Search Results for "Solo Project"

Video Premiere: Geoff Palmer releases new music video, “Giving In”

Geoff Palmer, of New Hampshire’s The Connection/The Guts glory, has a solo album dropping June 7th on Stardumb Records (EU) and Rum Bar Records (US) titled Pulling out all the Stops. The album is available for pre-order on CD and streaming with bonus tracks (via Rum Bar) here, and on red or black vinyl and 7″ here in the US (via The Machine Shop) and here for Europe.

“There’s nothing left to do. I’m giving up and giving into you.” is the chorus which breaks through the catchy harmonic cadence in this newest single, “Giving In” off the upcoming record. We’re streaming the music video below which has an interesting nostalgic quality of a lazy Saturday morning watching the spinning grooves of a record and the needle, or the dog. “You are 1989 and I am East of Berlin… I’m giving up my walls for something new.”

Geoff Palmer and his associated acts have several times been featured by Steven Van Zandt (Bruce Springsteen/Sirius FM Underground Garage) for having the “coolest song in the world”. He has also recorded with The Queers under the name Geoff Useless on their Everything’s O.K. and Punk Rock Confidential albums. His music goes well with Alkaline Trio, The Hard-Ons and The Queers. Stream the video for “Giving In” below.



6’10 (Folk Punk, IL) Stream Latest EP “Where We Are”

Flatfoot 56 vocalist and guitarist Tobin Bawinkel and his side project 6’10 have just released an EP titled Where We Are. The effort features six tracks that are sure to appeal to those who like their acoustic jams steeped in tradition and Americana.

You can check out Where We Are below.

The previous release from 6’10 was the 2014 full-length album, The Humble Beginnings of a Rovin’ Soul. 



DS Exclusive: Dave Hause on fatherhood, family, and his suicidally optimistic new album “Kick”

The journey of a career songwriter is one filled with a seemingly endless series of what can rightly be called “pivotal” moments that can alter the arc of one’s professional career; the death of a loved one, the dissolution of a band, divorce, the misuse of alcohol and other drugs, marriage, worsening societal ills. Even if you’ve got your head screwed on in a manner we’d call straight, each and every one of those areas can seem daunting. When you couple any of them with the growing senses of fear and doubt and insecurity that can come, frankly, with being alive and even remotely paying attention to the world around you, it can prove enough to bring an otherwise strong individual to their respective knees.

In one form or another, Dave Hause has tackled all of those issues — sometimes individually, sometimes collectively — generally in a manner that can be poignant and heart-achingly personal. On his upcoming album, Kick, due April 12th on Rise Records, Hause has yet another filter to approach his life, and his craft, through: fatherhood. When we caught up with the now California-based Hause over the phone last week, he was out for a walk with his twin two-month-old sons napping quietly away in their stroller, affording his wife a much-deserved breather. Lest those who might be afraid that turning 40 and establishing roots on the sun-soaked west coast and becoming a dad would have dulled the daggers that Hause spent the better part of two decades sharpening, fear not; Kick is very much a return to form from the more positive, upbeat themes of its predecessor, Bury Me In Philly. “I think that Kick and Devour are a lot closer to one another than Bury Me In Philly,” Hause explains. Bury Me In Philly was me moving to California and figuring out what that was going to look like and figuring out happiness. I didn’t want to write a bummed record if I wasn’t bummed. Little did I know that we were going to have one of the biggest heartbreaks as a society that I could have ever predicted.”

There are some weighty questions posited over the course of the ten songs that make up Kick. Many of them, like “Weathervane” and “Civil Lies” and lead single “The Ditch” tangle the wires between the personal and the political and reveal the obviously delicate balances that come with managing one’s own anxieties within the context of tides that are literally rising and a social climate that seems hellbent on allowing it to happen. The ride culminates in the album’s closing track, “Bearing Down,” a track which…well, let’s put it this way: if the Devour track “Autism Vaccine Blues” and its narrator outwardly considering whether or not they’d be better off dead tugged on your heartstrings, “Bearing Down” will use two hands and rip those heartstrings straight from your chest. The song finds Hause not only name-checking Hunter Thompson and Robin Williams (and insanely talented Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison, who provided backing vocal duties on the Devour track “The Shine,” in the liner notes), all of whom died from suicide after lengthy and sometimes public struggles with their own demons, but contemplating his own oblivion and weighing swan diving off the Golden Gate Bridge.

But then comes the pivot, that moment that the narrative shifts from being bleak to being heavy yet hopeful by way of our narrator finding that he’s got a newfound responsibility to be around for a while, and to help those that he’s close to through these difficult times. “What I was betting on with that final verse,” he explains, “was really like the old Buddhist philosophy that life is pain. “Hallelujah, we’re alive, and it’s bearing down. It is brutal. And if I can lighten that load for someone else, then I’m serving some grander purpose more than just my own selfish whims.” If you’re lucking, the act of older and going through some of your own trials and tribulations allows you the experience and perspective needed to learn from past mistakes. “I’ve got to stick around and not put my people through hell,” Hause notes, adding “in looking at the patterns of addiction and stuff, you start to realize that ‘wow…I’ve made some messes that I wouldn’t mind not repeating, so I’m going to stay in better touch!’ I look at it as more of a human responsibility.”

If there’s a central theme to Kick, it’s that yeah, the current might be strengthening around us or the ditch we’re in may be getting deeper, but that focusing on that isn’t going to fix it. “It’s a very dangerous proposition to look at the glass as either half-empty or filled with piss! Maybe that could be true, but I can’t really afford to ruminate on that. I have to come up with a reason to look toward the shore despite feeling I or we, collectively, are drowning. I have to. At this point, it’s a job as I have as a dad,” Hause notes, quickly adding that, upon reflection, his new duties aren’t necessarily “new” at all, though they’re certainly more intense. “To some degree, I’ve always had that job. I’ve been a brother and a husband and a friend and a songwriter. I’m supposed to try to be of some good use to people.”

There’s a genuine art to being able to write a song that uses your own uniquely human experiences and resonates with other people in such a way that not only can the listener relate to your stories, but use them in a way that can move the needle in their own lives. You know the Leonard Cohen quote “there’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in?” Hause asks, knowing full well what the answer is. “A lot of times what’s compelling to me is trying to look at the piece of pottery and trying to recognize that it is indeed cracked — and we cracked it! We fucked it up!  — But then trying to find that light, because what else are you going to do? A joking alternate title for the record was “Suicidally Optimistic,” and I know that can kinda make the skin crawl, but a lot of times, I think that that’s my outlook.”

As was the case with Bury Me In Philly a few years ago, Hause was joined by his brother Tim for the creation of Kick. The latter might be sixteen years younger than his big brother, but make no mistake; he is not, by any stretch (and to paraphrase a line from the track “Civil Lies”) a kid anymore, displaying songwriting chops that match his previously-established guitar abilities. Having Tim as my partner now is clutch. His whole theory is that you make a ten song record, and then, long-term, if you end up with three of them in your “greatest hits” set that we’ll play for the remainder of our careers as musicians, we did something right.” Tim not only collaborated on music and lyrics this time out, he takes on lead vocal duties on “Civil Lies,” providing an effect that’s familiar while still adding a layer we haven’t heard on a Hause “solo” album before. I use solo in quotes there, because it may not be that way for long. “I didn’t really want to be a solo guy (at first),” Hause the elder explains. “The financial collapse happened and I grabbed a guitar and just went. I didn’t realize (it would happen this way), I thought I’d be back with The Loved Ones after a record or two, but the cookie crumbled differently. I brought my brother in and assumed he’d be with me for a year or two and then go back to college.” Instead, Tim has turned himself into a vital cog in the process. “I think we’re just continuing to set the table for us combining streams and using both of our songwriting output and both of our talents toward the same end. Ultimately, we may just go completely under the last name so that it encompasses all of our writing,” a trend that’s started already, as evidenced by Kick‘s cover art. 

While Hause will have Tim alongside him as he gears up to hit the road with a full band, The Mermaid, for the first Kick support shows later this week and through the remainder of the year, he obviously won’t have his family’s two newest members alongside. In order to gear up for life on the road as a dad, Hause has called on some old friends like Dan Andriano, Pete Steinkopf, Brian Fallon and Cory Branan not just for songwriting input, but for advice on how to best navigate these previously (for him) uncharted waters. While being away from his wife and two little fellas is obviously going to suck, Hause is hoping to use that as inspiration to dig a little deeper – as though that were possible – in his live performances. I’m going to miss my family. I’m going to feel to some degree like a heel for not being there for first steps or things. I’m going to miss stuff if I continue to tour to support my life. But I’m trying to look at it like a two-pronged approach: 1 – what I do is cool and the kids will be psyched on that and 2- more importantly, if I can lean into that experience and be like ‘well, I’m in Berlin, and I don’t get to do this just willy-nilly; I can’t just pick up and go, it takes a tremendous amount of planning and effort and heartache to be away from my family, I’m going to really dig in on this Berlin show…or these two Boston shows.’ I think maybe it’ll make things shine up a little brighter.”

The new tour kicks off tomorrow (March 27th) in Hause’s hometown of Santa Barbara and takes a baby-steps approach through places like Boston, Philly, New York and Toronto before making its way overseas for three weeks later next month. Tour dates are available here. Kick is due out April 12th, and you can still pre-order it here.

More importantly, you can check out our full chat below; Hause and I have done these a few times, so as usual, we range pretty far and wide.



Dave Hause releases new single “Saboteurs” ahead of new LP “Kick”

Dave Hause has released a new single, “Saboteurs”. The song is from his upcoming Rise Records album Kick, which is released April 12th. The album is the follow up to 2017’s Bury Me In Philly.

Pre-orders are up now. Have a listen (and check out UK tour dates) below.



Scott Sellers (Pop Punk, CA) Releases Album “Being Strange” and Stream Two Tracks

Former Rufio guitarist and vocalist Scott Sellers has released his latest solo album under his own name and will be streaming two of the tracks from the effort, which is titled Being Strange. Handling the release for Scott Sellers is Canada’s Punk and Disorderly Records.

The two songs chosen to tease the album are called “Only in December” and “Being Strange”. You can listen to them below.

The previous release from Scott Sellers was the 2018 album, Strings. 



Jason Devore (Authority Zero) releases new LP “Conviction Volume III: The Road To Clarity”

Jason DeVore, the frontman of Arizona-based ska/punk band Authority Zero, has released a new album. His third solo album is titled Conviction Volume III: The Road To Clarity and has been released on Operation Records

He is currently midway through a run of dates to promote the release – the remaining of which are listed below.



Hans Roofthooft (F.O.D.) announces new album “Skeletons”

Hans Roofthooft, singer of Belgian punks F.O.D., has announced a new solo album called Skeletons, which is set to be released on March 1st via Bearded Punk Records, Morning Wood Records, and Inconsapevole Records.

To give you an idea of what to expect, you can check out the video for “Prudence and Passion” below.

Hans Roofthooft last released a split with Matteo Caldari in October 2017.



Joey Briggs and Divided Heaven announce Pacific Northwest Tour

The Briggs frontman Joey Briggs and Los Angeles based folk-punks Divided Heaven have announced some upcoming pacific northwest tour dates.

You can check out all the dates and locations below.

Joey Briggs last solo release was the single “Better Off Dead” in 2013.  Divided Heaven last released the single “Generator” in November 2018.



DS Esclusive: Lenny Lashley On Finding Happiness, Sobriety, and his Killer New Album, “All Are Welcome”

Sometime in the late spring of 2013, Lenny Lashley and I connected via social media to arrange an in-person meet up as a way to help promote Illuminator, his then-upcoming debut solo album under the Lenny Lashley’s Gang Of One moniker. It was a bit of a crossroads moment in Lashley’s career. He’d long been respected, especially locally, as a singer and songwriter of the beer-soaked punk rock and whiskey-soaked cowpunk varieties through his years in Darkbuster and Lenny and the Piss Poor Boys. By the time the 21st century’s first decade had closed, however, Lashley had struggled rather publicly off and on with some mental health and substance use-related issues, and both of those aforementioned bands had flamed out under less-than-ideal circumstances.

I hadn’t done many interviews at that point in time but wanted to take a more active roll in ramping up that area of Dying Scene. I’d known of Lashley professionally since Darkbuster won the coveted Rock ‘N’ Roll Rumble in Boston in 2000, but we’d only met in passing a time or two (including once at the infamous local real-deal dive bar known as the Cambridgeport Saloon, though that incident was more memorable to an underage me than it was to him for sure). So I took the opportunity to put fresh AAs in my old-school cassette recorded and met up with Lashley for coffee on a bright, sunny Jamaica Plain afternoon in June of that year. He struck me as open and honest right from the first moments of our conversation. Not only was it a week before the release of Illuminator, but it had also just been announced that Lashley signed on to join Street Dogs as they regrouped after a very brief hiatus. There was a lot of uncertainty, but things certainly seemed like they were trending in a positive direction.

Fast-forward to 2019 and that upward trend has shown no signs of going off track, both personally and professionally. In the years since our last chat, Lashley’s reconnected with his “one true love,” Shelley. He’s gotten sober, recently surpassing the five year mark from alcohol and cigarettes and the three-year mark from drugs of all kinds, perhaps no easy feat for a guy who’s previous band’s catalog includes the likes of “Booze N Pills,” “Lenny’s A Drunk,” “Miller,” “Cheap Wine” and “Whiskey Will.” He put out a new Darkbuster record, albeit under the name The New Darkbuster because, well, time hasn’t exactly healed all wounds yet. He toured throughout Europe and the States as a solo artist and with The New Darkbuster. He and his Street Dogs brothers put out a few 7-inches toured Europe and the States some more, and finally put out an excellent new full-length, Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing, last year via Century Media.

February 15th marks the release date of Lashley’s sophomore Gang Of One album, All Are Welcome (Pirates Press Records). For this project, Lashley enlisted not only the production services of Bouncing Souls’ Pete Steinkopf once again, but teamed up with fellow Street Dog Johnny Rioux and Mighty Mighty Bosstones drummer Joe “The Kid” Sirois for the core of the recording process. The group worked quickly throughout a much tighter timeline than the one that resulted in Illuminator a half-dozen years ago, resulting in a sound that is familiar sounding yet no less stellar than its predecessor. Echos of Strummer and Springsteen and Hank Williams and, well, Darkbuster, all somehow abound without one emerging as a clear leader. That’s part of what has made Lashley such a compelling songwriter over the years; an ability to float between styles and influences in a way that pays homage rather than simply aping, thanks in large part to a trademark New England accent that’s thicker than clam chowder (sorry, that’s a cheap analogy).

Where Illuminator found Lashley turning the lens inward and processing some of the struggles he’d been going through in the years leading up to its release, the better place he’s been in these days allowed him to shift his focus in an outwardly direction. One needs to look no further than the album’s cover art and the theme of its title track, “All Are Welcome,” complete with its bridge section that contains a portion of Dr. Martin Luther Kind Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech, for evidence of where Lashley found more than a little inspiration. Punk rock has long talked of revolution, and one of the fortunate side-effects of the present sociopolitical climate is that its proven fertile ground for talented artists to inspire the proverbial troops. But it’s not all Clash-style combat rock on All Are Welcome; there are songs of heartache and loneliness and unrequited love and Revolution, but the kind that’s found on the Major League Soccer pitch and not the kind that’s fought in the streets.

Lashley and I met up for a mid-week lunch recently to talk about All Are Welcome and the mental and physical work it took to pull the album together. As always, we covered a lot of ground, from writing without the aid of foreign substances, to the difference between the two Gang Of One albums, to how, despite being on the other side of 50 years old, life as a musician can still be full of surreal experiences. We also talked a lot about the upcoming Dropkick Murphys tour, that’ll feature support from Lashley’s Gang Of One project backed by a full band, which will be a first for a tour of this magnitude. Head below to check out our chat, and head here to pre-order All Are Welcome while you’ve still got time!



Dan Cribb streams entire “Worst Tribute Ever” project

Dan Cribb of Australian pop-punk outfit Dan Cribb & The Isolated is streaming his entire Dan Cribb & Friends Worst Tribute Ever project.

Worst Tribute Ever, a project dedicated to renditions of music from “The Simpsons”, has featured many noteworthy collaborators including Axis of Awesome’s Benny Davis, Spiderbait’s Kram, and Australian Idol winner Guy Sebastian.  You can listen to the whole 30 song release below.



Kyle Trocolla and the Strangers release video for “Start Again”

Alt-country punk favourite Kyle Trocolla and the Strangers just released a video for their excellent song “Start Again” from their latest record The Moon USA. Watch the video below.

The Moon USA was released last July. If you missed it, Dying Scene recently sat down with Kyle Trocolla to chat about the album.



Brian Fallon to play at Van Morrison tribute concert

Brian Fallon will be joining the likes of Shawn Colvin and Josh Ritter to play a Van Morrison tribute concert at Carnegie Hall on March 21st. Brian Fallon has, in the past, referenced how he steals Bruce Springsteen’s moves who in turn steals Van Morrison’s moves.

Brian Fallon’s second full length ‘Sleepwalkers‘ came out in February this year.



Blaine And His Keyboard stream debut self-titled EP

Lansing, Michigan pop punk solo act Blaine And His Keyboard is streaming his self-titled debut EP.

You can give it a listen below.

Blaine And His Keyboard was released on October 26th via GTG Records.



Stream the new Dave Hause EP “September Haze”

September Haze, the new EP from Dave Hause was released on Friday and you can stream the entire thing on spotify. It’s mellower than most of his previous material Hause enthusiasts will still dig it.

This EP is a follow up to Dave’s full length Burt Me In Philly which came out last year.

 

 



New Music: Dave Hause – “Lemon Hill”

If one Dave Hause story on a Monday is good, two mush be outstanding, right? Right!

Earlier today, we told you that the singer/songwriter is releasing a new EP, September Haze, this coming Thursday (November 1st). Well, you can now get a taste of what’s to come, by way of a new track called “Lemon Hill.” The track is a reference to the Philadelphia park where Hause would drink as a kid and would walk to reflect as he got sober a few years ago. Check out the lyric video below.

September Haze will be available digitally in a couple days. Pre-orders are available here. It’s the first Hause solo release since his early 2017 sophomore full-length, Bury Me In Philly.