Search Results for "Punk"

Album Review: Dead Bars – “Regulars”

Ever since I heard that first self-titled EP, I’ve been rooting for Dead Bars. They write simple songs that can paint a world in four lines of lyrics; they have big melodies that translate into bigger singalongs. They tap into that communal, we’re-all-in-this-together punk spirit—and seeing them at Fest this last year, I saw for myself how the gospel had spread. And why not? Dead Bars have continued to grow in new and interesting ways while still honoring what they are at their core—a band of big dreamers. They’ve gone from an Off With Their Heads-adjacent, No Idea Records gritty pop-punk band to a loud, hopeful band of rock ‘n roll devotees. Dream Gig was the first step in a peaceful coup, but it’s on Regulars where the dream is realized.

What’s apparent immediately is just how good Regulars sounds. With Jack Endino (Nirvana, Soundgarden, The Afghan Whigs) wearing the production hat, Dead Bars have never sounded better. This is a band that doesn’t pull from a specific sound as much as a specific spirit. Regulars is KISS, Tom Petty, The Clash, Motorhead, The Replacements, and Nirvana, even if they sound like a sort of minimalist Lawrence Arms. The important thing is this: the guitars are loud and distorted, the drums sound like thunder, and the words are true. Dead Bars is the Prometheus of rock ‘n roll, stealing pyrotechnics from the Gods to set the small stage ablaze.

This Ramones-y devotion to the power of music is on immediate display with album opener “Freaks.” Dead Bars are trading in hope and optimism—and it’s clear they hold an earnest belief in the power of music. On “Freaks”, this optimism rears its head as unity, as the chorus rages: “This one’s for the freaks, you’re all sick freaks!” It’s a rallying cry, as gritty as it is catchy, and I’d put a good wager that in a dark club, with a cold beer, it’ll be an anthem for all the like-minded weirdos who still see rock ‘n roll as kin to salvation.

It’s this direction that makes Regulars feel like Dead Bars have reached their own personal enlightenment, as if, release after release, they’ve shed their non-essential parts and now, with their sophomore album, have embraced the truest form of themselves. Which means, they’re songwriting is as great as ever. Minimalist, heart wrenching, with a sly sense of self-deprecating humor.

And with lyrics like, “I’m growin’ up, yeah, I’m growin’ up/ but I just threw up,” “Pink Drink” is about as simple and direct as you can be. Still, this song, with probably about a short verse full of unique lyrics, captures a lifetime. Even the title (which doubles as its chorus) is evocative. We all know what a pink drink is, we’ve seen them in bars, we’ve had friends make fun of us for ordering them. They represent taking your medicine with a spoonful of sugar, they’re a confectious means to an end, and in “Pink Drink” they’re also a sign of world-weariness, of getting older and not having the energy to maintain appearances. The burn of whiskey, the bite of vodka loses its luster—and you look around, and realize no one’s impressed anymore. That’s “Pink Drink.” The trials of growing up have always been at the heart of Dead Bars—but there’s something empowering and defiant in the way they capture that angst and then also stick their flag in it. On “Pink Drink, “No Tattoos,” and others—could’ves and should’ves are confronted head-on, and maybe a pink drink won’t save you, but maybe it will—if only for tonight.

The title track, “I’m a Regular,” is a clear highlight of the album, capturing Dead Bars at their most intimately anxious. Ushered in by ringing feedback, vocalist John Maiello snarls, “I’m a regular here, but nobody knows my name.” It actually highlights one of my favorite things about Dead Bars—the microcosm of their scope. We feel millions of little things a day, flights of fancy and minor frissons of panic, all instantly recognizable and largely left totally unspoken. “I’m a Regular” examines a funny, melancholy intrusive thought with rock ‘n roll gusto, bursting forth into a huge name-dropping chorus (“And it’s way Tom Petty, I’m livin’ like a refugee!”) We may not be living in a Cheers episode, but the internal dilemma (why the fuck not?) roars loud and clear. “I’m a Regular” is a snotty, riotous ode to living under the radar.

C.J. Frederick, original member and lead six-stringer of Dead Bars, is a strong presence on Regulars—where for the first time, Dead Bars truly feels like a ‘guitar band.’ This time around, the songs are distinctively riffy, with big muscular licks opening songs like “Time Takes Away”, “Rain,” and “I Need You.” The propensity for solos is also higher and welcome, bringing the music and lyrical direction into total synchronicity. For a group of guys who worship rock music, what’s more religious than a sick trilling solo? Here, they aren’t just talking the talk, they’re now walking it too, emulating the magic as if they’re the only ones who can keep it alive.

Dead Bars are underdogs, and when they aren’t, well, I’m not sure if they’ll be Dead Bars anymore. Regulars prove the band can put forth a product that is both polished and cohesive, and still be those same scrappy dudes who daydream of killer riffs and big singalongs. Somewhere in between the rock ‘n roll dream and the gutter realism of DIY punk is Dead Bars, and with Regulars, as always, it’s a pleasure to see where the two meet.

5/5



DS Photo Gallery: The Interrupters with Masked Intruder & Rat Boy (The Ogden Theater, Denver)

For me, Friday April 5th 2019 was a night of excitement, curiosity and comfort. Ska superstars, The Interrupters were here in The Mile High and having seen them perform many times before, there’s s sense of comfort and familiarity that I feel every time I catch one of their live performances. On the flip side of that coin, I had never had the chance to see the legendary antics of Fat Wreck alum Masked Intruder before. Many fables have been told of their highly interactive and massively entertaining sets, the lore alone enough to pique my interest. So, I was more excited than I normally am for a show, just to add this specific feather to my cap. I also had some curiosity mixed in as the opening act, Rat Boy was in from the UK and other than knowing that Tim Timebomb had taken the young act under his wing, I knew nothing about them. INTRIGUE!! So, I grabbed my trusty Nikon and headed down to The Ogden Theatre to the punk rock shooooow! Check out the full review and gallery below!



New Album/Stream: Check out Abolitionist’s “Ugly Feeling” For Free/Pay What You Want

Abolitionist, the hardcore-ish, post-ish, pop-punk-ish outfit from the city of Portland, OR, have released their new album Ugly Feeling on Bandcamp for free/pay what you want. These Northwesterners have been swinging for the fences this year, as this new album follows up their previous 2019 release A New Militance (see review here).

We have a stream below, but click here if you wanna go straight to Bandcamp and grab it for yourself. Word on the street, after a couple tour runs, Abolitionist will be going on an indefinite hiatus, so keep your eyes peeled for tour dates near your hometown.



Tear Them Down (Sweden) release music video for “The Nihilist Tone”

Swedish punks Tear Them Down have released a video for their new song “The Nihilist Tone,” which comes from their upcoming EP, No Sleep Til Arod, that is set to be released on May 10th via Morning Wood Records and Backbite Records.

You can check it out below.

Tear Them Down last released Abide in 2016.



The Jasons stream new song “Blood In The Streets”

Hockey masked, leather clad act The Jasons are streaming their new song, “Blood In The Streets,” which is the title track to their upcoming album that is due out on May 3rd.

You can give the song a listen below.

The Jasons last released Get Fucked in March 2016.



Glory Hole (Switzerland) stream new album “Don’t Rip”

Swiss punk act Glory Hole are streaming their new album, Don’t Rip, which was originally released in April 2018, and just put out again via PCT Musiqe.

You can give it a listen below, and if you like what you hear, you can get the whole thing as a pay what you want download.

Glory Hole last released The Way Out in 2012.



Avail Announce More “Over The James” Anniversary Shows

If you’re like me, you’ve been hopeful that the Avail reunion shows were going to make their way outside the Commonwealth of Virginia, and today we can finally say that those wishes have come true!

The monumentally-influential Richmond, Virginia band are taking the show on the road for a long-weekend of Over The James 21st anniversary shows in the northeast: September 6th at Union Transfer in Philly, September 7th at the Warsaw in Brooklyn, and September 8th at Royale in Boston. Support on all dates comes from Angel Du$t. Tickets go on sale this Saturday (4/20) at 4pm Eastern, and at least 200 tickets will be available for walk-up purchase at the Union Transfer, Gramercy Theater and Sinclair Box Offices respectively. All of the gigs will feature the original OTJ-era lineup of Tim Barry, Joe Banks, Beau Beau, Gwomper, and Erik Larson. Pack those sleeping bags and we’ll see ya in line!

Over The James was initially released on April 7, 1998, on Lookout Records, and was later released by Jade Tree a couple years later. Avail’s final release was their 2002 Fat Wreck Chords full-length Front Porch Stories.



The Jukebox Romantics and Triple Sundae detail UK tour

New York’s The Jukebox Romantics are to embark on a UK tour with London pop-punks Triple Sundae. The tour will take in dates in England, Scotland and Wales.

Full details of dates are below.



Spanish Love Songs release video for “Losers”

Spanish Love Songs have released a video for new track “Losers”. The song is the A-side from their new 7″, available for pre-order now. The tracks are the first new music since last year’s Schmaltz.

Have a watch below.



Tio Rico (Punk, UK) Stream Single “Unfledged” From Forthcoming Album “Suck It”

Manchester “noise grunk” merchants Tio Rico have a new record coming out and to get fans in the mood they’ve been releasing singles from it. The second is titled “Unfledged” and although it’s only officially out on April 26 via major streaming platforms, as well as through local label Horn and Hoof Records and Code 7 Distribution, you can listen to it early below.

Release details, including the title of the album itself are still-to-be-announced. The previous collection of music from Tio Rico was the 2017 EP, Business and Pleasure.



Clowns (Punk, Australia) Stream Latest Album “Nature/Nurture”

Aussie thrashers Clowns have just released their fourth studio album to date. Nature/Nurture is being handled by domestic label Damaged in Australia and New Zealand, as well as the almighty Fat Wreck Chords in the rest of the world.

You can check out Nature/Nurture here and as well you might since it’s clearly going to be a contender for album of the year.

The previous collection of tunes released by Clowns was the 2017 full-length, Lucid Again. 

 



Eat Dirt. (Hardcore, UK) Sign to Bearded Punk, Announce Album “Death is Death”, Stream Video

London’s Eat Dirt. have announced a load of news. The band has just signed to Belgium’s Bearded Punk Records and will release their debut full-length album on June 3. To whet fans appetite for the new music, Eat Dirt. has released a music video for the record’s title track – “Death is Death”. You can check it out below.

The previous release from Eat Dirt. was a self-titled EP from 2017.



Dead Broke Rekerds (NY) Stream Sampler “Year of the Dawg”

New York’s Dead Broke Rekerds has compiled a sampler featuring a track from each release it handled during 2018. You can expect tunes from Life Hacks, Parasites, Iron Chic, and a load more on the collection titled Year of the Dawg.

You can check out this entire 16-song compilation below. The label encourages fans to pick up a physical copy or even a shirt featuring the wild and brilliant artwork by Tom Lowell pictured.



Album Review: The Bouncing Souls “Crucial Moments”

My first The Bouncing Souls album was The Bad, The Worse and the Out of Print, I remember vividly not knowing any of their music but loving the chaotic artwork on the cover. Prior to this album I had a few punk albums, but I was totally obsessed with ska. Reel Big Fish, The BossTones, Goldfinger, Buck-o-nine and Mustard Plug dominated my CD player. One day at the behest of some of my more punk friends I decided to check the Souls out, and it changed my musical taste forever.

It probably seems weird that an album full of rarities, b-sides, and alternate versions should be a person’s first intro to a band like the Souls. However it is in these choices of cover songs and the laughs and outtakes, where it became obvious that there is a very distinct feeling in a Bouncing Souls album. On every album of theirs that I discovered afterwards there is a strong sense of brotherhood and camaraderie, a nostalgia for simpler times with your friends, and a sense of fun. For every “Gone” there is a “Bullying the Jukebox” for every “Turned my Back on You” there is “Wish Me Well, Go to Hell”. They mine the emotional depths but never leave without displaying at least a little of the optimism that can only be found among your friends. You could say that haphazardly finding The Good, The Bad, and the Out of Print was my Bouncing Souls crucial moment. Which leads me to the actual Crucial Moments EP, a six song celebration of the bands thirtieth anniversary.

This album represents every aspect of The Bouncing Souls that people have come to know and love. It opens with the titular track and delivers a prototypical punk rock set on simmer style that is familiar to every album. It is a nostalgia fueled rocker which displays the bands ability to discuss heavier topics without abandoning a sense of hope. “These chords stick with me, this ink etched in me, these crucial moments played on repeat” Greg sings as he reminds us that these moments will play on repeat forever.

This nostalgia driven rock and roll shows up again on “Here’s to Us” a song that brings to light the darker times that have plagued the band and how they know that those times will not last because they have each other. “The world can have the past, we know they won’t last, because we got each other” shows that the power of camaraderie and their ability to find a light in the dark is still an ideal that they are steadfast to present in their music. There are a lot of little things that have always made the band unique, Bryan’s bass lines being one of my personal favorites and this track may be some of his finest work.

While these two songs make it seem like they have moved away from their classic punk rock sound, this is where “1989” and “4th Avenue Sunrise” prove they can still shred with the best of them. The first being the about the community they discovered through having “no talent just a dream” and how they “Stick together, that’s the deal, Gotta make something, make it true, All together with all of you.” It is a punk rock ode to all their friends and all the good times they had even in bad situations. While “4th Avenue Sunrise” is a bass heavy blitzkrieg, clocking in under two minutes, that emphasizes a dark romanticism.

The highlight of the album is “Favorite Everything” an upbeat love song. The Bouncing Souls are at their finest with this type of pop-laden bouncy rock, (See also “True Believers”, “Hopeless Romantic”, “Private Radio”, “Manthem” or “Kate is Great”), which in these case is a song about comparing music to the love of their life. There is so many great analogies, from “You’re the greatest compilation” to “You’re the song that bring a tear, embrace the love, embrace the fear”, that specifically speak to the comparison of one’s love of music to the love one has for another. Simultaneously a happy love song and an emotional expression of words that can be difficult to articulate.

Crucial Moments ends with “Home” the saddest song the Bouncing Souls have written this side of Anchors Aweigh. It is a significant change in the tempo set forth in the earlier parts of the album but cranks up the emotional weight. “Home” proves to be an endless place where fear and sadness will never reach, a place away from a world that just does not care. Proving once again that even in the saddest depths of a Bouncing Souls song there is always a sense of hope and a small glimmer of optimism.

In a celebration of their thirtieth year as a band, The Bouncing Souls have proven that they are timeless. To paraphrase their own song, Crucial Moments has songs of punk and songs of joy, a love song about girls and boys, songs of metal and some English stuff, and some hardcore to make us feel tough. This album is a six song reflection on the band’s legacy, one of lighting our darkest times while reminding us to enjoy the good times with the people around us.

5/5 Stars



DS Exclusive: Harrington Saints debut title track from upcoming album, “1000 Pounds of Oi!”

Happy Friday, boys and girls! We’ve got a pretty cool debut to get you fired up for the weekend!

We’re stoked to bring you the new video from California street punks Harrington Saints. It’s for the track “1000 Pounds of Oi!” which also serves as the title track from their brand new full length, which is due out May 10th on Pirates Press. Here’s what the band’s frontman Darrel Wojick had to say about the song, and the video:

The song has to do with the early days when we first started playing shows, and then bigger shows. Many of the comments we like “they’re like as big as poison idea” or “Poison Idea plays Oi!” Also, we used to joke how the drummer could never see the crowd cause he said there was a wall of fuckers in front of him! That became thousand lbs. of motherfucker, then turned into thousand pounds of Oi!. We wanted to do a video with Forry’s 64 impala SS before he sold it. Thought it’d be fun driving it blasting the song with a Go-Pro. Luckily we all fit in it.

Check out the video below! You can pre-save 1000 Pounds of Oi! right here.

1000 Pounds of Oi! marks Harrington Saints’ first album since 2015’s Fish & Chips.