Search Results for "a fat wreck"

Exclusive Interview: On top of the world with Buck-O-Nine’s Jon Pebsworth, talks “Fundaymental” and keeping it DIY in a septet

Third-wave California ska-punk pioneers Buck-O-Nine have just released Fundaymental on Cleopatra Records. It’s their first album in 12 years and marks the band’s sixth studio album since their conception in ’91. Fundaymental has been years in the making with each of the seven members making ulterior individual contributions to bring these fourteen-tracks to life, where “do it yourself” finds new meaning when your rhythm section is spread across the country and the guy singing the songs lives 100 miles away.

Dying Scene caught up with that guy via telephone call from Dallas to L.A. His name is Jon Pebsworth, and like pretty much all the rest of the band members, he’s been there since the beginning. Jon says the main thing to take away from Fundaymental is “Come out to the show. Put your worries aside, and have fun for a night.” and Buck-O-Nine after all these years? “Let it go!” The secret is trust, and this singer says he has loads of that, as well as respect for each member of his septet. He keeps the process fun and easy, and collaborations are chilled and inclusive.

“People leave. Even our drummer Steve, he’s the original drummer. He left the band in I think like ’99 or something like that and then he came back about six or seven years ago. So, it’s basically the same group of guys minus the bass player that did all of the first three records, which is pretty cool. Our bass player who is in the band now, Andy, has been in the band for about nineteen years.” Fun fact: Andy Platfoot is also the creative talent behind Buck-O-Nine’s music videos of late… the more you know.

As for the art on Fundaymental, “Steve did the cover and then the back cover, and then Jonas, our guitar player did all the graphic design and put it all together.” Fundaymental was recorded, monitored and produced by trumpet player Tony Curry who utilized F.B.I. spy tactic technological wizardry to hack his band member’s computers and record demos remotely. “Like I said, everybody’s got their little job that they do.”

“Our drummer recorded all the drums in a proper studio and stuff like that. It was a really weird process, but it was a lot of fun. There was a lot of learning as we were going. We were kind of like, ‘This is so trippy. We’ve never even been in the same room together playing these songs – which on all the other records that we’ve done over the years, we were just in a rehearsal room somewhere in San Diego playing the songs together and working them out that way. This was different but it was the only option we had. We just really, really wanted to do it, so we made it happen.”

When you find something you love, you’ve got to let it shine… I mean, something to that effect… I know that’s not right. You’ve got to be a peacock, right? “I went through some work things a few years ago working at this company, and I was trying my best to be like, ‘I’m into it. It’s cool.’ You know? ‘Let’s do this!’ And finally, after a couple of years I was just like, ‘You know what? Fuck this! And fuck this place! And fuck this job! I’m fucking out of here, dude.’ You know? Like, ‘I’m gonna’ go back to what I do. This isn’t me.’ So, that’s really kind of what its about. It’s really kind of a message to yourself, you know? A lot of my songs are like that where it’s like a pep talk almost for yourself. It’s a healing and process where you are talking yourself back into being positive and cool, and not dealing with bullshit. You know? For the most part that’s what it’s kind of about, and the references like ‘going back to the bar’ and ‘hanging out hooligan style’ is just a part of getting away from that negative shit to me, because that shit’s cool and fun.”

Jon and I had a great chat. It was super fun talking about ska in the 90’s, and the components of a talented band who tries to keep it in the family. Jon gave me the ins-and-outs of the new album Fundaymental. (available here) I got to meet his dog Barney, and we even talked about Mike Park a little bit behind his back. Find these conversations and more below, you young dead scenesters. Have a great day!



Bristol’s Booze Cruise (May 2019) reveals day splits

The inaugural event of Bristol’s Booze Cruise has announced its day splits and full line-up. The festival takes place in Bristol on 24th – 26th May 2019 across various venues.

Play the festival are Cultdreams, Apologies I Have None, Ducking Punches, Dangers Of Love, Bong Mountain and many, many more (see the full line up on the poster below).

Tickets are priced at a rather reasonable £55 for a weekend pass (with individual day tickets also available) – available from here.



Sweet Empire release video for “The Hunter”

Dutch punk rock act Sweet Empire released their new album A New Cycle earlier this month via Shield Recordings (the follow up to their 2014 full-length, Old Ideas Keep Fighting Us.)

They’ve now released a video for a track from it, “The Hunter”, a track about trophy hunting. Have a watch below.



Album Review: Not On Tour – “Growing Pains”

Hailing from Tel Aviv, Israel, the punk band Not On Tour have released their latest offering, Growing Pains, on SBÄM Records. It has been a four year wait, but it was worth it. The seventeen-song album is a collection of female-fronted punk songs, not a single one of which clocks in at more than two minutes. And it works. That’s all this band needs to get their message across, and are a perfect choice for fans of bands such as Bad Cop/Bad Cop, The Distillers, Be Your Own Pet, and Tilt.

Sima’s vocals really stand out – her voice is more melodic than on previous offerings from the band, but it’s definitely not a bad thing. In fact, it’s a very good thing because this girl can sing – and she doesn’t lose any of the raw passion that is on display in their earlier albums while doing so.

Most of the songs have a California in the mid-90’s punk feel, though that doesn’t remotely mean they are a nostalgia-type act, as each song is fresh and new at the same time. It’s just hard to compare them to other bands that are playing now, and that’s a good thing. Sometimes being reminded of the past, with something that stands on its own two feet as well can be refreshing. Not On Tour is absolutely a breath of fresh air in the punk scene and one of the better bands that is regularly releasing records these days.

The album kicks off with the fast, hardcore skate punk sounding “Daddy”, which is 48 seconds of pure energy followed by the slightly longer “Fantasy World” (1:09). Each song on the album is instantly catchy and something you want to listen to over and over, because Not on Tour are masters of the art of leaving you wanting more.

Stand-out songs include the title track, “Growing Pains,” as well as the interestingly timed “N.O.T. Funny.” Though in all honesty, there’s not a bad song on the album, which is an achievement for the amount of songs on it.

You can check out and download the album below.

5/5 stars



Bad Cop/Bad Cop Release 7″ of First Three Songs

California’s Bad Cop/Bad Cop have released an exclusive 7″ featuring the first three songs the band ever recorded –  “Sweet Brown Water”, “Yeah, Yeah, Yeah”, and “A Little Wild.” The energetic songs show how much potential the band had from the first time they walked into a recording studio – and are high-quality, as opposed to many unearthed releases from bands.  The three songs are bursts of pure punk rock and the perfect way to tide yourself over with new-to-us Bad Cop/Bad Cop music until their next album is eventually released.

The 7″ comes out on April 26th, and the songs are also available on Spotify, Amazon, Apple Music, Deezer, and Tidal.



Saves The Day and Joyce Manor to tour together

Saves the Day and indie-punks Joyce Manor are heading out on tour together this summer. Saves The Day are touring in support of their autobiographical 2018 full-length, ‘9’, which came out via Equal Vision. Joyce Manor will be supporting the album ‘Million Dollars To Kill Me’, which was released via Epitaph also in 2018.

The tour dates can be found below.



Social Distortion and Flogging Molly Announce Summer Tour

Celtic punks Flogging Molly and rock n’ roll legends Social Distortion have announced an extensive 32-date tour across America (with one date in Canada). Having formed in 1979, Social Distortion have been a band for a staggering 40 years! The band’s last release, ‘Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes’ in 2011, was the first released via current label Epitaph Records and the band’s highest charting album to date. It has previously been confirmed that Social Distortion will be entering the studio this year to record new material. Flogging Molly will be touring to support their 2017 album ‘Life Is Good’.



Anti Flag release short documentary ahead of European Tour

Anti Flag have released a short documentary film called ‘Power To The Peaceful’. The film, directed by Bruno Fritzsche, is focused around the band’s reaction to the political environment in 2016 and the community of like-minded individuals that their music and message have helped to build. The fifteen minute film features some stunning live footage.

Anti Flag begin a European tour this week, including Punk In Drublic, ANTIfest, and Slam Dunk. A full list of dates, along with ‘Power To The Peaceful’ can be found below.



Tarakany! (punk rock) release lyric video for ‘What I Can Change’ featuring Nikola Sarcevic

Russian punk band Tarakany! have released a lyric video for a new song titled “What I Can Change”. This is a re-worked version of a single they released in 2015. This new version is sung in English (the previous one was in Russian) and features Millencolin singer Nikola Sarcevic. As huge fans of Millencolin, Tarakany! were excited to release this new version of the politically-charged anthem. The song is taken from their English/American release of ‘The Power of One’ that came out in 2018 via A-F Records.

Tarakany! will be touring Germany and Czech Republic over the next couple of weeks. Check out the tour dates and the video (I’m already on my third consecutive listen) below.



Album Review: Cokie The Clown – “You’re Welcome”

I made a mistake.

It was school vacation week in my neck of the woods recently, and as such, I had the privilege of spending a lot of really awesome time with my eleven-year-old. I also knew I had a review of the upcoming Cokie The Clown album coming down the ‘pike, and assumed – rightfully – that listening to the album with my kid in the car or in the house with me would be a terrible idea, so I decided to take a solo trip to the grocery store one evening and to give You’re Welcome a preliminary listen in the process. As it turns out, there might be worse places than a grocery store amidst the suburban sprawl of the greater Boston area to fire up an album like You’re Welcome for the first time…but there aren’t many.

While Fat Mike hasn’t been shy about wearing his heart on his sleeve for the duration of his three-plus-decade career, You’re Welcome finds that concept amplified: his heart is not merely on his sleeve, but ripped out of his chest and torn to shreds on the floor for all of us to see. You’re Welcome kicks off with “Bathtub,” which finds our protagonist Cokie accompanied by only whatever substances are coursing through his clown veins as he tells the story of waking up in the middle of the night to find his significant other facedown in a bathtub after an overdose, and the resulting uncertainty and dread that came along with wondering if she’d taken her final breaths. Buckle up, my friends, because the ride only gets bumpier from there.

Over the course of the next half-hour or so, Cokie takes the listener on a ride that is at  times painfully honest, uncomfortably raw, disturbingly complicated, and is undoubtedly going to piss a lot of people off. There are songs like “Fair Leather Friends” and “Fuck You All” that take thinly-veiled shots at people in Mike’s — er, Cokie’s — personal life that he feels have cheated him, screwed him, abandoned him and otherwise taken advantage of him. “Pre-Arrainged Marriage” theoretically tackles the subject of love, but through the prism of his two previous high-profile failed marriages. Listeners who read the NOFX autobiography The Hepatitis Bathtub several years back might recognize the story that “Swing And A Miss” graphically details, involving the failed and successful suicide attempts of a previous roommate and the fallout that ensued. “Punk Rock Saved My Life” and “That Time I Killed My Mom” shed a little more light on the relationship – or, ultimately the lack thereof – with his parents that was documented on past NOFX tracks like “My Orphan Year” and “Happy Father’s Day.” There’s “The Queen Is Dead,” a heart-breaking ode to a deceased longtime friend that comes across as one of the most tender, genuine moments that Fat Mike has committed to tape. While the bulk of the subject matter is painful, it is oddly enough the themes of narcissism and unresolved anger and self-martyrdom that rear their heads in tracks like “Pre-Arrainged Marriage”and “Negative Reel” and to a lesser extent “Down With The Ship” that I found more cringe-worthy and uncomfortable than the themes of suicide and parenticide and overdosing and bondage that were more prevalent.

Sonically, You’re Welcome plays more like a sad carnival soundtrack than a traditional “punk rock” album. If you give it a listen looking forward to it being composed of two-and-a-half minute anthemic skate punk songs, A) you’ll be wildly disappointed and more importantly B) you should have known better. There’s no standard verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-repeat in the bunch, meaning You’re Welcome isn’t an uptempo, sing-along style album the way that the Home Street Home musical and soundtrack that Fat Mike and friends put together a few years ago was in spite of its own disturbing imagery. While the musicianship and production are stellar (containing contributions from Travis Barker and Dizzy Reed and production from the mighty Danny Lohner), the majority of the instrumentation is largely present as a means of providing a loosely-built latticework. Fat Mike’s Cokie the Clown “character” — and I’ll save the remainder of my armchair psychoanalysis for another place and time — is by all means the star of the show, and if that means that sometimes songs are going to meander and switch tones and seem a bit unfocused and chaotic and largely just be narratives rather than traditional “songs,” that’s exactly what’s going to happen.

I’m still struggling with what I ultimately think of You’re Welcome in anything resembling a larger sense, which I understand is not maybe the ideal thing to say in a review of an album. I really like the bulk of it, though I have a hard time listening to it for long stretches. While I have long-since tired of the veneration of the degenerate GG Allin or Darby Crash or Sid Vicious types as the bellwether of what it means to be “Punk,” I applaud the choice to pull in some stylistically and artistically different directions and to tackle uncomfortable, challenging topics by way of performance art. From that perspective, You’re Welcome is a resounding success. It’s not an album you’re going to keep on repeat (well…if it is, you may want to have the assistance of a professional therapist or twelve at the ready). It’s not going to launch a series of copycat albums that turn into their own genre. It will probably leave you deeply disturbed on your trip to the grocery store, as you balance images of a nineteen-year-old Fat Mike showing his recently-deceased friend’s parents the exact spot they cut his lifeless body down and a grown-up Fat Mike covering his soon-to-be-departed mother’s face with a pillow as you try to weigh your bagel flavor options. And that’s exactly the point.



Sum 41 return with “Out For Blood” video and detail release of new album

Sum 41 have released a brand new single and detailed the release of their new album “Order In Decline”.

“Out For Blood” sees the band smash together thrashy riffs and pop punk in a way that they only seem to know how, and it also marks their first new music in three years.

The album will be released through Hopeless Records on July 19th, with European and North American festival appearances lined up across the summer to support the release.

Check out the video using the player below.



Dangers Of Love (Indie/Punk, London) release ‘Holsten Pils Blues’

Dangers Of Love are a new London based punk band fronted by Giles Bidder of Great Cynics. The band dropped a new track last night ahead of the release of their debut, self-titled EP this Friday, and we think it rips.

Check out ‘Holsten Pils Blues’ using the player below, and preorder the release direct through Bandcamp if you’re enjoying the indie/punk vibes. You’ll be able to see Dangers Of Love live at Bristol’s Booze Cruise Fest next month



Red Scare to release new Ramona and Billy Liar albums in June.

Red Scare has a busy summer coming up, as they’ve announced they will be releasing new albums from both Seattle-based punk band Ramona and Scottish folk punk Billy Liar this June.  We’ll keep you updated as songs premiere, but for now, you can check out the cover art, track listings, and release dates for these upcoming albums below.



Former Members of Dag Nasty form new group Field Day

Peter Cortner and Doug Carrion performed on Dag Nasty’s iconic recordings Wig Out at Denko’s and Field Day and played some 300 shows with the band in the late 80’s.  The guys wanted fans to be able to hear these classic songs live as much as possible, but due to scheduling and geographic conflicts, this was becoming much harder than everyone would have liked.  After a conversation with Brian Baker, it was decided that Doug and Peter would forge ahead under the name Field Day along with Mark Phillips from Down By Law.

The group has announced that they plan play a select number of East Coast and West Coast shows in late August 2019, and they will also be releasing new music in 2020.  We will be sure to keep you all updated once those dates have been announced, as well as any new music that comes from the group.



DS Exclusive: Down Memory Lane (Canada), Bare Teeth (France), Nerdlinger (Australia), and SHAMES (Japan) stream 4-way split, “Bridging Oceans”

YES!! Just when you’re thinking, “man, nobody does splits anymore”, we all get blasted in the face with this awesomely ambitious split compilation featuring four punk bands from four different continents – Bridging Oceans. 

It’s a behemoth of a record featuring three exclusive tracks a piece from Bare Teeth (France), Down Memory Lane (Canada), Nerlinger (Australia), and SHAMES (Japan) brought to you by four different labels: Thousand Islands (North America), Disconnect Disconnect (Europe), Pee (Australia), and Attractive Records (Japan) all joining forces to bring you this colossal unified skate punk monument which Dying Scene has streaming a few days ahead of its official release, below.

The album will be available April 26 on digital format as well as Digipak CD which includes a lyric booklet to sing along to made accessible by these fine respective distributors. Find yours here: America, Europe, Australia, Japan, and enjoy!