Search Results for "Rise Records"

Angels & Airwaves stream new video for “Rebel Girl”

California supergroup Angels & Airwaves have released a music video for “Rebel Girl”, the new single from their upcoming as-yet-unnamed sixth studio album on Rise Records and first original song since 2016’s Chasing Shadows EP. If you’re curious what Tom DeLonge has been up to while Lil Wayne is touring with Blink-182, check out the video below for a taste.



DS Photo Gallery: Dave Hause and the Mermaid with Weakened Friends – Boston, MA

In the days leading up to last Friday’s release of his latest solo album, Kick, Dave Hause and his stellar backing band, The Mermaid, played a small series of sold-out club shows scattered around the country. The shows seemed to serve a dual role involving equal parts getting people fired up for the pending release, and testing the touring waters as a parent for the first time (Hause’s wife recently gave birth to twin boys). If Boston show #2 back on Saturday, April 6th, was any indication, both of those roles seemed to result in overwhelming success.

Hause and the Mermaid, with a lineup on this run consisting of Hause’s younger brother/writing partner Tim on guitar, the immensely talented Kayleigh Goldsworthy on a keys and violin and guitar and I might be missing one, Kevin Conroy on drums and Frank Iero/Brian Fallon drummer Matt Olsson on bass) took the stage at Great Scott by storm on this night, kicking their set off with “Autism Vaccine Blues” from his stellar 2013 release Devour. Hause and I have spoken at length about the importance of that album generally and that song specifically to yours truly over the last handful of years, so for selfish reasons, I’d like to think the set started that way on purpose, though in the larger sense, it did seem to set an uptempo tone for the evening that never really wavered from that point on. The set featured a serviceable number of tracks from each of Hause’s three prior solo releases; it’s worth mentioning that his 2011 debut Resolutions sometimes gets overlooked in the wake of the releases of Devour and Bury Me In Philly in the years that followed, but this night’s full-band workups of “C’Mon Kid” and the title track are just as poignant and cathartic as ever. As you might imagine, the set also consisted of a healthy dose of Kick, an album that the vast majority of the audience had yet to hear in its entirety, though tracks like “The Ditch” and “Saboteurs” have already become seeming crowd favorites. A particularly meaningful moment in the evening came when the Kick track “Bearing Down,” inspired by the death of Hause friend and Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison, was followed immediately by the singalong-heavy “The Shine,” a song that Hutchison shared vocal duties for on Devour.

Opening duties for the back-to-back Boston shows were perfectly executed by Portland, Maine’s Weakened Friends. The trio channel everything that was right about 90s alternative music and its more recent stylistic revival. The guitar-heavy buzzsaw attack and guttural vocals evoke Dinosaur Jr. or Sleater-Kinney but with catchy, pop-driven hooks that would make Veruca Salt or early Smashing Pumpkins fans wistfully nostalgic. If you haven’t checked out their 2018 full-length debut, Common Blah, yet, you should really do yourself the favor.

Head below to check out our full photo rundown.



Album Review: The Bouncing Souls “Crucial Moments”

My first The Bouncing Souls album was The Bad, The Worse and the Out of Print, I remember vividly not knowing any of their music but loving the chaotic artwork on the cover. Prior to this album I had a few punk albums, but I was totally obsessed with ska. Reel Big Fish, The BossTones, Goldfinger, Buck-o-nine and Mustard Plug dominated my CD player. One day at the behest of some of my more punk friends I decided to check the Souls out, and it changed my musical taste forever.

It probably seems weird that an album full of rarities, b-sides, and alternate versions should be a person’s first intro to a band like the Souls. However it is in these choices of cover songs and the laughs and outtakes, where it became obvious that there is a very distinct feeling in a Bouncing Souls album. On every album of theirs that I discovered afterwards there is a strong sense of brotherhood and camaraderie, a nostalgia for simpler times with your friends, and a sense of fun. For every “Gone” there is a “Bullying the Jukebox” for every “Turned my Back on You” there is “Wish Me Well, Go to Hell”. They mine the emotional depths but never leave without displaying at least a little of the optimism that can only be found among your friends. You could say that haphazardly finding The Good, The Bad, and the Out of Print was my Bouncing Souls crucial moment. Which leads me to the actual Crucial Moments EP, a six song celebration of the bands thirtieth anniversary.

This album represents every aspect of The Bouncing Souls that people have come to know and love. It opens with the titular track and delivers a prototypical punk rock set on simmer style that is familiar to every album. It is a nostalgia fueled rocker which displays the bands ability to discuss heavier topics without abandoning a sense of hope. “These chords stick with me, this ink etched in me, these crucial moments played on repeat” Greg sings as he reminds us that these moments will play on repeat forever.

This nostalgia driven rock and roll shows up again on “Here’s to Us” a song that brings to light the darker times that have plagued the band and how they know that those times will not last because they have each other. “The world can have the past, we know they won’t last, because we got each other” shows that the power of camaraderie and their ability to find a light in the dark is still an ideal that they are steadfast to present in their music. There are a lot of little things that have always made the band unique, Bryan’s bass lines being one of my personal favorites and this track may be some of his finest work.

While these two songs make it seem like they have moved away from their classic punk rock sound, this is where “1989” and “4th Avenue Sunrise” prove they can still shred with the best of them. The first being the about the community they discovered through having “no talent just a dream” and how they “Stick together, that’s the deal, Gotta make something, make it true, All together with all of you.” It is a punk rock ode to all their friends and all the good times they had even in bad situations. While “4th Avenue Sunrise” is a bass heavy blitzkrieg, clocking in under two minutes, that emphasizes a dark romanticism.

The highlight of the album is “Favorite Everything” an upbeat love song. The Bouncing Souls are at their finest with this type of pop-laden bouncy rock, (See also “True Believers”, “Hopeless Romantic”, “Private Radio”, “Manthem” or “Kate is Great”), which in these case is a song about comparing music to the love of their life. There is so many great analogies, from “You’re the greatest compilation” to “You’re the song that bring a tear, embrace the love, embrace the fear”, that specifically speak to the comparison of one’s love of music to the love one has for another. Simultaneously a happy love song and an emotional expression of words that can be difficult to articulate.

Crucial Moments ends with “Home” the saddest song the Bouncing Souls have written this side of Anchors Aweigh. It is a significant change in the tempo set forth in the earlier parts of the album but cranks up the emotional weight. “Home” proves to be an endless place where fear and sadness will never reach, a place away from a world that just does not care. Proving once again that even in the saddest depths of a Bouncing Souls song there is always a sense of hope and a small glimmer of optimism.

In a celebration of their thirtieth year as a band, The Bouncing Souls have proven that they are timeless. To paraphrase their own song, Crucial Moments has songs of punk and songs of joy, a love song about girls and boys, songs of metal and some English stuff, and some hardcore to make us feel tough. This album is a six song reflection on the band’s legacy, one of lighting our darkest times while reminding us to enjoy the good times with the people around us.

5/5 Stars



Dave Hause streams “Fireflies” off upcoming album “Kick”

If you’re jonesing for another taste of the upcoming Dave Hause album “Kick” then here’s your dose. Stream “Fireflies” below. It’s mellow but solid IMO.

“Kick” is due out through Rise Records on April 12th.



DS Exclusive: Dave Hause on fatherhood, family, and his suicidally optimistic new album “Kick”

The journey of a career songwriter is one filled with a seemingly endless series of what can rightly be called “pivotal” moments that can alter the arc of one’s professional career; the death of a loved one, the dissolution of a band, divorce, the misuse of alcohol and other drugs, marriage, worsening societal ills. Even if you’ve got your head screwed on in a manner we’d call straight, each and every one of those areas can seem daunting. When you couple any of them with the growing senses of fear and doubt and insecurity that can come, frankly, with being alive and even remotely paying attention to the world around you, it can prove enough to bring an otherwise strong individual to their respective knees.

In one form or another, Dave Hause has tackled all of those issues — sometimes individually, sometimes collectively — generally in a manner that can be poignant and heart-achingly personal. On his upcoming album, Kick, due April 12th on Rise Records, Hause has yet another filter to approach his life, and his craft, through: fatherhood. When we caught up with the now California-based Hause over the phone last week, he was out for a walk with his twin two-month-old sons napping quietly away in their stroller, affording his wife a much-deserved breather. Lest those who might be afraid that turning 40 and establishing roots on the sun-soaked west coast and becoming a dad would have dulled the daggers that Hause spent the better part of two decades sharpening, fear not; Kick is very much a return to form from the more positive, upbeat themes of its predecessor, Bury Me In Philly. “I think that Kick and Devour are a lot closer to one another than Bury Me In Philly,” Hause explains. Bury Me In Philly was me moving to California and figuring out what that was going to look like and figuring out happiness. I didn’t want to write a bummed record if I wasn’t bummed. Little did I know that we were going to have one of the biggest heartbreaks as a society that I could have ever predicted.”

There are some weighty questions posited over the course of the ten songs that make up Kick. Many of them, like “Weathervane” and “Civil Lies” and lead single “The Ditch” tangle the wires between the personal and the political and reveal the obviously delicate balances that come with managing one’s own anxieties within the context of tides that are literally rising and a social climate that seems hellbent on allowing it to happen. The ride culminates in the album’s closing track, “Bearing Down,” a track which…well, let’s put it this way: if the Devour track “Autism Vaccine Blues” and its narrator outwardly considering whether or not they’d be better off dead tugged on your heartstrings, “Bearing Down” will use two hands and rip those heartstrings straight from your chest. The song finds Hause not only name-checking Hunter Thompson and Robin Williams (and insanely talented Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison, who provided backing vocal duties on the Devour track “The Shine,” in the liner notes), all of whom died from suicide after lengthy and sometimes public struggles with their own demons, but contemplating his own oblivion and weighing swan diving off the Golden Gate Bridge.

But then comes the pivot, that moment that the narrative shifts from being bleak to being heavy yet hopeful by way of our narrator finding that he’s got a newfound responsibility to be around for a while, and to help those that he’s close to through these difficult times. “What I was betting on with that final verse,” he explains, “was really like the old Buddhist philosophy that life is pain. “Hallelujah, we’re alive, and it’s bearing down. It is brutal. And if I can lighten that load for someone else, then I’m serving some grander purpose more than just my own selfish whims.” If you’re lucking, the act of older and going through some of your own trials and tribulations allows you the experience and perspective needed to learn from past mistakes. “I’ve got to stick around and not put my people through hell,” Hause notes, adding “in looking at the patterns of addiction and stuff, you start to realize that ‘wow…I’ve made some messes that I wouldn’t mind not repeating, so I’m going to stay in better touch!’ I look at it as more of a human responsibility.”

If there’s a central theme to Kick, it’s that yeah, the current might be strengthening around us or the ditch we’re in may be getting deeper, but that focusing on that isn’t going to fix it. “It’s a very dangerous proposition to look at the glass as either half-empty or filled with piss! Maybe that could be true, but I can’t really afford to ruminate on that. I have to come up with a reason to look toward the shore despite feeling I or we, collectively, are drowning. I have to. At this point, it’s a job as I have as a dad,” Hause notes, quickly adding that, upon reflection, his new duties aren’t necessarily “new” at all, though they’re certainly more intense. “To some degree, I’ve always had that job. I’ve been a brother and a husband and a friend and a songwriter. I’m supposed to try to be of some good use to people.”

There’s a genuine art to being able to write a song that uses your own uniquely human experiences and resonates with other people in such a way that not only can the listener relate to your stories, but use them in a way that can move the needle in their own lives. You know the Leonard Cohen quote “there’s a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in?” Hause asks, knowing full well what the answer is. “A lot of times what’s compelling to me is trying to look at the piece of pottery and trying to recognize that it is indeed cracked — and we cracked it! We fucked it up!  — But then trying to find that light, because what else are you going to do? A joking alternate title for the record was “Suicidally Optimistic,” and I know that can kinda make the skin crawl, but a lot of times, I think that that’s my outlook.”

As was the case with Bury Me In Philly a few years ago, Hause was joined by his brother Tim for the creation of Kick. The latter might be sixteen years younger than his big brother, but make no mistake; he is not, by any stretch (and to paraphrase a line from the track “Civil Lies”) a kid anymore, displaying songwriting chops that match his previously-established guitar abilities. Having Tim as my partner now is clutch. His whole theory is that you make a ten song record, and then, long-term, if you end up with three of them in your “greatest hits” set that we’ll play for the remainder of our careers as musicians, we did something right.” Tim not only collaborated on music and lyrics this time out, he takes on lead vocal duties on “Civil Lies,” providing an effect that’s familiar while still adding a layer we haven’t heard on a Hause “solo” album before. I use solo in quotes there, because it may not be that way for long. “I didn’t really want to be a solo guy (at first),” Hause the elder explains. “The financial collapse happened and I grabbed a guitar and just went. I didn’t realize (it would happen this way), I thought I’d be back with The Loved Ones after a record or two, but the cookie crumbled differently. I brought my brother in and assumed he’d be with me for a year or two and then go back to college.” Instead, Tim has turned himself into a vital cog in the process. “I think we’re just continuing to set the table for us combining streams and using both of our songwriting output and both of our talents toward the same end. Ultimately, we may just go completely under the last name so that it encompasses all of our writing,” a trend that’s started already, as evidenced by Kick‘s cover art. 

While Hause will have Tim alongside him as he gears up to hit the road with a full band, The Mermaid, for the first Kick support shows later this week and through the remainder of the year, he obviously won’t have his family’s two newest members alongside. In order to gear up for life on the road as a dad, Hause has called on some old friends like Dan Andriano, Pete Steinkopf, Brian Fallon and Cory Branan not just for songwriting input, but for advice on how to best navigate these previously (for him) uncharted waters. While being away from his wife and two little fellas is obviously going to suck, Hause is hoping to use that as inspiration to dig a little deeper – as though that were possible – in his live performances. I’m going to miss my family. I’m going to feel to some degree like a heel for not being there for first steps or things. I’m going to miss stuff if I continue to tour to support my life. But I’m trying to look at it like a two-pronged approach: 1 – what I do is cool and the kids will be psyched on that and 2- more importantly, if I can lean into that experience and be like ‘well, I’m in Berlin, and I don’t get to do this just willy-nilly; I can’t just pick up and go, it takes a tremendous amount of planning and effort and heartache to be away from my family, I’m going to really dig in on this Berlin show…or these two Boston shows.’ I think maybe it’ll make things shine up a little brighter.”

The new tour kicks off tomorrow (March 27th) in Hause’s hometown of Santa Barbara and takes a baby-steps approach through places like Boston, Philly, New York and Toronto before making its way overseas for three weeks later next month. Tour dates are available here. Kick is due out April 12th, and you can still pre-order it here.

More importantly, you can check out our full chat below; Hause and I have done these a few times, so as usual, we range pretty far and wide.



Racquet Club announce their break-up

So long, Racquet Club; we hardly knew ye!

The LA-based quartet that featured members of myriad other highly-respected bands like The Jealous Sound, Samiam, and Knapsack, announced via their various social media accounts that they’ve decided to call it quits by simply stating: “Still friends forever, thanks for everything.”

In lieu of further parting words, the band left behind three live videos, filmed during their last run through Brooklyn. You can check them out here.

Racquet Club’s debut – and as it turns out final – album was their self-titled 2017 full length, released on Rise Records.



Dave Hause releases new single “Saboteurs” ahead of new LP “Kick”

Dave Hause has released a new single, “Saboteurs”. The song is from his upcoming Rise Records album Kick, which is released April 12th. The album is the follow up to 2017’s Bury Me In Philly.

Pre-orders are up now. Have a listen (and check out UK tour dates) below.



DS Exclusive: Greg Attonito on “Crucial Moments,” The Bouncing Souls’ thirty year retrospective book and new EP

The year was 1989. The first George Bush had just been inaugurated President, and yours truly was turning ten years old. Bobby Brown’s Don’t Be Cruel and Aerosmith’s Permanent Vacation and Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start The Fire” and Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814 were in near constant rotation on the Panasonic cassette player in my southern New Hampshire bedroom. Elsewhere in the world, bands like The Cranberries and 4 Non Blondes and Wilson Phillips and The Black Crowes and EMF (remember them?!?) and Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch and Right Said Fred and SHeDAISY were in their formative stages. And down the I-95 corridor in a central Jersey college town, a group of four high school buds, Greg Attonito, Bryan Kienlen, Pete Steinkopf and Shal Khichi, had started a new musical project and were playing the first shows in that new band’s tenure. That band, of course, is The Bouncing Souls.

Fast-forward to 2019. With but a few changes to the role of drummer in their history (Khichi would be replaced by Michael McDermott in 1999; McDermott would in turn be replaced by Hot Water Music’s George Rebelo in 2013) the Souls have at this point carved out a career that includes ten full-length studio albums, countless splits and 7-inches, and long-ago established a reputation as one of the hardest-working groups in the punk rock scene. All the while, the band maintained – and even strengthened – reputations as genuinely good dudes, establishing personal friendships and relationships with fans across the globe.

To celebrate the Herculean achievement that is maintaining a band over the course of three decades essentially without interruption, The Bouncing Souls have a whole slew of special events planned. There are somewhere between 40 and 50 tour dates that’ve already been announced, featuring support from such heavy hitters as Swingin’ Utters, The Bronx and Off With Their Heads. Yesterday brought with it the announcement of Stoked For Summer, the band’s annual outdoor throwdown at the Stone Pony, located along the boardwalk in Asbury Park, New Jersey. All tour dates can be found here, but you’ll have to wait a little while longer for the full Stoked lineup.

But perhaps most intriguing amongst the 30th Anniversary festivities is Crucial Moments. Due out this coming Friday, Crucial Moments is a six-song EP of new material and companion 100-page book that culls stories and pictures and anecdotes from all stages in the band’s career. It’s a compelling trip down memory lane, regardless of when and where you first encountered the Souls on your own musical journey. There are requisite stories from longtime friends of the band like Tim Barry and Dave Hause and Benny Horowitz and Mark Stern and Kevin Seconds and Jack Terricloth. If you’re a longtime Souls fan, you’ll recognize some of the stories from the likes of Dubs and Wig and Johnny X and Matt Gere and Pedro Serrano and, of course, the mighty Kate Hiltz. There are myriad stories, most of them short and sweet, from fans, the true believers and hopeless romantics from all corners of the globe. There are even a few surprisingly poignant stories from the likes of Shanti Wintergate (Greg’s wife) and Dr. Neel Khichi (Shal’s younger brother).

We caught up with Souls’ frontman Greg Attonito via phone from his snowy Idaho home this past weekend to talk about both new releases. As always, we found Attonito to be open, honest, reflective, and pretty fired-up to chat about the legacy that he and his high school buddies Pete and Bryan (with assistance from Shal and Mike and George) over the course of the last three decades. Head below to check it out! While you’re at it, you can check out the first two singles from Crucial Moments here and here. The album is due out on Rise Records; you can still pre-order it here.

 



The Bouncing Souls stream new track “Favorite Everything”

Jersey punk legends Bouncing Souls have released a new track. Ahead of EP Crucial Moments, a 6-song affair out this Friday (March 15th) on Rise Records, the band are streaming “Favorite Everything”. Have a listen below.

EP pre-orders are up now from the band’s website.



PUP release fan-assisted video for new song “Free At Last”

Heading towards the release of “Morbid Stuff” this April, PUP have revealed a music video for their new single “Free At Last”.

The video is comprised of fan submitted covers of the track, who had only the lyrics and a chord sheet to go by to get the covers together and submit to the band.

Check out the end result of PUP’s foray into crowd sourcing using the player below and pre-order “Morbid Stuff” now through Rise Records.



Dave Hause streams “The Ditch” ahead of new album “Kick”

Dave Hause is streaming new track “The Ditch”. The song is from his upcoming Rise Records album Kick, which is released April 12th. The album is the follow up to 2017’s Bury Me In Philly.

Pre-orders are up now. Have a listen below.



Bouncing Souls announce “Crucial Moments” EP and book, unveil 30th anniversary tour dates

Gigantic news from straight outta the Garden State this afternoon. 2019 is shaping up to be the year of the Bouncing Souls!

The pioneering Jersey punk rockers celebrate their 30th anniversary this year, and have a smorgasbord of pretty awesome events planned to help mark the occasion.

Perhaps most important is the announcement of the release of Crucial Moments, a brand-new 6-song EP that’s due out March 15th on Rise Records. In what’s a bit of a departure from the band’s normal modus operandi, the new material was recorded with Will Yip who’s previously worked with everyone from Lauren Hill to The Fray to Tigers Jaw and all points in between. Also available will be a companion book entitled Crucial Moments: Thirty Years Of Life With The Bouncing Souls, slated to be chock full of stories, journals and pictures from the band’s storied career. Check out the retrospective video for the title track from Crucial Moments below, and snag yourself a pre-order from the myriad available options right here!

Last but certainly not least, the band are heading out on a pretty lengthy tour to mark their anniversary, and they’re bringing a bunch of friends like the Bronx and Off With Their Heads and Skinny Lister and The Casualties and Bar Stool Preachers along for the ride. Check out the full rundown below (after the video).



Hot Water Music announce Caution and No Division tour

Florida gravelcore band Hot Water Music have announced a tour in which they will be playing their classic albums Caution and No Division in their entirety.

You can check out all dates and locations below.

Hot Water Music last released Light It Up in 2017 via Rise Records.



Stream the new Dave Hause EP “September Haze”

September Haze, the new EP from Dave Hause was released on Friday and you can stream the entire thing on spotify. It’s mellower than most of his previous material Hause enthusiasts will still dig it.

This EP is a follow up to Dave’s full length Burt Me In Philly which came out last year.

 

 



New Music: Dave Hause – “Lemon Hill”

If one Dave Hause story on a Monday is good, two mush be outstanding, right? Right!

Earlier today, we told you that the singer/songwriter is releasing a new EP, September Haze, this coming Thursday (November 1st). Well, you can now get a taste of what’s to come, by way of a new track called “Lemon Hill.” The track is a reference to the Philadelphia park where Hause would drink as a kid and would walk to reflect as he got sober a few years ago. Check out the lyric video below.

September Haze will be available digitally in a couple days. Pre-orders are available here. It’s the first Hause solo release since his early 2017 sophomore full-length, Bury Me In Philly.