Search Results for "DS Exclusive"

DS Exclusive: Booze & Glory debut new video, “Too Soon”

Dying Scene is stoked to team up with the lads in Booze & Glory to debut the video for the brand new track, “Too Soon.” Clocking in at just a hair under six minutes long, the video and the song are a bit of a departure for the London-based street punk quartet. Here’s a few words from the band’s frontman, Mark, to set the scene:

“Too Soon” is a tribute to our family members and friends which are no longer with us. This is one of the most personal songs I ever wrote. We all lost and miss someone we loved and I hope people will appreciate the lyrics of this tune. This is not typical Booze & Glory track you would expect to hear but Im really pleased with it.

Check out the exclusive video for “Too Soon” below! The track is slated to appear on the band’s as-yet untitled new full length, which is due out sometime around October. The album was produced by none other than Millencolin guitarist Mathis Farm, and will also serve to mark the band’s tenth anniversary. Stay tuned for more on that special occasion soon!

Booze & Glory are about to head out on the road in support of Dropkick Murphys’ month-long US tour that kicks off this coming Sunday, February 17th, in Poughkeepsie, and winds down in Boston on St. Patrick’s Day. Full tour rundown is down below the video! Booze & Glory’s last release, Chapter IV, dropped back in 2018 on Pirates Press in the States (pick it up here) and via Burning Heart Records elsewhere in 2017.



DS Photo Galley: A Messy, Fun Evening with Ben Nichols and Chris Batten at Crossroads in Garwood, NJ

Just about exactly a year ago, inimitable Lucero frontman Ben Nichols played a one-off date at Crossroads in Garwood, New Jersey, the Andy Diamond-booked club that’s located kinda near everything but not really NEAR anything in the north central part of the Garden State. It wasn’t part of a bigger tour, like Nichols and his pal Oliver Peck‘s occasional Bikeriders combined music and tattoo tour. It seemed a bit random, really, but as can be expected, the 250-ish capacity venue sold out pretty quickly and made for, as chronicled here by yours truly, a pretty special evening.

It was so special, in fact, that Nichols made a return trip this past Saturday, this time as the second night of a two-day solo “tour” that featured a show in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the previous night. Support on this night came from local singer/songwriter Chris Batten and his trusty sidekick Nick Guido, who more regularly appear together in the Chris Batten & The Woods project. The result was another sold-out, whiskey-fueled barn-burner of a show that should all but solidify Nichols’makes an annual stop going forward at what’s become one of my favorite venues to visit.

Accompanied solely by his trusty workhorse Martin acoustic, a not-quite-full fifth of Bulleit Bourbon whiskey, and a literal Home Depot five-gallon bucket filled with ice appropriately adorned with “Let’s Do This” in big, bold letters on the side, Nichols took the stage at shortly after ten p.m. and proceeded to take the crowd on a winding, humorous, occasionally powerful, occasionally sloppy, always enjoyable set over the course of just about the next two-and-a-half hours. “Can’t You Hear Them Howl,” from Lucero’s 2015 album All A Man Should Do kicked things off, complete with audience-provided howling wolf sounds in the choruses. Audience participation proved to be a running theme throughout the show, as a good-natured Nichols was bombarded with a constant stream of requests for the duration of the evening, doing his best piece together some semblance of a “setlist” that balanced A) songs people wanted to hear and B) songs he could remember; the latter of which proved to be a bit challenging as the whiskey continued to flow.

In total, there were somewhere in the neighborhood of twenty-seven songs that were at least started, spanning all points of Nichols’s career, including “Crystal Blue,” which dates back to his pre-Lucero days in the band Old Lucky Sun. Nichols repeatedly commented on the crowd’s seemingly endless knowledge of the deeper tracks in the Lucero catalog, and he responded by pulling out such tracks as “Hold Me Close,” “Mine Tonight,” “Hello Sadness,” and the solo tracks “Davy Brown” and “Chambers.” There’s been a lot of references to family throughout Nichols’s songwriting career, though that theme has never been more prevalent than it was on Lucero’s most recent album, last year’s stellar Among The Ghosts. To that end, well-worn favorites like “Mom” and “The War” and “Raising Hell” made appearances in this set, as did more recent tracks like “To My Dearest Wife” and “Loving” and “Hello My Name Is Izzy.” The former two tracks were inspired by his wife while the latter is an ode to their two-and-a-half year-old daughter, and the tracks were made particularly poignant by the fact that Ben’s wife was in attendance at the show, while Izzy was asleep at a hotel down the road after hitting the bottle a little too hard in Lancaster the night before. Perhaps if he was playing with full band, some of the false-starts and wide-ranging stories told over the course of the evening wouldn’t have played quite so well, but in this intimate, stripped down setting, artist and crowd seemed to be in symbiotic union, and created a performance that really could have gone on a lot longer had potential curfews and, well, straight Kentucky bourbon not interjected.

Head below for more photos from the evening!

 



DS Esclusive: Lenny Lashley On Finding Happiness, Sobriety, and his Killer New Album, “All Are Welcome”

Sometime in the late spring of 2013, Lenny Lashley and I connected via social media to arrange an in-person meet up as a way to help promote Illuminator, his then-upcoming debut solo album under the Lenny Lashley’s Gang Of One moniker. It was a bit of a crossroads moment in Lashley’s career. He’d long been respected, especially locally, as a singer and songwriter of the beer-soaked punk rock and whiskey-soaked cowpunk varieties through his years in Darkbuster and Lenny and the Piss Poor Boys. By the time the 21st century’s first decade had closed, however, Lashley had struggled rather publicly off and on with some mental health and substance use-related issues, and both of those aforementioned bands had flamed out under less-than-ideal circumstances.

I hadn’t done many interviews at that point in time but wanted to take a more active roll in ramping up that area of Dying Scene. I’d known of Lashley professionally since Darkbuster won the coveted Rock ‘N’ Roll Rumble in Boston in 2000, but we’d only met in passing a time or two (including once at the infamous local real-deal dive bar known as the Cambridgeport Saloon, though that incident was more memorable to an underage me than it was to him for sure). So I took the opportunity to put fresh AAs in my old-school cassette recorded and met up with Lashley for coffee on a bright, sunny Jamaica Plain afternoon in June of that year. He struck me as open and honest right from the first moments of our conversation. Not only was it a week before the release of Illuminator, but it had also just been announced that Lashley signed on to join Street Dogs as they regrouped after a very brief hiatus. There was a lot of uncertainty, but things certainly seemed like they were trending in a positive direction.

Fast-forward to 2019 and that upward trend has shown no signs of going off track, both personally and professionally. In the years since our last chat, Lashley’s reconnected with his “one true love,” Shelley. He’s gotten sober, recently surpassing the five year mark from alcohol and cigarettes and the three-year mark from drugs of all kinds, perhaps no easy feat for a guy who’s previous band’s catalog includes the likes of “Booze N Pills,” “Lenny’s A Drunk,” “Miller,” “Cheap Wine” and “Whiskey Will.” He put out a new Darkbuster record, albeit under the name The New Darkbuster because, well, time hasn’t exactly healed all wounds yet. He toured throughout Europe and the States as a solo artist and with The New Darkbuster. He and his Street Dogs brothers put out a few 7-inches toured Europe and the States some more, and finally put out an excellent new full-length, Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing, last year via Century Media.

February 15th marks the release date of Lashley’s sophomore Gang Of One album, All Are Welcome (Pirates Press Records). For this project, Lashley enlisted not only the production services of Bouncing Souls’ Pete Steinkopf once again, but teamed up with fellow Street Dog Johnny Rioux and Mighty Mighty Bosstones drummer Joe “The Kid” Sirois for the core of the recording process. The group worked quickly throughout a much tighter timeline than the one that resulted in Illuminator a half-dozen years ago, resulting in a sound that is familiar sounding yet no less stellar than its predecessor. Echos of Strummer and Springsteen and Hank Williams and, well, Darkbuster, all somehow abound without one emerging as a clear leader. That’s part of what has made Lashley such a compelling songwriter over the years; an ability to float between styles and influences in a way that pays homage rather than simply aping, thanks in large part to a trademark New England accent that’s thicker than clam chowder (sorry, that’s a cheap analogy).

Where Illuminator found Lashley turning the lens inward and processing some of the struggles he’d been going through in the years leading up to its release, the better place he’s been in these days allowed him to shift his focus in an outwardly direction. One needs to look no further than the album’s cover art and the theme of its title track, “All Are Welcome,” complete with its bridge section that contains a portion of Dr. Martin Luther Kind Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech, for evidence of where Lashley found more than a little inspiration. Punk rock has long talked of revolution, and one of the fortunate side-effects of the present sociopolitical climate is that its proven fertile ground for talented artists to inspire the proverbial troops. But it’s not all Clash-style combat rock on All Are Welcome; there are songs of heartache and loneliness and unrequited love and Revolution, but the kind that’s found on the Major League Soccer pitch and not the kind that’s fought in the streets.

Lashley and I met up for a mid-week lunch recently to talk about All Are Welcome and the mental and physical work it took to pull the album together. As always, we covered a lot of ground, from writing without the aid of foreign substances, to the difference between the two Gang Of One albums, to how, despite being on the other side of 50 years old, life as a musician can still be full of surreal experiences. We also talked a lot about the upcoming Dropkick Murphys tour, that’ll feature support from Lashley’s Gang Of One project backed by a full band, which will be a first for a tour of this magnitude. Head below to check out our chat, and head here to pre-order All Are Welcome while you’ve still got time!



Altercation Punk Rock BBQ calls it quits after ten year run

 

With ten years of amazing shows under their belt The Altercation Punk Rock BBQ has become a must attend event for any true punk fan during the annual South By South West music conference in Austin Texas. With so many of our favorite bands like: Two Fisted Law, Teenage Bottle Rocket, The Jukebox Romantics, Off With Their Heads, American Pinup, Lower Class Brats, Dead To Me, The Split Seconds, Dwarves, The Fantastic Plastics, and so many many more awesome acts over the years it would fill a full book just to name them all.

So why is Altercation calling it quits? Find out below.



Dying Scene Radio Special Edition: Albums of the Year 2018

It’s that time of year again! To kick off 2019, we’re taking a look back at our favorite albums from 2018! We’ll tell you why they were our favorites and play some of the best tracks from those albums. Sound good? Alrighty then! Check out our special 2018 Albums of the Year Episode, below!



DS Exclusive: My Year in Photos 2018

Mike McColgan of Street Dogs, gestures to crowd surfer at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

2018 was another great year for documenting the punk rock scene, not just in my adopted city of Chicago. I also spent time shooting shows in my native state of New York, specifically, in my little brother’s borough of Brooklyn. And for the fourth consecutive year, I spent a long mid-December weekend in Boston, MA. For the compilation of my favorite images of 2018, I am again including faves from bands from a wide spectrum of years together and differing levels of public recognition. Quite a few of these images were featured in DS this year. However, as with my faves gallery in 2017, many others were heretofore not featured in any online or hard copy publications. The shows, Weekend Stands; and festivals (such as Wreck the Halls, Motoblot, Punk the Burbs; and Riot Fest) represented were a blast, every last one. Every group included is one more than worth checking out should they hit your town, city or other location where you might find yourself at the same time as them.

Personal Note:  A good many of the photos in this selection are of Street Dogs. I have been following them and documenting them coming up on 10 years in March. Those who know me know the only band I place above them as a personal favorite is The Clash. There are numerous reasons for my love of Street Dogs and among those reasons is their showmanship. 2018 presented me with the opportunity to document the band in NYC, Chicago; and in the Boston area. The Chicago images were part of my Riot Fest gallery for DS. They will be playing Punk Rock Bowling this May (which I likely may not make). After that, there are no scheduled shows announced for the foreseeable future. They are among the most fun and exciting bands to shoot. Their shows are always at maximum energy levels and the crowds pretty much never disappoint in matching that energy.  So I would like to extend my best wishes to the Michael, Johnny, Lenny, Pete, and Matt; as well as their crews. They and their latest album, “Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing,” were surely among the best of 2018.

Johnny Rioux (left) and Lenny Lashley of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls

Ben Roy of SPELLS may be one of Those Who Can’t on television but when it comes to getting a crowd going, he is definitely one of those who can.

Street Dogs’ Mike McColgan pulled me up on stage at Brooklyn Bazaar to get a shot of the crowd. I have documented band from various places on the sides and in the back of stages. However, getting the right up at the front P.O.V. of most of the band members certainly is eye-opening

Triumph Ace and helmet sporting the Ace Cafe London logo at Motoblot

The Queers perform at Punk the Burbs 2

Peter Mittler of The Bollweevils at Chop Shop Chicago

Chicago

Ken Fitzner of The Bollweevils at Chop Shop in Chicago

Dr. Daryl Wilson of The Bollweevils gets high…on punk. Pete Mumford and Ken Fitzner also pictured.

A photographer shoot images of Street Dogs at Brooklyn Bazaar in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY

Pete Sosa of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls #SadPeteSosa? Nah, just a quiet moment in the beautiful chaos.

Stickfight! perform at Liar’s Club Halloween show

The Run Around at Punk the Burbs 2

Stage invader during Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls

Ben Roy of SPELLS at Wicker Park Fest in Chicago

Pussy Riot at Riot Fest

Off With Their Heads at Wicker Park Fest

Nuns of Brixton at Motoblot in Chicago

Nate Leinfelder of Noi!se at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

Bill Stephens of Naked Raygun

Jeff Pezzati of Naked Raygun

Nikki Beller of Mystery Actions at Punk the Burbs 2

Mike McColgan of Street Dogs amid the crowd at Riot Fest

Street Dogs’ Johnny Rioux with his wife Melissa Rioux, on stage at Wreck the Halls

Lenny Lashley of Street Dogs at Wreck the Halls in Allston, MA

Legendary Shack Shakers’ JD Wilkes bends over backward for the Motoblot crowd

Matt Hensley of Flogging Molly on the squeezebox at Riot Fest in Chicago, IL

The Queers headlined Punk the Burbs 2

Scott Brooks of Avenues at Punk The Burbs 2

Trever Keith of Face to Face at Riot Fest in Chicago

Caitlin Rose of Bumsy and the Moochers performs at Punk the Burbs 2. Rose is one of the co-organizers of the fest taking place in the suburbs outside of Chicago

Rubber soles meet Bouncing Souls. Pete Steinkopf of Bouncing Souls has great taste in shoes.

Poli Van Dam of The Bombpops has fun at Riot Fest in Chicago

Todd Pott of Apocalypse Hoboken becomes one with the band’s fans at Chop Shop in Chicago

Alkaline Trejo during Alkaline Trio at Riot Fest

Tony Reflex leads Adolescents at Riot Fest. The band hung a large banner with the name Soto in place of the group name as a tribute to their late bandmate Steve Soto.

Larry Damore of Pegboy is surrounded by fans at Cobra Lounge in Chicago. The band performed at this fundraiser for another small Chicago venue.

Steev MF Custer and Devin Morris of Death and Memphis perform during their set at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Juan Avalos of Size 5’s jumps, for joy perhaps, as the band performs at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Benny NoGood of Benny and the No-Goods pours emotion into his performance during the band’s set at Brauerhouse Lombard.

Off With Their Heads perform at Brauerhouse Lombard

1916 gave a rollicking performance at this year’s Wreck the Halls

Denis Buckley of 88 Fingers Louie sits this one in, continuing to sing at the band’s show at Chop Shop Chicago

And finally, one of my faves I did not take. From left: Johnny Rioux, Matt Pruitt, Lenny Lashley, Pete Sosa, yours truly, and Mike McColgan. Thanks for all the great times! It’s been a blast documenting you all and I so wish I could make PRB this May in Las Vegas! Best Wishes!! Photo by Mark Korich



DS Staff Picks: The Torchbearer’s Favorite Albums of 2018

I feel like I say this every year, but 2018 was a great year for music. I went to some great shows; everything from small intimate house shows to big spectacles and festivals. I personally played my first show in over a decade, so that was cool.  But you all don’t care about all that, you just want to see if any of your favorite albums of the year are also on my list. Let’s compare notes below!



DS Exclusive: The Live Music Year In Pictures (Anarchopunk)

Oi!!!! Here’s some facts, Jack:  2018 is (almost) over. I didn’t manage to shoot as many shows this year. I moved from my home in Los Angeles to the Mile High City of Denver, Colorado. I got a new kitten. I bought a new car. I started a new job. Now, here’s some stats, Jill (I didn’t want anyone to feel left out):  Despite all of that, I still shot well over one hundred sets from about twenty-five different shows/festivals. Moral of the story:  I’m fucking tired.

Check out a gallery of some of my favorite pictures from 2018, below!



DS Staff Picks: Jay Stone’s Favorite Albums of 2018 (w/Spotify playlist)

Hey boys and girls, Jay Stone checking in with yet another year-end list. I’m the dopey one on the left up there. Anywho, as is par for the course, I put way more than ten albums on my “top ten” list, because rules are for squares or whatever. I tend to have a tough time coming up with a definitive number one, but my choice here has occupied that spot for the last eight months and never really got knocked off. A lot of the top half of the list is almost interchangeable based on my current mood, and might have even changed in the time between when I typed this list and when I actually published it. There’s a pretty extensive (fifty-ish song) Spotify playlist that features at least a couple tracks from each of these releases, so check it out and maybe find some new music! Check it all out below!



DS Photo Gallery: Street Dogs Wreck The Halls with Noi!se and Art Thieves

Last weekend, the punks and skins came from far and wide, descending upon Boston’s Brighton Music Hall for the 13th installment of Street Dogs‘ annual Wreck The Halls festivities. The hometown working class heroes have been riding high this year, primarily due to the release of Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing, their first full-length in eight years. As the band’s members – and fans – spread far and wide, it can be hard to get all the moving parts in one place at the same time, making events like the three-day Wreck The Halls blowout all the more special.

Nights two and three of this year’s Wreck The Halls featured opening performances from Slapshot, Dori Cameron and the Invisible Monsters, Ramallah and 1916. Dying Scene made it out to the first night, particularly to get the chance to see Street Dogs take the stage with a couple bands that we’ve been fired up to finally see live: Noi!se and Art Thieves, and boy are we glad we did.

Fresh off the release of their own stellar full length, Russian Rats (State Line Records), Art Thieves kicked off the long weekend of Wreck The Halls shenanigans in fine fashion. The three-piece local band play a no-frills style of street punk that’s been the calling card of the local scene for a long time. They’ve sort of perfected the fuck-the-government calls to arms from a past generation and morphed it with the melodic sensibilities of the newer school. If there’s a local band to carry the torch that Street Dogs have been brandishing for the better part of the last couple decades once they decide to hang it up, it may well be Art Thieves.

Noi!se followed up in one of the most eagerly-awaited sets I’ve seen in quite a while. The Tacoma-based quartet has been around for seven-ish years now, but had yet to make it to this side of the Mississippi River. And yet, in many ways, Noi!se’s 45-minute set had the feel of a hometown show of their own, as a solid majority of the 435-strong capacity crowd was well versed in the band’s entire catalog. “Rank And File,” from the band’s 2012 Pushing On full-length (and previously from the This Is Who We Are 7-inch) kicked things off, and from their the band mixed in a dozen other tracks from across the last half decade. The first real pit of the night – and the first in a seemingly endless barrage of crowd-surface – fired itself up by the time fan-favorite “How We Made It Through” made its way into the set at the halfway point, pushing the gas pedal on an energy level that wouldn’t let up for the remainder of the evening. It was one of those times where the event actually exceeds lofty expectations, and where the symbiotic relationship between a band and a crowd is truly palpable.

It can be tough to come up with new phrases or adjectives to describe the live performance of a band that’s long been a stalwart of the scene. Still, the recent Boston Music Award winners for Best Punk/Hardcore act seem to find new ways to mix things up and keep them fresh, perhaps now more so than ever. The band ripped through “Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing,” the title track and lead single from their latest album, as they took the stage (well…after the rocking out to a few minutes of Boston’s “Foreplay” as the instrument-wielding 4/5th of the band took the stage anyway) before proceeding to dig deeper into the back catalog than I’ve seen them do in recent memory. “Pull The Pin” and “You Alone” and “Katie Bar The Door” were welcome additions to the setlist that I can’t recall having seen in the last handful of SD shows. The band played without a barrier (and, as a result, without a photo pit, which is something I’ve become apparently waaaaaaay too comfortable with in my old age), meaning that a band that already gets up close and personal with its fans anyway was able to raise that bar even further. There were guest appearances from Big Truth of American War Machine (I think) and the legendary CJ Ramone, the latter of whom took on vocal duties for a cover of his namesake band’s classic track “Blitzkrieg Bop.” It was a raucous first night for both band and crowd — many of whom were in attendance for two or three nights — and set the stage brilliantly for what was to come.

Head below for our full photo rundown.



Inside All Silk Mastering House With Ed Hall (Egos At The Door): Interview, Live Session Premiere

We spend a lot of time covering music here at Dying Scene and not so much looking at the people behind the sounds. Today, we’re going to buck that trend with an interview with mastering engineer and owner of the All Silk Mastering House, Ed Hall.

Ed has spent most of his life in and around the DIY punk scene in the north of England. He’s probably best known as guitarist with the recently disbanded, hugely underrated techcore proggers, Egos At The Door. With Egos, Ed has travelled across Europe and America, allowing him to build a strong network of contacts from the international punk scene.

His latest venture involved the creation of a sonic fantasy lab in an undisclosed location in Colne, Lancashire in the north of the UK. Ed was kind enough to share his experiences setting up the All Silk Mastering House, which has been a complete DIY effort. From construction and decorating, through to fitting the space out with all the necessary gear and, of course, the mastering itself, Ed handles the entire process. He’s an inspiration to all those who long to cast off the shackles of the daily grind and chase their dreams but lack the gusto to take that initial plunge.

Below, you’ll find an interview with Ed, as well as an exclusive look at his latest project – a regular live session from the All Silk Mastering House floor itself. We’ve also thrown in an example of Ed’s recent work with UK garage punks SWEARS’s latest single, Space Invaders.



Dying Scene Radio – Episode 12 – Band Spotlight: Mad Caddies

Dying Scene Radio is back with a new installment! In this episode, Bobby heads down to the beach for Surf City Blitz Festival to eat some awesome food,watch some dirt bike racing and listen to some fantastic music. Oh yea! He also sat down with the Sultans of Ska, Mad Caddies to talk about growing up in Solvang, how Joey Cape helped kick start their music career and…wine fermentation?? As always, the guys are also bringing you all of the noteworthy scene news that you were probably too lazy to read and play rad new tracks from emerging artists that you were probably too lazy to discover! All of that and much, much more in Episode 12 of Dying Scene Radio, below!



Interview: David Green (Moonraker) Gives Us a Track by Track Breakdown of The New LP “Lanterns”

Southern California punks Moonraker released their sophomore record Lanterns back in September of this year via Tiny Dragon Music and after having a few months to listen to and digest the album, we wanted to know more about it. So we called up drummer/vocalist David Green and asked all of the questions that were eating away at us! All eleven tracks, dissected and explained by the man himself! If you haven’t heard the album yet, go download it and listen while you read through. If you’re already a fan, listen to it again while you read through, below!



DS Photo Gallery: The Radiator Rattlers Rock Nashua’s Holiday Stroll

It’s not often that Dying Scene covers performances at local Christmas season outdoor holiday strolls. In fact, I’m pretty sure this is the only time we’ve done it. However, it’s also not often that a band as cool as The Radiator Rattlers plays a local Christmas season outdoor holiday stroll, so this past weekend, we packed up our camera bag, headed to our old hometown, and took in a pretty awesome performance to finish out the family-friendly annual event.

As you may recall from our recent sit-down with guitarist and co-frontman Frankie Piessens, The Rattlers hail from a half-hour down the road in Haverhill, Massachusetts. However, the octet’s (Piessens, Kenny Turner on washboard and vocals, Matt Pepp on banjo and vocals, Travis Boucher on mandolin and vocals, Carla Pierce on acoustic guitar, Luke Williams on Drums and Jimbo Ritchie on bass) swashbuckling pedal steel player Jonee Earthquake has been a fixture in the New Hampshire punk rock community for…well, for as long as I’ve been alive, and I’ll be forty on my next birthday. Earlier in the week, they announced a pretty huge milestone in their career that spans about a half-dozen years; they’ll be playing the big stage at next May’s Punk Rock Bowling in Las Vegas! And while you wouldn’t think of “family friendly downtown holiday stroll in southern New Hampshire” as perhaps the punk rockingest of venues, the set up was very much guerrilla-style and DIY: the street was blocked to through traffic by off-duty DPW heavy equipment, and the band performed on the in between snowbanks on a sidewalk – no stage in sight – outside a dive bar in the sub-40 degree temperatures. That’s pretty punk rock if you ask us.

Check out the rest of our full photo gallery below.

 



Screwtape (hardcore) Announces New EP

Screwtape

Denver based hardcore act Screwtape is back with a new EP and we couldn’t be happier! The four track album, Static releases on pretty much every digital streaming site on November 28th If you’re a more hands on type like us, the EP will also be available in hard copy and we would highly suggest picking one up at the album release show which will be hosted at The Oriental Theater on the day of it’s release. Head over to the band’s Facebook page for more details and be sure to check them out if they play in your neck of the woods!