Search Results for "Solo Project"

S. T. Manville (Blakfish) releases covers album, “Somebody Else’s Songs”

“Somebody Else’s Songs” is the debut release from UK singer/songwriter S. T. Manville. The release is a collection of covers, with the ex-Blakfish man taking on the likes of The Get Up Kids, Green Day, blink-182, Weezer and The Offspring in reworked alternative/folk styles.

The release comes in advance of further, original material from Sam, and is available to stream in all the usual places in full from today.

The background of the release is available as a free ebook from S. T. Manvile’s website here.

Check out “Somebody Else’s Songs” using the player below.

 

 

 



Introducing Everyone Knows: Bluesy Alt-Rock (Sergio of The Early November solo project)

Look, as much as we’d all like to pretend that we subsist on a diet of Crass, recreational drugs and dumpster diving, there comes a time to admit sometimes we want, nay, need something more in our lives. I can’t help you with your questionable life choices or the lack of Vitamins in your diet, but I can point you in the direction of some music that your tinder dates will be able to stomach.

Everyone Knows is the solo project of Sergio Anello, bassist of The Early November. With ‘Tell or Be Told’ he has created a bluesy alt rock album that conjures images of a smoke-filled backroom bar frequented by people who have money, only you’re not sure where their money comes from. And you sure as hell shouldn’t ask.

Songs languorously flow into each other like hungover recollections of the night before and the vocals curl around you like cigarette smoke, seeping into your skin and staying with you all day. This album has all the layered notes of an end of night whiskey. It’s mature, sure. You might even call it smooth. But there’s an understated raw fragility in the lyrics and vocals that creates a slow, building burn that sticks with you.

Check it out here.

 



New solo album coming soon from Vinnie Caruana (The Movielife/I Am The Avalanche)

Vinnie Caruana, front man for The Movielife and I Am The Avalanche, has a new solo album coming out this year. Vinnie told The Wasting Time Podcast this week that the new material will sound like nothing like anything he has released before. Vinnie’s last album ‘Survivor’s Guilt’ was released in 2016 via Equal Vision Records. Caruana also confirmed in the interview that he will be announcing a UK tour for later this year.



New Music: Joey Cape streams “I Know How To Run” from upcoming solo album, “Let Me Know When You Give Up”

It’s been a minute since we’ve heard new music from the one-and-only Joey Cape; three-and-a-half years worth of minutes, to be more precise. But don’t worry boys and girls…the wait is almost over!

Today, The Bullshit One announced plans for a brand new full-length album. It’s called Let Me Know When You Give Up, and it’s due out on July 5th via his longtime label home, Fat Wreck Chords. Pre-orders are available already by clicking here.

To get you ready for what’s to come, you can check out the lead single, “I Know How To Run,” below.

Depending on how you keep score, Joey Cape’s last album was either his 2016 One Week Records release of reworked Lagwagon and Bad Astronaut songs or, more probably, his 2015 Fat Wreck Chords full-length, Stitch Puppy.



Divided Heaven announce new EP, stream new song

Los Angeles based folk-punks Divided Heaven have announced they will be releasing their new EP, Cold War Hangover, on May 17th via Paper + Plastick Records.  The new EP will feature new songs and acoustic/reworked songs from the band’s recent full-length, Cold War, released by Wiretap Records and Paper + Plastick Records in 2018.

To give you an idea of what to expect, you can listen to “The Daughters & The Sons” off the new EP below.



Jesse LeBourdais(folk-punk) streaming new song “See You In The Storm”

Vancouver folk-punker Jesse LeBourdais is streaming the first song “See You In The Storm” off of his upcoming three song EP. The new EP is being released today (May 7th), so scoot on over to Jesse LeBourdais’ Bandcamp page now to get your copy.

You can check out the first song off the upcoming EP below.

This is the first new music from the West Coast folk punk act since 2017’s Grief Intensity Friendship. If you’re a fan of The Menzingers or The Penske File you will enjoy Jesse LeBourdais as well. 



Tour: Kevin Seconds and Sammy Kay announce east coast dates

Photo by Alan Snodgrass

It’s been a hot minute since the great Kevin Seconds has been out on the east coast, but that’s going to change in July! For what’s been dubbed the “I’ve Come For Avail” tour, Seconds is heading to Virginia to kick off a small run of dates with New Jersey’s Sammy Kay. The tour runs July 15th to the 21st with a day off in Richmond on the 20th so that the duo can hit up one of the long-awaited Avail reunion shows in RVA.

Head below to check out the dates!



Stream Cokie the Clown’s (Fat Mike of NOFX) “You’re Welcome”

Cokie the Clown’s  “solo” album, You’re Welcome, has just been released on Fat Wreck Chords. For those who don’t know, Cokie is the alter-ego of Fat Mike from NOFX.

You can check out a stream of all ten songs below. Warning: There’s no skate punk on this release and it’s rather depressing… but it’s interesting as hell if you’ve at all followed the antics of the famous frontman over the last couple decades.



Album Review: Cokie The Clown – “You’re Welcome”

I made a mistake.

It was school vacation week in my neck of the woods recently, and as such, I had the privilege of spending a lot of really awesome time with my eleven-year-old. I also knew I had a review of the upcoming Cokie The Clown album coming down the ‘pike, and assumed – rightfully – that listening to the album with my kid in the car or in the house with me would be a terrible idea, so I decided to take a solo trip to the grocery store one evening and to give You’re Welcome a preliminary listen in the process. As it turns out, there might be worse places than a grocery store amidst the suburban sprawl of the greater Boston area to fire up an album like You’re Welcome for the first time…but there aren’t many.

While Fat Mike hasn’t been shy about wearing his heart on his sleeve for the duration of his three-plus-decade career, You’re Welcome finds that concept amplified: his heart is not merely on his sleeve, but ripped out of his chest and torn to shreds on the floor for all of us to see. You’re Welcome kicks off with “Bathtub,” which finds our protagonist Cokie accompanied by only whatever substances are coursing through his clown veins as he tells the story of waking up in the middle of the night to find his significant other facedown in a bathtub after an overdose, and the resulting uncertainty and dread that came along with wondering if she’d taken her final breaths. Buckle up, my friends, because the ride only gets bumpier from there.

Over the course of the next half-hour or so, Cokie takes the listener on a ride that is at  times painfully honest, uncomfortably raw, disturbingly complicated, and is undoubtedly going to piss a lot of people off. There are songs like “Fair Leather Friends” and “Fuck You All” that take thinly-veiled shots at people in Mike’s — er, Cokie’s — personal life that he feels have cheated him, screwed him, abandoned him and otherwise taken advantage of him. “Pre-Arrainged Marriage” theoretically tackles the subject of love, but through the prism of his two previous high-profile failed marriages. Listeners who read the NOFX autobiography The Hepatitis Bathtub several years back might recognize the story that “Swing And A Miss” graphically details, involving the failed and successful suicide attempts of a previous roommate and the fallout that ensued. “Punk Rock Saved My Life” and “That Time I Killed My Mom” shed a little more light on the relationship – or, ultimately the lack thereof – with his parents that was documented on past NOFX tracks like “My Orphan Year” and “Happy Father’s Day.” There’s “The Queen Is Dead,” a heart-breaking ode to a deceased longtime friend that comes across as one of the most tender, genuine moments that Fat Mike has committed to tape. While the bulk of the subject matter is painful, it is oddly enough the themes of narcissism and unresolved anger and self-martyrdom that rear their heads in tracks like “Pre-Arrainged Marriage”and “Negative Reel” and to a lesser extent “Down With The Ship” that I found more cringe-worthy and uncomfortable than the themes of suicide and parenticide and overdosing and bondage that were more prevalent.

Sonically, You’re Welcome plays more like a sad carnival soundtrack than a traditional “punk rock” album. If you give it a listen looking forward to it being composed of two-and-a-half minute anthemic skate punk songs, A) you’ll be wildly disappointed and more importantly B) you should have known better. There’s no standard verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-repeat in the bunch, meaning You’re Welcome isn’t an uptempo, sing-along style album the way that the Home Street Home musical and soundtrack that Fat Mike and friends put together a few years ago was in spite of its own disturbing imagery. While the musicianship and production are stellar (containing contributions from Travis Barker and Dizzy Reed and production from the mighty Danny Lohner), the majority of the instrumentation is largely present as a means of providing a loosely-built latticework. Fat Mike’s Cokie the Clown “character” — and I’ll save the remainder of my armchair psychoanalysis for another place and time — is by all means the star of the show, and if that means that sometimes songs are going to meander and switch tones and seem a bit unfocused and chaotic and largely just be narratives rather than traditional “songs,” that’s exactly what’s going to happen.

I’m still struggling with what I ultimately think of You’re Welcome in anything resembling a larger sense, which I understand is not maybe the ideal thing to say in a review of an album. I really like the bulk of it, though I have a hard time listening to it for long stretches. While I have long-since tired of the veneration of the degenerate GG Allin or Darby Crash or Sid Vicious types as the bellwether of what it means to be “Punk,” I applaud the choice to pull in some stylistically and artistically different directions and to tackle uncomfortable, challenging topics by way of performance art. From that perspective, You’re Welcome is a resounding success. It’s not an album you’re going to keep on repeat (well…if it is, you may want to have the assistance of a professional therapist or twelve at the ready). It’s not going to launch a series of copycat albums that turn into their own genre. It will probably leave you deeply disturbed on your trip to the grocery store, as you balance images of a nineteen-year-old Fat Mike showing his recently-deceased friend’s parents the exact spot they cut his lifeless body down and a grown-up Fat Mike covering his soon-to-be-departed mother’s face with a pillow as you try to weigh your bagel flavor options. And that’s exactly the point.



Video Premiere: Geoff Palmer releases new music video, “Giving In”

Geoff Palmer, of New Hampshire’s The Connection/The Guts glory, has a solo album dropping June 7th on Stardumb Records (EU) and Rum Bar Records (US) titled Pulling out all the Stops. The album is available for pre-order on CD and streaming with bonus tracks (via Rum Bar) here, and on red or black vinyl and 7″ here in the US (via The Machine Shop) and here for Europe.

“There’s nothing left to do. I’m giving up and giving into you.” is the chorus which breaks through the catchy harmonic cadence in this newest single, “Giving In” off the upcoming record. We’re streaming the music video below which has an interesting nostalgic quality of a lazy Saturday morning watching the spinning grooves of a record and the needle, or the dog. “You are 1989 and I am East of Berlin… I’m giving up my walls for something new.”

Geoff Palmer and his associated acts have several times been featured by Steven Van Zandt (Bruce Springsteen/Sirius FM Underground Garage) for having the “coolest song in the world”. He has also recorded with The Queers under the name Geoff Useless on their Everything’s O.K. and Punk Rock Confidential albums. His music goes well with Alkaline Trio, The Hard-Ons and The Queers. Stream the video for “Giving In” below.



6’10 (Folk Punk, IL) Stream Latest EP “Where We Are”

Flatfoot 56 vocalist and guitarist Tobin Bawinkel and his side project 6’10 have just released an EP titled Where We Are. The effort features six tracks that are sure to appeal to those who like their acoustic jams steeped in tradition and Americana.

You can check out Where We Are below.

The previous release from 6’10 was the 2014 full-length album, The Humble Beginnings of a Rovin’ Soul. 



DS Exclusive: Dave Hause on fatherhood, family, and his suicidally optimistic new album “Kick”

The journey of a career songwriter is one filled with a seemingly endless series of what can rightly be called “pivotal” moments that can alter the arc of one’s professional career; the death of a loved one, the dissolution of a band, divorce, the misuse of alcohol and other drugs, marriage, worsening societal ills. Even if you’ve got your head screwed on in a manner we’d call straight, each and every one of those areas can seem daunting. When you couple any of them with the growing senses of fear and doubt and insecurity that can come, frankly, with being alive and even remotely paying attention to the world around you, it can prove enough to bring an otherwise strong individual to their respective knees.

In one form or another, Dave Hause has tackled all of those issues — sometimes individually, sometimes collectively — generally in a manner that can be poignant and heart-achingly personal. On his upcoming album, Kick, due April 12th on Rise Records, Hause has yet another filter to approach his life, and his craft, through: fatherhood. When we caught up with the now California-based Hause over the phone last week, he was out for a walk with his twin two-month-old sons napping quietly away in their stroller, affording his wife a much-deserved breather. Lest those who might be afraid that turning 40 and establishing roots on the sun-soaked west coast and becoming a dad would have dulled the daggers that Hause spent the better part of two decades sharpening, fear not; Kick is very much a return to form from the more positive, upbeat themes of its predecessor, Bury Me In Philly. “I think that Kick and Devour are a lot closer to one another than Bury Me In Philly,” Hause explains. Bury Me In Philly was me moving to California and figuring out what that was going to look like and figuring out happiness. I didn’t want to write a bummed record if I wasn’t bummed. Little did I know that we were going to have one of the biggest heartbreaks as a society that I could have ever predicted.”

There are some weighty questions posited over the course of the ten songs that make up Kick. Many of them, like “Weathervane” and “Civil Lies” and lead single “The Ditch” tangle the wires between the personal and the political and reveal the obviously delicate balances that come with managing one’s own anxieties within the context of tides that are literally rising and a social climate that seems hellbent on allowing it to happen. The ride culminates in the album’s closing track, “Bearing Down,” a track which…well, let’s put it this way: if the Devour track “Autism Vaccine Blues” and its narrator outwardly considering whether or not they’d be better off dead tugged on your heartstrings, “Bearing Down” will use two hands and rip those heartstrings straight from your chest. The song finds Hause not only name-checking Hunter Thompson and Robin Williams (and insanely talented Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison, who provided backing vocal duties on the Devour track “The Shine,” in the liner notes), all of whom died from suicide after lengthy and sometimes public struggles with their own demons, but contemplating his own oblivion and weighing swan diving off the Golden Gate Bridge.

But then comes the pivot, that moment that the narrative shifts from being bleak to being heavy yet hopeful by way of our narrator finding that he’s got a newfound responsibility to be around for a while, and to help those that he’s close to through these difficult times. “What I was betting on with that final verse,” he explains, “was really like the old Buddhist philosophy that life is pain. “Hallelujah, we’re alive, and it’s bearing down. It is brutal. And if I can lighten that load for someone else, then I’m serving some grander purpose more than just my own selfish whims.” If you’re lucking, the act of older and going through some of your own trials and tribulations allows you the experience and perspective needed to learn from past mistakes. “I’ve got to stick around and not put my people through hell,” Hause notes, adding “in looking at the patterns of addiction and stuff, you start to realize that ‘wow…I’ve made some messes that I wouldn’t mind not repeating, so I’m going to stay in better touch!’ I look at it as more of a human responsibility.”

If there’s a central theme to Kick, it’s that yeah, the current might be strengthening around us or the ditch we’re in may be getting deeper, but that focusing on that isn’t going to fix it. “It’s a very dangerous proposition to look at the glass as either half-empty or filled with piss! Maybe that could be true, but I can’t really afford to ruminate on that. I have to come up with a reason to look toward the shore despite feeling I or we, collectively, are drowning. I have to. At this point, it’s a job as I have as a dad,” Hause notes, quickly adding that, upon reflection, his new duties aren’t necessarily “new” at all, though they’re certainly more intense. “To some degree, I’ve always had that job. I’ve been a brother and a husband and a friend and a songwriter. I’m supposed to try to be of some good use to people.”

There’s a genuine art to being able to write a song that uses your own uniquely human experiences and resonates with other people in such a way that not only can the listener relate to your stories, but use them in a way that can move the needle in their own lives. You know the Leonard Cohen quote “there’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in?” Hause asks, knowing full well what the answer is. “A lot of times what’s compelling to me is trying to look at the piece of pottery and trying to recognize that it is indeed cracked — and we cracked it! We fucked it up!  — But then trying to find that light, because what else are you going to do? A joking alternate title for the record was “Suicidally Optimistic,” and I know that can kinda make the skin crawl, but a lot of times, I think that that’s my outlook.”

As was the case with Bury Me In Philly a few years ago, Hause was joined by his brother Tim for the creation of Kick. The latter might be sixteen years younger than his big brother, but make no mistake; he is not, by any stretch (and to paraphrase a line from the track “Civil Lies”) a kid anymore, displaying songwriting chops that match his previously-established guitar abilities. Having Tim as my partner now is clutch. His whole theory is that you make a ten song record, and then, long-term, if you end up with three of them in your “greatest hits” set that we’ll play for the remainder of our careers as musicians, we did something right.” Tim not only collaborated on music and lyrics this time out, he takes on lead vocal duties on “Civil Lies,” providing an effect that’s familiar while still adding a layer we haven’t heard on a Hause “solo” album before. I use solo in quotes there, because it may not be that way for long. “I didn’t really want to be a solo guy (at first),” Hause the elder explains. “The financial collapse happened and I grabbed a guitar and just went. I didn’t realize (it would happen this way), I thought I’d be back with The Loved Ones after a record or two, but the cookie crumbled differently. I brought my brother in and assumed he’d be with me for a year or two and then go back to college.” Instead, Tim has turned himself into a vital cog in the process. “I think we’re just continuing to set the table for us combining streams and using both of our songwriting output and both of our talents toward the same end. Ultimately, we may just go completely under the last name so that it encompasses all of our writing,” a trend that’s started already, as evidenced by Kick‘s cover art. 

While Hause will have Tim alongside him as he gears up to hit the road with a full band, The Mermaid, for the first Kick support shows later this week and through the remainder of the year, he obviously won’t have his family’s two newest members alongside. In order to gear up for life on the road as a dad, Hause has called on some old friends like Dan Andriano, Pete Steinkopf, Brian Fallon and Cory Branan not just for songwriting input, but for advice on how to best navigate these previously (for him) uncharted waters. While being away from his wife and two little fellas is obviously going to suck, Hause is hoping to use that as inspiration to dig a little deeper – as though that were possible – in his live performances. I’m going to miss my family. I’m going to feel to some degree like a heel for not being there for first steps or things. I’m going to miss stuff if I continue to tour to support my life. But I’m trying to look at it like a two-pronged approach: 1 – what I do is cool and the kids will be psyched on that and 2- more importantly, if I can lean into that experience and be like ‘well, I’m in Berlin, and I don’t get to do this just willy-nilly; I can’t just pick up and go, it takes a tremendous amount of planning and effort and heartache to be away from my family, I’m going to really dig in on this Berlin show…or these two Boston shows.’ I think maybe it’ll make things shine up a little brighter.”

The new tour kicks off tomorrow (March 27th) in Hause’s hometown of Santa Barbara and takes a baby-steps approach through places like Boston, Philly, New York and Toronto before making its way overseas for three weeks later next month. Tour dates are available here. Kick is due out April 12th, and you can still pre-order it here.

More importantly, you can check out our full chat below; Hause and I have done these a few times, so as usual, we range pretty far and wide.



Dave Hause releases new single “Saboteurs” ahead of new LP “Kick”

Dave Hause has released a new single, “Saboteurs”. The song is from his upcoming Rise Records album Kick, which is released April 12th. The album is the follow up to 2017’s Bury Me In Philly.

Pre-orders are up now. Have a listen (and check out UK tour dates) below.



Scott Sellers (Pop Punk, CA) Releases Album “Being Strange” and Stream Two Tracks

Former Rufio guitarist and vocalist Scott Sellers has released his latest solo album under his own name and will be streaming two of the tracks from the effort, which is titled Being Strange. Handling the release for Scott Sellers is Canada’s Punk and Disorderly Records.

The two songs chosen to tease the album are called “Only in December” and “Being Strange”. You can listen to them below.

The previous release from Scott Sellers was the 2018 album, Strings. 



Jason Devore (Authority Zero) releases new LP “Conviction Volume III: The Road To Clarity”

Jason DeVore, the frontman of Arizona-based ska/punk band Authority Zero, has released a new album. His third solo album is titled Conviction Volume III: The Road To Clarity and has been released on Operation Records

He is currently midway through a run of dates to promote the release – the remaining of which are listed below.