Search Results for "ATO Records"

New Band Alert!! Amyl and The Sniffers can’t be muzzled

If you aren’t listening to Amyl and The Sniffers yet, I feel sorry for you… or I envy you, because that just means you still get to discover them. Let me guide you along your punk rock journey. I will gladly be your sherpa.

Amyl and the Sniffers is a Melbourne punk-as-fuck band for fans of Dead Boys and The Stooges, with a lead singer that sounds like a much angrier Courtney Barnett. They recently graced the cover of Razorcake Magazine, and are currently rounding out a U.S. expedition before heading across the pond for an eighteen date stroll through Europe.

Their latest single, Monsoon Rock was just released on March 6 through Flightless Records (Australia), ATO Records (America) and Rough Trade Records (everywhere else), and if you don’t know, now you M*%#@’ F*$#%!^’ know!!!

Check out their bandcamp page here, and stream that shizzzzzzzzz on Spotify. Give the song “Some Mutts Can’t be Muzzled” a listen and let me know what you think.

photo by @lacay.o



DS Exclusive: The Live Music Year In Pictures (Jay Stone)

Another year in the books, and while I scaled down the amount of shows I shot this year for a variety of reasons, it was still pretty awesome and eventful. The year started with a trip to Jersey to catch Jared Hart and a barn-burner of a Ben Nichols solo performance at the inimitable Crossroads venue booked by the equally inimitable Andy Diamond. There was also a trip to Connecticut to see Lucero and Jake LaBotz, a trip to Memphis for Lucero’s Family Block Party-slash-20th birthday celebration, another trip to Connecticut for the last installment of the Warped Tour (so, mostly, to see The Interrupters) and another trip back to Jersey for the Bouncing Souls‘ annual Stoked For The Summer throwdown that featured sets from Against Me!, Tim Barry, Titus Andronicus and Smoking Popes. Then there was a whirlwind Brooklyn trip to see Brian Fallon and Craig Finn. Oh, and there was another trip to Connecticut for a rager of a Bouncing Souls/Swingin Utters show. And a trip to New Hampshire for another Utters show. And a Frank Turner show in New Hampshire with Bad Cop/Bad Cop too.

Michael Kane

 

Oh The Humanity

Johnny Rioux (Street Dogs)

Rebuilder

But don’t think that means there was a lack of spectacular shows here on the homefront. There were stellar nights with Bundles and Birdwatching and Michael Kane & The Morning Afters and Art Thieves and Street Dogs and of course Rebuilder and of course Rebuilder again and Dan Webb and the Spiders a few times and Mint Green and Depressors and Oh The Humanity and KCUF and Weathered Friends.

Jared Hart and his better half, Casey

Ben Nichols

Trever and Dennis of Face To Face

Kayleigh Goldsworthy (Dave Hause)

National acts of all shapes and sizes came through the Boston area as well. Of course there was Lucero. And the same Brian Fallon/Craig Finn tour. And The Penske File. And The Lawrence Arms with Sincere Engineer and Red City Radio. And Fallon again. And Face To Face with Austin Lucas. And Dave Hause a couple times in a couple different formats. And another Frank Turner show. And Iron Chic. And Dead Bars. And Noi!se. And of course there was Pearl Jam at Fenway.

CJ Ramone

Bouncing Souls

Dave Hause crowd surfing during Frank Turner

Sincere Engineer

If you check this site out a lot, you’ll know I take a ton of pictures at most shows, and I try to present some of my favorite ones on a regular basis. Below, however, is a few dozen of my favorite pictures of the year. Some of them came out great, some of them came out less great but tell a cool story or evoke a great and personal memory. That’s ultimately, I guess, what I try to do when I’m shooting shows. Thanks for reading, and for looking, and for supporting the people and the venues that keep this thing chugging down the road.

Click on the individual pictures to see blow them up. Bring on 2019. -JMS-

 



DS Photo Gallery: Lucero with Brent Cowles, Paradise Rock Club, Boston, MA

Lucero are no strangers to the Boston area, but it’s been a few years since they played a proper club show of this sort; 2016 saw them headlining the Copenhagen Beer Fest, last years saw them playing on a boat in Boston Harbor. At the tail end of the East Coast run in support of their latest album, Among The Ghosts, the band made a whirlwind return to the city the weekend before last, returning to the legendary Paradise Rock Club for the first time in half a decade. Lucero have played some rather legendarily raucous shows in prior ventures to the greater Boston area, and while the craziest of those days are largely in their collective rear-view mirror, the fact that the band are on a pretty great run right now and that the show took place on a Saturday night resulted in a pretty high-energy affair.

The band kicked things off with the title track from Among The Ghosts, and in rather atypical fashion for Lucero, played largely the same core set they’d been playing on most nights of this particular run (albeit without a visible setlist in the house). What it might have lacked in improvisation, though, the set more than made up for in style and variation. Of course the new album was rightfully best represented throughout, but the band’s self-titled 2001 debut and sophomore album Tennessee, released the following year, combined to make up roughly half of what we’d call the “main set.” The return to prominence of underrated songs like “No Roses No More” and the more recent “I Can’t Stand To Leave You” are particular highlights for yours truly; the latter being an example of a song that, though Nichols wrote it during a different time in his life, has taken on new meaning and in light of more recent events in his life, and perfectly connects some of the grittier musical tones of early Lucero with the family-centered lyrical content so prevalent on Among The Ghosts. And fear not, old-school fans, the night wasn’t exactly formulaic — it’s a Lucero show, after all — as the quintet mixed things up in the latter part of their set, opted to play more music instead of leaving the stage and returning for an “encore,” and caved to audience-led peer pressure by pulling out “Bikeriders” late in the set.

Support on this run came from Brent Cowles and his stellar backing band, the Foxhole Family Band. Sadly, I admittedly wasn’t all-too familiar with the Denver-based singer-songwriter prior to the announcement of his opening role on this tour. Shame on me. Though small in stature, Cowles, the son of a preacher, sings and shreds with the kind of full-bodied soul that would make Sam Cooke look down and smile. Check out Cowles’ work here.

While you’re at it, check out our photo gallery from the evening below. You can find upcoming Lucero tour dates here. Among The Ghosts, as you should be aware, was released August 3rd on Thirty Tigers.

 

 



Lucero release video for “For the Lonely Ones” and announce tour dates

Folk-punk outfit Lucero recently shared a video for the song “For the Lonely Ones.” The song comes from the upcoming LP Among the Ghosts scheduled to be released August 3 via their own Liberty & Lament label.

The band has also announced some dates for a tour that has them traveling nearly to the end of the year.

Watch the video and see the tour dates below.

Among the Ghosts will be the first full-length studio album from the band since 2015’s All a Man Should Do.



311 and The Offspring get busted by the Super Troopers

311 and The Offspring are currently co-headlining The Endless Summer tour.  A 29 date stretch that will take them into September and features Gym Class Heroes as the openers.  In a recent Funny or Die promo, the two bands get pulled over by America’s favorite Super Troopers tag team Car Ramrod.

311 latest release is 2017’s Mosaic. While we have seen some studio updates from The Offspring, they have not had an album since 2012’s Days Gone By.

Check out the shenanigans below.



DS Photo Gallery: Lucero celebrate 20th anniversary with hometown Block Party blowout

Last weekend (April 13-14), for the fourth time in as many years, Lucero fans from far and wide converged on the grounds surrounding Minglewood Hall in the band’s hometown of Memphis, Tennessee, for the annual Family Block Party, a music and arts extravaganza for patrons of all ages. This year’s installment, in addition to being the biggest one yet, was celebratory for another, particularly noteworthy reason; April 13, 2018, marked the twentieth anniversary of Lucero’s very first show, which took place in a Memphis warehouse across the street from the infamous Lorraine Motel.

The weekend’s festivities kicked off on the evening of Friday the 13th inside the 1884 Lounge at the Minglewood complex, in the form of a gathering that was equal parts history lesson and birthday party, the bulk of which was curated by Lucero lead guitar player Brian Venable. Venable has long been the band’s unofficial historian, and in the days (hours?!?) leading up to the event, he dug through the time capsule and pulled out old pictures, setlists, album artwork, show flyers, lyric sheets and band-related memorabilia (old Flying Vs! Roy’s old Nikes!) that were compiled into a walk-through exhibit that inspired a night full of laughter and reminiscing between the band’s members, crew, and family of dedicated fans.

The lounge and the cavernous concert hall inside Minglewood remained open on Saturday, but the bulk of the goings-on took place outside. Not only was the venue’s parking lot closed to traffic, but neighboring South Willett and Monroe Streets and a few adjacent parking lots were as well, giving the occasion a true, block party feel. Local food trucks hawked their wares, as did a variety of merchandise vendors (Shitluck Clothing, Lumberjack Outfitters, tintype photography with Michael Foster, Oliver Peck and his Cheap Thrills line, etc) , most of whom remained steadily busy throughout the afternoon and well into the evening. But the focus, as you might expect, was on the music. Local singer/songwriter Louise Page (above) got things rolling under overcast but not quite rainy mid-afternoon skies. Page has only been in the business for a couple years but has steadily built a name for herself in Memphis, and it’s easy to see why, with elements of folk, pop and soul oozing throughout her melodies. A singer and piano player by trade, Page’s live sound was filled out by a five-piece band that consisted of drums, stand-up bass, violin, saxophone and trombone.

The inimitable John Moreland came next, accompanied by a full rock band of his own. That the Tulsa, Oklahoma, native isn’t household name on par with Jason Isbell or Chris Stapleton seems nothing less than criminal, although I guess there’s something special about his once-in-a-generation voice being our little secret. Moreland’s forty-minute set primarily highlighted his last two albums, last year’s stellar Big Bad Luv and 2015’s flawless High On Tulsa Heat, with a revved-up, pitch perfect cover of Tom Petty’s “You Wreck Me” tagged on as a raucous show closer.

The set change between Moreland and the next band on the docket, Rhode Island’s own Deer Tick, featured an appearance by The Mighty Souls Brass Band, a rotating group of musicians that includes former Lucero touring saxophone player Jim Spake playing their way through the crowd, an experience ripped right out of the French Quarter. While Deer Tick do, as stated, call the Ocean State home, they’ve become more involved in the Tennessee scene over the last handful of years; frontman John McCauley and his wife, Vanessa Carlton, have a Nashville home, and the band recorded both of their self-titled 2017 releases down the road from Minglewood Hall at renowned Ardent Studios. Deer Tick were followed by an hour-long set from the evening’s direct support, Turnpike Troubadours. Like Lucero, the Oklahoma-native Troubadours are road dogs in their own right, having spent more than a decade at this point touring like a punk rock band. While they play a style of music that’s a little more straight-forward country than you might be accustomed to reading about on the pages of Dying Scene, there’s a real storytelling aspect to frontman Evan Felker’s lyrics that make the music instantly more relatable.

While the afternoon and early evening’s happenings were an enjoyable gathering – even in spite of the occasional raindrops – of friends and families alike, this was clearly Lucero’s night. There were more than 4,000 people spread throughout the Block Party’s grounds by the time the band took the stage at a little after 8pm. When you’ve got twenty years and almost a dozen albums under your belt, it might be a little bit difficult to keep your rabid fanbase on their toes, but that’s just what they did, as Ben Nichols and the crew opened their celebratory set with “For The Lonely Ones,” a brand-new track off the band’s yet-to-be-released-or-even-formally-announced full length, due sometime in August on their new label home, Thirty Tigers (Jason Isbell, John Prine, Sturgill Simpson, etc).

Eschewing their normal formula for improvising their way through a two-hour set, the band did curate a setlist for this particular special occasion. Roughly half of the new album was woven in to the set and because this is 2018 and the internet is a thing, aside from one or two songs that hadn’t been played anywhere yet, a solid number of the new tracks (especially “Bottom of the Sea” and “Cover Me”) were not only well-received by their fans but were greeted with the same audience singalong treatment that decade-old crowd favorites have long generated. The band dug deep into the catalog, including a rare appearance by the raw, gritty stomach-punch of “No Roses No More” from their self-titled 2001 debut album (revisited on these pages a couple years back). Jim Spake rejoined the band on stage on saxophone duties for a few tracks, but otherwise this was a night to celebrate the long-running core of the band that’s stayed together in spite of a handful of moving parts throughout the decades. Nichos and Venable founded the band and played that first warehouse show with a different rhythm section, but Roy Berry (drums) and John C. Stubblefield (bass) would join within the first year and have remained in pace ever since, while the multi-instrumentally talented Rick Steff brought his serious chops into the mix in 2006. The night even featured a proclamation from Memphis mayor Jim Strickland declaring April 14, 2018, to be Lucero Day in the city, in honor of the band’s twenty year legacy of serving as a “source of inspiration, encouragement and strength for listeners all over the world.”

Head below to check out our full photo gallery of the weekend’s triumphant festivities, and stay tuned for more on Lucero’s new album (and a special Father’s Day release) in the weeks to come!



The Bronx release video for “Side Effects”

The Bronx have released a video for “Side Effects”, a track from the band’s latest album, “V which came out last year through ATO Records. The video was directed by Christian Jacobs (MC Bat Commander of the Aquabats / co-creator of “Yo Gabba Gabba”). 

You can watch it below.



The Bronx announce European tour with Culture Abuse

The Bronx have recently announced a string of European dates scheduled for the end of June, with Culture Abuse opening for five of the six dates. You can see the full list of dates below. This tour follows a full North American tour that The Bronx announced earlier this year.

The Bronx last released V in 2017 via ATO Records and Culture Abuse last released “Peach” in 2016 on 6131 Records.



DS Photo Gallery: Lucero Out-Heckle the Heckler in Hartford, CT (w/Jake La Botz)

After a couple of consecutive unfortunate show cancellations late last week, the good ship Lucero fired its well-traveled engines back up in Hartford, Connecticut, last Saturday, resuming a late winter tour that was initially paused on Thursday so that frontman Ben Nichols could fly to Arkansas for his grandmother’s funeral. The band had every intention of cancelling only that night’s show in Rhode Island and reconnecting in New Hampshire on Friday, only for Mother Nature to intervene in the form of a powerful winter storm that left Nichols unable to fly north and his bandmates rarely able to leave the confines of their tour bus for the better part of two days. The band finally reassembled as their full Voltron at the relatively new, 600-ish capacity Infinity Music Hall for what was by all accounts the band’s first headline gig in the capital of the Nutmeg State — we’re pretty sure they played Hartford on the Warped Tour in 2011 — which seems pretty remarkable for a band that’s spent twenty years earning a reputation as one of the hardest touring bands in the game. Much to the delight of all but one show-going knucklehead, the band seemed eager to get back into the swing of things as regularly as possible, making for a memorable, if slightly abridged, evening.

There was a time years ago when a Lucero show had the potential to go off the rails for a variety of reasons, many of which centered around the dysfunctional family dynamics that are present in any group of males working together, particularly when there’s alcohol involved. There’s less alcohol involved nowadays, meaning that a 2018-era Lucero live show has become less volatile but no less unpredictable for the band or the fans. No two sets are the same as Nichols calls shots that balance his instincts with feedback from an audience that’s generally rather lubricated in their own right, meaning his bandmates (Rick Steff on keys, John Stubblefield on bass, Brian Venable on guitar and Roy Berry on drums) have got to react on the fly. On this particular night, the Memphis-based quintet kicked their headline set off with crowd favorite “The Last Song” from their 2002 full-length, Tennessee. In this writer’s experience, this particular song has many times been reserved for later in the evening given the crescendo it builds to, so its early appearance was a welcome change of pace right off the bat. From there, things went in typical free-form fashion, with the band choosing to stick with the same album for the similarly crowd-pleasing singalong “Chain Link Fence” before taking the opportunity to showcase some brand new material. You see, Lucero have been hard at work on a follow-up to their last full-length, 2015’s All A Man Should Do, for a while now, and have slowly been working through some newer songs on stage in recent months (a trend that’s fallen by the wayside across the musical spectrum in the age of YouTube). Nichols’ pointing out that they were going to play a few new tracks, however, didn’t sit well with one particularly vocal gentleman at stage right who made his opinion rather well known early on.

The net result proved, for the young man, to be a fail of epic proportions, as a defiant Nichols led the band through four consecutive brand new songs – including the live debut of a song that seems to be called “Cover Me” which might be the strongest of an already strong bunch – until said young man made his way to the exit. The bulk of the crowd seemed mindful of the special nature of seeing so many new tracks played in order, heckler be damned. There seemed to be nary a hiccup, as the new tracks seem to fit naturally in the Lucero lexicon. I’ll shy away from specific spoilers except to say that “Cover Me” and “To My Dearest Wife” and “Everything Has Changed” sound like songs that were written by 2002 Lucero but performed by 2018 Lucero. Trust me, that’ll make sense when you hear them.

Most of the remainder of the set found the band calling on an ever-expanding number of audience favorites. “Texas & Tennessee,” “All Sewn Up,” “It Gets The Worst At Night,” “Nights Like These” and “On My Way Downtown” made requisite, raucous appearances. When he wasn’t at the mic, Nichols spent a greater-than-average amount of time pacing the stage, giving the impression of somebody who was working through a bit of a cathartic experience. Steff was his typically stoic, stabilizing self on stage left, and his stage-right bookend Venable’s understated leads seemed dialed in. I’ve said before on these pages that Berry is one of my favorite drummers to spend time watching, and that was still true on this evening. There’s in improvisational quality to his playing that’s in line with the rest of the set; just because you’ve heard him play “Tears Don’t Matter Much” a dozen times doesn’t mean you’ve ever heard him play it the same way more than once. Stubblefield left the stage at one point to get seasick over the side of the boat but somehow didn’t miss a beat holding down the low end (and that’s obviously not true, but it’s an inside joke that only he and probably mu wife will understand and I’m mostly just seeing if he’s reading this). The Nichols solo track “Loving,” penned for his filmmaker brother Mike’s film of the same name, seemed especially fitting as played on what happened to be the eve of an Oscars ceremony for which it was robed of even a nomination. “I Can’t Stand To Leave You” off 2012’s Women & Work was a personal favorite, as it’s the first time I’ve actually heard them play it.

But without question, no song was more poignant and heartfelt than “The War.” Accompanied my the multi-instrumentally talented Rick Steff on accordion, the song finds Nichols telling the stories of his World War II-veteran grandfather’s time as a member of the US Army. Many of those stories were told to Nichols over the years by the very grandmother whose funeral he had just returned from, giving the moment a special, albeit heavy, weight. Heckler aside, the only sour note of the evening was the venue’s hard 10:45pm curfew, meaning the band that’s capable of some fairly long sets had to cut things off at around 90 minutes or so. Nit-picking, I know.

Kicking the evening off at 8:00pm sharp was the mighty Jake La Botz. Very much the quintessential renaissance man, La Botz has been one of the more underrated folk-Americana songwriters in recent memory. He frequently tours solo, though this run opening for Lucero finds La Botz fronting a trio, with Brad Tucker (upright bass) and Phil Leone (drums) serving as the rhythm section, providing a bit of depth and foundation for La Botz’s soulful stories and imaginative guitar riffs to shine. If you’re not familiar with La Botz’s catalog, last year’s Sunnyside is as good a place as any to start, as the tracks featured were particularly well-received by the devout Lucero crowd.

Head below for our full photo gallery from the highly enjoyable evening!



New Punk Rock Bowling show announced

A new show has been added to Punk Rock Bowling for Friday, May 25th. The Bronx and Dwarves will headline the Bunkhouse stage, with Fireburn & Sciatic Nerve the inside stage. The Shrine will join the Bunkhouse stage and One Square Mile the inside.

Check out the flyer below for more details!



DS Photo Gallery: An Evening with Ben Nichols and Jared Hart at Crossroads in Garwood, NJ

Every once in a while, the mythical creatures that put show lineups together get one so correct that you and your better half pack up the car, drop the kiddo off at her grandparents’ house after her basketball game (go Panthers or Blueberries or whatever we’re calling ourselves now!) and make the five-ish hour trek from Boston to a tiny little borough in north central Jersey over a torrentially rainy February weekend. And so, when the inimitable Andy Diamond announced that February 10th at Crossroads in Garwood, New Jersey, would consist of an evening featuring the musical stylings of Lucero‘s Ben Nichols and The Scandals/Mercy Union‘s Jared Hart, it seemed the mythical creatures had spoken.

Jared Hart led off the late evening’s festivities in stellar fashion in what was all but a hometown show for the Bayonne-based punk. Lucero fans are an intensely dedicated lot who travel far and wide to see “their” band – let alone to see the band’s frontman in a rare, one-off solo gig – but Hart was more than up to the task of getting the night started on the right track. Hart has a penchant for penning sweeping, sing-along choruses, and that was on display from set-opener “Totem” on forward. The bulk of Hart’s set consisted of material from the Scandals catalog and his first solo album, 2015’s Past Lives And Pass Lines (including a duet with his own longtime better half, Casey, on “The Leo”), with a track from the forthcoming debut from his new project, Mercy Union, thrown in for good measure. Oh, and there was a rousing cover of the Wallflowers’ “One Headlight” which was resoundingly well-received.

After a bit of an extended layover between sets, Nichols took the stage accompanied by only by his trademark Martin acoustic and a half-filled fifth of Bulleit Rye Whiskey and embarked on what would become a rollicking, spirited look through the deeper portions of his songwriting catalog. Beginning the night with “Chambers,” Nichols highlighted the bulk of his brilliant debut solo EP, 2009’s The Last Pale Light In The West, across the evening. As could be expected at a Lucero show, the crowd was a constant vocal present throughout the duration of Nichols’ largely freeform set. And while a couple of expected long-time crowd favorites (“Nights Like These,” “Raising Hell,” “I’ll Just Fall”) made their staple appearances, the bulk of the twenty-nine (by my count, anyway) song setlist focused on either brand new material, or songs that have long since fallen out of regular live rotation.

While we’re not yet sure exactly how many songs will appear on Lucero’s forthcoming studio album (due hopefully this coming summer), we have gotten a pretty stellar taste of what’s to come on tracks like — and these are apparently working titles — “To My Dearest Wife I Write” and “Everything Has Changed” and “Bottom Of The Sea.” Also included on this evening were brand new tracks that won’t be on whatever becomes their new album – a sweet ode to his year-old daughter “Hello, My Name Is Izzy” and the searing and already underrated “One Last Fuck You.” Nichols also dusted off “The Outsiders,” a track by his pre-Lucero band Red Forty, and dedicated it to a longtime, well-known fan in the crowd. Nichols enjoyment of the evening was not only quite noticeable — not only by his eight or nine whiskey-infused Cheerses to the crowd — but was increasingly infectious over the course of the two-plus-hour set. As the midnight hour came and went and the *ahem* sobering reality of a 10:30am trip to catch a flight out of Newark sank in (prompting the image above), both Nichols and the still engaged crowd might have brought the musical portion of the evening to a close, but most were slow to leave, choosing instead to revel in the afterglow of what was a memorable (depending on your alcohol intake) and inimitable evening.

Head below to check out our photo gallery!



The Bronx announce North American tour, release new music video

The Bronx have just announced a North American tour for the spring, and released a new music video for their song “Night Drop At The Glue Factory”. You can check out all that stuff below.

The band’s latest album V came out in 2017 through ATO Records.



The Bronx announce reissue(s) of their albums I, II, and III

California punks, The Bronx, have announced that they will be reissuing their albums I, II, and III but this time on Vinyl. This is following the release of their recent album V, which came out in September off ATO Records

You can catch them at a show this December, dates can be found below.



The Bronx streaming new album “V”

The Bronx‘s new album V was released today through ATO Records, and is now available to stream. You can listen to the album in its entirety below.

This is the band’s first LP in four years, following 2013’s IV.



Music Video: The Bronx – “Two Birds”

The Bronx have released a music video for their recent single “Two Birds”, taken from their upcoming album V. You can watch the video below.

is set to be released on September 22nd via ATO Records.