Search Results for "Punk"

Tsunami Bomb stream another song (“Petaluma”) from upcoming album

Tsunami Bomb release a brand new LP, The Spine That Binds, on November 8th via Alternative Tentacles. Following recent single “The Hathors“, the band are streaming another song, “Petaluma”. 

Have a listen below. Pre-orders are up now.



The Damned streaming new song “Black is the Night”

British punk icons The Damned are streaming their new song “Black is the Night”. By the looks of it, the new song will be a part of an anthology to be released at a later date.

Either way it’s always awesome to get something new form The Damned, so check it out below.

This is the first new music from The Damned since Evil Spirits was released back in 2018.



Make War (folk-punk) streaming first song off upcoming album

Brooklyn’s Make War are streaming the first song “Sails” off of the bands upcoming album Get It Together, due out November 1st on Fat Wreck Chords. I must admit I am not familiar with Make War but the first track off the new album has me wanting to hear more.

Check out the new song below.

Make War last released their Self-Titled album back in 2015. They are currently out on tour with Face to Face and Lagwagon.



Fat Mike, Tommy, Baz and June record acoustic cover of The Muffs classic “Lucky Guy”

NoFX front-man Fat Mike joined forces with Tommy, Baz and June to record a heartfelt tribute to the late Kim Shattuck of The Muffs. The song originally appeared on the self-titled début album for The Muffs back in 1993. Kim Shattuck sadly passed away after a battle with ALS, she was just 56.

Check out the heartfelt tribute below.

Kim’s side project The Coolies released a six song EP back in the summer, all the proceeds from that album are going towards ALS research.



Rosegarden Funeral Party announce fall tour

Dallas neo-goth, post-punk band who recently played a small TX tour with The Dead Milkmen has announced they are hitting the road with pop-act Lorelei K. Dates as posted. Stream Rosegarden Funeral Party‘s previously released debut single, “Blitzkrieg in Holland” below.



Hans Gruber and the Die Hards announce fall tour

Hot off the release of Hans Gruber and the Die Hards 2, which was released through Paper + Plastick. Hans Gruber and the Die Hards have announced they are heading out on tour. Beginning later on this month in Austin, the tour winds its way across the good old U.S.A. and finishes up November 23rd in Denton.

Check out the latest video for “The Ballad of Burro the Man” as well as a full list of tour dates below.

As mentioned above Hans Gruber and the Die Hards 2 came out earlier this year. 



Subhumans (UK) release “Split” album with The Restarts

Veteran UK anarcho-punks Subhumans have teamed up with fellow UK hardcore act The Restarts to release a “Split” EP through Pirates Press Records. The album features one track from each band, and both songs are absolute bangers.

Check out the new album below.

Subhumans just released Crisis Point earlier this year, which also happened to be their first new music in ten years. 



Go Fund Me for Woman Injured in Tragic OWTH Accident Live Now

Desiree, a Vancouver woman was dragged for 5-7 blocks under the band’s trailer, resulting in the loss of an eye and severe damage to her face. She is in critical condition. Her friends and family have started a Go Fund Me page to aid in what will be the young woman’s life-long recovery. You can submit a contribution here. More details as they emerge.



Swiss Army (punk) stream two new songs, “Host” and “On Top of the World”

Pittsburgh’s Swiss Army have released two new songs in as many months, both on A-F Records. “Hosts”, which showcases the 90s-heavy alternative sound that Swiss Army is known for, was part of a collaboration with Dancing Gnome Brewery. The more reflective “On Top of the World” features guest vocals from Red City Radio frontman Garrett Dale. These two tracks are the first new music from the Pennsylvania punks since 2018’s Paris Mountain.

Give “On Top of the World” a listen below.



New Video: Tim Barry – “Fussin’ Over Fate” from new album, “The Roads To Richmond”

In honor of his latest album, The Roads To Richmond, the great Tim Barry has unveiled a brand new music video. It’s for the track “Fussin’ Over Fate,” and you can check it out below. You don’t have to be from Barry’s hometown of Richmond to identify with the encroachment of cranes and concrete on a lot of our own beloved home towns.

The Roads To Richmond came out last Friday (October 11th) on Chunksaah Records, If you haven’t read our extensive interview with Barry from last week yet, do so here!



DS Exclusive: Great Shakes premiere S/T LP

A few weeks ago Dying Scene rolled out a “new band intro” for these super-tight-sounding Dutch cats in Great Shakes. You may recall there are also members in the band from the sovereign state of Belgium, and now thanks to writing for Dying Scene I know those countries are right next to each other. In my defense, though, I do live in Texas, so I only have to know where Texas is, because everywhere else is too far away – but punk rock transcends geographical boundaries and personal projections in ways that amaze me more and more with each new encounter. Great Shakes is no different. They hit the nail on the head with an epic self-titled LP and I’m proud as a kitten tiptoeing a booby-trap to premiere it for you today.

Great Shakes LP is full of familiar and relatable themes: four best buds groping at the seems of tragic existence through relationship struggles and the aether of existential dread, the importance of a good friend, finding lasting companionship and living on for better days. It’s pop punk mixed with a California rock and roll sound, heavily influenced by Hot Water Music and Social D, a little bit of the East Coast (America) like Bouncing Souls, and there ya’ go we’ve just gone off the map. Really, what it is – Great Shakes – It’s new. It’s catchy and really good, and I think you’re going to like it.

Great Shakes’ self-titled album is their debut on the world. It releases October 25 on Shield Recordings and you can pre-order a digital copy here. Stream the early premiere ahead of time, exclusively below. Cheers scenesters! 



Grade 2 release “Graveyard Island”

Isle of Wight, UK street punk trio Grade 2 have released their third album, Graveyard Island, out on Hellcat Records. You can have a listen now.

Full details of their upcoming UK/Euro tour are below.  



Russian Girlfriends release video for “Antidote”

Albuquerque, New Mexico punks Russian Girlfriends have released another single from their recent album, In The Parlance Of Our Times, out via A-F Records.

Have a watch of “Antidote” below – and check Fall tour dates.



New Music: Real Space Noice (producer extraordinaire Chad Blinman) releases new LP “Empty And Pointless” and companion EP “Lost Science”

If you’re “of a certain age” and dove headlong into punk rock in the mid-1990s, the name Chad Blinman should be familiar to you. He produced a laundry-list of albums in the Vagrant Records heyday…acts like Boxer and The Get Up Kids and No Motiv and, of course, Face To Face.

Back in 2006, Blinman put out an album called Radio Method under the moniker Real Space Noise. It was vastly different than anything people in that era of the punk rock world would be familiar with; if we’re looking for a label, it’s less “emo” and more “radiophonic post-punk electro/industrial new wave gothic science fiction art rock.” (No, I didn’t come up with that genre on my own; yes, I stole it from Blinman’s website). Anyway, 13 years later, Blinman’s Real Space Noise project is back with not one but TWO new releases!

First up is Empty and Pointless, a haunting LP filled with ten tracks crammed with sci-fi post punk goodness. Alongside Empty and Pointless is a companion, instrumental EP, Lost Science, that, while it doesn’t contain any “vocals” per se, contains a plethora of old radio signals and sampled old science fiction clips about the joys and perils of the world of tomorrow. You can check both releases out here, and stream the video for the Empty and Pointless track “I Am Replacing You” here!



Album Review: The Menzingers – “Hello Exile”

The Menzingers were the first band I could truly say was my own. I was twenty-one when On the Impossible Past came out, and looking back, I’m not sure there was ever a better time to be that young. For myself and others, the Menzingers had just written an album that could be considered as monumental as Reinventing Axl Rose or Caution. And since then, they’ve toured endlessly and continued releasing quality albums. Sure, they’re not as fast and screamy as they used to be, but they’ve settled into a comfortable niche within the greater world of punk and indie, and more importantly, they occupy this space with consistently poignant songcraft. 

Hello Exile follows up After the Party, which in a lot of ways, was as career-defining as On the Impossible Past. This makes for a challenging release, as how many great albums does any band have in them? What’s always impressed me about the Menzingers is how they’re able to crank out so many of these great songs, and really, Hello Exile is no different. The songwriting is there, just as before (maybe too much as before, actually), and the melodies are just as sticky. Is this album a masterpiece? Well, no. After the Party and On the Impossible Past still lay the best claim to that elusive victory, but Hello Exile is no slouch, and while it may be divisive, it still brings the heart and lyricism that its fans crave. 

That being said, the greatest strengths and weaknesses of Hello Exile lay within its songwriting. The Menzingers have always been a songwriting-forward band, and as such, I think that’s a fair place to start, with both my praise and my criticism. Here, we have the band progressing into exciting new heights, and falling back onto old crutches. Opening song “America (You’re Freaking Me Out)” is one of my favorites of the album and it’s also the punkiest. Which means, if you’re reading between the lines—that no, this is not the album where the Menzingers’ reclaim their title as a raw-throated punk rock group. The song itself is a driving force though and it’s nice to see the band react politically (“what kind of monster did our parents vote for?”). They’ve always been a thoughtful band, and they again prove that in spades, even dropping a line referencing totalitarian Vichy France. “America (You’re Freaking Me Out)” continues a career-spanning tradition of opening their albums with absolute bangers. 

“Anna” is an equally great song, but it’s also where the band begins to look a little exposed. Here, is a wonderful track about a long-distance relationship, featuring a helluva hook. But here, we start seeing the limited subject matter inherent in the Menzingers’ songwriting. With lyrical references to Nabokov in his back pocket, we’ve all grown accustomed to guitarist/singer Greg Barnett as a deep literary reader. I’m pretty sure I’ve even read an interview where he mentions wanting to tackle writing a novel. These are awesome aims for anyone, let alone the primary songwriter in a punk band. But all artists can fall into the trap of repeating themselves. We’ve seen far too many songs about growing up, being reckless in Bukowski-certified ways, and doomed relationships. If I were Barnett’s writing coach right now, I’d be telling him he needs to push himself into new perspectives and subject matter. He needs to take an inventory of his common tropes and start building beyond them. Because, right now, it’s okay—“Anna” is one of my favorite songs on the album. But how many more “Anna”’s can we take before we start seeing the dove hidden in his sleeve?

“High School Friend” trods-well on familiar notes of nostalgia as well, but it does so with a sense of purpose, setting up the album’s theme of growing up before your time. This is, in a way, a sequel album to After the Party, it’s thematic mate. “Hello Exile,” the title track, is actually one of the stranger tracks I’ve seen the Menzingers do in recent years, and because of that, it has grown on me as one of the highlights of the new album. It has a swanky, cocktails-in-first-class feel throughout its opening, growing into a bluesy, Americana drenched singalong. It’s one of the best songs on the album and features some of Barnett’s most vivid imagery to date. “Strain Your Memory” is probably the song that most fans will be wishing the band would write more of, and it’s easy to understand why. In an album of plaintive mid-tempo jams, this is the mid-album rager that’ll get bodies moving in the pit. Of course, as is standard, it comes with a melody that fits easily on the throat and tastes sweet on the tongue. 

It’s not fair to paint Hello Exile as a riskless album though, because it does actually takes some large strides forward. “I Can’t Stop Drinking” is a great example of this. At five minutes and ten seconds, it’s the longest track on the album. I like that it challenges some of the Menzingers’ repeated imagery (“…and we drove back drunk through the busy city streets.”) with what is an ironically sober look at themselves. Greg Barnett is rightly lauded for his short story approach to songwriting, often taking his lyrics behind the eyes of another character. But, “I Can’t Stop Drinking” feels cutting, personal, and painful. I hope that both approaches survive into the band’s future, but it serves as a stark reminder of where all these pretty words are born. 

“Farewell Youth” completes the album’s arc with its chorus, “I was always hanging out with the older kids.” It feels like the Menzingers closing a chapter on themselves. These guys are just a little bit older than me, so probably feeling pretty similar things as they’re entering their thirties. They’ve spent over a decade as the Menzingers, a single unit with no personnel changes. That’s an impressive feat, especially while staying grounded enough to keep their audience engaged with their heartfelt melancholy. “Farewell Youth” doesn’t feel sad though, and it echoes a sentiment from the album’s opener, where Barnett croons, “Oh, how do I steer my early 30’s/ Before I shipwreck, before I’m 40.” The keyword is steer. There is control present, an eagerness for the future that can’t quite eclipse what’s passed behind them. It’s bittersweet, but as this album closes a chapter, I’m interested in where the ship takes us next. 

As so far, I’ve talked mostly about Barnett’s contributions to the album; these songs have come to define the sound of the band for many, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Tom May’s contributions to the album. He’s only got three songs on the album, but they’re three of the best he’s written, “Portland” being my personal highlight. I have mixed feelings here because I believe that the voice of a band is a difficult thing to navigate, because bands, by their very nature, are a collaborative art. But, because of the relative lack of Tom May’s songs, the cohesiveness of the album diminishes. There’s already a jolting difference in songcraft between the two writers (which I believe was at its finest point back in the OTIP days, as far as interplay and shared aims are concerned). One is nostalgic and wistful, carrying the band toward a more poetic direction. The other is sharp and declarative, the punkier heart of the band. I’d like to see these collaborate deeper in their compositions, combining their voices to do away with the notion of Greg-songs or Tom-songs, and just write Menzingers songs. 

So, what else can I say about a new Menzingers album? 

How about this—the biggest fuck up the Menzingers have committed is being good enough to become anyone’s favorite band. This is a review filled with nitpicks and suggestions, it gives praise and criticism to songs in equal breaths. Why? Because the Menzingers mean more to me than any other band, and with that affection, comes a sense of ownership. The Menzingers are my band. They’re the ones I learned to drink to, traveled hours to see, and became the go-to singalong for my group of friends. If all those sad-sack, Barnett-penned relationship songs have taught us anything, it’s that we can’t help but pick apart the things we love. Hello Exile shows the band stretching their limbs, ending an era with maturity and verve. It features some new tricks and also features some we’ve seen before. But for a band tied so much to so many personal times and places, I’m excited for a new sonic bookmark. 

4/5*

*This score is meaningless. Listen to the album.