Search Results for "Frank Iero"

Riot Fest 2019 Day 3: Bikini Kill, Teenage Bottlerocket and…The Village People Close Out The Weekend With Help From Others

Words by: Fredric Hall
Photos and additional words by: Meredith Goldberg

For the third and final day of 2019’s Riot Fest festivities, punk sets were, again, on the small side. Still what’s there ain’t too shabby. Against Me! Had an awesome set, playing both “Reinventing Axl Rose” and “Transgender Dysphoria Blues” start-to-finish, while singer Laura Jane Grace was belting out every song with her unique voice that forces you to pay attention. A particular high point was “Osama bin Laden as the Crucified Christ” with its driving, distorted bass line and disturbing lyrics. At one point, someone in the crowd held up a sign saying “You Are My Hero”, a good indicator of the effect the band had on the crowd.

Against Me!

 

Dave Hause & The Mermaid

Frankie Iero and the Future Violents

 

Sincere Engineer

Perhaps the most curious event to take place at Riot Fest’s 15th Anniversary staging in Chicago was a Wall of Death during The Village People’s performance of their most famous tune, “YMCA.” The song has long been a staple at basketball games of all levels and in all communities despite its lyrical content often understood to refer to the YMCA as a gay hook up spot in the 1970’s. Yet on Day 3,  fans young, old and looking to represent virtually every demographic at Riot Fest joined in forming the 4 letters in the title. And per an organized Facebook event, many took part in a Wall of Death in the center of crowd. For the uninitiated, a Wall of Death is basically a move within a circle pit where a large group of people back off and then at the same moment run toward each other. The event even took the life of a photographer’s sunglasses (though not the DS photog’s sunglasses, whew).

The Village People

 

The Village People fans spell out Y.M.C.A.

Patti Smith had her brand of a slow burning performance later on. Now I know the organizers don’t pick out acts all willy-nilly and Patti Smith is a legend in the genre. However, I’m sure there is a good size of the attendees who have no idea who is she and her contributions to the punk genre. And I guess Smith knew this because she really brought it on stage. While not “punk” in regards to modern tastes, there was a energy about it that exuded a punk attitude, even with covers like Jimi Hendrix’s “Are You Experience”(with some “Third Stone of the Sun” thrown towards the end) and Midnight Oil’s “Beds are Burning”. She did close the set with “Gloria” which really brought the crowd to its knees.

 

Bikini Kill

Finally, we got Riot grrrl pioneers Bikini Kill, the headliners for the final evening of the festival. Though Kathleen Hanna sang most of the set, she did occasionally switch over to bass, while the rest of the band traded instruments for certain songs. Seriously, they did so many times I couldn’t keep up. Declaring “We’re a feminist band. And we’re headlining a festival” they blazed through songs like “Reject All-American” with the abrasiveness and in-you-face attitude that put them on the map for almost thirty years.

Bikini Kill

If you’ve made it this far, so you might have the impression Riot Fest is straying from it’s punk roots. Well, here’s the thing: I get that festivals like Riot Fest have to carter towards different demographics to stay afloat. To me, this year was more of a history lesson. Teenage punks with Op Ivy back patches on their vests now got to hear Patti Smith and Bikini Kill. They also got to see Slayer which is always a treat (and also played right after Rise Against). So, this is a chance to see all kinds of genres. Limiting yourself to one thing is narrow-minded and stupid. In the end we all need to go beyond our boundaries and explore what’s out there.

Ween

 

Teenage Bottlerocket

 

Please check out the rest of our images from the final day of Riot Fest 2019 below:



DS Photo Gallery: Frank Iero And The Future Violents w/Reggie And The Full Effect, Boston, MA

I read an interview with Frank Iero the other day in which he talked about his musical career, and in the process of doing so he mentioned – and I’m paraphrasing here because I can’t find the original quote – that he enjoys the honeymoon period of a new project where you don’t really know what it’s going to turn out like and you’re nervous but excited because you get to figure that out together. When Iero brought his newest project, Frank Iero and the Future Violents, through Boston this past Sunday, barely 48 hours after the release of their debut album Barriers, the excitement was palpable and contagious for an obvious reason: Frank Iero and the Future Violents are a goddamn live freight train.

If you haven’t been keeping score at home, The Future Violents feature Iero and his frequent collaborator/guitarist/brother-in-law Evan Nestor joined by a few longtime scene heavyweights: Tucker Rule of Thursday and a bunch of other bands on drums, Murder By Death’s Matt Armstrong on bass and Kayleigh Goldsworthy of Dave Hause’s band The Mermaid and most importantly her own solo career on…well…just about every other instrument you can think of. Formed after the Iero and Nestor’s ill-fated and nearly fatal trip to Australia with their last project, Frank Iero and the Patience, a couple years ago, The Future Violents are rooted in Iero’s power punk songwriting core with some new sonic textures in the mix. In spite of having a comparatively few shows together under their collective belts, the Future Violents rhythm section of Rule and Armstrong is lock-tight and thunderous already. Rule hits hard and heavy, and is comparable maybe only to the great Atom Willard in terms of sheer live force, while Armstrong’s low end rattled SO low that I could quite literally feel my sinuses shaking. Iero and Nestor are simpatico from having played and performed so long together; they seem to have a knack for playing in support of one another without crowding each other’s sonic space. Goldsworthy’s parts, particularly the violin, seemed a little buried in the mix, though that might be just me projecting what I was seeing (with the stage set up, she was kinda buried behind the PA suspended from the ceiling in front of stage right) onto what I was hearing. That said, The Future Violents are hands-down Iero’s best project to date, and the near-capacity crowd seemed to cathartically, energetically eat up every word (well…except the poor kid who lost a tooth).

Support on this leg of Frank Iero and the Future Violents’ run comes from none other than James Dewees playing songs from his brainchild project, Reggie And The Full Effect. Dewees and Iero have been long time buds and collaborators – Iero did a stint in Reggie that coinicided with Dewees’ own stint alongside Iero in My Chemical Romance – and it makes an old emo kid like myself happy to see such longtime vets still supporting and playing with each other. Dewees’ set was essentially “Story Time with James,” as he told tangential tales of creating characters and his history with Iero and the early days of the Emo Night In Brooklyn movement, though he did manage to get to a few full or at least partial songs, accompanied by either a laptop or what I’m 95% sure was a pretty awesome British racing green version of Iero’s custom Epiphone Phant-O-Matic double cutaway guitars. While maybe not the most astute Reggie and the Full Effect fans, the bulk of the crowd was more than good-naturedly engaged with Dewees’ set, breaking out into full supportive chants on more than one occasion.

Head below for a bunch more pictures from the evening!

 



Album Review: Frank Iero and The Future Violents – “Barriers”

Ever since the end of My Chemical Romance, Frank Iero has not allowed himself, or his music, to be pigeonholed. This is evident with his latest project, Frank Iero and the Future Violents, which sounds nothing like previous offerings from the guitarist/singer, yet is equally good as the others have been. Barriers opens with a slower song, reminiscent of a 1950s ballad, which makes the punk that follows all the more interesting. (Not to say that opening track “A New Day’s Coming”  isn’t good – it is.)

The Future Violents lineup is  Iero, Evan Nestor (an alumni of all the Frank Iero solo projects), former Murder By Death bassist Matt Armstrong, multi-instrumentalist Kayleigh Goldsworthy from Dave Hause And The Mermaid and Thursday’s Tucker Rule on drums.

“Young and Doomed” feels like a slightly experimental punk anthem for anyone feeling the frustrations of life in the current times. The song crashes into “Fever Dream,” which almost has a Nirvana feel to it – something totally unexpected that works really well in the context of the album.  I think these two songs are my favorites on an album that I really like for its subdued charms and bursts of energy that keep the listener on their toes. “Moto-Pop” also stands out, as it is a song that would be equally at home on a late 70s punk album. The verses of “No Love” even sounds vaguely like The Cure – which is a surprising twist.

Barriers is, if nothing else, a diverse pastiche of different sounds and styles. It is a roller coaster of an album that takes listeners on an adventure through Frank’s brain and different aspects of music he appreciates and has been influenced by.

Frank Iero’s vocals are at times, like butter – this is especially apparent on “The Unfortunate,” and “Medicine Square Garden” – both at home in the middle of the album. But he hasn’t forgotten his roots from earlier bands and his ability to scream in the best possible ways.

The melodic and catchy chorus of “Police Police”, with almost spoken-word lyrics is another favorite and a song that is hard to characterize. “Hard to characterize” is probably the best way to describe this album, although there’s nothing wrong with that. It makes it more of an adventure, and is a great album when taken as individual songs as well as for listening to straight through.

The album closes with a jazzy ballad, almost a sexy siren song “Six Feet Under” and the sweeping and swooping “24k Lush”. Taken separately, the two songs couldn’t be less alike, but they work. That’s kind of the theme of the whole album – it just works, even if there is no real reason for it to do so. We’re dealing with ambitious professionals here. They knew exactly what they were doing when they put this album together.

Barriers is overall more tame than previous offerings from Frank Iero, especially when compared to his garage rock turn with Frank Iero and the Patience and the rawness of frnkiero and the cellabration. It doesn’t make this less of an album, not by any means, and it sounds nothing like what he did when he was in My Chemical Romance. At the same time, it is probably his solo album that will appeal most to fans of MCR.

4/4 stars



Show Review: Frnkiero and the Patience & Dave Hause and The Mermaid – Music Hall of Williamsburg, Brooklyn (APRIL 18, 2017)

Brooklyn had the honor and privilege not only of catching frnkiero and the Patience on one of their first shows back in the States after a crippling bus accident almost claimed their lives in Australia, but also of the eclectic Dave Hause’s latest project, The Mermaid, on their debut touring circuit, last month – and Jersey Beat was there to document the sights, the sounds, and the smells of it all.

The Mermaid were the openers this tour, but, as everyone who has ever seen Hause perform in any capacity knows, he always steals the show. Hause had recently scaled back his high-energy performances both with The Loved Ones and as a solo artist with his excellent 2013 release, “Devour,” taken on the road with brother Tim as a mellow acoustic set. Now, Hause brings that bounce back with his latest touring band, The Mermaid, in support of Hause’s February release, “Bury Me In Philly.”

A Frank Iero crowd is not the easiest to win over (this fate has only, to the best of my knowledge, been flawlessly achieved by the charming Homeless Gospel Choir and, of course, the impossible not to love live Against Me!). However, The Brothers Hause and the rest of The Mermaid accomplished the task with ease – so much so that the ever-present fan line was just as excited to meet them as they were The Patience, and they all bought cds. I bought a “Dirty Fucker” shirt, which Hause had the entire crowd chanting as an informal fuck you to the current administration.

The album is amazing, and the songs translate incredibly live. And, as always, Dave threw in a jam for us Loved Ones fans in the audience, “C’mon, Kid.” The set went by way too quickly. Hause is always an electriifying performer and a damn fucking good songwriter. If you haven’t grabbed a copy of “Bury Me In Philly” yet, run, don’t walk, to your latest record store / download site and nab one now.

As incredible as The Mermaid were, Iero and The Patience were not to be outdone. Always engaging and fun to watch onstage, Iero has really come into his own as a frontman. These shows see him comfortable and engaged in between songs, trading laughs and sharing anecdotes with the audience. This album, “Parachutes,” informally the sophomore release to 2014’s “Stomachaches,” performed live with three quarters of this current lineup, is really, really good.

Don’t let the innocent faces of this young crowd fool you, kids: this band is punk through and through, and those kids are pretty damn hardcore. Crowdsurfers pepper the pit and beer and sweat hit faces as Iero and the crowd scream every word together. I’m told that it was Iero who insisted that the barricade be removed that night, to eliminate the barrier between band and fan.

The set included the full “Parachutes” album and most of “Stomaches”, as well as a handful of Iero’s solo songs, including “B.F.F.,” which was written by his six-year-old daughter. Their shows are a like a bloodfest of frenetic energy. The band moves so rapidly onstage, that all photographic attempts wind up blurs until they’re in between songs. Everyone’s hair is in their mouths and everyone’s voices are shot at the end of the set – both artist and aficionado.

Iero is a very adept songwriter and interesting performer, and this tour, in particular, is very well worth the trip, but if you can’t make it out, definitely check out “Parachutes,” it’s a total ass-kicker.



Dave Hause and the Mermaid announce upcoming tours with The Bronx, Frank Iero and the Patience

As you may have learned in our recent lengthy interview with Philly-turned-Californian songwriter Dave Hause, it’s fixing to be a pretty busy year for him and his new backing band, The Mermaid (which features, among others, his brother Tim on guitars and Jay Bentley’s son Miles on bass). Today, we’re getting a peak at just what that entails.

Hause will kick off a few weeks of mostly Canadian tour dates on a co-headlining tour with The Bronx in Vancouver on April 4th. That run extends through April 15th in Ottawa, at which time the band will head south and join up with Frank Iero and the Patience in Brooklyn on April 18th for a US tour that runs until May 11th in San Francisco. Check out full details of all of the band’s aforementioned tour dates below.

Hause is touring in support of his stellar third full-length, “Bury Me In Philly,” which was released last Friday (February 3rd) on Rise Records.



John Nolan (Taking Back Sunday) and friends announce anti-Trump compilation “Music For Everyone”

Working with Collective Confusion Records and Hopeless Records, Taking Back Sunday frontman John Nolan has announced plans to release Music For Everyone. The political compilation will be released in Spring, 2017 and features the likes of Anti-Flag, Answering Machine and Frank Iero. Funds from the sale of the record will go to help organizations like the American Civil Liberties Union.



DS Show Review: Against Me!, frnkiero and the cellebration at the Chameleon Club (Lancaster, PA)

When you’ve been around the punk scene for a solid decade or so, you come to expect to have your face melted at every show, and the bands seldom disappoint.

This lineup was spot-on from start to finish. Newcomers Annie Girl and the Flight , of (where else?) the Bay Area, have been described as “hypnotic art rock,” which they are, for sure, but that moniker fails to encapture their energy – in particular that of frenetic guitarist Josh Pollock and drummer Nick Ott – or their warmth (lead vocalist and guitarist Annie is all smiles the entire set, and cracks frequent jokes.) It’s always nice to see female musicians get their day along the sausage fest which can be a punk tour, and Annie Girl and the Flight proudly sports two ladies who shred (the second being bassist Lauren Barth.) They were a lot of fun live, and their set went by much too quickly. Check out their “Bodies” EP if you have a moment.

Next up was the band I seem to wind up following around a lot, frnkiero and the cellebration. It’s gotten to the point where their tour manager hands me set lists every time he sees me, because he thinks I’m…well, following them around a lot. No follow-up to freshman album “stomachaches” is being busted out live yet by these cats, but they look like they’re having so much fun playing together, I wouldn’t be surprised if they put something together by next year. This band has incredible chemistry. Rob Hughes and Matt Olsson are both incredible musicians, and Frank and his brother-in-law, Evan Nestor, provide a whirlwind of dualing guitars and vocals which just seem to pour emotion directly into the hearts of even the biggest skeptic.

Finally, the men and women of the hour, Against Me! This was only my second time seeing them play, and fucking wow, do they know how to bring it. They have virtually zero songs in their repertoire that you’re bummed to see busted out live. Their latest installment, “Transgender Dysphoria Blues,” ranks just as high as every other effort of theirs, and has, in fact, become a favorite album to be blasted in our home on any given weekend. The fans know every word to every jam they play, and lead Laura Jane Grace is always happy to grab a body and sing along with him or her as they surf past. This band truly loves one another as much as they love to play, and you can see it. Laura, guitarist James Bowman, drummer Atom Willard and bassist Inge Johansson are so engaging with the audience that it’s impossible to look away, even to take a snapshot. I actually almost got tossed for dancing and singing so hard that I was (allegedly) spilling security’s beers (this was a first). If you do nothing else with your year, find out when they’re coming to your town and get your ass over there.



Music Video: frnkireo andthe cellabration – “She’s the Prettiest Girl at the Party…”

frnkiero andthe cellabration have released a music video for their song “She’s the Prettiest Girl at the Whole Party, and She Can Prove It With a Solid Right Hook.” The track comes off the band’s debut album, Stomachaches, and you can watch the video below.

frnkiero and the cellabration released Stomachaches on October 28, 2014 via Staple Records. The band is heading out on tour this spring, and you can check out the run of dates and locations here.



frnkiero andthe cellabration announces UK tour

frnkiero andthe cellabration, the new project from former My Chemical Romance guitarist Frank Iero, has announced spring tour of the UK. The band will be touring in support of their debut album, Stomachaches.

You can check out the list of dates and locations below.

frnkiero and the cellabration released Stomachaches on October 28, 2014 via Staple Records.



frnkiero andthe cellabration (ex-My Chemical Romance) announces US tour

frnkiero andthe cellabration, the new project from former My Chemical Romance guitarist Frank Iero, has announced a full run of US tour dates early next year. The band will be touring in support of their debut album, Stomachaches and will bring The Homeless Gospel Choir and Modern Chemistry along for the ride.

You can check out the list of dates and locations below.

frnkiero and the cellabration released Stomachaches on October 28, 2014 via Staple Records.



Interview: Frank Iero talks solo project FrnkIero AndThe Cellabration

Frank Iero, the man of many projects which share little in common but his name has treated the punk world to near-perfectly tracked album in his debut release “Stomachaches” under the solo project moniker FrnkIero AndThe Cellabration. Emotions run high in these lyrics, which is no surprise, considering that their composer was in crippling pain for the majority of the recording process.

Said to be kept in their rawest form possible, Iero took the album out for a test drive this past autumn on a month-long tour with The Used and Taking Back Sunday, and has been finding them very well received.

Frankie was cool enough to spare DS some time prior to his wrap-up headlining show at Metro Gallery in Baltimore to discuss fathers, zombies, trolls and oh yeah, a little bit about music as well. His interview is below (and can also be viewed on video here.)