Search Results for "Island Records"

Brian Fallon to play at Van Morrison tribute concert

Brian Fallon will be joining the likes of Shawn Colvin and Josh Ritter to play a Van Morrison tribute concert at Carnegie Hall on March 21st. Brian Fallon has, in the past, referenced how he steals Bruce Springsteen’s moves who in turn steals Van Morrison’s moves.

Brian Fallon’s second full length ‘Sleepwalkers‘ came out in February this year.



DS Photo Gallery: Brian Fallon and Craig Finn “Songs From The Hymnal Tour,” Boston, MA

Just shy of seven years ago, I had the opportunity to weasel my way in to a Northeastern University student-only show at what was basically a slightly oversized Starbucks in that institution’s student center. The show was a one-off that featured support from Matt Pryor of The Get Up Kids (amongst others) and headliner Brian Fallon, then still very-much active in The Gaslight Anthem. It was very much a unique experience – I’m still not entirely sure how it came together – as Fallon wasn’t really doing the “solo performer” thing at that point. Accompanied only by an acoustic guitar, he came without a setlist and essentially took requests all night. Oh, and he told stories. Boy, did he tell stories; funny, insightful, spontaneous stories. Lots of stories. At one point, Fallon even caught himself realizing he was talking a lot, joking that he was going to stop playing songs and just talk because, let’s face it, it was a free show, so nobody had actually paid to be there (to which an audience member fired back the fact that it cost $45,000 a year to go to Northeastern at the time).

Boy have things changed in the seven years since that one-of-a-kind event

. Gaslight would go on to produce two more albums, go on hiatus and recently reunite for a run of The ’59 Sound 10th Anniversary shows. Divorce and children and remarriage and being interviewed by me and all of the things that come with being in your mid-30s happened. Fallon has gone on to produce two solo albums of his own: 2016’s Painkillers and this February’s Sleepwalkers. Finally, this week marked the first dates on what’s being called the Songs From The Hymnal tour, an international run that features opener Craig Finn (himself on his third solo album to go along with a successful decade-long run as frontman for Minneapolis-cum-Brooklyn rock band The Hold Steady) and headliner Fallon appearing sans backing bands. Just two men, a couple acoustic guitars, a Korg, and a collective several decade’s worth of stories.

Night one of the US run took place last Tuesday at Royale in Boston, a venue that’s got a capacity approximately 500% larger than that student center cafe at Northeastern (though it also has 100% fewer working Starbucks within its walls). Finn kicked things off with a 45-minute set culled mostly from his past solo efforts: 2012’s Clear Heart, Full Eyes, 2015’s Faith In The Future and last year’s stellar We All Want The Same Things, with an old Hold Steady song and a couple of new solo tracks thrown in for good measure. Though he’s long been publicly affiliated with both Minnesota and, more recently, Brooklyn, Finn was born a short cab ride away from the Royale in Boston’s Allston neighborhood, a place he’d return when it was time for college (Finn went to BC). No matter what project he’s spearheading, Finn’s songwriting style has largely focused on storytelling anyway, having created characters and scenes and interactions and feelings that mirror the struggles of trying to get by in the world. To that end, a performance like this was right in Finn’s wheelhouse. One of his new tracks, “Magic Marker,” is one of the most compelling tales I’ve heard performed in a live setting, grabbing the listener and forcing her/him to pay attention to the story. The most relatable moment I have to compare it to was the first time I heard Dave Hause’s “Autism Vaccine Blues,” which was a new song he’d been woodshedding on the road prior to recording 2013’s “Devour.”

After a standard length set changeover, Fallon strode downstairs to the stage, picked up his acoustic, and strummed his way into a subdued version of “Forget-Me-Not,” the lead single from Sleepwalkers. Normally an up-tempo sing-along, this version was a more delicate (almost unrecognizably so) ode to his relationship with his wife. The setlist from there was a bit more structured than the Northeastern show seven years prior, but not by a lot. Where Finn’s set seemed thought out and his stories were focused, Fallon seemed to opt for more of a “rough outline” approach, seemingly allowing his stories to meander and to feed off some of the spontaneous feedback from the crowd. Some of Fallon’s stories are raw and painful, particularly when dealing with death or with his break-up (which wasn’t necessarily mentioned specifically, except with a nod to the crowd who “have been around a while, most of you know the story at this point.” Some of the stories were funny, especially when the razor-witted Fallon was riffing off-the-cuff. I’m not going to divulge many of the specific details, because I feel like that takes away from the experience for those who haven’t seen a show on this tour yet.

But in case you were wondering, the set was comprised of songs from Fallon’s solo career obviously, plus a handful of Gaslight favorites (“Great Expectations,” “Film Noir”) that came with particularly insightful oral histories. “Ladykiller,” from Fallon’s The Horrible Crowes side project with Ian Perkins also made an appearance. There were a handful of songs from the written setlist (3 of the original 19 tracks) that didn’t appear, as it would appear Fallon ran out of time because some of his stories took some lengthy side roads. It was a fun and memorable and compelling night that allowed both songwriters lyrics to take on new weight and gravity due to the stripped down musical accompaniment. While both men have storied careers fronting high-powered rock bands, both are equally capable of commanding a stage with little additional support. Go see this tour. Seriously.

Head below for our photo recap!

 

 



Due to popular demand Brian Fallon adds more UK tour dates

With shows in Newcastle, Edinburgh, Manchester, London and Brighton now sold out, Brian Fallon has announced additional dates for his UK tour. Second shows have been added in both London and Manchester.

Craig Finn of the Hold Steady, who is co-headlining the US tour, has been announced as the main support for all the UK dates.

Tickets are currently on sale and apparently moving very quickly.  Check out the updated tour dates below.



Brian Fallon announces an acoustic tour of the UK for 2019

Brian Fallon has announced he is returning to the UK with an eight date acoustic tour that includes a stop at London’s Union Chapel. Which is listed as a Grade 1, meaning that it is a building of exceptional interest and would make a interesting venue to catch Brian’s brand of Americana rock and roll.

Tickets are already on sale.  Check out the tour dates below.



Brian Fallon and Craig Finn announce joint tour

The Gaslight Anthem’s Brian Fallon and Craig Finn from The Hold Steady have announced a string of tour dates through October. Both singers are touring without their respective backing bands, so the shows will be a more intimate reflection of their songs and stories.

Fallon’s latest solo release is Sleepwalkers from earlier this year.  While Finn’s latest solo work is 2017’s We All Want the Same Things.  Check out the dates below.



DS Photo Gallery: Brian Fallon and the Howling Weather with Caitlin Rose at Royale in Boston (5/1/18)

When last we spoke with Brian Fallon (read that interview here), it was the morning after the first US tour date in support of his sophomore solo album, Sleepwalkers. With two full-length solo albums plus the Horrible Crowes catalog to draw from and backed by a retooled live band now known as The Howling Weather (longtime friend/collaborator Ian Perkins on guitar, Nick Salisbury on bass, Matt Olsson on drums), tour was off to a positive start. A month down the road, we caught the penultimate show of the Sleepwalkers US tour as it wound through Boston’s Royale nightclub last Tuesday night to finally take in the experience first-hand.

As she had for the last several weeks of the full-US tour, Nashville-based singer/songwriter Caitlin Rose kicked off the festivities on this particular evening. It’s probably not a stretch to assume that the bulk of the daily readers here at Dying Scene might not have Rose on their standard rotation, but we’re all also all about expanding musical horizons, so look her up. Backed by a three-piece band of her own, the silky-voiced Rose primarily plays a smooth blend of hypnotic alternative country and blues, like if Patsy Cline were fronting Mazzy Star. There’s a real soul to her voice when she opens up, giving tremendous depth to her forlorn stories.

Speaking of forlorn storytelling, Fallon kicked off his set with “Forget Me Not,” the lead single from Sleepwalkers. While the song – and the album in general – find Fallon in a more positive space than recent solo or even Gaslight work, there are still plenty of morbid undertones, the struggle against eternal pessimism. Ever the storyteller, Fallon spent a large chunk of time between the set’s second and third songs (“Red Lights” and “Come Wander With Me” polling the audience about a situation that was slated to come up the next night at the tour closer in New York City. Long story short; don’t bother sending Fallon direct messages through social media, and especially don’t propose to your significant other in a circle pit at a Fallon show.

Once the audience participation portion of the evening was over, Fallon and Co. got back to the rocking. The lion’s share of the set on the evening, as you’d imagine, was culled from Sleepwalkers and, to a lesser extent, its 2016 predecessor Painkillers, with a trifecta of songs (“Ladykiller,” “I Witnessed A Crime” and “Sugar”) from Fallon and Perkins’ 2011 The Horrible Crowes project thrown in for good measure. The set’s midway point featured a cover of the Derek And The Dominos classic “Bell Bottom Blues;” the song and its principal writer, Eric Clapton, have long been favorites of Fallon’s, so to hear him pull the song off live was a bit of a fanboy moment inside a fanboy moment. Going back to the Gaslight Anthem days, Fallon has typically opted to eschew encores, stating on numerous occasions that it seems like a waste of time and since you were going to play those songs anyway, just play those songs. As such, the remainder of the band left the stage after new, triumphant crowd favorite “Etta James,” leaving Fallon to man the piano for a solo version of “The ’59 Sound” that turned into an 1100-person singalong. Rose came back out and joined Fallon on a cover of the Dylan classic “Don’t Think Twice,” easily one of the saddest and yet razor-sharp post-relationship songs ever written, before Perkins, Salisbury and Olsson returned and brought the show to a rousing close with “If Your Prayers Don’t Get To Heaven.” This leg of tour has now officially wrapped up and Fallon’s got a little bit of a break before he and the Howling Weather head back across the pond for European festival season. Oh, and there’s the issue of the Gaslight Anthem’s ’59 Sound tenth anniversary shows this summer as well. But hopefully we’ll get Sleepwalkers – Round Two this fall, because a night out at a Brian Fallon show is about as fun and cathartic as a rock and roll show gets.

Head below to check out our full photo gallery from the evening.

 



Brian Fallon covers “Silence”

The Gastlight Anthem frontman Brian Fallon has recently released a cover of the pop song “Silence” by Marshmellow, featuring Khalid. This is not the first time, however, that Fallon has taken his unique, folk-rock sound to current pop music. He regularly performs Katy Perry’s “Teenage Dream” while touring. You can check out Fallon’s cover here.

“I recorded this song because I believe in the message.” Fallon said via Twitter. “I think it speaks to our times in this country. There can be peace even in a dark place. May we all find it soon.”

This is his first release following “Sleepwalkers” that came out earlier this year via Island Records.



DS Exclusive: Brian Fallon on “Sleepwalkers,” Growing As A Solo Artist, and, of course, Gaslight Anthem

I’m not entirely sure if “journalistic integrity” is one of the hallmarks that Dying Scene is known for when we conduct artist interviews, but it’s worth mentioning that I’m going to jettison whatever notions of it there may have been and insert myself right into the middle of this story. The Gaslight Anthem are one of the very few bands that I can not only vividly remember my first exposure to them, but can equally vividly remember being stopped in my tracks about what I was hearing and seeing. It was 2008 and I was a 28-year-old new dad, and the video for “The ’59 Sound” and it was on MTV (remember that?!?) as I was getting ready for work in the morning. I knew nothing about the band, and yet I instantly felt like I knew exactly who they were. Led by their Telecaster-and-patchwork-scally-clad frontman, Brian Fallon, the band presented a look and a sound that combined the best parts of my parents’ favorite artist (Springsteen) and my favorite band growing up (Pearl Jam), and ran it all through a ‘child of the 90s’ punk rock filter.

In the decade since, Fallon’s voice and words have been a constant steadying factor in my life. His lyrics have shifted away from telling other people’s stories and have instead become intensely personal, though each album somehow contains a song that either presently or in hindsight make you wonder if he’d somehow been following you around, telling your own story better than you could. There were rumblings probably five years ago that Fallon would work on a solo album after the release of the band’s 2012 album Handwritten, but those plans were shelved in favor of what became 2014’s Get Hurt. The dark, visceral album (a personal favorite) rather notoriously chronicles Fallon’s then-recent divorce, but it’s in many ways also a chronicle of the drifting away of the band’s members themselves; an indefinite hiatus would begin the following year.

Fallon himself would not be out of the game for long, as 2016 would see the release of his debut solo album, Painkillers. Recorded in Nashville with Butch Walker at the helm, the album was a stylistic departure, largely rooted in folk and Americana music. Still, there were more than enough threads to connect the listener – and the artist – to his past; Gaslight Anthem guitarist Alex Rosamilia joined Fallon’s touring band, The Crowes, on guitar and keyboards, alongside Fallon’s longtime friend and frequent collaborator Ian Perkins, and Jared Hart of fellow Jersey punk band The Scandals.

Which brings us to 2018 and Fallon’s sophomore solo album, Sleepwalkers. We caught up with Fallon by phone earlier this week, hours after the US leg of the album’s tour kicked off in Nashville, to chat about all things Sleepwalkers and, of course, Gaslight Anthem. Released February 9th (Island Records), the new album finds Fallon in a happier, more uplifting mood, having slogged for a few years through some pretty dark places. It can be viewed as a bit of a bookend to an unintentional trilogy that marks the most personal music of Fallon’s career, with 2014’s Get Hurt lamenting the demise of relationships and 2016’s Painkillers playing as a guy trying to figure out what comes next, in myriad levels. That trilogy was not, as you might imagine, by design. “I think that if I planned it out like that to be a trilogy, I’d be pretty smart,” jokes Fallon, pointing out that it was more realistically a natural progression. “It makes the point that records are true to life. I was following exactly where I was at the time on all three records, and it’s funny how it worked out like that, where it seems like it follows a trajectory. It did, although the trajectory wasn’t a planned record, it was my life.” 

Stylistically, Sleepwalkers is more straight-forward, R&B-infused, punk-tinged rock-and-roll than Painkillers or than his 2011 side project The Horrible Crowes. Fallon has long been a student of rock music and has not shied away from referencing his influences directly, especially in the earlier part of the Gaslight catalog. Soaked in references to The Beatles and The Clash and Etta James, Sleepwalkers is the most early-Gaslight thing that Fallon has done since, well, since the early Gaslight period. That’s at least partially by design. Gaslight Anthem, you see, was obviously one-fourth Fallon. “You can’t take away who you are and what your style inherently is and remove it just because you’re doing a new project, you know? I decided that instead of running from that, I’m just going to be myself, and if some people say “well, that sounds like Gaslight,” of course it does, because I’m the one doing it. The parts that don’t sound like the band are the parts that came from the other three people in the band, and now there are new people, so those parts will sound different and I’m the part that sounds the same. I finally was just like “yup, I’m okay with that! That’s fine!” Songwriting choices came quicker and freer after that realization was made. “I got to put my own shoes on again,” he explains, adding only half-jokingly that “I like Bruce Springsteen, I like old movies, I like New Jersey, I don’t care what you say about it!” 

In large part, the remarried, father-of-two Fallon drew motivation to move forward through some of the earlier darkness from his young children. “I didn’t have the luxury of just being a lunatic!” he laughs, adding “I was like ‘you have children, and you have clearly messed yourself up to the point where you don’t know what’s going on, and you’ve got to put your head back together. Your kids deserve better than that’.” While it took a lot of work — therapy, reading, doctors, etc — to come out the other side, Fallon is refreshingly not afraid to talk about that work, and has been inspired by the recent trend, particularly in the punk community, toward shedding light and awareness on mental health issues. It’s a trend that didn’t exist in earlier parts of his career, but that he certainly would have taken advantage of. “I know there’s this site I’ve been following (on social media) called Punk Talks, and they’ve got a number where you can call them and talk to them. I was amazed when I first saw it.” The organization would have come in handy, Fallon says, when dealing with the rapid ascent that Gaslight Anthem found themselves on a decade ago, where they went from playing their first shows in their home state of New Jersey to having The Boss himself join them on festival stages within the span of barely two years. “The speed at which that went and the inability to be prepared for it, whether it was my age or inexperience or expectations or just something that was inside of me,” Fallon explains, “created a lot of anxiety in me, to the point of not being even really able to enjoy a lot of it, because I was so nervous about everything all the time. It really was a hard, hard thing. I wasn’t prepared for the level of anxiety it would cause.”

That’s not to say, however, that Fallon is complaining. Far from it in fact. “It was awesome! We totally went for it. I feel like I was (just) ill prepared for it. I didn’t do the homework on myself to catch up. I was 27 then, now I’m 38, and I have much more — it’s funny to say “wisdom” — but I have much more of a perspective on how to handle something like that now.” Fallon is also not afraid to pass his teachable moments on to younger bands that might find themselves on the type of rapid ascent that Gaslight found themselves on a decade ago. “You have to break this thing down. If your band is getting successful and you’re starting to come up and get more recognition and to get it quicker than you thought and that’s getting to you mentally or emotionally, break it down into small, in-the-day things.” If taking the stage in front of any number of people can be enough to rattle some people’s nerves, taking the stage in front of five- or ten- or twenty-thousand can be downright overwhelming. “You have to remember that those people are not there to crucify you and they’re not there to criticize you,” says Fallon. “There might be one or two, but they’re always going to be there, whether you’re playing to twenty people or twenty thousand people. Most of the people there just love what you’re doing, and they’re trying to have a good time, and they’re just like you. They’re no different than you.”

Head below to read our full chat with Fallon. I had roughly nine years worth of questions to ask, but this was a good start. And yes, there’s plenty of insight on what happened – and is happening – with Gaslight, including the ’59 Sound anniversary shows, but you’ll have to read it to find out. Also, head here to find out where you can catch Brian Fallon and his new band, The Howling Weather, on tour over the next month!



Album Review: Brian Fallon – ‘Sleepwalkers’

It was obvious to anyone listening to The Gaslight Anthem in 2007 that Brian Fallon was destined to not only make a name for himself in the punk scene but larger rock-centric circles. Sure enough, it was the release of The ‘59 Sound just a year later that cemented him, and the rest of The Gaslight Anthem, as the poster boy(s) for the scene-wide trend of blending a little bit of Americana rock and soul into basement drenched punk rock. (Is it still a trend if bands are still doing it ten years later?). Three Gaslight albums, a couple of side projects, and one solo album later, Brian Fallon isn’t showing any signs of slowing down. Armed with his signature gravelly voice and broken heart, he’s heading into 2018 with his sophomore solo LP, Sleepwalkers.

Brian Fallon is nothing if not consistent and Sleepwalkers shouldn’t be full of surprises for anyone who has followed his career. For all of the experimentation found on Sleepwalkers, the album is still very decidedly a Brian Fallon album. Whether it’s the motown flavor of “If Your Prayers Don’t Get to Heaven,” the Strummer-esque reggae rock of “Come Wander With Me,” or even the rock and roll saxophone featured on the title track- these aren’t things that Fallon has put to tape before- it’s done with the same style and confidence that he does with straightforward rock tributes and acoustic ballads, both of which he’s done plenty in the past, and both of which make appearances on Sleepwalkers.

Lyrics have always been a blessing and a curse for Fallon. No stranger to heartbreak, he knows how to put fears and worries into a three minute song, which is greatly appreciated by the hopeless romantics (or, just the hopeless). “Oh my Lily, if you only knew, I only want to be haunted by you” he sings on “Her Majesty’s Service” while on lead single “Forget Me Not” he laments not “[taking] the time to miss you.” Of course, many are just as quick to roll their eyes at having so little sleeve covering his heart (“And most of my sad life I figured I was gonna die alone” from “Etta James”), and they’re even quicker to scoff at the sheer number of borrowed lyrics (some examples: “I never knew [my father] so I bandaged the hurt, I pretended my daddy was a bankrobber” and “an English song by a band that you love, here comes the sun little darling”). Whether these Fallon-isms sink or swim depends on the listener, but it’s clear that Fallon knows his strengths.

Sleepwalkers never takes any great leaps forward, but much like Painkillers, it is a worthy addition to Fallon’s discography by adding some sonic variety. Mostly, though, it provides 12 new songs to sing while putting a positive lens on past loves and regrets. And that’s what people listen to a Brian Fallon record for in the first place.

4 / 5

RIYL: Dave Hause, Ship Thieves, Counting Crows



Brian Fallon streams new song “My Name Is The Night (Color Me Black)”

The Gastlight Anthem frontman Brian Fallon is streaming another song off his upcoming solo album Sleepwalkers. The track’s called “My Name Is The Night (Color Me Black)”, and you can check it out below.

Sleepwalkers is set to release on February 9th, 2018 through Island Records. Fallon will be supporting the album with European and US tours.



The Gaslight Anthem to play Governors Ball Festival

59 Sound Gaslight

The Gaslight Anthem have been on a slight hiatus for a few years, but have just announced they will be returning to the stage for the Governors Ball in New York City from June 1-3.

For a special celebration of their hit album The ’59 Sound‘s tenth birthday, the boys will be returning to the spotlight.

Scope out the festival’s full lineup here.



Brian Fallon streams new song “If Your Prayers Don’t Get to Heaven”

The Gastlight Anthem frontman Brian Fallon premiered another song off his upcoming album Sleepwalkers. You can listen to “If Your Prayers Don’t Get to Heaven” below.

Sleepwalkers is set to release on February 9th, 2018 through Island Records. Fallon will be supporting the album with European and US tours next year.



Brian Fallon releases “Forget Me Not” video

The Gastlight Anthem frontman Brian Fallon has released a music video for the first single off his upcoming album Sleepwalkers. Check out the video for “Forget Me Not” below.

Sleepwalkers is set to release on February 9th, 2018 through Island Records. Fallon will be supporting the album with European and US tours next year.



Brian Fallon (folk) releases single “Forget Me Not” and announces tour

Gaslight Anthem’s Brian Fallon has decided to follow up his 2016 solo album “Painkillers” with a new one “Sleepwalkers”. The first single off the new album is “Forget Me Not”. The album is due to be released February 9th on Island Records.

To celebrate the new album, Brian will head out on tour with his backing band The Howling Weather and will be supported on the tour by Dave Hause, Ruston Kelly and Caitlyn Rose.

You can check out the new single and tour dates below.



Brian Fallon recording with producer Ted Hutt

Former Gaslight Anthem front-man Brian Fallon has begun recording with producer, Ted Hutt, down in New Orleans! Anyone else excited for this!? You can check out his progress through his Instagram here

Fallon’s last project, Painkillers, was released on March 11, 2016 through Island Records.