Boys, but it was really more diverse than just those “punk” punk bands.

Yes absolutely! I totally agree with you!

That is something that really comes across that I think gets overlooked otherwise. The Senders, for example, are not a traditional “punk rock band” by any stretch of the imagination, but you were right there in the middle of the whole scene.

It’s true. I think that at the time when I first heard the term “punk” was through Punk Magazine, so to me, it kinda meant underground, New York, maybe if there was a style it was short hair and not very professional, not very polished, not very skilled musicians. That’s all it meant. Nobody was in the same style as another band. Nobody really knew who was “punk.” I think that all became clearer after the punk wave in England. Then, it was like “yeah, that’s punk.” But the Ramones had Beatles haircuts. Nobody thought of them as being “punk”…or at least I didn’t.  And then you had stuff like Talking Heads, or Blondie…that wasn’t “punk” at all. So it was very mixed indeed. A lot of different styles at the same time. But now, when I hear the term punk, I think 70s or early 80s New York or London, but it took a lot of years to define that image. It didn’t feel like that back then to me at all. It’s funny, because when punk became more popular, in the ‘80s, I hated the term. It had become so overly commercial. Everybody had safety pins on! (*laughs*) As time has passed, I love the term again, but for a while it was just kinda lame! (*both laugh*)

Were there other bands at CB’s or at Max’s that, for whatever reason, never took off the way that Ramones or Talking Heads or Blondie did that you were always sort of curious about why they never got bigger than they were? I think that The Senders would certainly qualify as one of those bands, but are there others that while you were watching them, you were confused about why they never got big?

Oh yes, so many. There were so many bands that I admired so much that never got anywhere. The first thing that came to mind was Buzz And The Flyers. They were tremendous! They were an incredibly good rockabilly band and I thought they would be huge. Also, a lot of bands like The Victims. In the late 70s, there were so many that were great but that never got mentioned or that have been forgotten but were truly great.

Have you been back to the Lower East Side much in recent years? I know that obviously CB’s shut down and Max’s shut down, but what are your thoughts on the gentrification of that area? Even Alphabet City is not what Alphabet City used to be!

Yeah, to say the least! (*laughs*) It’s amazing. I never go to that neighborhood much anymore. Before I left, a friend from Europe came to visit me, and I took them to Avenue B and I couldn’t believe it! It was all yuppie restaurants and stuff. The last time I had been down there, it was very dangerous! There was nothing to do there but cop heroin. It was not a place to put a restaurant! (*laughs*) It’s amazing how much it’s changed, and I find it a bit sad. It seems to me that so many cool people got pushed out of the Lower East Side and moved to Brooklyn or Queens. Like myself, I lived in Queens for fifteen years because my rent became too much. I was living between Avenue A and Avenue B for twenty years or so, and I had to move out. All my friends too. It improved, maybe, the quality of life, but it lost a lot of the artistic life. All of the musicians and artists moved out, which is a shame, because there was such a cool community there before. Everybody was within three or four blocks of each other and that really made a cool scene, but I guess they all went to Brooklyn now! (*both laugh*) You’ve got to be very rich now to live in Manhattan. It’s crazy.

Right. And I’m calling from just outside Boston, and we’ve gone through the same thing. The Rat, which you reference early on in the book, got turned into a luxury hotel years ago…

…No…

Yeah. And whatever was left of that part of the Boston scene has long since gone away.

Oh man. I didn’t know that The Rat was gone.

Yeah, that building got sold to Boston University and they basically leveled the whole block and turned it into a luxury hotel.

I haven’t thought about that place in a while. I’m really sad to hear that. And you know, it’s the exact same thing on the Lower East Side. NYU bought most of the buildings and turned them into expensive rent for students that have rich parents! (*both laugh*) That’s nice for them, but not for us!

Yeah, and I honestly have mixed feelings about it. Like you said, the art and the community and the grit are gone, and yet, the city (Boston) itself is much safer. You can walk around at all hours of the day and night and not take your life into your hands in some of those old neighborhoods, so it’s a double-edged sword.

Exactly! It’s good and bad. It’s too bad it wasn’t safe like that when we were living there. But now, all my friends moved to Brooklyn — to Williamsburg — and that’s alright. It’s less dangerous than it was in 1980. But it’s a shame. It’s beautiful! It’s very nice, but it’s impossible to afford! Not when you’re a chick playing in a band or a painter or something!

One of the characters that I find most compelling in the book — well, she’s not a character, she’s a real person — was Nancy Spungen. She and her relationship with Sid have obviously been mythologized over the last forty years, but you knew her at a very different time. I was really fascinated by the way that she wove in and out of the early third of the book. You knew her differently than the public does now, and you even took over her heroin-addicted cat! That’s fascinating!

(*laughs*) That fucking cat! (*both laugh*) It’s funny, because I always thought Nancy was kind of a sad soul, a lonely girl. She wasn’t that pretty. Everybody was so fucking mean to her. And then, I read an interview with Johnny Rotten saying “ah, she worked as a prostitute and she was ugly.” And I thought, ‘what’s the matter with him? He’s supposed to be the king of punk rockers and he’s putting her down for not being pretty?’ I mean, come on! (*laughs*) What, you have to be a top model to be a punk rocker? But yes, I think a lot of people misjudged her because of the way she carried herself, and because of the whole heroin thing. But knowing her before, she was a sweet girl. She was as much a victim. She was not that “evil woman” that turned poor Sid Vicious on to drugs… I don’t subscribe to that theory! (*laughs*) She was really, very nice.

And I think the thing that we lose sight of is that she was twenty years old when she died. So it’s not like she had this whole long history and legend…she was still in many ways a child.

Exactly. It all just went so quick.

The whole mythological thing that a lot of them — the Ramones, the Sex Pistols, bands like that — developed over the years, does some of that seem a little bizarre to you? Or were bands like that mythologized for good reason? Were they really just THAT compelling?

The Sex Pistols I couldn’t tell you so much because I never saw them. I did meet Sid, but the most I actually saw of the Sex Pistols was on TV. The Ramones however I saw a hundred times. With the years that have passed, I think that their notoriety is totally deserved. They were just amazing! They were so good! The only thing I thing that I think people kind of reproached the Ramones about in America after a while was that it was a bit too much repetition. It was always a bit the same. But what a trip! I never went to a Ramones show and left thinking “eh, that wasn’t that great.” They never ceased to amaze me. And so indeed, they deserve that notoriety. Joey Ramone deserves a street named after him, totally! And I saw things change. I think that the first very important band of the movement, without being in the movement really, was Dr. Feelgood in England. They really changed things around. Then the Ramones and the Heartbreakers and The Cramps were just amazing groups. I’m so glad I got to see them.

Are there bands or scenes that you’ve come across over the last, let’s say twenty years, that remind you of the old days? A new scene that you’ve noticed burgeoning somewhere else or bands that carried on the legacy of the Lower East Side in the 70s, or is that gone?

Well that depends. In a way, I feel that I’m a bit out of touch, but hey…I’m 62! I think it’s god that I’m out of touch! (*both laugh*) I’m sure that there are some kids, some teenagers now some place doing something that’s completely unknown that will be known and great. But in more recent years, bands that I’ve seen more recently, I really love Daddy Long Legs. They’re a great band. I also really liked about ten years ago — shit, I forgot their name — that band from Sweden. Shit…they really, really followed the spirit…they had that hit “Don’t Say I Told You So” or something like that?

Oh…damnit…is it The Hives?

Yes! Of course! The Hives! I thought they were fabulous, and I thought they were very much in the spirit of the old scene. They totally got it.

Wow…that was a great song and a great album and I think I forgot about them for about half a decade until right now.

Thanks for remembering! That would have driven me crazy all night!

They had a sort of mod, British look to them, so I think I forgot they were Swedish, but you’re exactly right. I don’t want to take up too much of your evening — my afternoon — but thank you so much for talking. I could probably pick your brain for hours. Have you gotten a lot of positive feedback about the book yet? I know it’s not out yet, and there are the obvious quotes on the back of the book, but have you heard other cool feedback from people about it yet?

Yes, so far it’s been all good. Which is good, because it’s pretty terrifying. You don’t know if you’re going to put something out and have people hate it and think it’s crap. It’s very encouraging, what I’ve heard from friends to far. But again, they’re friends, so you never know if they’re just saying it to be nice. But people that I don’t know have given it positive reviews as well, so I’m very enthusiastic about that. I hope it stays like that for a while! Probably not, but… (*laughs*)

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Hot Water Music – “Vows”

"Vows" - Hot Water Music

Release Date: May 10, 2024 Record Label: Equal Vision Records Release Type: LP

Back in 2012, when I was still a relative newbie here at Dying Scene, I had the privilege of getting to do a write-up on the fact that not only were Hot Water Music getting back together, but that they were putting out a new record, the one we all know and love as Exister. Not only have the band stayed together since then – and added a dynamite new addition in Chris Cresswell into the mix – but they continue to put out powerful and dynamic and vital new music.

2024 marks the 30th anniversary of Hot Water Music’s formation, and in addition to playing a bunch of tour dates (scroll down) they’re also releasing yet another killer full-length record. It’s called Vows and it’s due out May 10th on Equal Vision Records, and it’s undoubtedly their most star-studded release to date, with featured guests including Thrice, Popeye Vogelsang from Farside, Dallas Green (City and Colour, Alexisonfire), Daniel Fang and Branden Yates from Turnstile and…The Interrupters! And of course, the album was recorded by the one-and-only Brian McTernan. There are oodles of pre-order options available through Equal Vision, and you can obviously pre-order it or pre-save it or however that works on all the standard digital platforms. Watch the video for lead single “Menace,” and keep scrolling for those 2024 dates. Happy 30th, HWM!



MAY
03 — Cincinnati, OH — Bogart’s *
04 — Columbus, OH — Newport Music Hall *
05 — Detroit, MI — St. Andrews Hall *
07 — Toronto, ON — Danforth Music Hall *
08 — Buffalo, NY — Town Ballroom *
09 — Philadelphia, PA — Underground Arts *
10 — Boston, MA — Royale *
11 — Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn Paramount #
12 — Mechanicsburg, PA – Lovedraft’s Brewing Co. *
13 — Washington, DC — The Howard *
14 — Richmond, VA — The National *
15 — Atlanta, GA — The Masquerade (Heaven) *
17 — Dallas, TX — South Side Music Hall *
18 — San Antonio, TX — Paper Tiger *
19 – Austin, TX – Mohawk *

JUNE

13 — Louisville, KY – Mercury Ballroom ^
14 — Cleveland, OH — House of Blues ^
15 — Chicago, IL — Concord Music Hall ^
16 — St. Louis, MO — Delmar Hall ^
17 — Lawrence, KS — Liberty Hall ^
18 — Denver, CO — Ogden Theatre ^
20 — Mesa, AZ — Nile Theater ^
21 — San Diego, CA — House of Blues ^
22 — Santa Ana, CA — Observatory ^
23 — Los Angeles, CA – The Belasco ^
24 — San Francisco, CA — Great American Music Hall ^
25 — Sacramento, CA — Ace of Spades ^
27 — Portland, OR — Revolution Hall ^
28 — Seattle, WA — The Showbox ^
29 — Vancouver, BC — Commodore Ballroom ^

* — with Quicksand, Off With Their Heads
# — with Quicksand, Modern Life Is War, The Ergs
^ — with Quicksand, Tim Barry

Murder City Devils

The Murder City Devils is an American garage rock band formed in 1996.

Power Trip to re-release 'Live In Seattle'

Power Trip have announced that they are re-releasing their live album, Live In Seattle. The album was recorded at Neumos in Seattle on May 28, 2018 and was originally released in 2020. The re-released version of the album will be out physically and digitally on June 23 via Southern Lord Records. "Drown (Intro)", "Divine Apprehension", "Executioner's Tax (Swing of the Axe)", and "Firing Squad" are available digitally now. See the announcement, songs, and tracklist below.

Queens of the Stone Age

Queens of the Stone Age (commonly abbreviated as QOTSA) is an American rock band formed in 1996 in Seattle, Washington. The band was founded by vocalist and guitarist Josh Homme, who has been the only constant member throughout multiple lineup changes. The band’s music style is predominantly hard rock, although they’re also billed as alternative rock and stoner rock. Repetitive riffs are a feature in their songwriting, with a distinctive sound that draws heavily from electronic dance music. 

Sicko

Sicko is an American rock group from Seattle, Washington, formed in 1991.