Search Results for "Folk"

Stoj Snak (Folk, Denmark) Streams New Video For “Apex Predator”

Danish folk punk songwriter Stöj Snak has released a new video for the track “Apex Predator”. It’s featured on the artist’s forthcoming release, a split with portable punks Speed Dinosaurs titled The Mass Extinction EP. The full record will be out at the end of this week, April 19, via TNS Records and 5FeetUnder Records

The video tells the story of a modern caveman hunting for frozen food. It was created in the band’s typical DIY spirit from royalty-free photos overlaid with simple hand-drawn animations by Stöj Snak frontman Niels Højgaard Sørensen.

You can check out “Apex Predator” below.



Assembly of Arsonists (Piano Punk, AZ) Stream Teaser Track from New Album “The End is Dear”

Piano-driven folk punkers Assembly of Arsonists are allowing fans to stream a track from their recently announced full-length album. The effort is titled The End is Dear and will be released on May 24 this year. It’s the first new music from the four-piece since their 2017 split with Diego Galvan, Hostility/Heartbreak.

For now, you can listen to “Learning at Both Ends” to get you in the mood for the album dropping next month below.



Sincere Engineer (folk-punk) is heading out on tour

Chicago folk-punks Sincere Engineer is heading out for a short tour through the Midwest. Joined by Mom Jeans and Mover Shaker it promises to be some pretty stellar shows.

Check out the full list of dates below, as well as the latest from Sincere Engineer, a stirring rendition of Paul Simon’s classic “You Can Call Me Al”.

If you are unaware of Sincere Engineer here is the rundown: Sincere Engineer exists in several forms but is primarily the brainchild/working moniker of Chicago’s Deanna Belos. She released her début full-length late last year accompanied by a full band, and it landed like a welcome breath of fresh air; honest, raw and inspiring fresh air. 



Frank Turner and Xtra Mile Announce Opening Slot Competition for Lost Evenings – Boston

Well this is a pretty cool opportunity if you’re in the Boston area (because we don’t have enough cool things going on here)!

As you probably know by now, the great Frank Turner will be holding the third installment of his Lost Evenings shows in Boston, Massachusetts, in a couple months. The four-night run of sold-out shows at House Of Blues features a different theme each night. The final night, May 19th, has been dubbed the Xtra Mile Night, and finds Turner teaming up with his long-running UK-based label hosting a handful of Xtra Mile Recordings vets like Against Me!, Skinny Lister and Trapper Schoep as openers. They’ve also announced a contest that will allow a kick-ass opening band a chance to kick the festivities off. Think you’ve got what it takes? Head here to find out how you and your band can enter!

Turner recently wrapped recording sessions for his eight studio album, which will serve as follow-up to last year’s Be More Kind.



Folk Punk Split: Stoj Snak and Speed Dinosaurs Announce “The Mass Extinction Split” EP

Denmark’s Stöj Snak and play-anywhere UK uke-punks Speed Dinosaurs have announced a split EP. The effort is called The Mass Extinction Split and will feature a total of six tracks – three from each band.

To get fans in the mood for the EP’s release on April 19, both bands have offered up one tune apiece early. You can check out “Fracking” by Speed Dinosaurs and “Drink From the Well” by Stöj Snak below

The most recent new music from Speed Dinosaurs was The Singles Collection in December of last year. Meanwhile, Stöj Snak released the 1,000 Daisies EP in September. 



Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic releases video for “My Meds”

Canadian acoustic-punk act Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic has released a video for his song “My Meds”. If you’re unfamiliar with Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic, he is sort of Canada’s more maple-covered version of Beans On Toast. The thoughtfulness of Beans On Toast but with a french twist.

Take a peek at the new video below and be sure to check out Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic’s Bandcamp page here to keep up with all his latest releases.

“My Meds” comes off Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic’s latest release 2018. As I said above if you’re a fan of Beans On Toast you will thoroughly enjoy the ninja-acoustic punk of Chainsaw Bitch Acoustic.



Album Review: Crywank – “Wearing Beige On A Grey Day”

crywank_wearing_beige_on_a_grey_dayCrywank are an anti-folk/folk-punk act based in Manchester who have just released their latest album Wearing Beige On A Grey Day, and they’re one of the most important voices in the genres today. With their encapsulation of depression and anxiety, combined with incredible creative imagery and unique wordplay, Crywank have consistently created haunting and addictive music. Wearing Beige On A Grey Day is the band’s sixth full length album, and third studio album.

Wearing Beige On A Grey Day takes the Crywank sound, often slightly understated and at times rather haunting, and adds new instrumentals and layering with some ominous brass on the tracks “I’ll Have Some In A Bit” and towards the end of “Unassimilated Normie.” The multilayered instrumentals combine quite well with the backing of moody acoustic music that’s akin to their first album James is going to die soon. There’s signature peaks of emotional explosion, something Crywank do quite well, notably in the almost deranged moments during “Drippy Droopy Pidgeonhole.”

The band has always had some incredibly strong lyrical work from James Clayton, both in writing and his emotion fueled performances. This album is no exception, with Clayton finding even more provocative angles to approach discussion of his own mental space as well as those around him. There’s a heartbreaking relevance to the album, with unique and strong imagery and metaphor combining to make a relatable experience. There’s new ground tread with “Blood,” separating from, yet still keeping relevance with, the general concept of the album; about not being able to feel alright. Blood discusses tragedy and society’s insistence on glossing it over, redirecting blame and to forget rather than find respect for those involved. James’ incredibly powerful lyrics are in full force for the entirety of the album, and here the lines carry real weight; “This is not a call for guilt, this is just a request for respect, the blood may not be on our hands, but we sleep in their beds, oh we sleep in their beds.”

The album feels a lot more directed than their previous, Egg on face. Foot in mouth. Wriggling Wriggling Wriggling. The more compact runtime gives a more solid concept to build around. It’s also nice to see the band has kept up with their trend for uncomfortable hand drawn album art. From front to back Wearing Beige On A Grey Day is terrific, another step forward for the ever growing Crywank.

You can give the album a listen down below.



Frank Turner finishes new album

Frank Turner recently announced that he has finished recording his eighth studio album with producer Catherine Marks. He tweeted:

“It’s a wrap! Just finished tracking album 8 with the incredible @cjmarks. Keeping the details close to my chest for now, and we have yet to mix, but very excited to have a sprawling experimental bunch of songs in the bag. Should be out later in the year!”

The new album will be the follow-up to Be More Kind, which was released last May via Xtra Mile Recordings.



New Video: Bryan McPherson – “Ghost of My Hometown”

Boston, Massachusetts native son Bryan McPherson has unveiled a new video, and this one is near and dear to our hearts for a few reasons. It’s for a track called “Ghost of My Hometown,” and it was filmed in and around McPherson’s old Dorchester neighborhood by none other than yours truly! McPherson and I caught up a couple months back before he made his annual migration to California and filmed guerrilla-style over the course of a couple of weekends. Check out the end product here!

“Ghost of My Hometown” appears on McPherson’s upcoming crowd-funded full-length, Kings Corner, which is due out imminently on McPherson’s own OFD Records.



The Shabs (Folk Punk, South Africa) Stream Album “Can You Hear Us At The Back”

South African folk punk duo The Shabs are allowing fans to stream their latest collection of music. The record is titled Can You Hear Us At The Back and features 12 tracks that are sure to delight fans of Ramshackle Glory or Defiance Ohio. 

You can check it out in its entirety below.

The previous release from The Shabs was the 2015 EP, DEJA.



Album Review: AJJ – “Ugly Spiral: Lost Works 2012-2016”

B-side and rarities compilations can be hit or miss. On the one hand, they’re a way to collect and gather non-LP tracks into one place, which is particularly great for non-obsessives who don’t track down every out-of-print 7-inch or promotional flexis with demos. On the other hand, because these songs are from a number of recording sessions, putting them together in one place can give the final product something of a disjointed feeling. AJJ’s Ugly Spiral: Lost Works 2012-2016, released last summer on SideOneDummy, largely avoids the latter while gathering a number of unreleased songs, a handful of non-LP singles, and alternate takes.

As the title implies, these songs only span a four year gap. Specifically, they come from a four year gap in which the band released Christmas Island and The Bible 2– two albums that have a fairly similar sound in a discography that is overall varied from album-to-album. In fact, one of the unreleased songs is the title track from Christmas Island and it sticks very closely to that album’s aesthetic. Opening track, “Space & Time,” similarly sticks to the optimistic side of AJJ shown on The Bible 2 with declarations of “I’m close enough to happy to say that I won’t throw my memories away.”

Out of all of the songs here, the one that sticks out the most is the band’s cover of Pink Floyd’s “The Final Cut.” AJJ has recorded plenty of covers in the past (many of which have made their way onto the band’s previous rarities collections Rompilation and the digital only Rompilation 2) but this is the first one that really feels surprising because Pink Floyd hardly seems like the type of band AJJ would cover. And yet they do an admirable job- you can tell it’s not the band’s usual style but it doesn’t feel out of place even on a collection of songs that are from a handful of different sessions.

Like almost any other b-sides compilation, Ugly Spiral isn’t likely going to turn on new listeners (or win back any former ones) but it still provides access to unreleased songs and a way to tide over fans while the band gears up for their next proper studio album.

4 / 5 Stars



Album Review: Vandoliers – “Forever”

An awful lot of material finds its way into my inbox on a fairly regular basis, and I truthfully don’t engage with a lot of it, either because nothing grabs me in the press kit, or because it’s wildly outside my area of interest (who knew Skrillex was still around?!?). Though a lot of what the Bloodshot Records roster has to offer doesn’t make it to the pages of Dying Scene (much to my chagrin), I’ve always been a fan of the vast majority of their lineup, so of course I fired up the new Vandoliers album, Forever. Even a cursory look at the album cover and tracklist while waiting for the album to load didn’t exactly instill the warmest of fuzzies that we weren’t in for another outlaw-country-punk-by-numbers offering; train tracks? Check. Songs about raising hell? Check (“Troublemaker”). Song about traveling? Check (“Miles And Miles”). Songs about being no good/down on one’s luck/drunk? Check (“Fallen Again,” “Bottom Dollar Boy,” “Nowhere Fast”). song about something that sounds like it’s a reference to a southern thing that a New Englander such as myself might not understand? Check (“Shoshone Rose”).

And so here, my friends, is a quick lesson in why you don’t judge a proverbial book by its cover or whatever. Forever is a damn fine album that further blurs whatever dividing lines are left between punk and Americana and outlaw country while injecting its own uniquely Texas flavor. As fate would have it, I fired up this album and Lenny Lashley’s newest album both for the first time on the same day, and couldn’t help but think that the Vandoliers might be where Lashley landed musically if he’d grown up in El Paso, TX, instead of the greater Boston area. The fiddle riff that kicks off album opener “Miles And Miles” instantly transports the listener to a place that maybe doesn’t exist on a map, and is maybe more of an idea than a tangible place. The double-time drums and feedback build up of “Troublemaker” evoke a modern, rambling Johnny Cash sound before the mariachi-style horns kick in and bring the song in a different direction. Where a band like Mariachi El Bronx will use the horns in a traditional style, songs like “Fallen Again” or “All On Black” find Vandoliers incorporating them in a way that adds extra, unique texture and depth to their cowpunk sound, sort of the way a band like Dropkick Murphys will incorporate bagpipes or Flogging Molly will weave accordion into a punk song without making them sound like traditional jigs and reels. The former of those tracks, “Fallen Again,” with its guttural, singalong chorus that imagines what might have been had Lucero been a little more Texas than Tennessee, has quickly become one of my favorite songs of the year.

So cast aside whatever you may have in the way of aspersions, my friends, and check out the new Vandoliers album, which is remarkably their third full-length in four years. I know it’s due out in February, but this album just begs to be played and sung along to at full-volume on the open summer roads. Forever is due out this Friday (February 22nd) on Bloodshot, and you can – and should – still pick it up here.

Rating: 4/5 stars



DS Photo Set: Sarah Shook and the Disarmers with National Reserve, Boston, MA

North Carolina-based outlaw country badass Sarah Shook brought her latest and greatest project, Sarah Shook & The Disarmers, through Boston last Friday on the tail end of their recent cross-country jaunt. The dimly-lit, cash only Great Scott is one of the last of a dying breed in Boston, and served as a perfect setting for the no-frills, no-bullshit Disarmers as they ripped through two-dozen songs, an impressive feat for a band that’s got two full-lengths under their collective belt buckles.

It took the band, centered around Shook and her lead guitarist and longtime collaborator Eric Peterson a few songs to hit their stride on this particular night, perhaps in part due to an audience that was present and focused but not overly engaged or providing the band a solid energy off of which to feed. By the time they hit the gutter punk anthem “Fuck Up” as the fourth song in the set, Shook’s trademark whiskey-soaked voice was out in full twang, and the older-than-average crowd began to show signs of life. Shook’s catalog is chock-full of the kind of lost or unrequited love songs and relationship failures that defined the early career of a band like Lucero; it’s only a matter of time before their live show does the same.

Support on this run came from The National Reserve, a four-piece Americana rock band that somehow hail from Brooklyn in the 2010’s and not Laurel Canyon sometime in the 1970s. There’s a real soulful vibe to the band’s live show, punctuated by frontman Sean Walsh’s velvetty smooth voice and lead guitarist Jon LaDeau’s near virtuoso style leads.

Head below to check out our full photo rundown. Sarah Shook and the Disarmers are touring in support of their latest release, 2018’s Years (Bloodshot Records), while The National Reserve are supporting their 2018 debut, Motel La Grange (Ramseur Records).



DS Photo Galley: A Messy, Fun Evening with Ben Nichols and Chris Batten at Crossroads in Garwood, NJ

Just about exactly a year ago, inimitable Lucero frontman Ben Nichols played a one-off date at Crossroads in Garwood, New Jersey, the Andy Diamond-booked club that’s located kinda near everything but not really NEAR anything in the north central part of the Garden State. It wasn’t part of a bigger tour, like Nichols and his pal Oliver Peck‘s occasional Bikeriders combined music and tattoo tour. It seemed a bit random, really, but as can be expected, the 250-ish capacity venue sold out pretty quickly and made for, as chronicled here by yours truly, a pretty special evening.

It was so special, in fact, that Nichols made a return trip this past Saturday, this time as the second night of a two-day solo “tour” that featured a show in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the previous night. Support on this night came from local singer/songwriter Chris Batten and his trusty sidekick Nick Guido, who more regularly appear together in the Chris Batten & The Woods project. The result was another sold-out, whiskey-fueled barn-burner of a show that should all but solidify Nichols’makes an annual stop going forward at what’s become one of my favorite venues to visit.

Accompanied solely by his trusty workhorse Martin acoustic, a not-quite-full fifth of Bulleit Bourbon whiskey, and a literal Home Depot five-gallon bucket filled with ice appropriately adorned with “Let’s Do This” in big, bold letters on the side, Nichols took the stage at shortly after ten p.m. and proceeded to take the crowd on a winding, humorous, occasionally powerful, occasionally sloppy, always enjoyable set over the course of just about the next two-and-a-half hours. “Can’t You Hear Them Howl,” from Lucero’s 2015 album All A Man Should Do kicked things off, complete with audience-provided howling wolf sounds in the choruses. Audience participation proved to be a running theme throughout the show, as a good-natured Nichols was bombarded with a constant stream of requests for the duration of the evening, doing his best piece together some semblance of a “setlist” that balanced A) songs people wanted to hear and B) songs he could remember; the latter of which proved to be a bit challenging as the whiskey continued to flow.

In total, there were somewhere in the neighborhood of twenty-seven songs that were at least started, spanning all points of Nichols’s career, including “Crystal Blue,” which dates back to his pre-Lucero days in the band Old Lucky Sun. Nichols repeatedly commented on the crowd’s seemingly endless knowledge of the deeper tracks in the Lucero catalog, and he responded by pulling out such tracks as “Hold Me Close,” “Mine Tonight,” “Hello Sadness,” and the solo tracks “Davy Brown” and “Chambers.” There’s been a lot of references to family throughout Nichols’s songwriting career, though that theme has never been more prevalent than it was on Lucero’s most recent album, last year’s stellar Among The Ghosts. To that end, well-worn favorites like “Mom” and “The War” and “Raising Hell” made appearances in this set, as did more recent tracks like “To My Dearest Wife” and “Loving” and “Hello My Name Is Izzy.” The former two tracks were inspired by his wife while the latter is an ode to their two-and-a-half year-old daughter, and the tracks were made particularly poignant by the fact that Ben’s wife was in attendance at the show, while Izzy was asleep at a hotel down the road after hitting the bottle a little too hard in Lancaster the night before. Perhaps if he was playing with full band, some of the false-starts and wide-ranging stories told over the course of the evening wouldn’t have played quite so well, but in this intimate, stripped down setting, artist and crowd seemed to be in symbiotic union, and created a performance that really could have gone on a lot longer had potential curfews and, well, straight Kentucky bourbon not interjected.

Head below for more photos from the evening!

 



Ducking Punches announce UK acoustic tour with Harker and George Gadd

Norwich, UK based folk-punks Ducking Punches have announced some UK acoustic tour dates with Harker and George Gadd.

You can check out all the dates and locations below.

Ducking Punches is getting set to release their new album, Alamort, on February 16th via Xtra Mile.