Search Results for "DS Exclusive"

Altercation Punk Rock BBQ calls it quits after ten year run

 

With ten years of amazing shows under their belt The Altercation Punk Rock BBQ has become a must attend event for any true punk fan during the annual South By South West music conference in Austin Texas. With so many of our favorite bands like: Two Fisted Law, Teenage Bottle Rocket, The Jukebox Romantics, Off With Their Heads, American Pinup, Lower Class Brats, Dead To Me, The Split Seconds, Dwarves, The Fantastic Plastics, and so many many more awesome acts over the years it would fill a full book just to name them all.

So why is Altercation calling it quits? Find out below.



Dying Scene Radio Special Edition: Albums of the Year 2018

It’s that time of year again! To kick off 2019, we’re taking a look back at our favorite albums from 2018! We’ll tell you why they were our favorites and play some of the best tracks from those albums. Sound good? Alrighty then! Check out our special 2018 Albums of the Year Episode, below!



DS Exclusive: My Year in Photos 2018

Mike McColgan of Street Dogs, gestures to crowd surfer at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

2018 was another great year for documenting the punk rock scene, not just in my adopted city of Chicago. I also spent time shooting shows in my native state of New York, specifically, in my little brother’s borough of Brooklyn. And for the fourth consecutive year, I spent a long mid-December weekend in Boston, MA. For the compilation of my favorite images of 2018, I am again including faves from bands from a wide spectrum of years together and differing levels of public recognition. Quite a few of these images were featured in DS this year. However, as with my faves gallery in 2017, many others were heretofore not featured in any online or hard copy publications. The shows, Weekend Stands; and festivals (such as Wreck the Halls, Motoblot, Punk the Burbs; and Riot Fest) represented were a blast, every last one. Every group included is one more than worth checking out should they hit your town, city or other location where you might find yourself at the same time as them.

Personal Note:  A good many of the photos in this selection are of Street Dogs. I have been following them and documenting them coming up on 10 years in March. Those who know me know the only band I place above them as a personal favorite is The Clash. There are numerous reasons for my love of Street Dogs and among those reasons is their showmanship. 2018 presented me with the opportunity to document the band in NYC, Chicago; and in the Boston area. The Chicago images were part of my Riot Fest gallery for DS. They will be playing Punk Rock Bowling this May (which I likely may not make). After that, there are no scheduled shows announced for the foreseeable future. They are among the most fun and exciting bands to shoot. Their shows are always at maximum energy levels and the crowds pretty much never disappoint in matching that energy.  So I would like to extend my best wishes to the Michael, Johnny, Lenny, Pete, and Matt; as well as their crews. They and their latest album, “Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing,” were surely among the best of 2018.

Johnny Rioux (left) and Lenny Lashley of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls

Ben Roy of SPELLS may be one of Those Who Can’t on television but when it comes to getting a crowd going, he is definitely one of those who can.

Street Dogs’ Mike McColgan pulled me up on stage at Brooklyn Bazaar to get a shot of the crowd. I have documented band from various places on the sides and in the back of stages. However, getting the right up at the front P.O.V. of most of the band members certainly is eye-opening

Triumph Ace and helmet sporting the Ace Cafe London logo at Motoblot

The Queers perform at Punk the Burbs 2

Peter Mittler of The Bollweevils at Chop Shop Chicago

Chicago

Ken Fitzner of The Bollweevils at Chop Shop in Chicago

Dr. Daryl Wilson of The Bollweevils gets high…on punk. Pete Mumford and Ken Fitzner also pictured.

A photographer shoot images of Street Dogs at Brooklyn Bazaar in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY

Pete Sosa of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls #SadPeteSosa? Nah, just a quiet moment in the beautiful chaos.

Stickfight! perform at Liar’s Club Halloween show

The Run Around at Punk the Burbs 2

Stage invader during Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls

Ben Roy of SPELLS at Wicker Park Fest in Chicago

Pussy Riot at Riot Fest

Off With Their Heads at Wicker Park Fest

Nuns of Brixton at Motoblot in Chicago

Nate Leinfelder of Noi!se at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

Bill Stephens of Naked Raygun

Jeff Pezzati of Naked Raygun

Nikki Beller of Mystery Actions at Punk the Burbs 2

Mike McColgan of Street Dogs amid the crowd at Riot Fest

Street Dogs’ Johnny Rioux with his wife Melissa Rioux, on stage at Wreck the Halls

Lenny Lashley of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

Legendary Shack Shakers’ JD Wilkes bends over backward for the Motoblot crowd

Matt Hensley of Flogging Molly on the squeezebox at Riot Fest in Chicago, IL

The Queers headlined Punk the Burbs 2

Scott Brooks of Avenues at Punk The Burbs 2

Trever Keith of Face to Face at Riot Fest in Chicago

Caitlin Rose of Bumsy and the Moochers performs at Punk the Burbs 2. Rose is one of the co-organizers of the fest taking place in the suburbs outside of Chicago

Rubber soles meet Bouncing Souls. Pete Steinkopf of Bouncing Souls has great taste in shoes.

Poli Van Dam of The Bombpops has fun at Riot Fest in Chicago

Todd Pott of Apocalypse Hoboken becomes one with the band’s fans at Chop Shop in Chicago

Alkaline Trejo during Alkaline Trio at Riot Fest

Tony Reflex leads Adolescents at Riot Fest. The band hung a large banner with the name Soto in place of the group name as a tribute to their late bandmate Steve Soto.

Larry Damore of Pegboy is surrounded by fans at Cobra Lounge in Chicago. The band performed at this fundraiser for another small Chicago venue.

Steev MF Custer and Devin Morris of Death and Memphis perform during their set at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Juan Avalos of Size 5’s jumps, for joy perhaps, as the band performs at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Benny NoGood of Benny and the No-Goods pours emotion into his performance during the band’s set at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Off With Their Heads perform at Brauerhouse Lombard

1916 gave a rollicking performance at this year’s Wreck the Halls

Denis Buckley of 88 Fingers Louie sits this one in, continuing to sing at the band’s show at Chop Shop Chicago

And finally, one of my faves I did not take. From left: Johnny Rioux, Matt Pruitt, Lenny Lashley, Pete Sosa, yours truly, and Mike McColgan. Thanks for all the great times! It’s been a blast documenting you all and I so wish I could make PRB this May in Las Vegas! Best Wishes!! Photo by Mark Korich



DS Staff Picks: The Torchbearer’s Favorite Albums of 2018

I feel like I say this every year, but 2018 was a great year for music. I went to some great shows; everything from small intimate house shows to big spectacles and festivals. I personally played my first show in over a decade, so that was cool.  But you all don’t care about all that, you just want to see if any of your favorite albums of the year are also on my list. Let’s compare notes below!



DS Exclusive: The Live Music Year In Pictures (Anarchopunk)

Oi!!!! Here’s some facts, Jack:  2018 is (almost) over. I didn’t manage to shoot as many shows this year. I moved from my home in Los Angeles to the Mile High City of Denver, Colorado. I got a new kitten. I bought a new car. I started a new job. Now, here’s some stats, Jill (I didn’t want anyone to feel left out):  Despite all of that, I still shot well over one hundred sets from about twenty-five different shows/festivals. Moral of the story:  I’m fucking tired.

Check out a gallery of some of my favorite pictures from 2018, below!



DS Staff Picks: Jay Stone’s Favorite Albums of 2018 (w/Spotify playlist)

Hey boys and girls, Jay Stone checking in with yet another year-end list. I’m the dopey one on the left up there. Anywho, as is par for the course, I put way more than ten albums on my “top ten” list, because rules are for squares or whatever. I tend to have a tough time coming up with a definitive number one, but my choice here has occupied that spot for the last eight months and never really got knocked off. A lot of the top half of the list is almost interchangeable based on my current mood, and might have even changed in the time between when I typed this list and when I actually published it. There’s a pretty extensive (fifty-ish song) Spotify playlist that features at least a couple tracks from each of these releases, so check it out and maybe find some new music! Check it all out below!



DS Photo Gallery: Street Dogs Wreck The Halls with Noi!se and Art Thieves

Last weekend, the punks and skins came from far and wide, descending upon Boston’s Brighton Music Hall for the 13th installment of Street Dogs‘ annual Wreck The Halls festivities. The hometown working class heroes have been riding high this year, primarily due to the release of Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing, their first full-length in eight years. As the band’s members – and fans – spread far and wide, it can be hard to get all the moving parts in one place at the same time, making events like the three-day Wreck The Halls blowout all the more special.

Nights two and three of this year’s Wreck The Halls featured opening performances from Slapshot, Dori Cameron and the Invisible Monsters, Ramallah and 1916. Dying Scene made it out to the first night, particularly to get the chance to see Street Dogs take the stage with a couple bands that we’ve been fired up to finally see live: Noi!se and Art Thieves, and boy are we glad we did.

Fresh off the release of their own stellar full length, Russian Rats (State Line Records), Art Thieves kicked off the long weekend of Wreck The Halls shenanigans in fine fashion. The three-piece local band play a no-frills style of street punk that’s been the calling card of the local scene for a long time. They’ve sort of perfected the fuck-the-government calls to arms from a past generation and morphed it with the melodic sensibilities of the newer school. If there’s a local band to carry the torch that Street Dogs have been brandishing for the better part of the last couple decades once they decide to hang it up, it may well be Art Thieves.

Noi!se followed up in one of the most eagerly-awaited sets I’ve seen in quite a while. The Tacoma-based quartet has been around for seven-ish years now, but had yet to make it to this side of the Mississippi River. And yet, in many ways, Noi!se’s 45-minute set had the feel of a hometown show of their own, as a solid majority of the 435-strong capacity crowd was well versed in the band’s entire catalog. “Rank And File,” from the band’s 2012 Pushing On full-length (and previously from the This Is Who We Are 7-inch) kicked things off, and from their the band mixed in a dozen other tracks from across the last half decade. The first real pit of the night – and the first in a seemingly endless barrage of crowd-surface – fired itself up by the time fan-favorite “How We Made It Through” made its way into the set at the halfway point, pushing the gas pedal on an energy level that wouldn’t let up for the remainder of the evening. It was one of those times where the event actually exceeds lofty expectations, and where the symbiotic relationship between a band and a crowd is truly palpable.

It can be tough to come up with new phrases or adjectives to describe the live performance of a band that’s long been a stalwart of the scene. Still, the recent Boston Music Award winners for Best Punk/Hardcore act seem to find new ways to mix things up and keep them fresh, perhaps now more so than ever. The band ripped through “Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing,” the title track and lead single from their latest album, as they took the stage (well…after the rocking out to a few minutes of Boston’s “Foreplay” as the instrument-wielding 4/5th of the band took the stage anyway) before proceeding to dig deeper into the back catalog than I’ve seen them do in recent memory. “Pull The Pin” and “You Alone” and “Katie Bar The Door” were welcome additions to the setlist that I can’t recall having seen in the last handful of SD shows. The band played without a barrier (and, as a result, without a photo pit, which is something I’ve become apparently waaaaaaay too comfortable with in my old age), meaning that a band that already gets up close and personal with its fans anyway was able to raise that bar even further. There were guest appearances from Big Truth of American War Machine (I think) and the legendary CJ Ramone, the latter of whom took on vocal duties for a cover of his namesake band’s classic track “Blitzkrieg Bop.” It was a raucous first night for both band and crowd — many of whom were in attendance for two or three nights — and set the stage brilliantly for what was to come.

Head below for our full photo rundown.



Inside All Silk Mastering House With Ed Hall (Egos At The Door): Interview, Live Session Premiere

We spend a lot of time covering music here at Dying Scene and not so much looking at the people behind the sounds. Today, we’re going to buck that trend with an interview with mastering engineer and owner of the All Silk Mastering House, Ed Hall.

Ed has spent most of his life in and around the DIY punk scene in the north of England. He’s probably best known as guitarist with the recently disbanded, hugely underrated techcore proggers, Egos At The Door. With Egos, Ed has travelled across Europe and America, allowing him to build a strong network of contacts from the international punk scene.

His latest venture involved the creation of a sonic fantasy lab in an undisclosed location in Colne, Lancashire in the north of the UK. Ed was kind enough to share his experiences setting up the All Silk Mastering House, which has been a complete DIY effort. From construction and decorating, through to fitting the space out with all the necessary gear and, of course, the mastering itself, Ed handles the entire process. He’s an inspiration to all those who long to cast off the shackles of the daily grind and chase their dreams but lack the gusto to take that initial plunge.

Below, you’ll find an interview with Ed, as well as an exclusive look at his latest project – a regular live session from the All Silk Mastering House floor itself. We’ve also thrown in an example of Ed’s recent work with UK garage punks SWEARS’s latest single, Space Invaders.



Dying Scene Radio – Episode 12 – Band Spotlight: Mad Caddies

Dying Scene Radio is back with a new installment! In this episode, Bobby heads down to the beach for Surf City Blitz Festival to eat some awesome food,watch some dirt bike racing and listen to some fantastic music. Oh yea! He also sat down with the Sultans of Ska, Mad Caddies to talk about growing up in Solvang, how Joey Cape helped kick start their music career and…wine fermentation?? As always, the guys are also bringing you all of the noteworthy scene news that you were probably too lazy to read and play rad new tracks from emerging artists that you were probably too lazy to discover! All of that and much, much more in Episode 12 of Dying Scene Radio, below!



Interview: David Green (Moonraker) Gives Us a Track by Track Breakdown of The New LP “Lanterns”

Southern California punks Moonraker released their sophomore record Lanterns back in September of this year via Tiny Dragon Music and after having a few months to listen to and digest the album, we wanted to know more about it. So we called up drummer/vocalist David Green and asked all of the questions that were eating away at us! All eleven tracks, dissected and explained by the man himself! If you haven’t heard the album yet, go download it and listen while you read through. If you’re already a fan, listen to it again while you read through, below!



DS Photo Gallery: The Radiator Rattlers Rock Nashua’s Holiday Stroll

It’s not often that Dying Scene covers performances at local Christmas season outdoor holiday strolls. In fact, I’m pretty sure this is the only time we’ve done it. However, it’s also not often that a band as cool as The Radiator Rattlers plays a local Christmas season outdoor holiday stroll, so this past weekend, we packed up our camera bag, headed to our old hometown, and took in a pretty awesome performance to finish out the family-friendly annual event.

As you may recall from our recent sit-down with guitarist and co-frontman Frankie Piessens, The Rattlers hail from a half-hour down the road in Haverhill, Massachusetts. However, the octet’s (Piessens, Kenny Turner on washboard and vocals, Matt Pepp on banjo and vocals, Travis Boucher on mandolin and vocals, Carla Pierce on acoustic guitar, Luke Williams on Drums and Jimbo Ritchie on bass) swashbuckling pedal steel player Jonee Earthquake has been a fixture in the New Hampshire punk rock community for…well, for as long as I’ve been alive, and I’ll be forty on my next birthday. Earlier in the week, they announced a pretty huge milestone in their career that spans about a half-dozen years; they’ll be playing the big stage at next May’s Punk Rock Bowling in Las Vegas! And while you wouldn’t think of “family friendly downtown holiday stroll in southern New Hampshire” as perhaps the punk rockingest of venues, the set up was very much guerrilla-style and DIY: the street was blocked to through traffic by off-duty DPW heavy equipment, and the band performed on the in between snowbanks on a sidewalk – no stage in sight – outside a dive bar in the sub-40 degree temperatures. That’s pretty punk rock if you ask us.

Check out the rest of our full photo gallery below.

 



Screwtape (hardcore) Announces New EP

Screwtape

Denver based hardcore act Screwtape is back with a new EP and we couldn’t be happier! The four track album, Static releases on pretty much every digital streaming site on November 28th If you’re a more hands on type like us, the EP will also be available in hard copy and we would highly suggest picking one up at the album release show which will be hosted at The Oriental Theater on the day of it’s release. Head over to the band’s Facebook page for more details and be sure to check them out if they play in your neck of the woods!



DS Exclusive: Catching Up with Jeff Pezzati of Naked Raygun

Naked Raygun, a band founded in 1980, recently played The Aragon in their hometown of Chicago. Though the headliner was Jawbreaker, there were many in the crowd who were there specifically to see Naked Raygun.
A few days after the show, I checked in with Jeff Pezzati, one of the band’s founders and its lead singer. He is routinely described as a punk rock icon from a legendary band. So how does he feel about such labels? We discuss it here. While the word “legend” may mean one thing to most fans, Pezzati views it with a sense of humor,”I don’t pay that much attention to labels like that. I know that James Van Osdol called us that once. It could mean that we’re just old. Ha.”


Pezzati spoke of the effects such a label might have on the receiving people or groups of such labels, “We’ve always been pretty hard on ourselves to play the best that we can. I don’t think just because a few people are calling us legends would change our preparation for playing out live.” Along the same lines of the band being considered legendary, Pezzati has been ordained by NR fans and those whose job it is to analyze and write about punk musics, with the word “icon.” According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, the second description of the word icon is as follows: “an object of uncritical devotion : IDOL.”

From our discussion, I sense that Pezzati would not believe or describe himself as someone who has been an object of devotion, sans criticism. I did put the question of how it feels to be called an icon of punk rock. And whilst the subject of dictionaries never arose, his definition resembles that found in the Collins English Dictionary. As Collins defines it in their entry: “someone or something regarded as embodying the essential characteristics of an era, group, etc.”

On being called an icon, per Pezzati: “Well, that’s weird too. It indicates that I am symbol of punk rock. In that sense of the word” (the literal meaning) it feels right because I believe that punk rock is a very good thing that changed music indelibly forever. I can stand up for that any day.”

Pezzati downplays the influence he and Naked Raygun have had on the musicians and  bands that followed and his role in shaping said people/bands. Most famous perhaps of citing the influence of Naked Raygun is Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters. Grohl has oft relayed his memory of watching and being inspired by his first live music performance. The show was at The Cubby Bear, when Grohl came to Chicago for a visit. He was there with his cousin and the band was Naked Raygun. In 2015, Grohl repaid that “favor” by inviting Naked Raygun to open for them at Wrigley Field.

“Those bands would have probably made the right kind of music anyway. There were plenty of great bands out there to pick up on when we were starting. We might have hurried the process along for some of the people in those bands.”

I have myself seen many bands describe how much they appreciated what Naked Raygun has done and how they were insured by NR. It occurred again on the evening of the Jawbreaker show, when Smoking Popes, the first band on the bill, gave a shout out to NR and Eli Caterer of Smoking Popes joined in for a couple of songs.

So of course, I felt compelled to ask Pezzati to discuss his influences and to recall some of the stand out moments in the band’s history of sharing the stage. “This is a great question. Our influences were: The Buzzcocks, Wire (first 2 albums), The Stranglers, Gang of Four, The Dead Boys, The Birthday Party and a few others. We never got to play with any of them. Shows that stand out for me are: The Undertones at the Aragon Ballroom in the mid 1980’s. Madness at the Park West in the 80’s. Johnny Thunders at some little hole in the wall where Walter Lure’s band was playing in NY,NY – he just showed and took over the show. The Birthday Party at Tut’s in Chicago in the 80’s, The Cramps and also The Psychedelic Furs both at Tut’s. Blurt at Hueys in Chicago. Gang of Four at the University of Chicago. Also Ian Hunter at the Park West with Mick Ronson on guitar.”

When it was announced that Naked Raygun would be opening for Jawbreaker, there were ripples of rumors that this show would mark the end of the band playing live. Pezzati is quick to dispel that rumor: “Well, we WILL play out live when our album comes out. Although no one seems to be in a hurry to finish it. And we may play on New Year’s Eve…this year.:”

As with what seems to be most bands, the Naked Raygun’s lineup has changed over the course of its history of nearly four decades. I wondered how those changes affect the performances of songs that were first played by members no longer affiliated with the group. Pezzati: “Well every player, plays a little different, however we want the ‘new guy’ to play the songs as close to the recorded version as possible. There may be a slight difference. Hopefully it is an improvement to the original or we would have the part explained better to the player. For example…we have very few songs with any guitar solos. I hate guitar solos…but if you’re going to stick (one) into a song it should be brilliant and you (as a guitar player) should be able to regurgitate it up the same way every time the song is performed.”

Moving on to other ground, the corporatization of punk rock, which is not new. Pezzati describes it this way:

“(Punk rock) certainly started out on unsteady ground. It was the laughable joke of most American music fans. However, as people ‘got it’ they became devout believers and some, disciples of the music. The corporate world just took edible pieces of punk and applied it to sell their products or ideas. I have no problem with that. The fact that the entire genre was ignored by popular radio… now that I have a problem with. Looking forward I see a worrisome predicament beginning to occur…that is that the mainstream music industry still has not included into their ‘boys club’ attitude this great music. I mean how many times have you heard even Weezer on the radio or seen a post, pre, emo, pop punk band on the Grammys? They still believe that rap is good music and it just isn’t. It’s total garbage. And yet they are rewarding it like it’s the best thing since ice cream. How many times are we going to listen to a song where the guy calls himself the N word and think ‘Wow that is so great and new’?”

When discussing punk rock with a singer who was active in his present band during the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher / United States President Ronald Reagan years, I would be remiss if I did not broach a topic on a lot of our minds recently: Donald Trump. I presented it to him as follows: “Treason” is a song that has been recently played, repeatedly on Facebook and other places with Trump in mind. How do you feel about that? Are there songs you have written long ago, which feel newly relevant in the era of Trump?

Pezzati: “I first read about Donald Trump in the 80’s when I bought a book – an unofficial biography of Trump. He had bad taste then and he has bad taste now. Some people will never have the skills to mold themselves into a palatable version of their elected position. “Treason” remains relevant as does “Managua,” “Hips Swingin’ and certainly “Rat Patrol.”

Recalling that roughly one month post-2016 U.S. Presidential election, Guardian newspaper in Great Britain put this query to its readers via this headline “Rise above: will Donald Trump’s America trigger a punk protest renaissance?” I put this query to Jeff Pezzati: “Have you seen an uptick in music addressing politics and is this something you like to see? I see now that a few bands have taken on the GOP in their music (as it seems when it comes to punk does appear to be more of a target that the left). I

Pezzati responds, “I have seen some really pissed off people in bands – for example Vic Bondi. Originally of Articles of Faith. But I don’t know if I’m the one to ask. I’m not really in tune with the kids these days..”

I asked him to respond to something I have also seen happening starting almost from the moment Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton finished her concession speech that night in early November 2016. It seems much of what we see in the punk rock community is addressing the president is via t-shirts and buttons and the like. Is this something you see as productive or merely cathartic for the wearer? And do you see a discernible difference from the punk rock answer to Reagan and Thatcher; and other leaders coming after both Reagan and Thatcher?

Pezzati: “The punk rock community seems split on this issue and during Reagan’s and Thatcher’s day it was too. You have emo bands just writing torrid love songs and some people are just sick of hearing about the latest atrocity that the Trump administration has contrived.”

I then switched gears back to Naked Raygun and specifically, its beloved bass player Pierre Kezdy. Kezdy joined the band in the early 1980’s, however he’s not presently playing the live shows due to his health. I asked Pezzati if he would provide an update that best that he could.

“I know he feels the love from the NR fans…. He is not doing well. Cancer is a bitch. They treat it so viciously that almost kills the host …meaning you. The thing is – most of this malady could have been avoided but Pierre has always had what I call ‘The Martyr Complex’ and always will.”

The love was indeed present at the most recent show where arguably the most popular item available at the Naked Raygun table was a t-shirt featuring a delineation of Kezdy.

Almost wrapping up, I had two more questions to pose to Jeff Pezzati. The first was in reference to upcoming projects he might want to share with Dying Scene readers. And what a teaser he provided.

“Someday I WILL release a solo effort that is mostly complete at this time. It has one song on it that is the best thing I have ever written.”

I also asked if he had anything else he wanted Dying Scene readers to know. He answered with a few words of wisdom, not necessarily garnered through years of being that aforementioned punk rock icon but by years of just being a human. They are words we all should already be heeding but a reminder every now and again is always a good thing. Of course Pezzati had to answer with a bit of humor.

“Be good to one another. Life is fragile and very short. To overcome any situation, take small bites. You’ll get there. Since most of the time you spend is doing things that you HAVE to do rather than CHOOSE or ENJOY doing ….treat every day as something special… a gift – if you will. And things will work out, I promise. I am after all an icon AND a legend. Ha!”



Dying Scene Radio – Episode 11 – Band Spotlight: Lost In Society

The boys over at Dying Scene Radio are back with a special Halloween episode (….a week after Halloween) to tickle and titillate those pretty lil ears of yours! In this installment, Bob meets up with NJ punks down in Fullerton to talk about the current trends in album recording, down tuning and other awesome stuff that AP has no clue about. As always, the guys are also bringing you all of the news you were probably too lazy to read and play spooky, Halloween themed tunes from emerging artists that you were probably too lazy to discover! They did all the work for you! So, crank up the volume grab some of that leftover Halloween candy and stream Episode 11 of Dying Scene Radio, below!



DS Photo Gallery: Oh The Humanity, Tiny Stills, KCUF and Brook Pridemore – Cambridge, MA

Almost unarguably, one of the best parts of living in the greater Boston area is the small, passionate community of people working hard and on an independent level to continue to provide an outlet for artists, musicians and creators of all shapes and sizes. There’s been a lot of hand-wringing about the seemingly endless gentrification across the area and the resulting demise of smaller, independent venues, but I’ll be damned if there aren’t some inspiring people and places keeping the scene’s heart pumping strong. Take Charlie’s Kitchen, for example. The two-floor , diner-style burger joint nestled away in Cambridge’s Harvard Square plays host to live music on Monday nights, featuring bills curated by Rebuilder‘s Daniel Carswell, always chock full of  solo troubadours and great local and national indie rock and punk bands.

Such was the scene last Monday, when Los Angeles’ Tiny Stills came to town to kick off a run down the east coast that ended with an appearance at Fest in Gainesville. The (I guess we’re calling them) power-pop quartet anchored by singer-songwriter Kailynn West are still on the road in support of their new album Laughing Into The Void, which is one of the catchiest and important albums of 2018 — more on that in the future. They were joined on this night by fellow Fest-ers Oh The Humanity!, the local five-piece who play a particularly shred-worthy metal-infused brand of skate punk that would make bands like A Wilhelm Scream proud. Local project KCUF – Ken and Chris’s Undecided Franchise – played second on this night. While they’re still a relatively new collective, the members are scene vets instantly recognizable from other outlets like Loser’s Circle and Coffin Salesman and OC45 and The Radicals and Live Nude Girls and Back Door Key and probably like 800 other projects I’m forgetting. Boston is a delightfully incestuous place sometimes. Kicking things off was Brook Pridemore, who himself was wrapping up a fairly lengthy run before heading home to Brooklyn. Calling Pridemore a “solo acoustic folk punk” act probably does a disservice to both Brook Pridemore and to your boilerplate solo acoustic folk punks. There’s doom metal and dark humor and fuzzed out guitars and synth pedals (or whatever) and a bunch of other ingredients thrown in the blender in a way that makes Pridemore a unique performer.

It’s nights like these filled with bands out grinding that keep the scene alive. And at Charlie’s, it happens every Monday. Head below to catch our full photo rundown, and stay tuned for more.