Search Results for "Pop Punk"

Album Review: Teenage Bubblegums – “In Limbo”

When it comes to music, an often overused phrase I hear regarding bands is something along the lines of “wow, their sound has really matured”. More often than not, it hasn’t and the listener is left listening to an album that’s about the same as the last. This is definitely not the case with “In Limbo”, the newest album by Teenage Bubblegums. This trio from Italy has been maturing their sound over the last 10 years with each and every album they’ve released… “In Limbo” is no exception.

What I love about Teenage Bubblegums is their no nonsense approach to pop punk, and yes, I still consider it pop punk. Each song hits you one after another like rapid fire and before you can even get comfy you realize you’re already on your second spin of the album. If you’re looking for a lyrically light-hearted, feel good album about sunshine and daisies, this may not be the album for you. What Teenage Bubblegums does so well is deliver self-described songs about “sad stuff” in the catchiest way possible that’s both dark and mesmeric. 

The album is only 14 minutes long, but that doesn’t matter. I can almost guarantee that you’ll listen to this album over and over again in a single sitting to make up any time you feel they may have shorted you. The dueling brother and sister vocals along with the cohesiveness of the songs draw you in deep and keep you wanting more. There’s not a lot of variation in tempo in these songs, but that’s part of the charm. Teenage Bubblegums kicks in the door, announces that they’re here, and then leaves the door wide open reminding you that they were there.

They begin the album with a short intro, a journey into the darkness that “In Limbo” is going to lead you through. Immediately after the intro comes bass player Ally’s menacing band announcement and laugh, letting you know it’s go time! They immediately dive into “Quit It”, the first song on the album. We’re greeted with Luca’s blistering hi-hats as well as a heavy guitar and bass that carry through the entirety of the album. This song is about expecting more from life and the desire to “quit it” and it really sets you up for the dismal tone of the rest of the album.

Lyrically there is definitely a theme throughout the entire album, and each song is a short poetic, yet dejected masterpiece. The entirety of “In Limbo” to me tells the story of a few lost souls wandering in a state of ignorance and sadness, unable to find their way through a doomed reality. It wasn’t until I read the lyrics on their Bandcamp that I realized how dark and deep this album really is. It also shows that a lot can be said in a short amount of words.

Each track is fast, catchy and provides plenty of opportunity to sing along. They’re mostly straightforward, but there are a few surprises in a few of them. For example, “Burn” has a nice breakdown that happens almost out of nowhere and adds another great element to the song musically. Teenage Bubblegums doesn’t allot themselves a ton of time, so they make it a point to do as much as they can in the amount they’ve given themselves.

The title track, “In Limbo”, like the others, is short and to the point and features a great hook in the form of a call and response between the siblings. The guitar and bass almost dance in the background while the drums drive you through the song. The pounding floor tom towards the end provides a nice intermission before the chorus picks up again to finish it out.

The song “High” doesn’t hesitate to propel you directly to the pre-chorus and chorus. Before you know it you’re singing along to the song, it ends and it’s on to the next one. The most mysterious thing I find with Teenage Bubblegums’ lyrics is that it’s not always obvious to the listener what they’re about exactly. My interpretation of “High” is that it tells a story of a person suffering from a closetted depression and drug addiction, clinging to life alone while no one knows. Pairing subject matter like that with catchy songs is what makes this band stand out from the rest.

My favorite song, “Shame”, starts off with a heavy riff that teeters between chords like a seesaw. There’s something about the tone in Marco’s voice at the beginning that give this song a different feel to it. When you hear the catchiness of the chorus, “Baby I’m on fire!”, you almost forget that the song is about someone who is overcome with so much humiliation and loneliness that they feel like they’re “on fire”. The song structure is almost a mirror of itself. Not only do I love how the verse is repeated between the two singers before coming together in the chorus, I also love that in the first verse Marco sings first, and in the second verse Ally sings first. Lyrically, it’s a very well thought out song.

If you’re from the United States, hopefully you were fortunate to catch Teenage Bubblegums on their tour that just wrapped up. If you enjoy streaming “In Limbo”… you’ll most definitely enjoy seeing it played live. I knew I wasn’t going to be disappointed with this album, because as I alluded to earlier, Teenage Bubblegums is a band that gets exponentially better with every single one of their releases. They pull off something most bands of a specific genre cannot, and that’s putting their own brand on it. Although this album is short, it’s very clear that they spent a lot of time and effort on it. “In Limbo” was just released and I already want more!



Album Review: The Yodees – “S/T”

What do you get when you combine all the great elements of pop punk and mix them with a splash of Ramonescore? You get the first self-titled album from the Brazilian band, The Yodees!

Clocking in at just under 23 minutes, The Yodees let you know that they’re playing for a specific pop punk audience… and the bands that inspire them can be heard throughout each of the nine songs on the album. What you won’t hear is music that’s played in malls, mainstream radio or movie soundtracks. This album isn’t for fans of New Found Glory or Simple Plan… and that’s what I love about it. The Yodees remind the punk rock world that there’s another type of pop punk that’s alive and well, and won’t be found in Hot Topic. 

Perhaps one of the most impressive things about this album is the amazing sound quality it possesses. Most bands take a few albums to dial in their sound and figure out how it should be captured on a record. It is clear The Yodees took their time with their debut and added the right amount of polish to produce an overall cohesive album in both sound quality and song selection. The tempos vary as well as the moods of each of the nine songs on this album, and each one tells a different story of falling in love, falling out of love, being foolish and growing up.

With their first song, “Better Without Love,” The Yodees knock on your door with a thunderous drum intro reminiscent of the Methadones, Mopes and even the Huntingtons. It’s a great way to introduce the band and prepare listeners for the type of punk they’re about to take in. The song touches upon a familiar subject matter that most other pop punk bands dabble in from time to time: a relationship about to end. But rather than talk about it in a celebrated and snotty way, The Yodees approach the subject in a more reserved and mature manner with a sound to match. There’s guitars with the right amount of chugging and drums that propel the song forward while keeping it interesting with tasty, but simplistic fills. The Yodees aren’t here to overplay. They fit right into the pop punk pocket musically and keep you comfortable and wanting more of what’s familiar.

“Loony” begins with a classic Ramonescore tom intro and count off that would make Dee Dee smile. Immediately, chainsaw guitars you’d hear from any great Screeching Weasel song kick in along with a driving and catchy vocal melody. We were warming up before, but now this album is cooking. This is the song I didn’t know I was waiting for, and now that it’s here I can’t wait to learn the words. This song has everything, including a silly chorus that I know you’ll be caught singing along to, even if you don’t mean to.   

About halfway through the album we’re given “The Vitamin Shoppe Girl”… a ballad about a guy with a crush on you guessed it, a Vitamin Shoppe girl. It tells the story of a day in the life of a man desperate to talk to the girl of his dreams. We’ve all been there one way or another… and this connection along with the catchy verse and chorus make this one catchy tune. It’s serves as a nice break after the upbeat “Loony” and introduces layered backups that remind me of every great Queers ballad. The line, “Vitamin Shoppe Girl, you’re everything that my body needs,” is a cheeky play on words. Is it access to all the vitamins that your body needs or something else? I’ll have to ask him in person.

After a couple mid tempo songs comes “Everybody Is Growing Up (But Me)” and we’ve officially thrown a few more logs on the fire. A crunchy guitar intro leads into a Kody Lillington style chord progression. Just like the songs that have come before it, this song has everything that makes up a great song: a strong verse, well thought out pre-chorus, and chorus that just makes you want to point your fist in the air and sing along.  “Everybody is Growing Up (But Me)” tells the story of a friend that everyone has, or at least I have. A friend that is a little behind in life… not married, no kids, and feeling hopeless while watching other friends achieve these milestones. The beginning of the song has the character questioning whether or not he’s the one who’s wrong and if he should be feeling sorry for himself. Towards the end we’re given another perspective… when he realizes that while he may not have all the things his friends enjoy, he’s still able to “live his prime” while being debt free.

The Yodees debut album is a celebration of pop punk. Are they reinventing any wheels?  No. But when you play in a sub genre of a sub genre that has a tight knit and loyal following you don’t have to. The Yodees will do well, because they do their style of pop punk well. As this debut album demonstrates… even the simplest and easiest style of music, when done great, makes an impact and can stay with you… maybe even bring you back for a few more listens. Listening to this S/T is almost like listening to an amazing pop punk compilation, only there’s one band. The mix of mid tempo songs, ballads, and rippers creates an amazing rollercoaster effect that has a perfectly executed arrangement. I hope to see these guys tour the US in the future. I already know we’ll be hearing more from them.

Stream the album now on Bandcamp or Spotify!





Introducing Pop-Punk Act: The Yodees

What if I told you one of the best pop punk albums of the year was from a band from Brazil? You’d want to hear more right? The first self-titled album from The Yodees is here and the boys in blue and white bring the perfect blend of all things traditional pop punk with a sprinkle of Ramonescore. There’s plenty of whoas, ohs, and doot doot da doos to pick you up on even the cloudiest day.

To stream now, head on over to their Spotify or listen to their Bandcamp below.



Chief State release new track “Deciduous”

Vancouver pop-punk five-piece Chief State have released a new single. “Deciduous” is out now on all the usual platforms – and is the first track to be taken from upcoming album Tough Love, out at some point early next year.

Have a listen to the track on Spotify.



For I Am (pop-punk, BE) release video for new track “Die Hard”

Belgium pop-punkers For I Am have released a video for new single “Die Hard”. The track is taken from the band’s second album, Late Bloomers, out Nov 15th via Bearded Punk Records.

Have a watch below.



Introducing Pop-Punk Act: Between Bodies

Sometime in the unknown, but assumably not too far away, future German pop-punk act Between Bodies will release their debut EP on KROD Records. No whet the appetites of would-be fans the band has created a music video for a song off the release titled “Fire Alarm,” and I must say it has certainly worked on me. Dynamic, fresh, slightly emo-ish, and just… good. These guys have successfully landed on my radar. Let them do the same for you by checking out the music video below.



Introducing Skate Punk Act: Basement Sound

So many Dying Scene readers make this humble website a daily virtual stop in their Internet wanderings because they crave new discoveries. Navigating the vast sea of new bands popping up daily on Spotify or Bandcamp is a daunting task but that’s what we’re here for – to save you hours upon hours of listening to mediocre songs just to find the next gem. Well, here’s a new one to add to the radar for you fans of 90s style skate punk. Dual singers, angsty vocals, Fat-esque melodies and rhythm. Basement Sound isn’t breaking the mold with their style but they certainly do the genre justice. On December 13th the boys (“Dads” actually) will be releasing their debut album “Good Job Some Of You,” and you can stream the first single “Wake Up,” below.



Bowling for Soup streaming cover of Eddie Money’s “Two Tickets to Paradise”

Texas pop-punk veterans Bowling for Soup are streaming their tribute to the late Eddie Money, a cover of his hit song “Two Tickets to Paradise”. Money recently succumbed to esophageal cancer on September 13th. “Two Tickets to Paradise” came out back in 1977 on Eddie Money’s début album. Bowling for Soup originally recorded this cover way back in 2006, it was originally meant to be a part of the film “Two Tickets to Paradise!”, but for whatever reason was never released.

Call it an ode to Eddie Money or a celebration of their 25th year as a band, Bowling for Soup kills this cover so check it out below.

Bowling for Soup is now out on the road celebrating their 25th anniversary, they recently announced some shows across the pond with “super special guests” Simple Plan for February, which you can also check out below. Bowling for Soup’s last release was a cover of the Suicide Machines classic “Sometimes I Don’t Mind” earlier this year.



Video Premiere: Rational Anthem stream “Through Being Punk”

Florida to Iowa punks Rational Anthem are streaming their latest music video in support of their record, It’s Only Permanent, out November 1 on A-F Records. The new single is called “Through Being Punk” and it’s for anyone who’s ever thought about packing up their bags and moving far off to some remote region where even dyingscene.com can’t get a hold of you.

“The title of this song pretty much sums it up.” Bassist/vocalist Chris Hembrough has to say about the new single. “One of the things I’ve grown super tired of in regards to punk rock is the marriage between the music and how celebrated it is to be depressed and apathetic. I thought that was cool for a long time. It showed people you were punk. I came to realize it doesn’t have to be that way.”

He leaves us with an enlightened perspective to ponder while a guy in an Undertaker shirt superstitiously taps the various paintings of his favorite venue’s art collection. “I want to be happy, healthy, and take good care of myself. I want people around me to do well and do great things. A lot of the punk scene sells you on this dumb notion that staying angsty and sad is all just a part of it. Fuck that. As far as that stuff goes, I’m through being punk, but playing and celebrating punk music will always be a passion of mine. Put on a Tony Robbins tape and join a jazzercise class. Being happy is cool.” Sounds good. Stream “Through Being Punk” below



Versus You (melodic punk) release music video for new single “Your Only Song”

Listen up melodic punk fans, I’m here to tell you about a new single from Versus You, one of Luxembourg’s best punk bands, which might also be Luxembourg’s only punk bands, but that’s beside the point. These guys can hold their own with their European, Canadian, Australian, and US counterparts and “Your Only Song,” their latest single, is the proof. Check out the video below

The new single is the band’s first releases since their full-length “Worn And Loved,” released in March, 2019.



DS Exclusive: Love Like Fiction Stream Debut EP, “Summer Daze”, with Track-by-Track Breakdown

Ahoy, pop punk lovers! Dying Scene is back atcha’ with new music that amounts to a clever misdirection maybe, but never a waste of time. Love Like Fiction are streaming their debut EP, Summer Daze, for fans of unique lyricism and skillful harmonious melodies. Pop punk and emo fans are sure to love this new six-track EP. Love Like Fiction draws some pretty definite inspiration from bands like New Fond Glory, but with perhaps a Boy’s Night Out approach. They’ve shared the stage with such notable acts including Sum 41 and SWMRS. The new self-released EP is available now on all major streaming services.

Below they’ve included a track by track breakdown for each song on the EP. Enjoy!



Green Day streams “Fire, Ready, Aim” off upcoming album

Pop-punk icons Green Day are streaming the second single “Fire, Ready, Aim” off of their upcoming album Father of All… Personally, I am not a huge Green Day fan. Dookie is about where my Green Day knowledge ends. So not sure if this is a good song or Blink-esque fall from grace.

Check out the new song below.

The new album Father of All.. is due out February 7th.



Avem streaming new album “Split” with Cobra & the Daggers

Ramonescore bird-nerds Avem are streaming their latest high-flying release “Split” along with Cobra & the Daggers. Avem happens to be from my neck of the woods and are truly after Celine’s heart with these beautifully crafted aviary-punk masterpieces. I was especially impressed with the track “Flying Back to You”.

Check out the new release below.

This is the first new music from Avem since Don’t Call Me Bro earlier this year. 



Future Teens on tour with The Wonder Years, Homesafe, and Trash Boat for The 3rd Annual Halloween Extravaganza

The self-described “bummer pop” band from Boston, MA is currently on tour with The Wonder Years, Homesafe, and Trash Boat for the 3rd (Occasionally) Annual Halloween Extravaganza, where all of the bands play a costumed cover set as another band in addition to their own. Future Teens most recently released Breakup Season on Take This To Heart Records in late August and will be complimenting those originals on this tour with samplings from the beloved Carly Rae Jepsen catalog. Homesafe will be playing as Weezer (playing as Toto?), Trash Boat will be taking the stage as Oasis, and The Wonder Years will be breaking stuff as the equally maligned-and-praised nu metal OGs Limp Bizkit.

Check out the tour below to see if you can still catch the extravaganza!



The Subjunctives (pop-punk from former Sicko member) stream new song from upcoming album “Sunshine And Rainbows”

If you were a pop-punk rock in the mid 90’s and didn’t know who Sicko was you weren’t enough of a punk nerd. Their songs were brilliant in their earnest, hopelessly catchy simplicity, and if you were from the Pacific Northwest they were your endearing hometown heroes regretfully overshadowed by their Californian “Epifat” kin. For those of you paying attention lately, you may be aware that the band has resurfaced for a few shows and even put out a sort of “greatest hits” release through Red Scare Industries. Anybody excited by this news quickly asked the obvious follow-up question: Does this mean a new Sicko album??? Sadly, so far, the answer is “no,” but we’ve got the next best thing – The Subjunctives.

Fronted by former Sicko singer/guitar player Ean Hernandez The Subjunctives pick up where Sicko left off, playing infectious pop-punk anthems that the the pissed off 15 year old punk-wallflower I was, as well as the 40 year old jaded punk fan and father I’ve recently become, can relate to. Perhaps nowhere do both those versions of myself come together better than on the track, “The Fastbacks are the Greatest Band in History, so FUCK YOU!” featured on the band’s upcoming full-length “Sunshine And Rainbows.” Ean elaborates on the track’s inspiration: 

“This song is basically a tribute to my favorite band, The Fastbacks. For the uninitiated, The Fastbacks are Seattle’s original pop punk band. Forming in 1979, by 1990 they had become Seattle’s defacto godfathers of the genre. Fast drums, beautiful female vocal harmonies, virtuoso guitar, a healthy appreciation for 70s hardrock/punk/powerpop as well as 80’s hardcore, frenetic live shows, and delivering hooks hooks hooks… The Fastbacks were simply incredible and perfect. Their albums are available mostly through Discogs today, but remain highly recommended listening for anyone seeking a refreshing yet excellent take on our little corner of punk. Ask me about this subject at a bar, and I will go on and on! With regard to the specifics of the song: my roommate Scott really did bring home a copy of The Fastbacks’ 1990 album Very Very Powerful Motor and recommend it to me. This disc promptly blew my mind, altered my notion of what music could be, and gave me permission to play the kind of music that was in my heart, but I had no idea anyone else in the world would ever accept. Nonetheless there it was – reaching out to me, melting the turntable in my 1990 college apartment. This was my Gabba Gabba Hey moment. A few years later, I was fortunate enough to book a show for the Fastbacks and another favorite band, Beat Happening. This show, besides being totally awesome, confirmed my growing suspicion that the Fastbacks were in fact, none other than the greatest band in history. Later still, Kurt Bloch of the Fastbacks became the (nearly) exclusive engineer for Sicko’s recorded output, and even did some work for the Subjunctives. In the song, I list off the members of the band in the chorus, and change the drummer out each time I sing the chorus… since they had something like 19 different drummers (including a young Duff McKagen), but otherwise the same 3 other permanent members on guitars/bass/vox. The expletive nature of the title is a nod to Kurt’s sense of humor, and to some extent the only advice I have for dissenting opinions on this subject. Get with the program!”

Now, before you go track The Fastbacks down on Spotify, Give the new Subjunctives tune a listen below.

“Sunshine And Rainbows” is due out via Top Drawer Records on November 22nd.