Search Results for "Folk"

Sincere Engineer shares video of Paul Simon cover

Chicago’s own, Sincere Engineer has shared a video of her cover of the Paul Simon classic “You Can Call Me Al”. Sincere Engineer does a great job of channeling her inner Paul Simon and this is a pretty awesome cover, if we could only get Paul Simon to cover “Corn Dog Sonnet No. 7”.

Check Sincere Engineers take on “You Can Call Me Al” below.



Band Spotlight: Connor Ratliff and Mikey Erg bring us a secular XMAS with “The Spirit of Ratliff”

The punk rock world is wide and weird, and in a joining between comedian Connor Ratliff and the incredibly busy Mikey Erg, it has just gotten a little weirder. Christmas albums aren’t entirely outside of the punk scene’s wheelhouse (just look to Bad Religion and Chris Farren), but this entry might be the most unique I’ve encountered. The Spirit of Ratliff is an ode to the season, delivered with acoustic gusto via songs like, “Have Yourself a Merry Secular Xmas,” “No One Wants A Pizza on Xmas Day,” and “Xmas is Over (Let’s Keep the Lights Up 4 Awhile).” In a more bizarre twist, this album is as much about hating summer (see: “Summer is the Worst”) as much as it is about loving Christmas—secularly, of course.

It is, in a word: ridiculous. But—for a laugh and a little holiday cheer (or to curse the sun), you might just want to take a trip over to State Champion Records and check out the pre-order. The Spirit of Ratliff comes out, appropriately, on Black Friday (11/23), but for a more immediate taste of what the Chris Gethard alums have cooked up, check out the video below for “XMAS is the Best.”



Beans on Toast (Comedy, UK) Streams Video for “Alexa”

UK comedy folk punker Beans on Toast has released a music video for an hilarious tune about internet retail giant Amazon’s voice activated “home assistance” unit, Alexa. The track, also titled “Alexa”, questions the eventual capabilities of such a device monitoring every aspect of people’s lives, culminating in a future in which the sun itself is blocked out by an ominous shadow of Amazon delivery drones.

You can check out “Alexa” below and you definitely should because it’s bloody funny.

The track also appears on Beans on Toast’s 10th studio album, A Bird In The Hand, set for release on December 1st.



Stream “Nicrophorus Americanus” the new full-length from folk-punk act Coffin Salesman

Back in 2012, when I had a lot more time on my hands, I released a folk-punk compilation album called “Took Folk To Punk (still available for free download).” It featured a handful of up and coming folk-punk bands that I thought seriously deserved more attention. Since then punk frontmen-gone-solo acts seem to have overshadowed the sub-genre, and the lazy genre groupings of punk media organizations (guilty) probably didn’t help shaping perceptions of what a folk-punk band actually might sound like.

Enter Coffin Salesman, a side project of Boston-based musician Aria Rad (of The RadicalsLive Nude Girls). Fiddles, violins, organs and pianos meet electric guitar and punk rock angst. It’s what I would consider “true” folk-punk and had they been around in 2012 they very likely would have wound up alongside Mischief Brew, The Fucking Buckaroos, and all the others on “Too Folk To Punk.” Their new album “Nicrophorus Americanus” was released yesterday and if you dug at all the bands on “Too Folk To Punk” you’re going to want to stream it below.



Bryan McPherson Launches Kickstarter for New Album, “Kings Corner”

Dorchester, Massachusetts, native Bryan McPherson has spent the better part of the last couple decades touring the country and producing solo music that brilliantly melds traditional folk-influenced storytelling with an aggressive, punk rock playing style and work ethic. After moving to California and touring relentlessly across the country and back over the course of the last couple of years in support of his last full-length, 2015’s stellar – and criminally underrated – Wedgewood, McPherson returned home to his native Massachusetts to woodshed material for a new album.

When he got here and saw first-hand the devastating impact that the opioid epidemic of the last several years has had on his hometown, McPherson changed his mind. He decided to go back into his own personal archive to rework old tracks that never really saw the light of day commercially. Many of the songs were written when McPherson himself was in the throes of his own issues with substance use. Now sober for years, McPherson retooled the old material, approaching it from a person with an extra decade-and-a-half of lived experience. The result is Kings Corner, named after the Dorchester street corner that McPherson and his friends used to hang out on (and, coincidentally, a solid fly ball from my own old apartment).

McPherson has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help Kings Corner see the light of day. Head here to check out the unique pledge options!

 



Steady Hands stream new album “Truth In Comedy”

Steady Hands, Philadelphia Americana/punk project of former Modern Baseball drummer Sean Huber, is streaming their new album, Truth In Comedy, which was released on October 19th via Lame-O Records.

You can give it a listen below.

Steady Hands last released Rude Boys Of Bar Rock in December 2016.



DS Photo Gallery: Lucero with Brent Cowles, Paradise Rock Club, Boston, MA

Lucero are no strangers to the Boston area, but it’s been a few years since they played a proper club show of this sort; 2016 saw them headlining the Copenhagen Beer Fest, last years saw them playing on a boat in Boston Harbor. At the tail end of the East Coast run in support of their latest album, Among The Ghosts, the band made a whirlwind return to the city the weekend before last, returning to the legendary Paradise Rock Club for the first time in half a decade. Lucero have played some rather legendarily raucous shows in prior ventures to the greater Boston area, and while the craziest of those days are largely in their collective rear-view mirror, the fact that the band are on a pretty great run right now and that the show took place on a Saturday night resulted in a pretty high-energy affair.

The band kicked things off with the title track from Among The Ghosts, and in rather atypical fashion for Lucero, played largely the same core set they’d been playing on most nights of this particular run (albeit without a visible setlist in the house). What it might have lacked in improvisation, though, the set more than made up for in style and variation. Of course the new album was rightfully best represented throughout, but the band’s self-titled 2001 debut and sophomore album Tennessee, released the following year, combined to make up roughly half of what we’d call the “main set.” The return to prominence of underrated songs like “No Roses No More” and the more recent “I Can’t Stand To Leave You” are particular highlights for yours truly; the latter being an example of a song that, though Nichols wrote it during a different time in his life, has taken on new meaning and in light of more recent events in his life, and perfectly connects some of the grittier musical tones of early Lucero with the family-centered lyrical content so prevalent on Among The Ghosts. And fear not, old-school fans, the night wasn’t exactly formulaic — it’s a Lucero show, after all — as the quintet mixed things up in the latter part of their set, opted to play more music instead of leaving the stage and returning for an “encore,” and caved to audience-led peer pressure by pulling out “Bikeriders” late in the set.

Support on this run came from Brent Cowles and his stellar backing band, the Foxhole Family Band. Sadly, I admittedly wasn’t all-too familiar with the Denver-based singer-songwriter prior to the announcement of his opening role on this tour. Shame on me. Though small in stature, Cowles, the son of a preacher, sings and shreds with the kind of full-bodied soul that would make Sam Cooke look down and smile. Check out Cowles’ work here.

While you’re at it, check out our photo gallery from the evening below. You can find upcoming Lucero tour dates here. Among The Ghosts, as you should be aware, was released August 3rd on Thirty Tigers.

 

 



Tim Loud releases video for “Hate”

Tim Loud has released a video for “Hate”, a track from his third album Salvation, out now on TNS Records. You can have a watch below.

The acoustic punk has a load of dates coming up in Europe and the UK. Full info for those are also below.



Basement Benders (Punk, TN) Stream Latest Album “Shrapnel Songs”

Four-piece punk outfit Basement Benders have just released their latest album titled Shrapnel Songs on Dead Broke Rekerds. The best part is that the group are allowing you fine folks the opportunity to stream it for free. Despite being entirely amplified, the effort has a strong folk punk feel to it and will likely excite those who are that way inclined.

Check out Shrapnel Songs below. It’s the latest music from the band since their self-titled EP in 2015.



Introducing “Salty Punkabilly” Act: Wicked Shallows

Banjos? Check. Fiddle? Check. Rollicking bass lines? Yup. From the band’s own website, “Wicked Shallows is a rowdy up and coming punkabilly band from Portland OR. Their music is the auditory equivalent of a cocktail happy hour on a 1890’s steamship crewed by outlaws.” An apt description. Three songs in and I’ve determined I will see this band live before I die. Stream their new album Parched Earth below.



Stream new folk-punk album “Salvation” from Tim Loud

When the keg’s run dry and the adrenaline starts to fade here’s a great album to wind things down a smidge while still keeping the punk vibes flowing. Salvation is the new full-length from Leeds folk punk Tim Loud and it was released last week on TNS Records. Give it a spin below.



DS Photo Gallery: Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls with Bad Cop/Bad Cop and Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs, Hampton Beach, NH

So a funny thing happened last Friday night, and I know that’s a peculiar way to start a story that’s supposed to be a show review, but, well, here we are. The latter stages of Frank Turner‘s Herculean tour in support of his latest album, Be More Kind found their way to a Friday night stop at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire. Though it had been a few years since I’d been in the area, I’m a native of New Hampshire, and as is requisite when you’re a Granite Stater, I’ve spent many, many hours eating Blink’s Fry Doe and perusing the airbrush t-shirt shops up and down the strip at Hampton Beach. I’ve taken in a handful of shows at the Casino Ballroom in years past, though the last of those was a Sevendust/Drowning Pool/Stereomud show as a recent college graduate a week prior to 9/11, which is a statement that provides a lot more context than you might realize.

A lot, obviously, has changed since then. I’ve lived in Massachusetts for a decade-and-a-half with my wife of fifteen years (the night of this show marked our anniversary) and, more recently, with our just-about eleven-year-old daughter. The three of us headed to the Seacoast on this particular evening, and immediately upon reaching the top of the stairs inside the venue, the feeling of deja vu made its first appearance. This wasn’t a nu-metal show, and I wasn’t 21, and I was with my wife and my kid and yet, immediately everything started to feel familiar. Due to a bit of a snafu at the ticket window (also not the first time) the show had already started — Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs were 3/4 of the way through their first song — so I got into normal position in the photo pit and went to work  and it kinda went away for a bit. I’d never experienced the Canadian sextet in person before, and they were a lot of fun. The spandex-and-sequin adorned Coffey led his denim-vested band of misfits through a high energy set that owed more than a little bit to T. Rex and would have been right at home on an arena stage several times the size at the 2000-capacity Casino Ballroom.

Bad Cop/Bad Cop were next up as the tour’s direct support, and as I’ve said many times on these pages, they’re one of my favorite bands for myriad reasons. When the California-based quartet put out their sophomore album, Warriors, in June of last year, it presented as one of the first albums to fire a direct shot across the bow of the newly-inaugurated Trump administration. It was powerful, angry, defiant, righteous, raw…everything a classic punk rock album should be. They’ve been boldly and continuously flying the flag since, and this set was no different. Pulling from both of their Fat Wreck studio full-lengths and their Boss Lady EP, the band’s set was not only well received by the Turner diehards in the crowd, it seemed especially fiery given the day’s breaking news surrounding the week-long postponement of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote in the US Senate in favor of what, it seems, was a sham investigation. It is frustrating that we’re still at a point where the foursome don’t have to look far and wide for new ways to be inspired and fired-up, but damnit we’re lucky to have them.

Frank Turner took the stage for his headline set and, though he was accompanied by his full band, the Sleeping Souls, the lights were low and Turner dove into the first notes of set-opener “Be More Kind” accompanied only by an acoustic guitar. It was a bit of a delicate other side of the coin to the firebrand BC/BC set that preceded it, that was an equally poignant rallying cry amidst these crazy times. The full band kicked into high gear on the set’s next track, “1933,” and I’m paraphrasing a bit, but there’s a line at the beginning of the song’s second verse that makes reference to the idea of surveying the landscape and thinking “we already did this.” As that line bounced around my head for a second while I was switching lenses in the photo pit, the deja vu came roaring back. In the song, that line has a negative connotation, drawing a direct parallel between the events going on in the West now and those that the Greatest Generation witnessed building in the pre-World War II lead-up. As it relates to this story and this show in particular, though, my brain twisted that line to a more positive context.

I’ve been privileged to shoot Turner and his supremely talented crew more than a few times in the last half-decade most recently at a date on the weeklong Boston run that closed out the first US leg of the Be More Kind tour. Though I’d never seen him play some of these specific songs and had certainly never done so at this venue, in this State, with these people, I was overwhelmed with a sense of familiarity that I’d never quite experienced before. Turner and his band have long been quintessential road warriors in every sense of that phrase, rather famously having played well over 2000 shows at this point in their respective careers. The “Frank Turner And The Sleeping Souls” live show is inspiring not just in the message of the lyrics — if you’ve never heard “Be More Kind” or “Recovery” or “Get Better” or even “Four Little Words,” you can probably paint an accurate picture of their content based on title alone — but in how honest the unit are as performers. Each of the band’s five core members (yes, though the pictures don’t prove it, they were all present, but the lighting sucked worse than my self-taught photography skills) are the musical equivalent of the athlete who “leaves it all on the field every night.” The bulk of the night’s set – seven of a total of 23 songs – was culled from the band’s most recent release, but in typical Turner fashion, he dug WAY into the vault for a solo acoustic rendition of “Wisdom Teeth” and even FURTHER into the archives for a rather poignant take on “Nashville, Tennessee.” Though he’s from across the pond — “Olde Hampshire,” to be exact — Turner has become one of the most dependable and familiar lynchpins of the US music community, trying desperately to inspire the world around him to wake up and fight to keep this country from falling off an all-too-familiar cliff. If only we’d be able to stop having this same conversation again and again.

Anyway, head below to check out our full photo stream from the evening!



We Bless This Mess (folk punk) stream new album “Awareness Songs and Side Stories”

Portugal natives We Bless This Mess are now streaming their new album “Awareness Songs and Side Stories.”

The nine track release follows up their release of “Ocean” which hit the streets in September of last year.

Stream it below.



Steady Hands (FFO: Modern Baseball) stream new single “Indifferent Belushi” off upcoming album “Truth in Comedy”

 Steady Hands, Philadelphia Americana/punk project of former Modern Baseball drummer Sean Huber, has announced the October 19, 2018 release of their debut, self-titled, full-length album, “Truth in Comedy.”

The record will be released via Lame-O Records. This will be the first musical release from Steady hands since the 2016 release of “Steady Hands-Live at Ortlieb’s.”

Pierre is now streaming the first single from the record, “Indifferent Belushi.” If you like sad songs that make you want to dance, you can check it out below.



Stoj Snak streams new EP “1000 Daisies”

Danish folk/acoustic-punk poet Stöj Snak is streaming his new EP, 1000 Daisies, which was released on September 19th.

You can give it a listen below.

Stöj Snak last released ScreamerSongwriter in June 2016.