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The Old Firm Casuals announce tour dates; Added to This is Hardcore

Leading up to an appearance at the This is Hardcore festival, California’s The Old Firm Casuals have announced a string of dates across the US this July. The dates are as follows:

Saturday July 6 – Berkeley, CA – Cornerstone
Sunday July 7 – Los Angeles, CA – 1720
Thursday July 11 – Dallas, Tx – Three Links
Friday July 12 – Austin, Tx – Dirty Dog Bar
Saturday July 13 – Houston, Tx – The Secret Group
Saturday July 27 – East Providence, RI – Roadblock Music Festival
July 28-29- Philadelphia, PA – This is Hardcore Festival

You can watch their video for “Motherland” below.



Album Review: The Old Firm Casuals – “Holger Danske”

The second “Get Out Of Our Way” kicks in, you get a feeling that The Old Firm Casuals aren’t fucking about on “Holger Dankse”. There’s no holding back from bassist Casey Watson as he leads the beginning of the album with a menacing snarl, delivering a statement of intent and a spit in the face to those that would write the band off as a mere side gig.

Once the middle finger to the world is over, The Old Firm Casuals enter into more familiar territory with Lars Frederiksen’s trademark wail on “Motherland”, an ambitious, anthemic street punk track firmly rooted in the big chorus approach he’s become known for over the years.

From here, “Pendulum” begs you to throw your weight around in a pit, and the anti-fascist tones of the record reach their first climax here before “De Ensomme Ulve” segues into the title track. “Holger Danske” tells the tale of the album’s eponymous Dane, in what feels like the original album opener enduring on the tracklisting despite more visceral content entering the fray as the writing went on – for all its intent and swagger.

Next up, “Casual Rock-N-Roll”, creates an effortless marriage of AC/DC and Lars’ “…Wolves” era that throws up visions of Mashall cabs and mohawks, letting the band cut loose and have fun before “Traitor” brings The Old Firm Casuals right back to the line of punk and hardcore that they’ve walked so well in the past.

The album’s such a patchwork of genres at this point that it’s almost disorientating, but that’s meant entirely in a complimentary way: it’s a “best bit” of sorts from each genre that the band touch on, living as both a throwback and a breath of fresh air, so much so that the uplifting “The Golden Fall Pt. 1” giving way to Casey Watson’s growl on Sick Of It All-esque throwdown “Thunderbolt” doesn’t even feel jarring.

“Overdose On Sin” kicks in with a solid bass solo and bulldozes through a snotty, two minute hardcore before the woahs return for “Nation On Fire” (which could easily have been a lead track on the record) and the record yields with a five minute epic in “Zombies”.

“Holger Danske” is a landmark record for The Old Firm Casuals. It’s an album by a group of experienced and confident musicians making music on their own terms, with little regard to what other people expect them to sound like. There’s no hammering the songs into a fixed genre, no restrictions on the ideas, and it’s a thrilling listen because of it – especially if you’re a fan of the collective work of its members.

The Old Firm Casuals have delivered a well balanced full length that has depth, quality, passion and piles of energy in “Holger Danske”, and it’s absolutely one of the best punk records of 2019 so far.

4/5 Stars



DS Exclusive: Lars Frederiksen on The Old Firm Casuals’ Blistering New Album, “Holger Danske,” And So Much More

In what is a bit of an atypical move, The Old Firm Casuals made their album, Holger Danske, available for streaming on February 18th, close to a month before said album’s official physical release date of March 15th. The album marks a few firsts for the band, most notably the fact that it’s their first full-length as a four-piece and simultaneously their first full-length on Pirates Press Records. But more importantly, Holger Danske finds The Old Firm Casuals officially unleashing what can fairly and accurately be called a whole new sonic experience to the masses; a dozen songs that merge balls-out 70’s AC/DC-style rock, blistering early-80’s Metallica style thrash and their trademark Oi!/street punk sound and bellow it through a centuries-old Viking Gjallarhorn.

We called the band’s well-known frontman, Lars Frederiksen, at his home last week, to discuss Holger Danske and all that went in to the making of this unique and widely well-received album. To say that we found Frederiksen’s personality and storytelling to be any less unique, compelling, and wide-ranging than the album we set out to discuss would be to wildly inaccurate. And while Holger Dankse may not be comprised of autobiographical material referencing his friends or his family or his upbringing, it may well be the most personal album from start-to-finish in Frederiksen’s three decades in the music business. But fear not, punk fans. Lest you were afraid that approaching the age of fifty, being a husband for more than a decade and a father to eleven-year-old and seven-year-old sons, Wolfgang and Soren, would have softened some of Lars Frederiksen’s trademark rougher edges, you clearly don’t know Lars Frederiksen. “Since I’ve become a father,” he points out, “I’ve gotten a lot more pissed off. There’s a lot more responsibility and there’s a lot more being accountable and taking responsibility for my actions or seeing the world as it is.” Still, fatherhood has allowed Frederiksen some rather important insight into his own history and behavior. “When I was eleven years old,” he explains, “I went to juvie for possession of PCP, breaking and entering and mayhem, because the guy who I broke into the house with, I took his eyeball out of his skull (when I hit him) with a piece of racing track because he was giving me a bad trip. That’s what I got busted for. And to juxtapose that, my eleven year old loves Magic: The Gathering, right? Plays soccer. Can solve a Rubik’s Cube in under ten seconds. Does Rubik’s Cube tournaments, okay? He reads himself to sleep every night.”

The fact that Frederiksen reports that both of his boys are musical may not necessarily be much of a surprise to most readers. What may be a surprise, however, is the role that his youngest son had in shaping some of the album’s sound. “My seven year old is a drummer,” he explains with a palpable level of pride oozing from his voice. “(Soren) thinks punk is cool, but (he) wants to listen to Slayer and Lamb Of God and Testament and Kreator and Manowar. KISS is too puss for (him) right now. So, when I have a new riff, most of the time, he’ll go down and jam them with me. He’s a really good drummer, he can keep a beat. That’s how “Thunderbolt” came about. We were sitting down there, and he’s like “Dad, you gotta play some hardcore. I’ve got this beat and I want to play it but it’s got to be to hardcore!” So I went downstairs and we started playing around and that’s when I came up with that riff. So there’s really a few songs on that record that he sort of helped come into fruition!” But the familial input didn’t stop there. Far from it, in fact.

To have been aware of Lars Frederiksen in any number of his projects, from Rancid to Lars Frederiksen And The Bastards to Oxley’s Midnight Runners to Stomper 98 to The Old Firm Casuals to others that I’m probably forgetting to mention now is to have been aware of how outwardly proud he is of his Danish heritage; Lars’ mom moved to the States from Denmark with little in the way of money, contacts, or knowledge of the English language and eventually brought Frederiksen and his older brother back to her homeland for a time after divorcing the boys’ father. While Holger Danske owes a great deal of its inspiration and imagery to the Frederiksen family’s *ahem* “motherland,” that wasn’t initially the case. “The whole thing about this record is that, and I hate to use this word, but it’s a little be auspicious in a sense,” he explains. You see, during the writing process, the band had initially planned on calling the album Zombies, a title derived from the song of the same name that closes Holger Danske but that was really a hold-over from the sessions that went into A Butcher’s Banquet a few years back. The album’s artwork, while not completed, would have essentially consisted of zombie-fied, cartoon-like depictions of the band’s four members. As the writing process continued, however, a change of direction began to take shape, simultaneously inspired by Frederiksen’s connection to his mother’s native Denmark, and his own growing anger at the current sociopolitical climate at home.

My mom was raised in Nazi-occupied Denmark in World War II, and she saw a lot of things that no kid between the ages of four and eight should ever see,” says Frederiksen. “Growing up in that environment as a kid, she comes from a Socialist country that’s very accepting and very tolerant, whether it be sex, race, religion, whatever it is. From her own experiences in dealing with fascism, she’s obviously got a very strong hatred toward that kind of thinking. I think that was installed in me and my brother.” Enter: Holger Danske, the legendary Danish folk hero who fought as one of the Knights Of Charlemagne. According to legend, Holger Danske is still alive centuries later, albeit in a deep sleep in an off-limits corner of a castle basement in Denmark. As Frederiksen describes it, “the story is that every Christmas an angel comes and whispers in his ear, and either he can stay asleep or he has to rise up and defend Denmark against his enemies.

It was during a visit from his Danish cousin to the States last year that Frederiksen began to take notice of the Holger Danske iconography that was depicted on the front of the Danish Men’s National Team’s jerseys during the World Cup. From there, the wheels started in motion, but in a stroke of serendipity, the decision to change the album’s name and direction came from a perhaps unlikely source. “What really sealed the fucking deal on that,” he explains, “is that me and my mom were talking, and she’s like “oh, you’re making a new record!…what are you going to call it?” And I said, “actually, I was thinking about calling it Holger Danske.” And she goes “Oh, that’s a great idea!! Did you know that your uncle Viggo, in World War II was part of the Danish resistance against the Nazis, and his unit was called ‘Holger Danske’?” And I was like “no, I was never told that, mother, because you don’t want to talk about the war and what happened and how you saw body parts and your family getting killed for their farm and shit like that.” So, I was like “this is it!

As you might imagine, Frederiksen took a look at the current sociopolitical climate in the world – not just in the States – and thought that now might be as good a time as any for Holger Danske to awaken and get shit back on track. “Holger Danske was kind of a metaphor in a way where I’m talking about fighting fascism…That’s what this record is kind of about; it’s about fighting fascism from both the left and the right.” One need not look very far for examples of the types of fascism Frederiksen is referring to. Racism. Sexism. Homophobia. Lack of clearly defined boundaries between church and state. Political correctness. All of the above and on both sides of the political spectrum draw the ire of Frederiksen and crew on Holger Danske. “I don’t care who the current administration is — well, I DO — but you’re going to get fucking shots fired at you either way. You’re going to take more shots than Karl Malone, to borrow a phrase from my buddies over in The Transplants. To me, politics is bullshit…Once you start telling people how they can act, what they can say, what they can not say, how they can dress, how they can not dress, what they can call themselves or what they can’t call themselves, that’s fascism…And that’s one of the things with Holger Danske. Now’s the time for this motherfucker to rise up and defend us again. Obviously I’m from a long line of fighting fascism, so I have to continue the family tradition!”

Assuming you haven’t done so, give Holger Danske a listen right here. You’ve still got time to pre-order before the March 15th street date here through Pirates Press as well. But most importantly today, you can check out our exclusive chat with the inimitable Frederiksen. We covered an awful lot of ground; being working class poor, the origin of “casual rock and roll,” Metallica’s Kirk Hammett’s opinion of The Old Firm Casuals’ new lead guitar player (Gabe Gavriloff), parenthood, the Kardashians, gerrymandering, the separation of church and state, and watermelon farmers in Alabama are but a few of the many topics touched on. Check out the full exchange below!



The Old Firm Casuals stream upcoming album “Holger Danske”

The Old Firm Casuals are streaming their upcoming album. Holger Danske isn’t out until March 15th, but the band are streaming it in its entirety over at Decibel Magazine.

The album is the first full length from the band since 2014’s This Means War.



The Old Firm Casuals (Oi! / Punk) stream new single “Get Out Of Our Way”

The Old Firm Casuals, led by Lars Frederiksen (Rancid) and Casey Watson (ex-Never Healed), have premiered a new single through Kerrang!. “Get Out Of Our Way” is taken from the band’s forthcoming album “Holger Danske”, which is released next Friday 15th February through Demons Run Amok Entertainment. The album follows 2017’s “Wartime Rock ‘N’ Roll” EP.

You can stream the track using the player below.



The Old Firm Casuals (Lars from Rancid) release music video for new song “Motherland” off upcoming album

The Old Firm Casuals have released a music video for “Motherland,” a new song off their upcoming album “Holger Danske” set for release through Pirates Press and Demons Run Amok Entertainment on March 15th. Check it out below.

For those of you not in the know, The Old Firm Casuals is Lars Frederiksen of Rancid’s Oi!/Streetpunk side project band.



Old Firm Casuals detail new album

The Old Firm Casuals have announced the release date for their upcoming album. Holger Danske is out on March 15th.

The album is being co-released on Pirates Press and Demons Run Amok Entertainment. No advance tracks or pre-order links have yet surfaced, but you can check out the track listing below.



Demons Run Amok announce signing of Old Firm Casuals

German label Demons Run Amok have announced the signing of Old Firm Casuals to their roster.

CEO Marcel Erdmann said of the signing:

“We are happy and proud to work with such legendary punkrock musicians. Its undoubtedly that Lars and Rancid influenced my musical taste years ago! We follow OFC for a long time and have finally the chance to work with them! Welcome to the DRA Family!”

The band will be releasing their first record with the new label this winter. Their latest release was the 2017 EP Wartime Rock N Roll.



Agnostic Front announce Punk Rock Bowling club show w/ The Old Firm Casuals & more

Another club show has been announced for the 20th Anniversary edition of Las Vegas’ Punk Rock Bowling. Taking place at Fremont Country Club on May 27th, the show will be headlined by New York hardcore legends Agnostic Front. Support bands include The Old Firm Casuals (ft. Lars Frederiksen), Bad Co. Project, and Crim.

Tickets for the 21+ show are $20 (presales begin March 3rd) and doors open at 10pm. Stay tuned for more PRB club show announcements, and check out the main festival lineup here.



The Old Firm Casuals release video for San Jose Earthquakes anthem “Never Say Die”

Lars Frederiksen’s side project The Old Firm Casuals just released a music video for their song “Never Say Die”, which is the official anthem of Major League Soccer’s San Jose Earthquakes.

The video was recorded inside the team’s home stadium. Check it out below.

“Never Say Day” was released in 2014 to celebrate the Quakes’ 40th anniversary. The track features backup vocals from former and current players for the MLS club.



The Old Firm Casuals stream new track “Wartime Rock ‘n’ Roll” and announce EP

The Old Firm Casuals are streaming a brand new song, “Wartime Rock ‘n’ Roll”. The track accompanies an announcement that the band will release a new EP in the near future. The exact date of the new material is currently unknown but watch this space for further news.

For now, you can enjoy “Wartime Rock ‘n’ Roll” below.



The Old Firm Casuals release music video for “A Butcher’s Banquet”

The Old Firm Casuals have released a new video. It’s for the song “A Butcher’s Banquet.”

You can watch it below.

The song is off an upcoming 12-inch EP of the same name due out June via  Oi! The Boat Records and Randale Records.



DS Photo Gallery: Old Firm Casuals, Suede Razors, Roadside Bombs at The Night Light, Oakland (1.30.16)

This past Saturday I nearly missed an incredible show featuring local favorites Old Firm Casuals, Suede Razors, and Roadside Bombs. I was supposed to work, and once I got the night off I found it terribly difficult to find tickets to the sold-out event. Alas, a ticket materialized and I headed across the Bay Bridge to the sauna that is The Night Light. If the previous week’s show’s theme was youthful energy, this show’s theme was ‘old punks’. Indeed, all the bands have been around in the scene for quite awhile, and at 30, I found myself as one of the younger attendees.

Roadside Bombs opened the night in classic fashion with some great sounds of the street. The band is punk-driven, but definitely has a melodic side that shines through. There’s plenty of opportunities to sing along with some gang vocals too, especially with songs like “Not Everybody Knows a Good Thing”, “My Side Of Town”, “Tax Revolution”, “Bring ‘Em Home”, and more just to name a few. Definitely the perfect fit for the lineup, and a great opener for the night. The band most recently released “My Side Of Town” back in 2014, which you can listen to here.

Things got a little more intense as Darrel, Mike and crew took to the stage for Suede Razors, featuring members of Harrington Saints, Sydney Ducks, Hounds & Harlots, and more, these guys are no strangers to the scene. A Suede Razors show is like a trip to your local bar, singing along to pub songs with your mates – just with a punk/skinhead tinge to it. In fact, the intro to “Bovver Boys” sounds like something you would hear in an English pub after a soccer match. The band has really done well creating a unique sound that builds off all the guys’ collective experience. “Here She Comes” gets you off your barstool and maybe not dancing, but definitely nodding your head along to the beat. One of my favorites is “Longshot Kid”, which builds up and will have you throwing fists in the air by the end.

I don’t know what it is, but it has proven to be a challenge of entry for every band Lars is in. I hear he is a fan of dyingscene, however it seems our press requests always fall on deaf ears. Persistence and perseverance are the names of the game, and I managed to be up front and center as Old Firm Casuals took the stage. I’ve seen the band several times over the years, and it amazes me that photos from their set at The Blank Club nearly 6 years ago still remain at the top of Google image searches. It’s great to see Lars’ voice shine through in a new light outside of the Rancid sound we’ve all become accustomed to. He’s got the perfect amount of grit and melody – no frills vocals at its best. It was definitely a treat to see “Skinhead” performed live, among other favorites.

You can view set photos below.

Huge thanks to Ian, Ben, Darrel, Skip, and Chelsea for helping out, and cheers to all the Pirates and Chapter 11 crew! It’s always great seeing you all.



The Old Firm Casuals and Evil Conduct team up for a Christmas split 7″

Oi! fans, get ready for some Christmas cheer from Evil Conduct and The Old Firm Casuals.  Although Yuletide Cheers and Oi! has been out for a while now, it’s that time of year and you really can’t miss hearing 2 of your favorite Christmas tunes sung with streetpunk flavor.

The split features Evil Conduct’s version of “Silver Bells,” and The Old Firm’s “Father Xmas.”  You can stream both tracks below.



Music Video: The Old Firm Casuals – “Election Day”

Rancid guitarist/vocalist Lars Frederiksen’s side project The Old Firm Casuals have released a music video for their song “Election Day” and you can check it out below.

“Election Day” comes from the band’s latest album This Means War, which was released in July on Oi! The Boat Records and served as a follow-up to the group’s a 7-inch Never Say Die, launchd in January.