Search Results for "Interview"

Descendents are working on new music, says Milo Aukerman

Descendents frontman Milo Aukerman confirmed in an interview with OC Register that a new album from the band is on the way. Fans had to wait nine years for 1996’s Everything Sucks, eight years for 2004’s Cool to Be You and then twelve years for 2016’s Hypercaffium Spazzinate, but Milo promises that it won’t be too long before the next record arrives.

He’s quoted as saying, “When we put out the last record we thought, ‘OK, I bet we could put out another record after this one and not wait a decade to do it.’ It was such a rewarding experience and you know what? Our fans deserve better. They deserve more than a record every decade or so. We started writing almost immediately after that record was done. I have been writing and Stephen (Egerton) has really picked up the mantle, too. Between us I think we have like 20 songs written and Bill (Stevenson) and Karl (Alvarez) have been writing songs as well. We’ve done some basic tracking, but it’s still a work in progress but I hope we’ll have something out by the end of the year.”

We’ll keep you posted as more details on the next Descendents record come to light.



Adam Pfahler confirms Jawbreaker are writing new material

Jawbreaker drummer Adam Pfahler confirmed in a recent interview with Music Radar that new music for what will be the band’s first album in over two decades is in progress. He was quoted as saying:

“Yeah, absolutely. We’re writing right now and we’ve rescued a couple of old songs that we never had a chance to record right at the end of the band. We’re going to get together in San Francisco and get right back to it. We don’t have a label yet, and we haven’t booked any studio time. We’re just dipping our toes and taking it one step at a time.”

Jawbreaker broke up in 1996, shortly after the release of their iconic record Dear You, but reunited in 2017 and have been performing live occasionally since then.



DS Exclusive: Dave Hause on fatherhood, family, and his suicidally optimistic new album “Kick”

The journey of a career songwriter is one filled with a seemingly endless series of what can rightly be called “pivotal” moments that can alter the arc of one’s professional career; the death of a loved one, the dissolution of a band, divorce, the misuse of alcohol and other drugs, marriage, worsening societal ills. Even if you’ve got your head screwed on in a manner we’d call straight, each and every one of those areas can seem daunting. When you couple any of them with the growing senses of fear and doubt and insecurity that can come, frankly, with being alive and even remotely paying attention to the world around you, it can prove enough to bring an otherwise strong individual to their respective knees.

In one form or another, Dave Hause has tackled all of those issues — sometimes individually, sometimes collectively — generally in a manner that can be poignant and heart-achingly personal. On his upcoming album, Kick, due April 12th on Rise Records, Hause has yet another filter to approach his life, and his craft, through: fatherhood. When we caught up with the now California-based Hause over the phone last week, he was out for a walk with his twin two-month-old sons napping quietly away in their stroller, affording his wife a much-deserved breather. Lest those who might be afraid that turning 40 and establishing roots on the sun-soaked west coast and becoming a dad would have dulled the daggers that Hause spent the better part of two decades sharpening, fear not; Kick is very much a return to form from the more positive, upbeat themes of its predecessor, Bury Me In Philly. “I think that Kick and Devour are a lot closer to one another than Bury Me In Philly,” Hause explains. Bury Me In Philly was me moving to California and figuring out what that was going to look like and figuring out happiness. I didn’t want to write a bummed record if I wasn’t bummed. Little did I know that we were going to have one of the biggest heartbreaks as a society that I could have ever predicted.”

There are some weighty questions posited over the course of the ten songs that make up Kick. Many of them, like “Weathervane” and “Civil Lies” and lead single “The Ditch” tangle the wires between the personal and the political and reveal the obviously delicate balances that come with managing one’s own anxieties within the context of tides that are literally rising and a social climate that seems hellbent on allowing it to happen. The ride culminates in the album’s closing track, “Bearing Down,” a track which…well, let’s put it this way: if the Devour track “Autism Vaccine Blues” and its narrator outwardly considering whether or not they’d be better off dead tugged on your heartstrings, “Bearing Down” will use two hands and rip those heartstrings straight from your chest. The song finds Hause not only name-checking Hunter Thompson and Robin Williams (and insanely talented Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison, who provided backing vocal duties on the Devour track “The Shine,” in the liner notes), all of whom died from suicide after lengthy and sometimes public struggles with their own demons, but contemplating his own oblivion and weighing swan diving off the Golden Gate Bridge.

But then comes the pivot, that moment that the narrative shifts from being bleak to being heavy yet hopeful by way of our narrator finding that he’s got a newfound responsibility to be around for a while, and to help those that he’s close to through these difficult times. “What I was betting on with that final verse,” he explains, “was really like the old Buddhist philosophy that life is pain. “Hallelujah, we’re alive, and it’s bearing down. It is brutal. And if I can lighten that load for someone else, then I’m serving some grander purpose more than just my own selfish whims.” If you’re lucking, the act of older and going through some of your own trials and tribulations allows you the experience and perspective needed to learn from past mistakes. “I’ve got to stick around and not put my people through hell,” Hause notes, adding “in looking at the patterns of addiction and stuff, you start to realize that ‘wow…I’ve made some messes that I wouldn’t mind not repeating, so I’m going to stay in better touch!’ I look at it as more of a human responsibility.”

If there’s a central theme to Kick, it’s that yeah, the current might be strengthening around us or the ditch we’re in may be getting deeper, but that focusing on that isn’t going to fix it. “It’s a very dangerous proposition to look at the glass as either half-empty or filled with piss! Maybe that could be true, but I can’t really afford to ruminate on that. I have to come up with a reason to look toward the shore despite feeling I or we, collectively, are drowning. I have to. At this point, it’s a job as I have as a dad,” Hause notes, quickly adding that, upon reflection, his new duties aren’t necessarily “new” at all, though they’re certainly more intense. “To some degree, I’ve always had that job. I’ve been a brother and a husband and a friend and a songwriter. I’m supposed to try to be of some good use to people.”

There’s a genuine art to being able to write a song that uses your own uniquely human experiences and resonates with other people in such a way that not only can the listener relate to your stories, but use them in a way that can move the needle in their own lives. You know the Leonard Cohen quote “there’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in?” Hause asks, knowing full well what the answer is. “A lot of times what’s compelling to me is trying to look at the piece of pottery and trying to recognize that it is indeed cracked — and we cracked it! We fucked it up!  — But then trying to find that light, because what else are you going to do? A joking alternate title for the record was “Suicidally Optimistic,” and I know that can kinda make the skin crawl, but a lot of times, I think that that’s my outlook.”

As was the case with Bury Me In Philly a few years ago, Hause was joined by his brother Tim for the creation of Kick. The latter might be sixteen years younger than his big brother, but make no mistake; he is not, by any stretch (and to paraphrase a line from the track “Civil Lies”) a kid anymore, displaying songwriting chops that match his previously-established guitar abilities. Having Tim as my partner now is clutch. His whole theory is that you make a ten song record, and then, long-term, if you end up with three of them in your “greatest hits” set that we’ll play for the remainder of our careers as musicians, we did something right.” Tim not only collaborated on music and lyrics this time out, he takes on lead vocal duties on “Civil Lies,” providing an effect that’s familiar while still adding a layer we haven’t heard on a Hause “solo” album before. I use solo in quotes there, because it may not be that way for long. “I didn’t really want to be a solo guy (at first),” Hause the elder explains. “The financial collapse happened and I grabbed a guitar and just went. I didn’t realize (it would happen this way), I thought I’d be back with The Loved Ones after a record or two, but the cookie crumbled differently. I brought my brother in and assumed he’d be with me for a year or two and then go back to college.” Instead, Tim has turned himself into a vital cog in the process. “I think we’re just continuing to set the table for us combining streams and using both of our songwriting output and both of our talents toward the same end. Ultimately, we may just go completely under the last name so that it encompasses all of our writing,” a trend that’s started already, as evidenced by Kick‘s cover art. 

While Hause will have Tim alongside him as he gears up to hit the road with a full band, The Mermaid, for the first Kick support shows later this week and through the remainder of the year, he obviously won’t have his family’s two newest members alongside. In order to gear up for life on the road as a dad, Hause has called on some old friends like Dan Andriano, Pete Steinkopf, Brian Fallon and Cory Branan not just for songwriting input, but for advice on how to best navigate these previously (for him) uncharted waters. While being away from his wife and two little fellas is obviously going to suck, Hause is hoping to use that as inspiration to dig a little deeper – as though that were possible – in his live performances. I’m going to miss my family. I’m going to feel to some degree like a heel for not being there for first steps or things. I’m going to miss stuff if I continue to tour to support my life. But I’m trying to look at it like a two-pronged approach: 1 – what I do is cool and the kids will be psyched on that and 2- more importantly, if I can lean into that experience and be like ‘well, I’m in Berlin, and I don’t get to do this just willy-nilly; I can’t just pick up and go, it takes a tremendous amount of planning and effort and heartache to be away from my family, I’m going to really dig in on this Berlin show…or these two Boston shows.’ I think maybe it’ll make things shine up a little brighter.”

The new tour kicks off tomorrow (March 27th) in Hause’s hometown of Santa Barbara and takes a baby-steps approach through places like Boston, Philly, New York and Toronto before making its way overseas for three weeks later next month. Tour dates are available here. Kick is due out April 12th, and you can still pre-order it here.

More importantly, you can check out our full chat below; Hause and I have done these a few times, so as usual, we range pretty far and wide.



TX street punks, The Scandals celebrate 15 years, tell all

Check out this interview from TX street punks The Scandals. They spilt the beans on everything from 15-years of punk rock, to putting out records with Slope and inciting riots in the third most dangerous city on the planet. UP THE PUNX!!! ***((Bonus videos in article))***



DS Interview: Jenna Enemy of The Von Tramps discusses DIY, must-do vacation tips for San Diego, and The Beach Boys on cocaine

The Von Tramps are a rising punk & ska-core act from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Front woman Jenna Enemy took some to answer a few questions while the band gets ready to make a sensible escape from Minnesota in January. Check out the interview below for hot tips on what to do when touring the west coast, the band’s next release, and life with DIY!



DS Interview: Spanish Love Songs in the UK

Dylan Slocum is tired.  Spanish Love Songs are on the penultimate date of a two-and-a-half week jaunt around the UK and Europe with Ducking Punches.  Today they have driven to my home town of Milton Keynes, UK from Antwerp, Belgium.  Delays on the Eurostar train on top of the usual rigours of road life seem to be catching up with the band’s singer so it was extremely gracious that he took the time to have the following conversation.

Check out the interview below.



Interview: Dennis Jagard (Ten Foot Pole) talks to us about all things TFP

I recently had the chance to catch up with Dennis Jagard of Ten Foot Pole. Fresh off a tour and recording a new album, I had the opportunity to find out what Ten Foot Pole has in store for us, and what we can expect from the punk veterans going forward. 

Check out the interview below.



Interview: The Split Seconds’ Drew Champion fills us in on 2018 their most bestest, funest, excitingest year ever!

Photo by Roxplosion.

I was recently able to share a few words with front man Drew Champion of the up and coming DC Punk band The Split Seconds, (Altercation Records) and below is what he had to say about the year gone by.



DS Interview: Catching up with Junior Battles on their recent London tour date

Canadian pop punk legends Junior Battles finally made it across the water to play a two and half week run through Europe. Sam, who shares vocal and guitar duties with Erin, was kind enough to hang out for a chat amongst the beer kegs at the rather splendid New River Studios in London before their one and only UK show.  Thanks to fishouttawater for use of the picture from the show.  Check out the interview below.



DS Exclusive: Zen man saves stories for stage, an interview with T.S.O.L. front man, Jack Grisham

Photo by: Danielle Nicol

 My best buds and absolute American heroes in Noogy just ended a 6-day Texas stretch with legendary punk band, T.S.O.L., who is currently on tour promoting their 2017 release, The Trigger Complex. I hit Andre (Noogy) up wondering if it would be at all possible to set up an interview with the man who has become one of my idols – novelist, singer, and American demon – Jack Grisham. He and Anthony hit me back a few nights later from San Antonio, in between sets of rocking out with Piňata Protest and Dead 77, to let me know it was on. I was already planning to roadie the show at Three Links (Dallas), and the conceptualization of this conversation began to dawn on me. Did you read the book? (American Demon) Jack Grisham’s nuts! I knew right away that we were going to be best friends. Read that story below. [short read: 1 minute/ long read: 20 minutes]



Inside All Silk Mastering House With Ed Hall (Egos At The Door): Interview, Live Session Premiere

We spend a lot of time covering music here at Dying Scene and not so much looking at the people behind the sounds. Today, we’re going to buck that trend with an interview with mastering engineer and owner of the All Silk Mastering House, Ed Hall.

Ed has spent most of his life in and around the DIY punk scene in the north of England. He’s probably best known as guitarist with the recently disbanded, hugely underrated techcore proggers, Egos At The Door. With Egos, Ed has travelled across Europe and America, allowing him to build a strong network of contacts from the international punk scene.

His latest venture involved the creation of a sonic fantasy lab in an undisclosed location in Colne, Lancashire in the north of the UK. Ed was kind enough to share his experiences setting up the All Silk Mastering House, which has been a complete DIY effort. From construction and decorating, through to fitting the space out with all the necessary gear and, of course, the mastering itself, Ed handles the entire process. He’s an inspiration to all those who long to cast off the shackles of the daily grind and chase their dreams but lack the gusto to take that initial plunge.

Below, you’ll find an interview with Ed, as well as an exclusive look at his latest project – a regular live session from the All Silk Mastering House floor itself. We’ve also thrown in an example of Ed’s recent work with UK garage punks SWEARS’s latest single, Space Invaders.



Interview: David Green (Moonraker) Gives Us a Track by Track Breakdown of The New LP “Lanterns”

Southern California punks Moonraker released their sophomore record Lanterns back in September of this year via Tiny Dragon Music and after having a few months to listen to and digest the album, we wanted to know more about it. So we called up drummer/vocalist David Green and asked all of the questions that were eating away at us! All eleven tracks, dissected and explained by the man himself! If you haven’t heard the album yet, go download it and listen while you read through. If you’re already a fan, listen to it again while you read through, below!



The Offspring apparently still working on new album

The Offspring guitarist Noodles recently gave Junkee an update on the band’s long-awaited new album. He’s quoted as saying:

“Yeah, we’ve been spending a bit of time in the studio with Bob Rock, who worked on our last two albums as well. He’s great, man — we get along with him really well. We’ve got a bunch of new songs that we’re preparing to go in and record right now.

I think there’s a record’s worth in there, but we’re thinking that maybe the songs are just a little too different. We know there’s a song or two on every record that comes out of left-field for us, but it’s more than just a couple this time. Right now, we’re entertaining the idea of doing two records — one where we can put all of these, and another of straight-up Offspring songs.”

The follow-up to 2012’s Days Go By is reportedly set for release next year, and Noodles said a while ago that they were working on two albums, though it’s not clear if it will result in separate or double album(s).



Hub City Stompers Reverend T. Sinister talks about his life in the Hardcore/Ska/Skinhead scene

I recently had the opportunity to share some words with The Reverend T. Sinister of New Jersey’s premiere Ska-Punk band Hub City Stompers and below is what he had to say about his life and coming up in the New Jersey and New York Hardcore/Ska/Skinhead Scene.



Kyle Trocolla of Kyle Trocolla And The Strangers talks about his new album The Moon USA

Let it be known I am a big fan of Kyle Trocolla‘s work, I have every Two Fisted Law album and have seen TFL at least 8 times. When he came out with his solo album The Stranger in 2016 I thought it was one of the finest acoustic albums I have ever heard and this week I was totally stoked to catch up with him to chat about his most recent album The Moon USA.

Read what he had to say below.