Search Results for "Folk"

Tim Loud releases video for “Hate”

Tim Loud has released a video for “Hate”, a track from his third album Salvation, out now on TNS Records. You can have a watch below.

The acoustic punk has a load of dates coming up in Europe and the UK. Full info for those are also below.



Basement Benders (Punk, TN) Stream Latest Album “Shrapnel Songs”

Four-piece punk outfit Basement Benders have just released their latest album titled Shrapnel Songs on Dead Broke Rekerds. The best part is that the group are allowing you fine folks the opportunity to stream it for free. Despite being entirely amplified, the effort has a strong folk punk feel to it and will likely excite those who are that way inclined.

Check out Shrapnel Songs below. It’s the latest music from the band since their self-titled EP in 2015.



Introducing “Salty Punkabilly” Act: Wicked Shallows

Banjos? Check. Fiddle? Check. Rollicking bass lines? Yup. From the band’s own website, “Wicked Shallows is a rowdy up and coming punkabilly band from Portland OR. Their music is the auditory equivalent of a cocktail happy hour on a 1890’s steamship crewed by outlaws.” An apt description. Three songs in and I’ve determined I will see this band live before I die. Stream their new album Parched Earth below.



Stream new folk-punk album “Salvation” from Tim Loud

When the keg’s run dry and the adrenaline starts to fade here’s a great album to wind things down a smidge while still keeping the punk vibes flowing. Salvation is the new full-length from Leeds folk punk Tim Loud and it was released last week on TNS Records. Give it a spin below.



DS Photo Gallery: Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls with Bad Cop/Bad Cop and Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs, Hampton Beach, NH

So a funny thing happened last Friday night, and I know that’s a peculiar way to start a story that’s supposed to be a show review, but, well, here we are. The latter stages of Frank Turner‘s Herculean tour in support of his latest album, Be More Kind found their way to a Friday night stop at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire. Though it had been a few years since I’d been in the area, I’m a native of New Hampshire, and as is requisite when you’re a Granite Stater, I’ve spent many, many hours eating Blink’s Fry Doe and perusing the airbrush t-shirt shops up and down the strip at Hampton Beach. I’ve taken in a handful of shows at the Casino Ballroom in years past, though the last of those was a Sevendust/Drowning Pool/Stereomud show as a recent college graduate a week prior to 9/11, which is a statement that provides a lot more context than you might realize.

A lot, obviously, has changed since then. I’ve lived in Massachusetts for a decade-and-a-half with my wife of fifteen years (the night of this show marked our anniversary) and, more recently, with our just-about eleven-year-old daughter. The three of us headed to the Seacoast on this particular evening, and immediately upon reaching the top of the stairs inside the venue, the feeling of deja vu made its first appearance. This wasn’t a nu-metal show, and I wasn’t 21, and I was with my wife and my kid and yet, immediately everything started to feel familiar. Due to a bit of a snafu at the ticket window (also not the first time) the show had already started — Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs were 3/4 of the way through their first song — so I got into normal position in the photo pit and went to work  and it kinda went away for a bit. I’d never experienced the Canadian sextet in person before, and they were a lot of fun. The spandex-and-sequin adorned Coffey led his denim-vested band of misfits through a high energy set that owed more than a little bit to T. Rex and would have been right at home on an arena stage several times the size at the 2000-capacity Casino Ballroom.

Bad Cop/Bad Cop were next up as the tour’s direct support, and as I’ve said many times on these pages, they’re one of my favorite bands for myriad reasons. When the California-based quartet put out their sophomore album, Warriors, in June of last year, it presented as one of the first albums to fire a direct shot across the bow of the newly-inaugurated Trump administration. It was powerful, angry, defiant, righteous, raw…everything a classic punk rock album should be. They’ve been boldly and continuously flying the flag since, and this set was no different. Pulling from both of their Fat Wreck studio full-lengths and their Boss Lady EP, the band’s set was not only well received by the Turner diehards in the crowd, it seemed especially fiery given the day’s breaking news surrounding the week-long postponement of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote in the US Senate in favor of what, it seems, was a sham investigation. It is frustrating that we’re still at a point where the foursome don’t have to look far and wide for new ways to be inspired and fired-up, but damnit we’re lucky to have them.

Frank Turner took the stage for his headline set and, though he was accompanied by his full band, the Sleeping Souls, the lights were low and Turner dove into the first notes of set-opener “Be More Kind” accompanied only by an acoustic guitar. It was a bit of a delicate other side of the coin to the firebrand BC/BC set that preceded it, that was an equally poignant rallying cry amidst these crazy times. The full band kicked into high gear on the set’s next track, “1933,” and I’m paraphrasing a bit, but there’s a line at the beginning of the song’s second verse that makes reference to the idea of surveying the landscape and thinking “we already did this.” As that line bounced around my head for a second while I was switching lenses in the photo pit, the deja vu came roaring back. In the song, that line has a negative connotation, drawing a direct parallel between the events going on in the West now and those that the Greatest Generation witnessed building in the pre-World War II lead-up. As it relates to this story and this show in particular, though, my brain twisted that line to a more positive context.

I’ve been privileged to shoot Turner and his supremely talented crew more than a few times in the last half-decade most recently at a date on the weeklong Boston run that closed out the first US leg of the Be More Kind tour. Though I’d never seen him play some of these specific songs and had certainly never done so at this venue, in this State, with these people, I was overwhelmed with a sense of familiarity that I’d never quite experienced before. Turner and his band have long been quintessential road warriors in every sense of that phrase, rather famously having played well over 2000 shows at this point in their respective careers. The “Frank Turner And The Sleeping Souls” live show is inspiring not just in the message of the lyrics — if you’ve never heard “Be More Kind” or “Recovery” or “Get Better” or even “Four Little Words,” you can probably paint an accurate picture of their content based on title alone — but in how honest the unit are as performers. Each of the band’s five core members (yes, though the pictures don’t prove it, they were all present, but the lighting sucked worse than my self-taught photography skills) are the musical equivalent of the athlete who “leaves it all on the field every night.” The bulk of the night’s set – seven of a total of 23 songs – was culled from the band’s most recent release, but in typical Turner fashion, he dug WAY into the vault for a solo acoustic rendition of “Wisdom Teeth” and even FURTHER into the archives for a rather poignant take on “Nashville, Tennessee.” Though he’s from across the pond — “Olde Hampshire,” to be exact — Turner has become one of the most dependable and familiar lynchpins of the US music community, trying desperately to inspire the world around him to wake up and fight to keep this country from falling off an all-too-familiar cliff. If only we’d be able to stop having this same conversation again and again.

Anyway, head below to check out our full photo stream from the evening!



We Bless This Mess (folk punk) stream new album “Awareness Songs and Side Stories”

Portugal natives We Bless This Mess are now streaming their new album “Awareness Songs and Side Stories.”

The nine track release follows up their release of “Ocean” which hit the streets in September of last year.

Stream it below.



Steady Hands (FFO: Modern Baseball) stream new single “Indifferent Belushi” off upcoming album “Truth in Comedy”

 Steady Hands, Philadelphia Americana/punk project of former Modern Baseball drummer Sean Huber, has announced the October 19, 2018 release of their debut, self-titled, full-length album, “Truth in Comedy.”

The record will be released via Lame-O Records. This will be the first musical release from Steady hands since the 2016 release of “Steady Hands-Live at Ortlieb’s.”

Pierre is now streaming the first single from the record, “Indifferent Belushi.” If you like sad songs that make you want to dance, you can check it out below.



Stoj Snak streams new EP “1000 Daisies”

Danish folk/acoustic-punk poet Stöj Snak is streaming his new EP, 1000 Daisies, which was released on September 19th.

You can give it a listen below.

Stöj Snak last released ScreamerSongwriter in June 2016.



North Alone (folk-punk) streaming new song “For Milo”

German folk-punks North Alone have recently had a tiny addition to the band in the form of lead singer Manuel North’s little son Milo being born. In honor of this amazing moment, North Alone has released the track “For Milo”.

I warn you if you’re a parent watching your kids grow up way too fast, this song will definitely bring on the mist. Seriously though, go check it out below.

North Alone is hot off the heels of releasing possibly the best album of the year, Next Stop, CA. If you enjoy sounds you’ll enjoy these guys, that is literally how awesome they are!



Kyle Trocolla of Kyle Trocolla And The Strangers talks about his new album The Moon USA

Let it be known I am a big fan of Kyle Trocolla‘s work, I have every Two Fisted Law album and have seen TFL at least 8 times. When he came out with his solo album The Stranger in 2016 I thought it was one of the finest acoustic albums I have ever heard and this week I was totally stoked to catch up with him to chat about his most recent album The Moon USA.

Read what he had to say below.



Introducing Alt-Country-Folk-Punk Act: Thirsty Curses

I can’t classify Raleigh’s Thirsty Curses. Alt-Country? Folky-Americana? Garage-Punk? Indie-Rock (gasp!)? Your significant other that doesn’t appreciate your taste in punk music will probably like half this album. Great, but why do are you reading about this band on Dying Scene, you’re rightfully asking. Because as soon as I start to think Thirsty Curses’ music might not qualify for Dying Scene, a pissed off, fast paced track with gang backed “whoah-ohs” comes out of nowhere and seems to pull them back into the realm of acceptable Dying Scene standards. As schizophrenic as their genre influences seems to be, the one common denominator is that I dig every single track I’m hearing. If you have trouble getting into anything outside your typical skate-punk or hardcore, this one won’t be for you. If you occasionally like to dabble in rock ‘n roll, folk, or God forbid, more contemporary indie rock like Modest Mouse or Mumford and Sons you might want to give this quirky album a spin below. I defy you not to get hooked by the track “Dimlit Cathedral.”



DS Exclusive: Rob Taxpayer (The Taxpayers) premieres new video and talks Song of the Week Club anniversary!

Rob Taxpayer is an artist’s artist. This is a man who continuously creates. Whether it be the many exciting, volatile, and ambitious records he’s made with The Taxpayers, or the accompanying novel to God Forgive These Bastards: Songs From the Forgotten Life of Henry Turner, Rob Taxpayer is constantly busy making something. He’s punk in the most classical sense—an individual with a developed perspective and DIY to the bone—following his muse in and out of the strict boundaries punk sets for itself, and redrawing the borders as he sees fit.

Rob’s latest project is the Song of the Week Club, in which he releases a new song every week. August 20th, today, is the anniversary of this insane, impressive project. To commemorate this event, we’re premiering the video for “Gary, Indiana”—a song about Janus, the Roman God of Change “taking Gary, Indiana into her car and carrying the city towards whatever new birth is coming for the post-industrial midwestern city.” 

As an added bonus, Rob sat down with us to talk about the Song of the Week Club, songwriting, his new video, and everything else he’s doing. Check below to see the video and read what Rob has to say about all the cool stuff he’s working on these days.



Davey Dynamite (Dying Scene Records) announces Midwest and East Coast Tour Dates

If you somehow missed it, Chicago folk-punk artist Davey Dynamite digitally released one of the best punk albums of 2016 on Dying Scene Records (stream it or download “Holy Shit” for free here if you don’t believe me). Ever since the day I stumbled across that album in my tiny Brooklyn apartment I’ve been dying to see Davey’s live show and now, nearly 2 years later, he’s finally announced a decent run of tour dates extending all the way to the East Coast. Of course, now I live in Africa where where my chances of catching a Davey Dynamite show went from slim to none, which is why I need you readers to go in my stead so I can at least live it vicariously.

Find all the dates and locations here, and report back on your experience!

You can order “Holy Shit” on tape through No Time Records and pick yourself up a vinyl copy through Don’t Panic Records & Distro.



AJJ stream new rarities album “Ugly Spiral: Lost Works 2012-2016”

Arizona’s AJJ are streaming a new album consisting of never-before-heard studio cuts, live favorites, songs previously only available on vinyl, and alternate takes of album highlights, all spanning the years of 2012-2016,  The new album is called Ugly Spiral: Lost Works 2012-2016, and you can give it a listen below

AJJ last released Back in the Jazz Coffin in August 2017.



Stream Audio: Folk Punkers The Manx release “Mystery Skum and the Odyssey of Goo” cassette/download (ffo: Gogol Bordelo, Gwar, Ween)

Freaky deaky folk-punk band, The Manx, out of L.A., has just released a 25-track follow up of remixes and teasers to 2015’s Voyage in Bad Taste.

Rick and Morty’s Justin Roiland, Buzz Osborne of The Melvins, JR Slayer of Blood Brothers fame, and Ryan Kattner of Man Man all make cameos on “Mystery Skum and the Odessey of Goo”, just to give you a small feel for some of the more eclectic tangibilities of the album, available on cassette and digital download here.

Banjo player Tommy Meehan describes, “Among other things included on the cassette tape are a bunch of experimental tracks and atmospheric bits we’ve used for live shows over the last couple of years. There are several little gobs and splats of foreshadowing that will tie into our upcoming full length album as well. This collection of absurdities is a labyrinth of digital grime almost as much as it is a road map to the slimed out Manx lore we’ve been evolving over the last couple of years.” The full album is available to stream at punknews.org.