Tag «pop punk»

Hidden Home Records Release Label Compilation

Boise record label Hidden Home Records have released their first label compilation for pay-what-you-want download on bandcamp. The compilation is entitled “Do You Remember Punk Rock Comps? Vol. 1” and features Union Stockyards, Destroy Nate Allen, Wicked Bears, and more.

You can listen to the compilation below.

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Album Review: Couple’s Fight – “There’s Someone Else”

Another Valentine’s Day gone by and another stellar release from the dysfunctional Phoenix-based duo Couple’s Fight, I certainly hope this is going to become a yearly tradition. While most American’s took the day to appreciate their significant other, x-romantic partners Alaynha Gabrielle and Travis James used the hallmark holiday to release six new blazing dis tracks aimed at each other.

For a basic idea of what this new E.P. Is like basically imagine dance punk duo Matt&kim with less production and if they hated every fiber of each others being. The new record, There’s Someone Else, like the first record, Breaking Up, is composed entirely of songs based on common couples squabbles, but this time the punchlines are punchier, the dance tracks are dancier, and Gabrielle’s big voice and creativity shine far brighter, which is most evident in her more stout jabs at Travis this time around.

For their new record the two piece takes on such romantic topics like the way a relationship changes for the negative in “The Way it used to be,” cheating in the tune “There’s Someone Else,” fighting in public in “Causing a Scene” and comparing one’s partner to their parents in “You’re Just Like with their tongue in cheek songwriting and upbeat danceable tracks.

One track that really stood out on the record was “Anything For Your (To Leave)” about the scary change that happens in a relationship when it goes from wanting to do anything for your partner to being willing to anything to get rid of them. The track is unlike the rest of the record because it features an acoustic guitar, and it almost sounds like it was more made for Travis James main project Travis James and the Acrimonious Assembly of Arsonists.

The new Couple’s Fight record even brings the Alaynha and Travis to couple’s therapy with the love expert Dr. Andy Warpigs filling in the vocals of the therapist. What exactly did Dr. Warpigs prescribe for the ailing relationship? A full split of course … and by the way, he’s boning both of them.

All in all “There’s Someone Else” is a fun listen that really highlights the clever word-play of both Alaynha and Travis, and is a definite valentine’s punk classic. Oh, it’s also available for nothing on the bands Bandcamp right now.

3.5/5 Stars

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DS Exclusive: Stream upcoming split from Just Friends and Prince Daddy & The Hyena

Party punks Just Friends from California and Prince Daddy & The Hyena recently announced a 7″ Split coming out just in time for The Fest, and Dying Scene has the exclusive stream of the whole thing below!

Being Weezer fanatics, both band recorded one Pinkerton-era cover, Just Friends grabbing the underrated single “The Good Life”, while Prince Daddy chose the B-Side “Devotion”. Fans of Bomb The Music Industry! and, hell, Weezer, are sure to love this. You can preorder the Split here.
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Just Friends and Prince Daddy & The Hyena Announce Split 7″

Party punks Just Friends and Prince Daddy & The Hyena have announced a Split 7″ to be released just in time for The Fest! The split will be released on yellow and green vinyl and is set to include one original and one Weezer cover from each band.

Just Friends last released Rock 2 The Rhythm on Open Door Records in 2015 and Prince Daddy & The Hyena most recently released I Thought You Didn’t Like Leaving on Broken World Media last month.

You can pre-order the split here and view the track listing below.

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Album Review: The Hotelier – “Goodness”

Over the past few years, the Hotelier (previously spelled “The Hotel Year”) has morphed from an impressive no-bullshit pop punk band into seemingly the biggest band of the “emo revival.” Home, Like No Place Is There was a record that connected with fans all over the world for its brutal honesty and relatability dealing with heavy subject matters. Records like it come around once or twice every ten years or so. This said, Goodness was one of the most anticipated punk-anything records of 2016, and while it might not break ground sonically or lyrically for fans the way their last record did, it doesn’t mean they weren’t pushing their boundaries or combatting people’s expectations.

Christian Holden, the voice behind The Hotelier, loves to challenge the status quo and people’s’ notions of what are acceptable and unacceptable. The same attitude that went into putting a group of naked elderly people onto the album cover also went into certain musical choices on the album. A good example can be found at the very beginning of the record, where there’s an unexpected spoken word track (“N 43° 59’ 39.927” W 71° 23’ 45.27””).

Goodness is a quality record in the fact that each song seems to be thoughtfully written and catchy. “Goodness Pt. 2”, the song’s second track, opens the record by layering instrument after instrument one by one thus creating anticipation in the listener until everything crashes in toward the middle. “Piano Player”, one of the more uptempo songs on the record, holds its own for five and a half minutes, something unheard of for a more punk rock sounding song. “Soft Animal”, possibly the best song on the record, appears at a time when the record needs a kick in energy. On top of it all, it can’t be stated how much feeling Holden obviously put into the lyrics and subject matter on this album.

When listeners hear “I’m freezing” repeated through the chorus of “Fear of Good”, they will actually see the singer shivering, coatless in a snowy town. “Opening Mail for My Grandmother” which begins with “your grip on my forearm/insert the wrong name” paints a sad picture of one’s grandparent slipping away to the end of their life and observing them as their body and brain deteriorate over time. In “Soft Animal,” when the words “Make me feel alive/make me feel like I don’t have to die/make me believe that there’s a God sometimes,” there’s no doubt that Holden actually has felt that sense of longing for purpose. However, while Holden has stated in interviews that Goodness is more or less a positive record (“Taoist love record” they say), the way the lyrics were written in conjunction with the actual instrumentals make that hard to pick up on.

Here’s the thing: each song on this record is good. But the great thing about this band’s previous records were that they were journeys in themselves. The first songs left listeners feeling different than the last songs did. Goodness on the other hand has the problem of keeping listeners in one place or frame of mind. The last song feels like the first. Unfortunately, this makes for kind of an overly melancholy record. It’s not one of those things where they made the same album twice, because this album is definitely different and a departure from their previous work, but no song in this collection particularly sticks out from the rest, whereas with Home, or even with INGO, almost every song was uniquely individual in the emotions they evoked or the way they evoked them.

Goodness gets a 3.5/5. That said, The Hotelier are still one of the best bands in the game right now and I hope they’re around for years and years to come. This record was simply where they’re at now – I’m excited to see where they go in the future.

3.5/5 Stars

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SKiTTiSH iTZ stream new song “Keep Your Castle”

Boise punks SKiTTiSH iTZ are streaming a new song from their final album, BACK TO REALiTY, over at New Noise Magazine. Listen to it here.

The song is entitled “Keep Your Castle” and is an ode to a lovestruck Super Mario who at last gives up on chasing Peach. Fans of Lagwagon, the Vandals, or Goldfinger will probably like this a lot.

BACK TO REALiTY is SKiTTiSH iTZ’s fifth release and final album. It’s set to be released on July 22nd on Hidden Home Records.

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Interview: Mike Park of Asian Man Records talks label origins, 20 Year Anniversary Show, and more

I remember buying Big D & The Kids Table’s “Good Luck” from a local record store at age 15 and finding inside the ten year anniversary Asian Man Records mail order catalog. In this catalog there was a letter from label founder Mike Park explaining that they were not a big label. He said he ran it out of his parents’ garage, had one phone line with no call waiting, one computer, and two employees (his mom being one of them). This blew my mind and was my simple little introduction to DIY ethics. So when I got the chance to interview the man behind the label himself, it was no small deal to me.

I got to sit on a couch and drink a beer while Mr. Park walked his dog around his neighborhood on a very windy day in San Jose, California. While there were several moments in our interview that I could barely hear him due to the weather, this was still the best interview I’ve ever done and a dream come true for me. Read it below.

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Albums Punk Forgot: Osker – ‘Idle Will Kill’

Idle Will Kill

Albums Punk Forgot is a look back at excellent or important records within our community that, for one reason or another, have been lost or forgotten. It’s a tribute to those bands and releases that deserved to be heard, but maybe for some reason dropped off our radars too soon. We at Dying Scene hope to give these records the credit they deserve.

Today DS writer Robolitious takes a look back at Oskar’s Idle Will Kill and its vast, if not subtle, influence on modern punk. You can read his take on the album below. (more…)

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Album Review: Seaway – “Colour Blind”

Canada has long been turning out some of the most groundbreaking pop-punk North America has to offer. Whether it’s more commercial acts like Sum 41 to not-as-well known bands like Daggermouth (RIP), our neighbors up north have done a great job of infiltrating and subtly influencing and changing punk’s most accessible sub-genre as we know it.

Now, I’m pretty cynical when it comes to newer pop-punk. I feel like the genre is pretty over-saturated right now with more bands than are listenable and not a ton of individuality. That said, Seaway isn’t the most groundbreaking band by any means. But their sound is refreshing to me and I’ve actually been following the band since Dying Scene posted about “Sabrina the Teenage Bitch” several years ago. 2013’s Hoser was a solid release as well, and I had a blast watching them live on that touring cycle. However, this year’s Colour Blind seems unfortunately unimaginative, and it struggled to keep my attention through the whole thing.

While listening through Colour Blind, it’s easy to feel that Seaway’s gotten lazy in their songwriting. The lyrics are cheesier, the tempos drag on, and the songs sound like generic pop rock rather than something unique. It unfortunately seems like more of a regression than any kind of progression or continuity of their last record.

Early in the record, the listener can get the feel of what Seaway’s album is going to sound and feel like. “Best Mistake”, the album’s second track, is a great precursor for the rest of the record. While a very New Found Glory-ish jump-up-and-down song, it’s unfortunately pretty cheesy and doesn’t contribute much that you haven’t heard before from bands like this. Sadly, the rest of the album is very similar with cliche hooks, progressions, song structures, and lyrics. Just about every song has at least something that sticks out a bit, but overall they don’t give you any reason to listen to Seaway over any other band in the genre.

Colour Blind has some bright moments on it though. “Trick”, the album’s third track, is the kind of track I wish I would have seen more of on the record and what I think is good about this newer brand of pop-punk when done right. A little faster, a bit more attention-grabbing, catchy without the corniness, and not too technical for it’s own good (although Seaway is very technical if you listen hard enough). The ninth track on the record, “Growing Stale”, is a different feel for the album while still maintaining consistency with the overall style. While a little less jumpy, it’s definitely worth a listen and sticks out among the rest of the tracks as better-written and just different overall.

The album’s three ending tracks, “The Day That She Left”, “Turn Me Away” and “Goon” fit well as end of the record songs, but in conjunction with the previous songs on the album, don’t do much to save Colour Blind as a whole.

I personally still have hope for Seaway. I think they’re good musicians and they have a knack for writing hooks. A little more maturity or thought put into their songwriting would probably do them well though, as this album seems stale and unimaginative.

Unfortunately, I’m giving Colour Blind a 2.5/5, but while that seems harsh, you should still keep an eye out for what this band does in years to come, because this album could just be their sophomore slump.

Listen to Colour Blind below. (more…)

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