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DS Exclusive: South Class Veterans (Oi) premiere “Squared Away” off upcoming “Hell to Pay” LP

This week has been stacked. Between playing catch-up on premieres and getting my 40 hrs on some remodel, I somehow managed to gain a local community radio DJs favor, who hooked me up with free Bad Religion tickets – then home for a late night writing session, before waking up early to get the kids to school and back off to work again. It almost slipped my mind that Municipal Waste was tonight. Those were $10 tickets son! I’d picked up a few but the couple friends I invited couldn’t make it… So I brought the kiddos, and the eldest (11) straight DOMINATED the pit, crowd-surfed, and only high-fived the lead singer. (or so he tells me… I can’t believe I missed it!) No biggie though. The point? It’s another late night, and tomorrow is another early morning, but then… it’s the WEEKEND! I don’t have to work. I’m not playing a show. I get to clean, and relax!!!!!!

And what better way to celebrate a long week (or month) then with some good oi music? Albeit, the song “Squared Away” isn’t about taking your boots off. It’s about putting them on.

Maybe it’s just me, but I love when a song starts on drums. The opening percussion solo/ tom roll is a definitive call-to-arms before perhaps the simplest but dare-I-say most epic of guitar techniques – a good ear splitting pickslide – chimes in to bring with it utter devastation to your copacetic equilibrium, and that’s just the first five seconds.

South Class Veterans are a five-piece skin head outfit out of New Jersey. They lay down thick, hefty East Coast street punk. Recently they’ve been picked up by Demons Run Amok Entertainment, and are set to release their debut full-length album Hell to Pay on October 25 to follow up their 2017 EP, Tall Cans and Shortcomings. Album pre-orders are available here. They’ve given Dying Scene the green light to premiere the first single off that album, “Squared Away” – a song about the eruption of violence at an infamous Dropkick Murphy’s/Oxymoron show in 1999 Teaneck, NJ.

“The night is young and the clubs packing. We’ve been at it for weeks, you can feel the tension. LET’S GO! We’re gonna end it at the show tonight!The booze is flowing and the music’s right, just need a little spark to set this place alight. LET’S GO!  We’re gonna end it at the show tonight!”

Stream “Squared Away” below



Pirates Press Records announces lineup for Rock The Ship

Pirates Press Records has announced the lineup for its four night run of shows called Rock The Ship. It will be in the Bay area and will begin Thursday October 17th and finish up Sunday October 20th. Some of the acts for this years event are: Cock Sparrer, Subhumans, CJ Ramone, Bad Cop/Bad Cop, Off With Their Heads, The Bar Stool Preachers, The Old Firm Casuals and Charger. Wait! There’s more! Pirates Press Records has also saved a few surprise announcements for Rock The Ship, which we can look forward to in the upcoming weeks.

You can scoot on over here to get yourself a pass. Check out below for a look at the lineup so far.



Booze & Glory Announce New Album, “Hurricane”

Good news, street punk fans…new Booze & Glory is coming by the end of the year!

The UK-based quartet have announced October 18th as the release date for their long-awaited fifth studio album. It’s called Hurricane, and the band will be releasing it via their own Scarlet Teddy Records. Hurricane was recorded by Millencolin’s Mathias Farm, and closes with the six-minute epic “Too Soon,” which you may have seen the video for here.

Hurricane marks Booze & Glory’s first album since 2017’s Chapter IV. Stay tuned for more info!



The Take release video for “Revolution Now”

The Take, who feature Will Shepler, (Agnostic Front, Madball) Scott Roberts, (Biohazard, Spudmonsters) and Carlos Congate (45 Adapters, Urban Noise, Legion 76), have released a video for “Revolution Now”. The track is taken from their eponymously titled debut album, out now on Demons Run Amok Entertainment.

Have a watch below.



New Video: The Old Firm Casuals – “Casual Rock-N-Roll”

Lace up your boots and roll up your jeans, gang…the latest video from The Old Firm Casuals is finally upon us!

It’s for the track “Casual Rock-N-Roll” from the band’s latest effort, Holger Danske, which was released back in March on Pirates Press Records. The title is a reference to the way the band’s frontman, Lars Frederiksen, characterizes their sound; as he told us when we chatted a few months ago, “At the end of the day, yeah we’re a punk band, yeah we’re a street punk band, yeah we’re an Oi! band, but basically what we are and always have been … is a “casual rock and roll band!”

Check out the video for “Casual Rock-N-Roll” below, and head here to find out where you can catch Lars and the fellas live this summer!



UK Subs detail another covers album…

UK Subs are to release Subversions II, the follow up to their covers album of last year, on June 28th. The record is out on vinyl and CD and available for pre-order now.

A list of who they’ve covered for the album is below



The Old Firm Casuals announce tour dates; Added to This is Hardcore

Leading up to an appearance at the This is Hardcore festival, California’s The Old Firm Casuals have announced a string of dates across the US this July. The dates are as follows:

Saturday July 6 – Berkeley, CA – Cornerstone
Sunday July 7 – Los Angeles, CA – 1720
Thursday July 11 – Dallas, Tx – Three Links
Friday July 12 – Austin, Tx – Dirty Dog Bar
Saturday July 13 – Houston, Tx – The Secret Group
Saturday July 27 – East Providence, RI – Roadblock Music Festival
July 28-29- Philadelphia, PA – This is Hardcore Festival

You can watch their video for “Motherland” below.



Album Review: The Old Firm Casuals – “Holger Danske”

The second “Get Out Of Our Way” kicks in, you get a feeling that The Old Firm Casuals aren’t fucking about on “Holger Dankse”. There’s no holding back from bassist Casey Watson as he leads the beginning of the album with a menacing snarl, delivering a statement of intent and a spit in the face to those that would write the band off as a mere side gig.

Once the middle finger to the world is over, The Old Firm Casuals enter into more familiar territory with Lars Frederiksen’s trademark wail on “Motherland”, an ambitious, anthemic street punk track firmly rooted in the big chorus approach he’s become known for over the years.

From here, “Pendulum” begs you to throw your weight around in a pit, and the anti-fascist tones of the record reach their first climax here before “De Ensomme Ulve” segues into the title track. “Holger Danske” tells the tale of the album’s eponymous Dane, in what feels like the original album opener enduring on the tracklisting despite more visceral content entering the fray as the writing went on – for all its intent and swagger.

Next up, “Casual Rock-N-Roll”, creates an effortless marriage of AC/DC and Lars’ “…Wolves” era that throws up visions of Mashall cabs and mohawks, letting the band cut loose and have fun before “Traitor” brings The Old Firm Casuals right back to the line of punk and hardcore that they’ve walked so well in the past.

The album’s such a patchwork of genres at this point that it’s almost disorientating, but that’s meant entirely in a complimentary way: it’s a “best bit” of sorts from each genre that the band touch on, living as both a throwback and a breath of fresh air, so much so that the uplifting “The Golden Fall Pt. 1” giving way to Casey Watson’s growl on Sick Of It All-esque throwdown “Thunderbolt” doesn’t even feel jarring.

“Overdose On Sin” kicks in with a solid bass solo and bulldozes through a snotty, two minute hardcore before the woahs return for “Nation On Fire” (which could easily have been a lead track on the record) and the record yields with a five minute epic in “Zombies”.

“Holger Danske” is a landmark record for The Old Firm Casuals. It’s an album by a group of experienced and confident musicians making music on their own terms, with little regard to what other people expect them to sound like. There’s no hammering the songs into a fixed genre, no restrictions on the ideas, and it’s a thrilling listen because of it – especially if you’re a fan of the collective work of its members.

The Old Firm Casuals have delivered a well balanced full length that has depth, quality, passion and piles of energy in “Holger Danske”, and it’s absolutely one of the best punk records of 2019 so far.

4/5 Stars



Video Premiere: The Take (Oi, Hardcore) premiere “The Elitist”

New York hardcore and oi punk veterans, Will Shepler, (Agnostic Front, Madball) Scott Roberts, (Biohazard, Spudmonsters) and Carlos Congate (45 Adapters, Urban Noise, Legion 76) have joined forces to create the next highly anticipated New York sensation, The Take… I know, right? This shit is fucking titillating.

Shepler, a drummer of legend, is back on the scene after a long hiatus, in which time he’s gained a family and a degree. He never rejoined Agnostic Front after their initial breakup in ’93 due to increasing obligations with his other legendary hardcore band Madball, except briefly when occasioned to fill-in. After Madball, Shepler’s focus fell on his family, respectively, playing in smaller circumstantial acts, and still somehow finding time to go to shows. He says now, however, that he’s ready to let music retake a more prominent role in life, and he’s bringing it back with the help of these other fine gentlemen to their other family.

That’s you and me, young scenesters, and today is your lucky day.

We’re bringing you the first look at The Take’s debut music video for “The Elitist”.

“The Elitist” was directed and put together by noted videographer – legendary in his own rights – Drew Stone, in collaboration with Jeff Plisken of Raised Fist Propaganda. Stone is known for the documentary The New York Hardcore Chronicles, as well as producing videos for a host of reputable musical acts including Run-DMC, Vanilla Ice, and Insane Clown Posse, and currently has a documentary streaming on Netflix called Who the Fuck is That Guy? The Fabulous Journey of Michael Alago.

Keep an eye out for the band’s self-titled album to drop soon on Demons Run Amok Entertainment sometime this spring. Of the album, Shepler says, “The influences are from everything we grew up listening to and were a part of : oi! / punk/ hardcore / rock’n’roll, that is our roots. It’s in our soul. It’s in our DNA! We are not trying to copy something, we are just playing what is within us already and trying to give it a new voice, a fresh sound.”

The band is excited. Here’s one for the punks and skins!! Premiere the music video for The Elitist below.

Photo credit: Rich Zoeller



Behind The Label: Dying Scene chats with Pirates Press’s Eric “Skippy” Mueller

News of the dramatic upswing in the sales of vinyl albums over the course of the last decade – to levels not seen since prior to the digital age – should come as no surprise to faithful Dying Scene readers. While reissues of classic albums from the 1970s and ’80s tend to rule the popular charts, the punk and hardcore and metal and indie scenes are well represented in the area of sheer volume of new releases and options and variants being cranked out week after week.

Leading the charge in the vinyl revolution has been none other than dyed-in-the-wool punk rock label Pirates Press Records. Founded by Eric “Skippy” Mueller back in 2005 as the advertising arm of the vinyl manufacturer that shares its name and was started a year prior, Pirates Press has built a name and reputation as putting out some of the more special and innovative releases available, particularly under the street punk umbrella. Cock Sparrer “Essentials “boxed set? That was Pirates Press. 46-album Rancid 7-inch boxed set? Pirates Press. Noi!se 12-inch single featuring three-dozen assault rifle-style bullets milled out of the vinyl itself as a fundraiser to tackle gun violence and school shootings? Pirates Press. Playable The Ratchets hologram vinyl (yes…effing playable hologram vinyl!)? Pirates Press, of course. New The Old Firm Casuals full-length that allowed me the opportunity to chat for like an hour with the great Lars Frederiksen a few weeks ago (okay, maybe that one’s not necessarily cutting edge, but it’s my story, dammit)? You guessed it: Pirates Press.

We caught up with the one-and-only Mueller over the phone from his Bay Area, California, office a little while back and found in him a kindred spirit right from jump street; despite living in and operating Pirates Press from the Bay Area, Mueller is a native of Massachusetts and, as such, a diehard – and we mean DIEHARD – card-carrying member of Red Sox Nation. Yet his level of passion for the Red Sox is surpassed by leaps and bounds for his level of passion for the punk rock community and for giving back to a scene that’s given him so much. Case in point: his loves of punk rock and his label and his manufacturing business and his two hometowns collided last weekend when Mueller attended the San Francisco record release show for The Old Firm Casuals’ Holger Danske, left early, caught a red eye flight to Boston in time for Lenny Lashley’s gig at the in-the-shadow-of-Fenway-Park House Of Blues supporting Dropkick Murphys, complete with a hockey bag full of Lenny Lashley’s Gang Of One-themed merch…then flew right back home to San Francisco.

Mueller is endlessly positive and energetic (perhaps more accurately “shot out of a proverbial cannon”), equal parts ultra-confident salesman for his cutting-edge business and, in many ways, quintessentially proud papa for a label that he literally grew out of his old bedroom. In a nutshell, it kinda works like this: Pirates Press, the manufacturer, presses products – mostly vinyl albums and mostly in the Czech Republic – for labels and products of all shapes and sizes. Revenue from the manufacturing side gets infused into Pirates Press Records, the label, offering the opportunity to put out albums for bands and projects that they personally support. And if they come up with a cool new idea or technology or color variant in the manufacturing side, they can use that first on Pirates Press Records releases, allowing an album from The Ratchets or Noi!se or Bar Stool Preachers or Lenny Lashley to effectively become a real-life business card, showing the world via the label the things that the manufacturer is able to do, thereby drawing more labels and artists and brands into the fold on the manufacturing side, and so on and so on. Mueller remains vigorously committed to putting out new and unique and innovative products on the manufacturing side of the business, using the label to showcase some of the things they’re able to pull off, and reinvesting the money earned from larger manufacturing projects into the label, helping bands he loves and respects to put out new, vital music. It’s a fascinating win-win cycle that should continue to provide constant wind into the sails of the good ship Pirates Press for many years to come

Head below to check out our chat with Skippy to find out just what goes in to pulling off some of the seemingly endless options that Pirates Press’ manufacturing arm is able to pull off, particularly their recent run on flexi vinyl and how they were able to reverse engineer new presses to expand their line, and how the label offers Mueller and his fellow Pirates to invest in a record label that offers a home for projects that they – and we – love and support!



LVGER (Oi!, NYC) announce debut self-titled EP

New York City Oi! band LVGER have announced their debut self-titled EP will be released on March 21st via Oi! The Boat Records.

The band is streaming 4 of the 6 songs ahead of the release.  You can give those a listen below, and pre-order the EP here.



DS Exclusive: Lars Frederiksen on The Old Firm Casuals’ Blistering New Album, “Holger Danske,” And So Much More

In what is a bit of an atypical move, The Old Firm Casuals made their album, Holger Danske, available for streaming on February 18th, close to a month before said album’s official physical release date of March 15th. The album marks a few firsts for the band, most notably the fact that it’s their first full-length as a four-piece and simultaneously their first full-length on Pirates Press Records. But more importantly, Holger Danske finds The Old Firm Casuals officially unleashing what can fairly and accurately be called a whole new sonic experience to the masses; a dozen songs that merge balls-out 70’s AC/DC-style rock, blistering early-80’s Metallica style thrash and their trademark Oi!/street punk sound and bellow it through a centuries-old Viking Gjallarhorn.

We called the band’s well-known frontman, Lars Frederiksen, at his home last week, to discuss Holger Danske and all that went in to the making of this unique and widely well-received album. To say that we found Frederiksen’s personality and storytelling to be any less unique, compelling, and wide-ranging than the album we set out to discuss would be to wildly inaccurate. And while Holger Dankse may not be comprised of autobiographical material referencing his friends or his family or his upbringing, it may well be the most personal album from start-to-finish in Frederiksen’s three decades in the music business. But fear not, punk fans. Lest you were afraid that approaching the age of fifty, being a husband for more than a decade and a father to eleven-year-old and seven-year-old sons, Wolfgang and Soren, would have softened some of Lars Frederiksen’s trademark rougher edges, you clearly don’t know Lars Frederiksen. “Since I’ve become a father,” he points out, “I’ve gotten a lot more pissed off. There’s a lot more responsibility and there’s a lot more being accountable and taking responsibility for my actions or seeing the world as it is.” Still, fatherhood has allowed Frederiksen some rather important insight into his own history and behavior. “When I was eleven years old,” he explains, “I went to juvie for possession of PCP, breaking and entering and mayhem, because the guy who I broke into the house with, I took his eyeball out of his skull (when I hit him) with a piece of racing track because he was giving me a bad trip. That’s what I got busted for. And to juxtapose that, my eleven year old loves Magic: The Gathering, right? Plays soccer. Can solve a Rubik’s Cube in under ten seconds. Does Rubik’s Cube tournaments, okay? He reads himself to sleep every night.”

The fact that Frederiksen reports that both of his boys are musical may not necessarily be much of a surprise to most readers. What may be a surprise, however, is the role that his youngest son had in shaping some of the album’s sound. “My seven year old is a drummer,” he explains with a palpable level of pride oozing from his voice. “(Soren) thinks punk is cool, but (he) wants to listen to Slayer and Lamb Of God and Testament and Kreator and Manowar. KISS is too puss for (him) right now. So, when I have a new riff, most of the time, he’ll go down and jam them with me. He’s a really good drummer, he can keep a beat. That’s how “Thunderbolt” came about. We were sitting down there, and he’s like “Dad, you gotta play some hardcore. I’ve got this beat and I want to play it but it’s got to be to hardcore!” So I went downstairs and we started playing around and that’s when I came up with that riff. So there’s really a few songs on that record that he sort of helped come into fruition!” But the familial input didn’t stop there. Far from it, in fact.

To have been aware of Lars Frederiksen in any number of his projects, from Rancid to Lars Frederiksen And The Bastards to Oxley’s Midnight Runners to Stomper 98 to The Old Firm Casuals to others that I’m probably forgetting to mention now is to have been aware of how outwardly proud he is of his Danish heritage; Lars’ mom moved to the States from Denmark with little in the way of money, contacts, or knowledge of the English language and eventually brought Frederiksen and his older brother back to her homeland for a time after divorcing the boys’ father. While Holger Danske owes a great deal of its inspiration and imagery to the Frederiksen family’s *ahem* “motherland,” that wasn’t initially the case. “The whole thing about this record is that, and I hate to use this word, but it’s a little be auspicious in a sense,” he explains. You see, during the writing process, the band had initially planned on calling the album Zombies, a title derived from the song of the same name that closes Holger Danske but that was really a hold-over from the sessions that went into A Butcher’s Banquet a few years back. The album’s artwork, while not completed, would have essentially consisted of zombie-fied, cartoon-like depictions of the band’s four members. As the writing process continued, however, a change of direction began to take shape, simultaneously inspired by Frederiksen’s connection to his mother’s native Denmark, and his own growing anger at the current sociopolitical climate at home.

My mom was raised in Nazi-occupied Denmark in World War II, and she saw a lot of things that no kid between the ages of four and eight should ever see,” says Frederiksen. “Growing up in that environment as a kid, she comes from a Socialist country that’s very accepting and very tolerant, whether it be sex, race, religion, whatever it is. From her own experiences in dealing with fascism, she’s obviously got a very strong hatred toward that kind of thinking. I think that was installed in me and my brother.” Enter: Holger Danske, the legendary Danish folk hero who fought as one of the Knights Of Charlemagne. According to legend, Holger Danske is still alive centuries later, albeit in a deep sleep in an off-limits corner of a castle basement in Denmark. As Frederiksen describes it, “the story is that every Christmas an angel comes and whispers in his ear, and either he can stay asleep or he has to rise up and defend Denmark against his enemies.

It was during a visit from his Danish cousin to the States last year that Frederiksen began to take notice of the Holger Danske iconography that was depicted on the front of the Danish Men’s National Team’s jerseys during the World Cup. From there, the wheels started in motion, but in a stroke of serendipity, the decision to change the album’s name and direction came from a perhaps unlikely source. “What really sealed the fucking deal on that,” he explains, “is that me and my mom were talking, and she’s like “oh, you’re making a new record!…what are you going to call it?” And I said, “actually, I was thinking about calling it Holger Danske.” And she goes “Oh, that’s a great idea!! Did you know that your uncle Viggo, in World War II was part of the Danish resistance against the Nazis, and his unit was called ‘Holger Danske’?” And I was like “no, I was never told that, mother, because you don’t want to talk about the war and what happened and how you saw body parts and your family getting killed for their farm and shit like that.” So, I was like “this is it!

As you might imagine, Frederiksen took a look at the current sociopolitical climate in the world – not just in the States – and thought that now might be as good a time as any for Holger Danske to awaken and get shit back on track. “Holger Danske was kind of a metaphor in a way where I’m talking about fighting fascism…That’s what this record is kind of about; it’s about fighting fascism from both the left and the right.” One need not look very far for examples of the types of fascism Frederiksen is referring to. Racism. Sexism. Homophobia. Lack of clearly defined boundaries between church and state. Political correctness. All of the above and on both sides of the political spectrum draw the ire of Frederiksen and crew on Holger Danske. “I don’t care who the current administration is — well, I DO — but you’re going to get fucking shots fired at you either way. You’re going to take more shots than Karl Malone, to borrow a phrase from my buddies over in The Transplants. To me, politics is bullshit…Once you start telling people how they can act, what they can say, what they can not say, how they can dress, how they can not dress, what they can call themselves or what they can’t call themselves, that’s fascism…And that’s one of the things with Holger Danske. Now’s the time for this motherfucker to rise up and defend us again. Obviously I’m from a long line of fighting fascism, so I have to continue the family tradition!”

Assuming you haven’t done so, give Holger Danske a listen right here. You’ve still got time to pre-order before the March 15th street date here through Pirates Press as well. But most importantly today, you can check out our exclusive chat with the inimitable Frederiksen. We covered an awful lot of ground; being working class poor, the origin of “casual rock and roll,” Metallica’s Kirk Hammett’s opinion of The Old Firm Casuals’ new lead guitar player (Gabe Gavriloff), parenthood, the Kardashians, gerrymandering, the separation of church and state, and watermelon farmers in Alabama are but a few of the many topics touched on. Check out the full exchange below!



Album review: Vis Vires – “The Wolves EP”

Los Angeles has a new Oi band Vis Vires, which features members of The Templars, The Hardknocks, and Bovver Wonderland. The Wolves may be their debut four track EP, but they are no rookies and this album full of hardcore street punk anthems, will commandeer your attention.

The EP opens with marching drums before giving away to soaring guitars, while the lyrics build up an us-against-them attitude, as “Witch Hunt” sets the table for all the threats and injustice that face us. Where the next song “Wolves” gives us that hardcore ideology that we are in this together and our unity can ‘destroy the betrayers’ that were defined in the first song. Next up is “Vengeance” a not-so-gentle reminder that perhaps we should not betray their trust. A burner of a tune dripping with rage and showcasing a face-melting guitar solo.

The Wolves ends with a more melodic tune, “This is the End” tones down the hardcore elements and gives their street punk side a little more room to breathe. The subtle change of pace really makes this song standout on the album. It still oozes with anger but really showcases their musicianship, as each band member is given a chance to shine. From the opening drum and bass lines to the swelling guitar work punctuated by a gang chorus, this song draws you into the wolfpack and makes you want to join the fight.

While Vis Vires may not be as frantically charged as Bovver Wonderland or have the same garage buzz as the Templars, they are carving their own niche into the oi scene with a high quality blend of hardcore and street punk. If you are a fan of anthemic, tough as nails music that features soaring guitars overlayed on surgically precise drumming, Vis Vires has something you might want to check out.

4/5 Stars



The Old Firm Casuals stream upcoming album “Holger Danske”

The Old Firm Casuals are streaming their upcoming album. Holger Danske isn’t out until March 15th, but the band are streaming it in its entirety over at Decibel Magazine.

The album is the first full length from the band since 2014’s This Means War.



The Old Firm Casuals (Oi! / Punk) stream new single “Get Out Of Our Way”

The Old Firm Casuals, led by Lars Frederiksen (Rancid) and Casey Watson (ex-Never Healed), have premiered a new single through Kerrang!. “Get Out Of Our Way” is taken from the band’s forthcoming album “Holger Danske”, which is released next Friday 15th February through Demons Run Amok Entertainment. The album follows 2017’s “Wartime Rock ‘N’ Roll” EP.

You can stream the track using the player below.