Search Results for "The Minutemen"

DS Photo Galley: Mike Watt + The Missingmen with Minibeast at ONCE Ballroom in Somerville, MA

The inimitable Mike Watt brought his Missingmen project through the greater Boston area – Somerville, to be exact – last week on what he’s dubbed the Dick Watt Tour. It’s a little bit of a different lineup than the Missingmen we’ve seen in these here parts in years passed; Watt and his longtime ax-man Tom Watson were joined by the fresh-faced Nick Aguilar behind the drumkit as previous Missingman drummer Raul Morales has retired from the road after starting a family. Aguilar is probably best known on the pages of Dying Scene for his work in Neighborhood Brats, and not only is the son of a fella that Watt and his Minutemen counterparts D. Boon and George Hurley went to high school with, but he’s the precise age that trio was when they started their legendary band. Cool!

The setting on this night was the ONCE Ballroom, a quirky, 300 capacity spot that has the feel of a wedding venue gone sideways; the kind of place that thankfully still exists in the ever-gentrifying greater Boston area. Frankly, in that regard, it’s the perfect venue for a guy such as Watt. If you’ll recall back to our chat on these pages a few weeks ago, the present run constitutes Watt’s sixty-seventh tour, with the caveat that he considers a tour to be anything longer than a month, meaning that he’s seemingly been on the road jamming econo forever. The legendary – a term I don’t use lightly – Watt and his comrades took the stage a few minutes late (local opener Minibeast ran a little over, more on that later) and proceeded to blow through well over two dozen songs over the course of the evening. Sure they played Watt solo material and a handful of requisite Minutemen songs, but they also included covers by such varied – and sometimes obscure – acts like Blue Oyster Cult and Redd Krayola and The Pop Group for good measure. The trio’s unique stage set-up, with Aguilar’s drum kit front-and-center but angled about 45 degrees toward Watt’s stage left, created an interesting stage dynamic, with Watt and Watson trading vocal duties and Watt planting himself almost uncomfortably at Aguilar’s side for chunks of time. Despite the relatively few shows they had under their collective belts and the numerous twists and turns a Mike Watt set can take, this version of the Missingmen sounded tight, largely in sync, and loaded for bear.

As I mentioned above, Minibeast opened the show and I’d never head them before and holy hell I’d been missing out. The Rhode Island-based trio is fronted by Peter Prescott, whom readers of a certain age might recognize from his days in the iconic Boston post-punk band Mission of Burma. Through a combination of vocals and guitar and loops and keyboards and myriad other technological instruments I couldn’t begin to name, Prescott generates an endless array of sounds and textures from his corner of the stage while the duo of Keith Seidel (drums) and Niels LaWhite (bass) combine to form the tightest and goddamned heaviest rhythm section I’ve heard live in quite some time; dynamic, thunderous, rock-steady. Seriously; watch this and see for yourself.

Check out more photos from the dimly lit shindig below. Tough sledding for a rank amateur such as myself, but you get the idea!



DS Exclusive: Jumpstarted Plowhards (Mike Watt, Todd Congelliere and friends) stream debut album, “Round One”

Earlier this week, it was our esteemed privilege to bring you a lengthy interview with the legendary Mike Watt. Read it here if you missed it. Among the many things we covered was his brand new “proj,” Jumpstarted Plowhards. It’s a collaboration between Watt and Todd Congelliere (F.Y.P., Toys That Kill), and features a different drummer on each track. Among the guests are George Hurley (The Minutemen), Patty Schemel (Hole, etc), Jerry Trebotic, Raul Morales and more.

Today, we’re beyond stoked to bring you the debut of the Round One, the debut album from Jumpstarted Plowhards. It’s due out on Recess Records next Friday (October 4th); pre-order here…but check it out in all its esteemed goodness down below!



DS Exclusive: Mike Watt talks Jumpstarted Plowhards, D. Boon, songwriting on the bass, Eddie Vedder, and so much more

Up until the dawn of the digital music revolution within the last couple of decades, generations of kids found out about new music in three real main ways: by stumbling into music videos on the actual television, by scouring the new releases put out by known and trusted record labels (see: Epitaph, Fat Wreck, Blue Note, Apple Records, etc), and by finding out who your favorite artists liked and respected and toured with and diving headlong into that rabbit hole. I was twelve years old when first saw Pearl Jam’s video for “Even Flow” and was so captivated by it that…well…that I’ve continued to buy into whatever they’ve been selling for more than a quarter-century since. Because they’ve been more than vocal about their influences over the years, this meant exploring the catalogs of artists as varied as The Who and Daniel Johnston and Bad Religion and Cypress Hill and Fugazi and Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and, thanks to the 1995 release Ball-Hog or Tugboat?, Mike Watt.

Ball-Hog or Tugboat? marked the first “solo” release for the founding bassist from both Minutemen and fIREHOSE, the latter of whom I only knew from having seen a poster for what would become their final full-length, Mr. Machinery Operator, hanging in the front window at Strawberries Music & Video at the Nashua Mall and not realizing that fIREHOSE and FireHouse were two different bands. Ball-Hog featured Watt supported by a diverse cast of characters that obviously included Eddie Vedder but also Dave Grohl and Pat Smear and Krist Novoselic and J Mascis and Frank Black and the Kirkwood brothers from Meat Puppets and Henry Rollins and Mark Lanegan and Flea and Kathleen Hanna and most of Sonic Youth and a bunch of others. It was ground-breaking and genre-bending and was really a perfect look into the future of what was to come for Watt’s career going forward.

If you haven’t been able to keep track of the sheer number of projects – or proj’s, as Watt refers to him in his trademark San Pedro patois – that Watt has been involved with in the years since, that’s no slight on you; it’s overwhelming. There’s Dos, a duo that featured Watt and ex-Blag Flag bassist (and eventually Watt’s ex-wife) Kira Roessler. There’s Unknown Instructors, which had Watt and his Minutemen/fIREHOSE drummer George Hurley joined by Joe Baiza, Jack Brewer and Dan McGuire. There was Big Walnuts Yonder, and Il Sogno del Marinaio, and The Hand To Man Band, and a bunch of years with The Stooges, and another proj with Novoselic and friends called Anywhere. There was obviously The Secondmen, followed obviously by the Missingmen. And honestly, there were a bunch more that I’m not going to pretend to have committed to memory right now.

Next up out of the chute from the iconic Watt is a proj known as Jumpstarted Plowhards. It’s a unique endeavor that found Watt team up with Todd Congelliere (Toys That Kill, FYP, founder of Recess Records). Watt wrote a handful of tracks on bass and sent a fifteen-song CD-R to “Todd Cong,” who not only wrote guitar lines and lyrics, but recruited a different drummer to play on every track. The first eight of those tracks now appear as a release called Round One that’s due out October 4th on Recess Records. Joining Watt and Congelliere are Hurley, Jimmy Felix from Toys That Kill, Patty Schemel of Hole fame, Brian Brunuk from Fartbarf, Trevor Rounseville from Clown Sounds, Jerry Trebotic from Watt’s Secondmen band, Raul Morales from Watt’s Missingmen project, and Neighborhood Brats‘ Nick Aguilar, who’s not only joining Watt on drums for his solo tour that kicked off last week, but who is also the son of a high school classmate of all three Minutemen (Watt, Hurley and, of course, the  inimitable D. Boon).

You can pre-order Round One right here, though jump on it because some options are already gone. But you can also head below to read our Q&A with the iconic Watt. It’s one of the more enjoyable conversations I’ve ever conducted for this here website, due entirely to Watt’s jovial nature and his willingness to talk about all portions of the long, strange trip its been since he and D. Boon met as thirteen-year-olds, picked up a couple of cheap guitars, and started jamming out to Creedence Clearwater Revival songs before even knowing how to tune their instruments. Also, head here to see where you can catch Watt’s current Missingmen incarnation out on the road, including an October 11th date here in the Boston area; it’s Watt’s sixty-seventh tour of more than a month! Thanks for being you, Watt!

Photo credit: Steve Linsley.



10 Things You Might Not Have Known About D. Boon (Minutemen)

There’s a pretty good chance you are at least familiar with the name D. Boon. You might even be aware that he fronted San Pedro’s Minutemen, the punk band that was too weird for even most punks, until his tragic death in a car accident in 1985. But what else do you really know about him? Time has been kind to the Minutemen legacy, particularly to their 1984 double album, Double Nickels on the Dime, but it has been less kind when it comes to the people in the band. That’s where we come in.

Grab your pens and notebooks, and be prepared to take notes, because we’re going to give you a little history lesson on the late guitarist below.



Random Cover Song: Minutemen – “Fortunate Son” (Creedence Clearwater Revival)

Cover songs are like a box of chocolates; you never know what you’re going to get. We here at Dying Scene love hearing punk bands do their own take on other band’s songs. Sometimes they pull off amazing interpretations of old classics, sometimes they’re not much more than humble tributes to a fellow artist, and other times they’re just downright laughable renditions of otherwise great songs. Good or bad. Intriguing or mundane. We’ll let you be the judge.

Today’s cover comes from San Pedro’s Minutemen and their cover of the classic Creedence Clearwater Revival tune “Fortunate Son”. The original version appeared on CCR’s 1969 album Willy and the Poor Boys, while the Minutemen version was recorded in 1981 for the Joy EP, but was not released until 1987 on the cassette edition of Ballot Result.

You can listen to both versions of “Fortunate Son” below.



Plans announced for 30th anniversary comic book tribute to Minutemen’s “Double Nickels…”

Here’s a pretty cool project that might need your help!

In honor of the 30th anniversary of the release of the seminal Minutemen album “Double Nickels On The Dime,” Virginia-based artist Warren Craghead III has announced an interesting, crowd-sourced tribute.

The goal is to put together a “comic anthology” in which one separate page would be dedicated to each of the album’s 45 songs. He’s looking to have a different artist contribute each page, which should result in a pretty cool, unique project when it’s all said and done. Click here to get more info on the project and to see how you can contribute your own ideas.

Haven’t had your Minutemen fix in a while? Click here to stream the band’s “We Jam Econo” documentary in its entirety (highly recommended). Still haven’t had enough? Here’s the “Double Nickels…” entry in Dying Scene’s now-defunct Sacred Cow Saturday series, in which I extol the virtues of the legendary album.

 



Video Archive: SWA, Saccharine Trust, Meat Puppets, Minutemen and Hüsker Dü performing live in San Francisco in 1985

Since we’ve been covering news on Black Flag and their reunion(s) lately, I thought about sharing a video clip of SWA, Saccharine Trust, Meat Puppets, Minutemen and Hüsker Dü (pictured at left) performing live at The Stone in San Francisco, California on January 5, 1985. At the time of this performance, all those bands were on SST Records, a label owned by Black Flag founder and guitarist Greg Ginn.

Go here to watch the video of the show.



Sacred Cow Saturday: “Double Nickels on the Dime”

Punk rock has been around long enough  to hold within its musical boundaries a slew of albums considered both classic and essential. We here at Dying Scene love and appreciate these classic albums, but every once and a while we have the urge to challenge what the community has deemed sacred. Every Saturday, two Dying Scene writers will square off head-to-head and either attack or defend one of these so-called classics. Up for slaughter today is the Minutemen‘s “Double Nickel on the Dimes.” Does the 1976 classic hold up today? You be the judge. Jason Stone will be defending and Carson Winter will be attacking.

Let the battle begin!