Search Results for "Street Dogs"

Hellcat and Smelvis Records announce Rancid tribute “Hooligans United”

According to a recent Instagram post from the Potato Pirates, a Rancid tribute album entitled Hooligans United is set to be released through Hellcat Records and Smelvis Records sometime soon!

The full tracklist for the tribute can be found below. Bands appearing on it include Street Dogs, Mustard Plug, Anti-Flag, Voodoo Glow Skulls, among many others.

A release date for Hooligans United hasn’t been revealed yet but we’ll be sure to keep you posted as more details are revealed. If the tracklist is any indication, this is sure to be an amazing release.



Video: Mike McColgan (Street Dogs) sings “God Bless America” at Fenway Park

Check out a video of Street Dogs frontman Mike McColgan singing “God Bless America” at Fenway Park prior to the Boston Red Sox game on May 16th below.

Street Dogs last released a 10-inch split with Noi!se in April through Pirates Press Records.



10 Bands That Make The Boston Punk Scene Better Than Yours

Boston Breakout from the Street Dogs 2013 Wreck The Halls show at Boston’s House of Blues.

A flip through the pages that cover the last decade or so in the annals of Boston punk history reveals a scene very much at a crossroads. Coupled with the slow burnout of the street punk and ska-core flames that lit much of the fuse for the previous decade, the increasing impact of gentrification in some of the grittier, working-class areas of the city (perhaps best typified by the closure of the legendary Rathskellar club, aka “The Rat”, in the Kenmore Square neighborhood to make way for a high-end hotel and the ongoing Boston University sprawl) created a veritable power vacuum in the scene.

As a direct result of that power vacuum, you haven’t been paying attention to what’s been going on in Boston for the last decade. Shame on you. Boston is back, in a major way.

While the 2014 Boston punk scene may not necessarily be aligned with the rough-and-tumble, blue collar days of yore, what does carry over is the spirit of camaraderie. Boston has always been a scene that looks out for each other, and the current scene is no different. The sounds are more diverse than ever before: traditional street punk and hardcore blend with throwback pop-punk and the ever-emerging Tiny Engines Records sound. Nick Gold, who waves the Boston punk flag high at the Run Don’t Walk blog, notes that “the punk scene (in Boston) is small, tight-knit, and has a family atmosphere because simply, we take care of our own.”

Sal Medrano, most recently of the band Rebuilder, echoes Gold’s sentiment: “Through all of this mess, we haven’t given up. When a venue or basement gets shut down, we always find a way to keep it alive. We have an extreme amount of loyalty to one another. If you look at Dropkick Murphys and Bosstones, both took out small local bands on national tours when they reached national level. Still to this day both bands host week-long events at house of blues once a year in which the line up has local Boston acts. Both these bands don’t have to do that but it’s helping to pass the torch. Eventually someone will have to fill their shoes.”

Case in point: The recent passing of two Boston firefighters while in the line of duty cast a pall over the city. Inspired by the events, Mark Lind (Ducky Boys/The Warning Shots) and scene vet Josh Smith sprung into action and organized a benefit show on short notice. The goal was to raise $10,000 for the firefighters’ memorial fund. Bands like Street Dogs, Lenny Lashley’s Gang of One, Ducky Boys, The Welch Boys and a reunited-for-the-first-time-in-a-decade Avoid One Thing volunteered their services, and bands like Bouncing Souls and the Dropkick Murphys and Rancid and Paul Westerberg contributed items to the affiliated raffle. The cause was so successful that a second night was added, and close to $40,000 has already been raised before the raffle even starts. That’s Boston punk.

No post on the Boston scene would be complete without a nod to the old guard that are still out there kicking ass and taking names. A sincere debt of gratitude is owed to bands like the Bosstones and the Dropkicks and Slapshot and Street Dogs and Lenny Lashley’s Gang of One and Continental and Ducky Boys and Transit and Jonathan Richman and Ramallah who have kept the fires burning. Were it not for that top tier of bands giving a shit about holding the door open for then next act through, this scene would have asphyxiated many years ago. But what follows is an homage to those aforementioned shoe-fillers. The scene probably wouldn’t be what it is now without guys like Ryan Agate and Clay Fernald and venues like O’Brien’s Pub and Great Scott and the legendary Middle East.

Head below to check out our playlist of the ten up-and-coming Boston area bands that make this scene the best damn one to be a part of.



Tim Timebomb streams “Drink Up And Go Home” featuring Street Dogs

Holy crap.  I really thought I was done writing stories about Tim Timebomb and Friends (the solo project from Rancid’s Tim Armstrong) but I guess not.  At least I’m happy to report that this new song “Drink Up And Go Home” features one of my current favorite acts in the punk scene – Street Dogs.  You can stream the rather mellow collaboration below.

Tim Timebomb will be releasing a self-titled compilation album on April 15th, featuring 36 songs that were released during the song-a-day project.  Check out the track list here.

This compilation was originally released in a limited CD run, but this will be the first time it will be available digitally.



Second Boston Firefighter benefit show announced (Street Dogs, Slapshot, Avoid One Thing and more)

Remember that show we told you about the other day where Street DogsDucky BoysLenny Lashley’s Gang of OneThe Welch BoysBurning Streets and Duck & Cover f and a reunited Avoid One Thing (playing their first show in a decade) were coming together to raise money for the official Lieutenant Walsh and Firefighter Kennedy Memorial Fund? We never brought you more ticket information because, well, it sold out in a couple hours.

By popular demand, a second show has been announced, this time at a larger venue. It takes place Thursday, April 23rd at The Sinclair in Cambridge. The lineup for night number two includes Street Dogs, Ducky Boys, Avoid One Thing, Boston hardcore legends Slapshot, and more special guests to be announced soon. Tickets are on sale tomorrow (April 3rd) at Noon Eastern by clicking here.



Avoid One Thing to reunite for Boston Firefighter Fundraiser show w/Street Dogs, Ducky Boys, Lenny Lashley + more

Boston punks Avoid One Thing, founded and fronted by the Mighty Mighty Bosstones‘ bassist Joe Gittleman, have announced plans to reunite for their first show in a decade, and for a great cause.

The band will join a roster that already includes Street Dogs, Ducky Boys, Lenny Lashley’s Gang of One, The Welch Boys, Burning Streets and Duck & Cover for a show to benefit the official Lieutenant Walsh and Firefighter Kennedy Memorial Fund. Walsh and Kennedy, based out of the Engine 33/Ladder 15 house at the famous intersection of Boylston and Hereford Streets, were both killed tragically while fighting a fast-moving fire in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood.

The fundraiser will take place Tuesday, April 22nd at Great Scott in Allston, and will also feature raffle items from Dropkick Murphys, Rancid, Swingin’ Utters, the Boston Bruins, the Boston Red Sox and many more. Stay tuned for ticket info.

Avoid One Thing’s last album, “Chopstick Bridge,” was released via SideOneDummy Records back in 2004.



New Music: Noi!se streaming new track “The Bottom Rungs” from upcoming Street Dogs split

Don’t let the image fool you, boys and girls; this is not a double post.

Washington punk act, Noi!se, are streaming a new song entitled “The Bottom Rungs” off their upcoming split with Street Dogs.

You can check it out below.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



New Music: Street Dogs streaming “First Cut” from upcoming Noi!se split

Boston punks Street Dogs are streaming a new song entitled “First Cut.” It’s the last of their tracks from the band’s upcoming split with Noi!se. Give ‘er a listen below.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



Noi!se streaming new song “Chameleon” off upcoming split with Street Dogs

Washington punk act, Noi!se, are streaming a new song entitled “Chameleon” off their upcoming split with Street Dogs.

You can give it a listen below.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



Street Dogs streaming new song “Johnny Come Lately” (Steve Earle cover) off upcoming split with Noi!se

Boston punks Street Dogs are streaming a new song entitled “Johnny Come Lately” off their upcoming split with Noi!se and you can give it a listen below.

The track is a cover of Steve Earle’s song, which was originally released on his “Copperhead Road” album in 1988, and has since been performed by numerous acts including The Pogues.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



Noi!se streaming new song “Broken Bonds” off upcoming split with Street Dogs

Washington punk act, Noi!se, are streaming a new song entitled “Broken Bonds” off their upcoming split with Street Dogs.

You can give it a listen below.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



Street Dogs streaming new song “We’re Still Here” off upcoming split with Noi!se

Boston punks Street Dogs are streaming a new song entitled “We’re Still Here” off their upcoming split with Noi!se and you can give it a listen below.

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.



Street Dogs and Noi!se announce split 10-inch for Record Store Day

We’ve been hearing about a Street Dogs / Noi!se split release for a while now, and we’ve finally got more information!

The six-song split will be released by the kind folks at Pirates Press Records on CD and 10-inch vinyl on Record Store Day (April 19th). Online versions will only be available after Record Store Day, so get out and support your local indie shop.

Check out the tracklisting for the Street Dogs/Noi!se split below.



DS Feature: FM359 Record Release Party review and interview (Rick Barton, Johnny Rioux and Mike McColgan)

FM359’s Johnny Rioux, Mike McColgan and Rick Barton. Photo (c) Jo M. Wood

Avid followers of the band Pearl Jam are no doubt aware that by the mid-1990s, the band was in the throes of a sort of internal crisis of faith. The highest highs of their popularity found them at the apex of what, in hindsight, was an all-too-rapid ascent into the cultural stratosphere. Enter Neil Young.  The rock icon recruited Pearl Jam to play his annual fundraising Bridge School Benefit and to serve as his backing band on his 1995 Mirror Ball album and corresponding tour. The band credits Young’s influence with teaching them to not worry about what other people thought, to make music that they like playing, and that if they weren’t enjoying the process, to just stop for a while.

Rick Barton and his comrades in FM359 appear to be musical kindred spirits, taking a page from Neil Young’s playbook. “At this point in my career, I don’t care what the fuck I play, as long as I like it. You know what I mean? I’m over that whole fear of if it’s going to fit in to something,” Barton explains. “Don’t be worried about what people think of what you write, because that’s going to hold you back from so much.”

Barton, Johnny Rioux and I gathered for an impromptu chat amongst the straight-outta-Fenway-Park seats that line the wall of the basement of McGreevy’s, a sports-themed Irish bar in Boston co-owned by Dropkick Murphys’ bassist Ken Casey. FM359, which features Rioux and Barton on guitar, Mike McColgan on vocals, Hugh Morrison (of Murder The Stout) on accordion and, on this night, Jamie Walker on guitar as well, had just finished their inaugural set, playing as part of a record release event in honor of their debut full length, Truth, Love & Liberty (Pirates Press Records), the brick-and-mortar (and painted Dropkick Murphys mural) providing a noteworthy (if not a tad ironic) backdrop.

All but the most casual observers of either the punk scene in general or the Boston music scene more specifically will undoubtedly appreciate the tangled layers of subtext in the paragraph above. McColgan and Barton, for the uninitiated, represent half of the original Dropkick Murphys lineup, and Rioux worked as Barton’s guitar tech. McColgan left in 1998 after the release of the band’s debut full-length, Do Or Die, to be replaced by Al Barr, formerly of The Bruisers (for whom Rioux played guitar). Barton, meanwhile, made his departure in 2000 prior to the release of Sing Loud, Sing Proud.  The Dropkicks’ timely alignment with the Red Sox successful run in the mid-00s (not to mention a certain Scorcese film) catapulted the band into the mainstream, effectively making McGreeveys “The House That Tessie Built.”

McColgan and Rioux went on to found Street Dogs, while Barton has played in bands like Everybody Out! and, most recently, Continental (in addition to producing the last Street Dogs full-length). FM359 marks a musical departure for sure, with their traditionally raw, distorted guitar street punk sounds traded in, in favor of acoustic guitars, accordions and the occasional tin whistle. But perhaps the biggest difference is the deeply personal, introspective nature of the lyrics.

“All hell was breaking loose personally,” says Rioux. Though the album was recorded at his house, it was done so amidst his actively separating from his wife. “We did it in my studio, and my wife and I were going through a separation, and I didn’t know if I was even going to be allowed in the studio,” he continues. “It would be sort of an on-call situation, like, ‘things are a little rough right now, let’s hold off tracking for a little bit.’ (The situation) also affected the songwriting to a degree.” McColgan agrees: “(This album is) the most fearlessly introspective songs we’ve ever done, literally cutting our arteries open on this one. And when I got up there and I sang tonight, I’m channeling that.”

For a band that has effectively never played together, even in the studio, the performance on this night was stellar, and universally appreciated by the capacity crowd (which featured McColgan and Rioux’s fellow Street Dogs Lenny Lashley and Matt Pruitt amongst many notable Boston scene staples) who’d ventured from all points on a Wednesday night to catch the unique performance.  “I thought tonight was great because it felt exactly how it started,” Rioux said. “Just in that shitty room in my garage with acoustic guitars, you know what I mean? It was a perfect record release… a little rough around the edges, which is good, I think.” “It’s hard to just have basically one jam and go play…but I think it adds to the show,” adds Barton. “I give myself a B+ on my performance, and if we just went on tour from now until like Sunday night, just around New England, by Sunday night, the thing would be clicking on all cylinders and I’d feel fucking great.”

While the future may be a tad on the uncertain side for the FM359 project going forward, the band and crowd alike on this evening seemed to view the evening as a celebration, a welcome sign of hopeful things to come. McColgan and Rioux will always have their punk roots planted firmly in the Street Dogs, just as Barton will long have a home with his Continental project (which also includes his son, Stephen, on bass). But if Truth, Love & Liberty, and the energy and ease with which the band performed on this evening are any indication, FM359 have the chops to be anything but a one-off project.

During our thirty-minute chat, Barton, Rioux, McColgan and I covered an awful lot of real estate, from the origin of the project (a solo record for McColgan?), a debate between Rioux and Barton on the ability of artists to grind out a living wage as musicians in 2014, a fired-up Barton railing on ever-increasing commercialism in the music scene, and McColgan channeling his inner Rod Stewart. It’s a lengthy read, but we think you’ll enjoy it. Check it out below. Most of the photos scattered throughout are my handiwork. The cover photo, however, is courtesy of the great Boston-area concert photographer Jo M. Wood. Check out her gallery from that night here.



DS Interview: Mike McColgan on FM359, what’s next for Street Dogs, and his return to Boston

We last caught up with Street Dogs frontman Mike McColgan early last spring. At the time, the band had just announced that their recently-revealed hiatus was going to be incredibly short-lived. Little did anyone really know just how strong a year the band would have.

We were lucky enough to catch up with Mike again this week, and we caught him at a pretty good time. The Street Dogs capped a successful 2013 with their most successful Wreck The Halls tour to date, and his side project FM359 (with fellow Street Dog Johnny Rioux and fellow founding Dropkick Murphy Rick Barton) is readying their debut full-length (due January 15th via Pirates Press Records). We chatted about all things Street Dogs (including new music in the works!), FM359, and Mike’s recent return to Boston after some time spent in California. Check it out below.