Search Results for "Folk"

Lucero release video for “For the Lonely Ones” and announce tour dates

Folk-punk outfit Lucero recently shared a video for the song “For the Lonely Ones.” The song comes from the upcoming LP Among the Ghosts scheduled to be released August 3 via their own Liberty & Lament label.

The band has also announced some dates for a tour that has them traveling nearly to the end of the year.

Watch the video and see the tour dates below.

Among the Ghosts will be the first full-length studio album from the band since 2015’s All a Man Should Do.



Album Review: The Killigans – “Dance On Your Grave”

Dance On Your Grave isn’t a part of my wheelhouse. I’m not a bagpipes and fiddles in my punk kinda guy. I’m the sort of snob who left Punk Rock Bowling early one night because Flogging Molly was playing. That’s the sort of guy I am. But—The Killigans, despite first appearances, are not just another celtic punk band. In fact, upon listening, they reminded me of something I do like a lot: the folksy troubador stylings of the late Erik Petersen. Here is holistic folk music, pulling from strummed cowboy chords, the perspective of the working class, and yes, occasional bagpipes and fiddles.

The Killigans won me over with their songwriting. These guys can craft a melody, they can write a chorus, and they can get you to sing along with it. Dance On Your Grave sits somewhere between The Orphans and Rancid, with a wide-range of orchestration. Opener “Throw It Away,” is a certified stomper with a melodic guitar lead, lots of gang vocals, and a pointed message delivered in lyrics like, “the rich blame the poor, while the poor just try to get by.” Lyrical asides like this, coupled with their catchiness were what made me see the Killigans as more than just a punk band playing in a gimmicky subgenre. These guys have things to say and they’re using folk punk (and is punk that different than just electric folk in the first place?) as their platform.

The album, from there, doesn’t lose momentum with “Peducah” and its aggressive folk opening, or “One Angry Voice,” with its big, sticky woahs. “Burn it Down” is the first introduction to slower, more traditional folk, but by the time the chorus hits the electric strums are laying down a heavy rhythm and once again, we have something to shout along with. “Bartender” is one of the heavy-hitters on the album, a big ode to the bartender, that’s probably just a hop and a skip from being Billy Joel’s “Piano Man,” (a worthy influence, if I ever heard one). It’s a fun song, that’s insanely singable and works well within the context of the album, balancing the political content with some working class barn-burning.

The most insistent song on the album is “Reality Bites,” a pure stomper carried by sharp chords and a sneering vocal delivery that comes off as nearly apocalyptic in its disgust with the war being waged on the working class via gentrification. It’s this sort of grounded approach that makes Dance On Your Grave feel like more than an exercise in style. They lyrics here matter, and the folk trappings only serve to reinforce the perspective held within. This is music and lyrics, in lockstep.

Dance On Your Grave is an album I didn’t expect to like, but it won me over with its earnest exuberance and cutting politics. And it helps that the Killigans are no slouch in the songwriting department, crafting catchy melodies and fun arrangements in an effortless display of chops. While I think the album could be a song or two shorter, there’s no denying what the Killigans have done here. Dance On Your Grave is exemplary working class punk rock—an under-documented perspective, put to music meant to be played as well as learned.

4/5



DS Photo Galley: Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls with Dave Hause and the Mermaid, Boston, MA

Frank Turner has had a bit of a mutual love affair with the greater Boston area over the last handful of years. While his first show inside the city limits didn’t occur until February 2010 – roughly six years after his first-ever show as a solo performer and three years after his first US show which happened in San Antonio of all places – the years since have found the Wessex boy turning Boston into his North American home, with area’s bars and clubs and storage lockups serving as a virtual basecamp for his touring operation on this side of the Atlantic. There’s been obvious support from the likes of local heroes Dropkick Murphys over the years – including lengthy tours both Stateside and abroad – but Turner and his band, the Sleeping Souls, have also garnered a fair amount of radio play from the city’s holdover alternative and independent stations and won over crowds the old fashioned way: by playing their asses off.

Traditionally speaking, Boston, you see, prefers its musicians and its athletes to share a few overlapping characteristics. If you’re viewed a tough, scrappy, hard-worker who may not necessarily have been born with the most virtuosic capabilities but through blood, sweat and tears have carved out a spot for yourself, you’ll do alright here. (Not having an abundance of melanin helps as well, but that’s a conversation for another time and platform.) And so it was a little confusing to see only a couple of Boston dates on the initial list of North American dates in support of Turner’s new album, Be More Kind. Both dates were at Royale, a thousand-ish capacity club that is a great venue, however it’s much smaller than venues like House of Blues and, of course, the Agganis Areana that Turner has headlined in past runs through the city. And while Lucero and The Menzingers were listed as openers for the bulk of the month-long tour, neither were slated to appear in Boston. Hi-jinks, it seemed, were afoot. Within a few days, however, a bigger picture appeared. Tickets to the first two sold out in mere moments, and were quickly joined by two more shows, which also sold out quickly, and finally by two more shows, all without openers announced, meaning that Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls would be headlining the same venue six times in a week. All of a sudden, we had ourselves a big deal on our hands.

Dying Scene have had the privilege of covering a bunch of Frank Turner shows over the years, and night four of this six-night run (which turned into a seven-night run as Turner played a benefit show for the Claddagh Fund at one of Dropkick Murphys’ founder Ken Casey’s new dining establishments on July 3rd) marked yours truly’s seventh time shooting Turner locally at venues ranging from a record store to a college hockey arena to a giant outdoor festival, and while it’s generally hyperbole state that a show was the best of a particular bunch, I’ll be damned if this one wasn’t right up there. The varied setlist covered all seven of Turner’s full-length studio albums (pretty sure I’d never heard “Journey Of The Magi” off 2009’s Poetry Of The Deed live before) as well as the 2010 Rock & Roll EP (definitely sure I’d never heard “Pass It Along” live before). Turner is able to change at a moments notice from being the solo, folk-punk troubadour persona that has long been his bread and butter, to the consummate showman, singing and dancing in non-stop, high-energy fashion, including a lap around the entire venue balcony during the show-closing “Four Simple Words.” Hell, he even got opener Dave Hause to play along, as the latter crowd-surfed his way around the venue as though it were a punk rock baseball diamond during fan favorite “If Ever I Stray” (see the last photo above for proof).

Oh and as was mentioned briefly above, Dave Hause and his band, The Mermaid, were added as opener to this show after the sell-out had been announced (other shows featured support spots from some combination of Speedy Ortiz, The Homeless Gospel Choir, Jeff Rosenstock, Restorations, Tim Barry, Hotelier, War On Women, Kevin Devine and Trapper Schoepp, making each of the six shows a truly unique experience). Hause and his brother/musical counterpart Tim were in town for a stripped down show at Boston’s new City Winery establishment during the altter stages of their tour with Northcote earlier this month. While we enjoyed the hell out of that experience, the elder Hause is masterful at commanding an audience and a full band at a sweaty punk rock show, and this particular band has turned itself into quite a force that’s able to seemingly effortlessly pull off the myriad sounds that have been woven into the Dave Hause solo catalog – yes, that’s Kayleigh Goldsworthy on melodica above – particularly on its latest entry, last year’s Bury Me In Philly. It was a disorientingly early set – Royale turns into a dance club at 10pm, prompting a hard 9:30 curfew, but the dynamic Hause fired the crowd up the way few others can. (Plus, his merch girl was pretty cute!)

Head below to see our full photo gallery from the evening.



Freddy Fudd Pucker (Folk Punk, Germany) stream new album “Open Doors”

German folk punk one-man band Freddy Fudd Pucker are streaming their new album Open Doors, which was released on June 6th via Rebel High Records and Round Dog Records.

You can give it a listen below.

Freddy Fudd Pucker last released Hourglass Wine in September 2015 via Monkey Records and Ramones Museum Records.



Gogol Bordello unveil music video for “Seekers and Finders” featuring Regina Spektor

Gypsy punks Gogol Bordello have released a video for “Seekers and Finders” featuring Regina Spektor, which is the title track to last years critically acclaimed album Seekers and Finders. The video gives us a little peek at the live version of a lilting and breezy track which perfectly captures the balance between the energy of Gogol Bordello and the beauty of Regina Spektor.

Enjoy the video below.



Jake and The Jellyfish release video for “Spokesdog”

Leeds, UK folk punk band Jake and The Jellyfish have released a new video for “Spokesdog” from their album Long in Winters from earlier this year.

If you like your punk mixed with folk rumblings, be sure to check out the video below.



Divided Heaven announce summer tour

Folk punk outfit Divided Heaven have just announced that they’ll be shipping off to tour at the end of the month (beginning in Tempe, AZ) through the end of July. These guys’ new album “Cold War” will drop on July 20th which the tour comes in support of.

According to Jeff Berman, “Cold War is (and was) meant to be different, all around. It was recorded differently, written differently, and presented differently. It’s less singer-songwriter and more full-band; less a collection of songs and more of a cohesive group of songs. I simply can not waiting for people to hear it and feel it.”

Check out the tour dates below!


Dollar Signs release music video for “Waste My Life Away”

Charlotte based folk-punks Dollar Signs have released a music video for their new single “Waste My Life Away.” 

You can check it out below.

Dollar signs last released Life Is Ruff on March 28th, 2017 through their own Possum Heart Records.



Cousin Boneless (Folk Punk, PA) Stream New Record “Possession”

The Pittsburgh-based folk punkers of Cousin Boneless have amped up and gone considerably weirder on their latest record. Possession finds the band exploring a menagerie of new sounds and experimenting with a variety of musical textures. If you’re a fan of Blackbird Raum or Railyard Ghosts, you’re probably going to love this album.

You can listen to it in its entirety below.

The previous effort from Cousin Boneless was their 2017 EP Revel in Rubble.



Introducing Folk Punk Act: The Killigans (FFO early Flogging Molly)

Do you guys remember when Flogging Molly put out music that made you want to dance a jig and mosh at the same time? Fast and aggressive enough to satisfy your rebellious soul yet folky enough to provide a depth sometimes lacking in more traditional punk rock? Those were the days. And I thought they were over until I stumbled across The Killigans. Hailing from Lincoln, Nebraska of all places, this six-some channel folk-punk as if they were spawned from the back of a gypsy caravan in the heart of the Old Country. Playing together since 2004, how they escaped my notice until now is beyond me, but let’s not dwell on that. What’s important is that they just released a new full-length titled “Dance On Your Grave” and I’m here today to tell you it is well worth a listen. Do so here.



Frank Turner announces tour of the United States


British singer/songwriter Frank Turner will be touring the United States in support of his latest album Be More Kind. He’ll be touring with his backing band The Sleeping Souls and supporting him on the tour will be Lucero and The Menzingers.  Check out the dates and locations below.

Be More Kind was released May 4 via Xtra Mile Recordings.



New Music: Lucero debut “To My Dearest Wife” and “For The Lonely Ones” from upcoming album, “Among The Ghosts”

Still riding the wave from the tremendously successful 20-year anniversary birthday bash in their hometown of Memphis, Tennessee, Lucero have officially announced plans for a brand-new full-length album on a brand-new label home.

Entitled Among The Ghosts, the album is slated for release on August 3rd via Thirty Tigers. It marks the band’s first album since 2015’s All A Man Should Do. And while it might also be the band’s first album since the birth of frontman Ben Nichols’ first child, don’t assume the band has flipped to writing only happy songs. Says Nichols: “As it turns out, I think Among the Ghosts is probably one of the darker records we’ve ever made. Possibly the darkest if not the saddest. Not sure if that’s because I got married and had a daughter or in spite of it. It’s dark but it’s big and tough at the same time. And I’m happier than I’ve ever been in my life.”

Pre-orders for Among The Ghosts are available here, and they include some pretty cool, band-member specific options. As a bonus, you can check out the debut of not one, but TWO new tracks, “To My Dearest Wife” and “For The Lonely Ones,” right here. You can also check out the cover art for Among The Ghosts down below. It’s a haunting, tintype picture of a flooded-out Mt. Zion Baptist Church No. 1 in rural Mississippi, taken by the friend and fellow fan Michael Foster.

Lucero head out on the road with the great Frank Turner in a couple weeks for a US tour; dates are below the album cover below!



Music Video: Frank Turner – “Little Changes”

Folk veteran Frank Turner recently released a new music video for his song, “Little Changes.” The track is one off of his most recent album, Be More Kind, which was released on May 4th, 2018.

You can check the video out below.



Cousin Boneless (spooky street folk) announces new album, “Possession”

Pittsburgh’s Cousin Boneless has announced their latest album, “Possession,” will release on June 7th. You can preorder the album at bandcamp and preview two tracks in the stream below.

Cousin Boneless’ most recent release is “Revel in the Rubble” in 2017.



Fire Next Time premiere video for “Collars”

Canadian punks Fire Next Time have premiered a video for “Collars”, a song off their upcoming Spring full length titled ‘Knives’. ‘Knives’ is due out May 4 via Stomp Records, but in the meantime you can check out the video below.

Fire Next Time’s last release was ‘Cold Hands’ in 2015.