Search Results for "Trivia"

13 Punk Songs About Heartbreak To Celebrate Anti-Valentines Day

There are few things more known to any wayward punk than heartbreak. Politics, for some of us–but what drove us to our anarchist ways in the first place? Skating culture is as lonely as one can get sans a mid-90s Hook-Ups board. Heartbreak is at the very core of emocore, for crying out loud!

Pun completely intended.

In honor of the worst of commercial holidays I give you 13 of the best punk rock heartbreak tunes. Why 13? Because the 14th was stolen by the cynical commentators of my heart. One for each day of this frozen February leading up to this bittersweet day. Read on, kids.



10 More (Punk) Songs About Buildings and Food

A seminal record of early post-punk is The Talking Head’s sophomore release More Songs About Buildings and Food . The album’s name is a bit of a non-sequitur. Especially for a band that in 1978 was known for songs about psycho killers more than anything else.

The name of the title does beg the question: where are the songs about buildings and food? They were missing from this album, but throughout the rest of punk culture they thrive. Today, I present some of those punk songs about buildings and food. Spoiler alert: they are mostly about food.

Check it outbelow!



10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Jerry Only (Misfits)

At New York Comic Con this year I saw many cosplayers, but by far the most interesting one was a young man whom I mistook for Glenn Danzig.  As I walked among the supermen and superwoman at the convention, a well-toned, ghoulish and shirtless young man caught my eye and I immediately screamed, “Hey! Glenn Danzig!”

He looked nonplussed, so I tried again. “Hey! Nice Glenn Danzig cosplay!”

“Jerry ONLY!” He responded back with much umbrage.

Whoops.

Jerry Only is the leader of the Frankenstein-esque Misfits that has included Black Flag’s Dez Cadena and his own brother (but not Glenn Danzig). He is often reviled as much as revered. Only, with his face paint and love of all things horror, is the top cartoon character in a punk rock history of cartoon characters. Today we take a look at some of the less known facts of one of the founding members of the Misfits. Do they explain the hybrid moments of one of punk’s most notorious persons? Read on, dead boys and girls!

Check out a list of 10 things you probably didn’t know about Jerry Only below.



Punk Rock Trivia: Atlantic Records wanted to sign Fugazi

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses (we read a lot of Wikipedia, after all) here at Dying Scene like to unleash some noteworthy trivia. Today’s “fun factoid” is about Fugazi refusing to sign with a major label.

In 1993, one year before the success of The OffspringGreen Day and Rancid, Fugazi were pursued by a number of major record labels when they were on tour promoting their seminal album In on the Kill Taker. During their sold-out 3-night stint at New York City’s Roseland Ballroom that September, Atlantic Records president Ahmet Ertegün met Fugazi backstage and offered them ten million dollars and “anything they wanted” to sign to his label. They refused, and would continue releasing albums on Ian MacKaye’s label Dischord Records.

Just stop for a moment and imagine what Red Medicine would sound like if it was released on Atlantic. Yeah, that would be weird.



Random Punk Fact: Mathias Färm of Millencolin is part of a professional dragracing team

Well here’s a random punk factoid for ya, did you know that guitarist/vocalist Mathias Färm (Millencolin, Franky Lee) is a Superstock Dragracer in a DragRacing team called KillerSnake? Yeah, I bet you did…

Below is a recent video the team put up on youtbue, edited by fellow band member Erik Ohlsson.



Punk Rock Trivia: Why Bad Religion re-recorded “21st Century (Digital Boy)”

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses (we read a lot of Wikipedia, after all) here at Dying Scene like to unleash some noteworthy trivia. Today’s “fun factoid” is about Bad Religion re-recording one of their signature songs “21st Century (Digital Boy)”.

“21st Century (Digital Boy)” was originally taken from Bad Religion’s 1990 album Against the Grain, but was recorded again four years later on their hit album Stranger Than Fiction. Guitarist Brett Gurewitz has stated that the reason “21st Century (Digital Boy)” was recorded again is because Atlantic Records (their label at the time) did not “hear a single” and thought it would be a hit if they redid it. Brett commented, “Since we were selling out anyway I didn’t see any point in arguing”.

Another reason “21st Century (Digital Boy)” was re-recorded is that both Brett and bassist Jay Bentley were not happy with the Against the Grain version, the latter commented, “(We re-released the song) because we were playing it every night since 1989, 1990. It wasn’t that we weren’t happy with it. I was thrilled with it. I thought it was a great fucking song. Brett just happened to think that we were playing it better than we played it on the record. He just thought it was the one song of his that had a snowball’s chance in hell of being popular. I think one of Brett’s quests as a song writer was to write a pop hit. That’s hard to do when you’re in a punk rock band. He always thought that song could be a pop hit, and he fought for it to get on the record and to be a single. I eventually got tired of saying ‘that’s not what we do.’ That’s what he wanted to do when he was a member of the band at the time and we all went ‘well, OK, if you feel that strongly about it, we’ll put it on the record.’ We have a very democratic process which is that if 3 members vote one way, then it’s going to happen, unless one member feels so strongly about it, then we all just concede and say ‘that’s cool.'”

By 1994, Bad Religion had been together for 15 years, but the re-recorded version of “21st Century (Digital Boy)” was the song that made Bad Religion more famous, and it even helped Stranger Than Fiction achieve gold status.

You can check out the re-recorded version of “21st Century (Digital Boy)” and compare it to the original below.



Punk Rock Trivia: William DuVall was a punk rocker

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia is about William DuVall, who is not only best known as the “new singer” of the iconic grunge band Alice in Chains, but was actually associated with the punk scene.

Prior to joining Alice in Chains in 2006, William DuVall was a member of at least four punk rock bands. He began his career in the early 1980’s in a short-lived punk rock band called Awareness Void of Chaos before he helped form the legendary Atlanta-based hardcore punk band Neon Christ. DuVall, who was just 16 years old when Neon Christ started in 1983, contributed guitars and lyrics to their music. Neon Christ’s only releases are a self-titled 7″ album from 1984 and the compilation album Neon Christ 2×7″, which was released in 1990 and contains some previously unreleased songs.

After Neon Christ broke up for the first time in 1986, DuVall briefly joined the Northern California punk rock band Bl’ast! as their second guitarist and helped write their second album It’s in My Blood, which was released in 1987 on Greg Ginn of Black Flag‘s label SST, but left the band just prior to the recording of that album. DuVall’s fourth “punk rock” band was Final Offering, which featured Randy Gue (a former Neon Christ roadie) on vocals, Mike Dean of Corrosion of Conformity on bass and Greg Psomas on drums. Unfortunately, Final Offering would not last long enough as Psomas’ heroin habit hindered them from working consistently, and Dean soon went back to Corrosion of Conformity. Psomas eventually died of an overdose in 1994.

Apparently, I couldn’t find any clips of DuVall rocking out with his other bands like Bl’ast, but to hear his work in Neon Christ, click here.



Punk Rock Trivia: Dr. Frank (Mr. T Experience) writes award-winning teen fiction

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses (we read a lot of Wikipedia, after all) here at Dying Scene like to unleash some noteworthy trivia. Today’s “fun factoid” is about The Mr. T Experience frontman Frank Portman (better known as Dr. Frank) and some of his extracurricular activities.

Dr. Frank has been the frontman for the seminal Bay-area punk band The Mr. T Experience for over 25 years now, releasing fifteen albums with the group. In addition to 3 solo albums, Dr. Frank began a career in young adult fiction writing in 2006 when he released “King Dork,” which gained recognition as a 2007 Best Book for Young Adults from the American Library Association. He released his second book “Andromeda Klein” in 2009 (his solo album of the same name serves as a companion), and is currently working on his third.

 



Punk Rock Trivia: Dee Dee Ramone, the author

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia is about the legendary punk rock bassist Dee Dee Ramone and his ability to write more than just vicious two minute songs.

It’s no secret that the former Ramones bassist penned a large batch of the band’s songs, even after he left the band he would still contribute songs here and there. But did you know that Dee Dee Ramone also tried his hand at writing books? He had published three books total, two during his lifetime and one posthumously. Granted, two of those three were autobiographical in nature: “Poison Heart: Surviving the Ramones (aka Lobotomy)” and “Legend of a Rock Star: A Memoir: The Last Testament of Dee Dee Ramone”, but his third novel found him exploring the realm of fiction. Titled “Chelsea Horror Hotel”, the novel is a fictitious account of Ramone, his wife, and his dog visiting the Hotel Chelsea, believing to be staying in the very room that Sid Vicious had allegedly killed girlfriend Nancy Sprugen. Ramone is also visited by the ghosts of Vicious, as well as other dead punks such as Johnny Thunders, Stiv Bators, and Jerry Nolan.

It’s almost as if “Chainsaw” and “You Should Have Never Had Opened That Door” became a full length book!



Punk Rock Trivia: Dee Dee Ramone raps… poorly

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia regards one of the finest punk rock bassists of all time, Dee Dee Ramone, and his regrettable decision to take his solo career in a direction he clearly couldn’t handle.

After leaving the Ramones, Dee Dee Ramone continued with various musical projects… the first of which was a hip hop album, “Standing in the Spotlight”, released under the moniker “Dee Dee King”. Taking a break from his usual style, Dee Dee tried his hand at creating an old school hip-hop album, full of silly rhymes and classic samples of 1950’s surf rock and doo-wop. It was poorly received to the point where it was said that the album “will go down in the annals of pop culture as one of the worst recordings of all time” and shortly after releasing “Standing in the Spotlight”, Dee Dee returned to guitar-based music which was undoubtedly his forte.

One piece of Dee Dee’s short lived career as a rapper did survive however: his song “The Crusher” was later recorded by his former bandmates and appeared on their final album ¡Adiós Amigos!, released in 1995. Interestingly, the Ramones version featured lead vocals by none other than Dee Dee’s replacement, CJ Ramone.

Interested in hearing the scratchy voiced punk rocker try his hand at rapping? You can listen to his song “Commotion in the Ocean” right here.



Punk Rock Trivia: Ian MacKaye and Amy Farina drop a vowel movement

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia is about former Minor Threat and Fugazi (among others) front-man Ian MacKaye, and is brought to you by the letter “E.”

In 2001, Ian MacKaye formed a new band with his partner Amy Farina (of the Warmers) called the Evens. As Fugazi entered their hiatus, MacKaye had more time to focus on the post-post-hardcore band, and the band recorded a music video for their original composition “Vowel Movement” to air on the DC-based online children’s program, Pancake Mountain. The song is notable for not only being an upbeat Sesame Street-esque children’s song, but also for being the first (and in all likeliness, the only) time Ian MacKaye had ever recorded a music video for one of his songs.

You can watch the music video for “Vowel Movement” right here.

The Evens put out a two song single, appropriately titled “2 Songs”, in 2011 on Dischord Records.



Punk Rock Trivia: Dave Grohl was asked to join Glenn Danzig’s band?

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia is about some connection between Dave Grohl and Glenn Danzig, who apparently asked him to join his post-Misfits and Samhain band Danzig.

Most of us know Dave Grohl as the drummer or singer and guitarist for many well-known bands such as Nirvana, Foo Fighers, Queens of the Stone Age, Probot and Them Crooked Vultures. Not only that but apparently he was asked to join Glenn Danzig’s post-Misfits and Samhain band Danzig. Here’s what happened: a special issue of Kerrang! magazine from 1994 said that Dave was asked but turned down the offer to join Danzig as replacement for Chuck Biscuits, who would eventually join Social Distortion. Coincidentally, Chuck’s replacement Joey Castillo would eventually join Queens of the Stone Age, which once featured Dave on drums.

Would you imagine seeing Mr. Grohl in a band about satanism and stuff like that and there would never be Foo Fighters? Yeah, that would be odd, but it’s good that he and Glenn had a nice friendship back in the day.



Punk Rock Trivia: Ice-T is the punkest dude in hip hop

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses* here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers.

Long-time hip-hop/rap artist Ice-T has something that most modern-day rap artists don’t have: an extensive background in punk rock. Ice-T is not only just a self-proclaimed fan of the glory days of hardcore punk, but a direct participent in the genre, having recorded music  and spoken word material with Pennywise, Jello Biafra (of the Dead Kennedys) and Black Flag’s Henry Rollins. He’s also recorded several hardcore covers of bands like The Exploited and Black Flag with numerous musicians. To hear some of these collaborations, click here.

Ice-T also fronts the rapcore band Body Count, his interpretation of rap/hip hop music with hardcore punk and speed metal. Check out their song “Cop Killer” here.

Additional fun fact: Ice-T’s 1987 hip hop album “Rhyme Plays” was the first to have the explicit “tipper sticker” warning, helping solidify him as the punkest dude in hip hop.



Punk Rock Trivia: Sex Pistols – a punk rock boy band

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia takes us back to the early days of punk, where we learn a little bit about the classic relationship between art and commerce.

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, you can’t deny the Sex Pistols were as influential as they come. But did you know that the sneering lads of London were little more than a boy band?

Rather than come together organically, the Sex Pistols were largely orchestrated by band manager Malcolm McLaren. The earliest form of the Sex Pistols were in the Paul Cook and Steve Jones occupied The Strand. When Jones asked local sex shop owner McLaren to help manage, an icon of punk was born.

But what did McLaren bring to the table? How about financing, Johnny Rotten, and the band’s bad-boy image?

N Sync is in good company.



Punk Rock Trivia: The Menzingers rooted in ska-punk.

Every once in a while the punk rock geniuses here at Dying Scene like to unleash some punk rock trivia to enlighten and enhance the minds of you, the readers. Today’s trivia is about the humble beginnings of modern indie-punk darlings, The Menzingers.

Before forming the Menzingers, guitarist/vocalist  Tom May, drummer Joe Godino, and bassist Eric Keen all played in another Scranton, PA band together called Bob and the Sagets. While the name is certainly cringe-worthy, the music sure isn’t. Following in the vein bands such as Operation Ivy, Choking Victim, and early Flatliners, Bob and the Sagets played ska-punk without the use of a brass section. Minus the fact that they play with lots of upstrokes, a lot of the band’s music contains elements that would later go on to become a part of the Menzingers’ signature sound.

If you’re interested, you can check out a couple tracks by Bob and the Sagets right here. They’re no Scrantonicity, but they’re still pretty good.

The Menzingers released their Epitaph Records debut, “On the Impossible Past” earlier this year.