Search Results for "Punk"

Lee Corey Oswald stream new album “Darkness, Together”

Portland based punk band Lee Corey Oswald are streaming their new album Darkness, Together, which was released on October 12, 2018 via A-F Records.

You can give it a listen below.

Lee Corey Oswald last released Unhealthy in October 2017.



Bad Sports (Punk) streaming new single “Don’t Deserve Love” off of upcoming album

Old-school punks rejoice! Texas punks Bad Sports are streaming the first single “Don’t Deserve Love” off of their upcoming album Constant Stimulation. Set to be released October 26th on Dirtnap Records, Bad Sports is a throwback to the early days of punk. If you enjoy The Ramones or The Queers you’ll love these guys.

Check the single out below.

This appears to be the first new music from Bad Sports since their 2016 release Living With Secrets.



Blindspot (skate-punk) streaming three new songs

Aussie skate-punks Blindspot are streaming three new songs under the guise of The Right Swipe Single Plus More. Featuring the single “The Right Swipe” which jumps into the issues of modern-day dating…I think (never had to swipe for a date). Two more pretty awesome songs: “Heart Half Full” and “Dark and Stormy” round out this sampling of Blindspot and I must say I found myself thoroughly enjoying this snifter of Punk goodness.

So go ahead and take a nibble below.

This is the first new music from the Perth punks since their split with The Bob Gordons. The Right Swipe was originally released on this album back in 2016. If you’re a fan of 90’s punk these guys nail the nostalgic nail on the head. 



Against Me! stream “People Who Died” for Songs That Saved My Life compilation

A few weeks back Hopeless Records and Sub City announced an amazing project called Songs That Saved My Life. The compilation features bands covering songs that have inspired and helped them get through the toughest of times in life. The latest teaser is Against Me! covering the Jim Carroll hit “People Who Died”. When asked why they chose this song Laura Jane Grace had this to say: ““Choosing to cover a song that is filled with death to be featured on a compilation dedicated to the thought that music can save your life seemed completely fitting to me. I’ve always thought music was about taking all the sadness, pain, fear and trouble that you have weighing on you and turning it into something empowering, celebratory and life-affirming.”

You can check out the stirring Against Me! cover below.

A few weeks back Neck Deep released their cover of “Torn” and if these two songs are any sign of what the rest of this album will sound like, we are in for a treat. This project benefits a variety of mental health and suicide prevention organizations. Currently, this project benefits Crisis Text Line, Hope For The Day, The Trevor Project, and To Write Love On Her Arms. As well, last month, the Songs That Saved My Life grant was announced. The $10,000 grant will be awarded to a fan or band partnering with a non-profit organization related to mental health awareness and/or suicide prevention. 



Album Review: Restorations – “LP5000”

The moody, rootsy, punk-adjacent rock of Restorations has always represented a war between the grounded and the ethereal. Maybe that’s its raison d’etre. It forges broken relationships and melancholy into something divine, while pulling divinity down from its pedestal and into our gutters. It’s a marriage between why we play music in the first place—the expressive drive; and how we play it—the artistic drive. The end result sounds like an amalgam of Fugazi, Constantines, The Menzingers, Hot Water Music, and My Bloody Valentine—and the only ones playing this particular amalgam are Restorations.

LP5000 is their latest full-length, on the heels of three well-loved albums and a handful of singles. This one is noticeably shorter, seven songs at twenty-four minutes—a grey area between album and EP that in the end, feels more complete than many longer works. Here, they’re just as anthemic, vulnerable, and experimental as they’ve always been—but the heart of Restorations is still in rock ‘n roll.

Album opener “St.” opens with feedback before succumbing to a steady, hypnotic, and bassy drum rhythm. Drumming usually escapes me completely, I’m as arrhythmic as they come and for me, a song’s quality usually starts and stops at its lyrics and melody. But here, and across the entirely of LP5000 I was entranced by the mesmeric rhythms—they don’t just back the music here, they’re as fundamental as the plaintive vocals and spidery guitar lines. Between the drums, grungy chorus, and the short, but whiplash guitar solo, “St.” serves as a reminder of Restorations’ roots—a broken-in, world weary vision of rock ‘n roll.

“Nonbeliever” is a highlight of the album, with its tense shuffle, portrait-like lyricism, and emo-influenced palm-muted guitar riffs. The lyricism here is beautiful, softly political, and at points conversational. I always appreciate when songwriter’s bring a sense of time, place, and age into their words. “Said you’ve found the trick: just be bad at your job/ If you burn all the fries, they’re gonna make you the king,” paints a picture of youthful struggle, the self-deprecation we utilize to make peace with a living we don’t want to fight for. “Nonbeliever” is an ode to being born into adulthood, chronicling a struggle doomed to bloom into complacency.

There are some interesting choices made on LP5000 production’s, but with a band like Restorations, no choice really feels outside their already fairly broad boundaries. The programmed beat, sounding like pulsating static, on “Melt” comes to mind. But it’s used to even greater effect on ending track “Eye,” giving a sort of eerie and desolate tone to the slice-of-life narration. The dead-air drums in the background, a perfect juxtaposition between the technologically-complex world we live in and the human relationships that define us. It explodes into squealing guitars and a massive chorus, the sound of Restorations using every tool at their disposal to feel and be felt.

LP5000 is more of the same, when the same has always been top-notch. Restorations is a band with nothing to prove, and yet, they are one of the most exciting working in the greater punk rock arena. They’re as lyrical as their contemporaries and just as catchy, yet they push their sound into spacey, angular directions. Perhaps the band’s greatest feat is making this feel effortless. Restorations experimentation is an extension of their identity, it comes off as natural and unpretentious. LP5000 is seven great songs, and everything else is just what it took to make them great.

4.5/5



New Junk City release new album “Same Places”

Atlanta punk act New Junk City have released their new album Same Places. The album is out now on Real Ghost Records, with physical orders up now direct from the label. 

You can have a listen to the album below.



Brogues stream new track “1982” ahead of album

Brogues (ex-Morning Glory) are streaming “1982“, a track from their upcoming Metropolitan Blues, which is out October 23rd. Pre-orders are up tomorrow (October 16th).

The album is the follow up to 2016’s “Heart & Song“.



Scumbag Millionaire release video for “Under The Spell”

Swedish punks Scumbag Millionaire just released a video for their newest single “Under The Spell”. The track is taken from their debut album, “Speed”, which has just come out last week on Suburban Records.

You can have a watch below.



Bucky Harris (Folk Punk, Canada) Stream Latest EP, “Breathing Room”

Montreal-based folk punk ensemble Bucky Harris are allowing fans to stream their entire latest EP. The four-track effort is titled Breathing Room and you can stream it below.

Breathing Room is the latest music from Bucky Harris since their 2017 EP, In Sheep’s Clothing.



Majority Lost (Punk, CA) Stream Latest EP “We Needed This More Than You Wanted This”

California-based punk rock group Majority Lost have just released their first EP in seven years. The new record is titled We Needed This More Than You Wanted This and sees the band experiment with a more stripped back sound than the rapid onslaught of their 2011 self-titled EP. Their latest work is the produce of the band’s original lineup but it’s entirely acoustic.

You can check out We Needed This More Than You Wanted It below.



Street Dogs announce dates for Wreck The Halls 2018

Somehow, it’s almost the holiday season again, and while it that doesn’t seem real or fair, that does bring with it some good news…the announcement of the Street Dogs‘ 2018 edition of Wreck The Halls!

Now in its thirteenth year, this year’s Wreck The Halls festivities will take place at Boston’s Brighton Music Hall between December 14 and 16. Openers vary from night by night and include such noteworthy acts as Art Thieves, Noi!se, Slapshot and more. As has been the case in the past, proceeds from the event will benefit the Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Foundation. Head below for the full rundown!

Street Dogs’ most recent release, the stellar Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing was released earlier this year on Century Media, and will be on my year-end “best of” list for sure!



The Morphine Pilgrims (Punk, Austria) Stream Latest EP, “Rescue Me Acoustic”

Austria’s The Morphine Pilgrims have just released an acoustic EP with five re-imagined versions of their tracks. The effort is titled Rescue Me Acoustic and is the first new music from the group since their 2017, fully amplified EP, Rescue Me.

You can check out Rescue Me Acoustic below. Enjoy!



Arising From (Melodic Hardcore, Canada) Announce EP “Contemplating the Unknown” and Stream Teaser Track

Montreal-based melodic hardcore act Arising From have announced that their latest EP, Contemplating the Unknown, will be released on October 25 via Thousand Islands Records. To get fans in the mood, the band have released a teaser track from the EP, titled “Was It You”.

You can listen to “Was It You” below.



Daggerplay (Punk ‘n’ Roll, Finland) Stream New Full-Length “Subterranean Reality”

The Finnish fusion of punk and rock and roll that is Daggerplay are allowing fans to stream their entire new record. The effort is titled Subterranean Reality and features fourteen tracks that straddle the aforementioned genres.

If classic riffage set to a punk rock tempo sounds up your street, you can listen to Subterranean Reality below. The previous full-length release from the four-piece was 2013’s Urban Campfire Songs.



Album review: Rundown Kreeps “Illside Village”

Last year the Rundown Kreeps released Illside Village which is their sophomore release and follows 2015’s Breaking the Routine. The Rundown Kreeps are not a band that can be pigeon-holed or succinctly described as they draw from a wide range of influences but still develop a sound that is uniquely their own.

The opener “Me and Jay in Space” sets the table for what to expect on this album. It has blistering breakneck speed guitar solos and a driving rhythm that is flirtatiously ska. It’s in the next two songs “Seem to Care” and “I Won’t Go” that this love affair is fully realized. The first being a mid tempo jam with some uptempo interludes which will have you tapping your toes. “I Won’t Go” returns to the full speed and would fit on pretty much any 90’s era ska-core album, just with no horn section. This throwback ska styling can also be seen on “Glass and Regrets”.

This will they or won’t they affair with ska is widespread on this album as the Rundown Kreeps keep up a frantic pace and use the ska as a way to allow the listener to relax for a second before being tossed back into the fray. “Here nor There” is the perfect example of this, as it is sandwiched between “Pulling Pins” a borderline hardcore gem centered on a fantastic guitar riff and the pure pop punk “The Routine”. The use of “”Here nor There” in between gives the listener a brief respite with a slower ska skank and a bit of a 50’s vibe vocal delivery. Almost as if instead of taking a break at the bar, they took a break at a malt shop. The other example that I would be remiss to not mention is “Not a Clue” it carries the same 50’s style vocals overlaid on slow upstroke guitars that is totally skankable but, like the rest of the album, does not let you get too comfortable because of a crazy outro which kicks the album back into turbo.

Two standout tracks are “Silent Shots” and “You Belong’d to Me”. “Silent Shots” is a ridiculously steep dive on this roller-coaster of an album. It takes an already frenzied pace and kicks it up a notch in the way that would make Black Flag or Minor Threat proud. Its hardcore, its political, and it’s sure to open up a pit. While “You Belong’d to Me” is the exact opposite, an acoustical love song which displays the Rundown Kreeps ability to channel some vulnerability, made on a barren landscape that is in sharp contrast to the rest of the album.

Most of Illside Village sounds like horn-less Losing Streak era Less than Jake but playfully mixed with a Misfits style punk rockabilly and a hint of classic pop-punk sensibility. I did say at the beginning they defy a easy description.

4/5 Stars