Category «Shows»

Slam Dunk (North) 2019 – Live Review

This year’s Slam Dunk festival took place at two locations, the northern event in the beautiful Temple Newsham Park on the outskirts of Leeds, the southern date at the similarly picturesque Hatfield House Park near London.  What the aristocratic owners of these large country estates would make of the Slam Dunk attendees descending on their properties, I’d love to know!  Being punkers of a certain age, my wife and I had to plan our attendance with military precision – depositing our three kids with their grandparents, stocking up on supplies for a couple of nights of freedom from behaving like responsible adults and heading north with the Friday afternoon motorway traffic.  We spent the night before Slam Dunk North in nearby Sheffield with friends before heading to the show bright and early on the Saturday.  After negotiating our way through housing and industrial areas we arrived at the festival along with a few thousand other music fans.  With the smell of cheap cider in the air and the lunchtime sun shining, we made our way in and headed to the far side of the site to Fat Mike’s Punk In Drublic stage.  The line up had spent the last few weeks winding its way through Germany, Spain and France with the two Slam Dunk dates in the UK capping off this run through Europe.

We got to the stage just in time to catch the end of openers, The Bombpops, set.  They ripped through I Can’t and Jerk from 2017’s Fear of Missing Out, ending on Dear Beer from last year’s EP.  The band were super tight and I was disappointed not to have caught the whole set, hopefully they’ll be back this side of the Atlantic soon.

Next up were Anti-Flag, a band I’ve lost touch with over the past decade having previously enjoyed their output.  They launched into Die For Your Government, much to the appreciation of the assembled crowd and played a solid set spanning their twenty years plus of releasing music.  Despite it being around 1pm they managed to incite a giant circle pit during Broken Bones, after reminding us “Brothers and sisters, if someone falls down, we pick them back up”.  We were then treated to a couple of their poppier songs (Turncoat and This Is The End) before Fuck Police Brutality, a song written twenty two years ago that is as relevant now as it ever has been.  The set was rounded out with Cities Burn, American Attraction, Press Corpse and finally, singalong favourite Brandenburg Gate.  Having not really checked in with the band for a while I had been slightly ambivalent about checking them out however their performance, positivity and set list were all top notch.

Santa Barbara sextet, the Mad Caddies, then took the stage to share some reggae/ska punk love with the masses.  Despite lead singer Chuck not getting any sound out of his monitor for the early part of their set, the boys were sounding great.  The crowd was skanking and grooving along from the opening trumpet refrain of The Dirge to the last notes of oompah thrasher All American BadAss.  Personal highlights for me were Road Rash, Weird Beard and the cover of Propagandhi’s Nation States from last summer’s Punk Rocksteady album.

Keeping the ska punk vibe going, The Interrupters followed next.  My main exposure to the Bivona brothers and Aimee Interrupter is from my wife and nine-year-old daughter playing them in the car and around the house.  I’ve always appreciated their Hellcat inflected tunes and was looking forward to seeing them in person.  Friend Like Me got the crowd moving nicely and they went on to play Take Back The Power, On A Turntable, She’s Kerosene and She Got Arrested amongst others.  It could have just been me but it did feel like the energy in the crowd dropped a few songs into the set but this was by no means a reflection of the effort being given by the band.  They finished with This Is My Family adding a slightly prolonged singalong finale to the song which I could have done without but, overall, I was pleased to have caught The Interrupters live.

I first saw Lagwagon in 1998, headlining a show which also had NUFAN, Strung Out and Swingin Utters on the line up, a few months before Let’s Talk About Feelings came out.  I have a lot of time for this band and I waited patiently to see them for the fourth (fifth?) time while my compadres foolishly opted to hit the bar and food stalls.  Their set list focussed mainly on their mid to late nineties albums with Violins, Sleep, Razor Burn from Hoss; Alien 8 and Making Friends from Double Plaidinum and Change Despair, May 16 and After You My Friend from ‘Feelings.  Cog In The Machine got an airing from 2014’s Hang, I had been hoping for a few more from this album but they had played a lot of those songs when they played London last year so I wasn’t too disappointed.  With close to thirty years under their belts, it’s no surprise Lagwagon are consistently excellent live, with plenty of choreographed shredding and general tom foolery thrown in for good measure.  The rain started to fall as the set drew to a close, so after four and half hours at the Punk in Drublic stage I took a wander to find food, toilets and buy a long overdue round at the beer tent.

Millencolin played next however I opted to visit the Dickies stage to check out Saves The Day, a band my wife and I saw on our first sort of date in 2002.  I lost touch with the band’s music after Stay What You Are and was gambling on them playing songs from their first few records to make it worth my while straying from the Punk in Drublic stage.  They kicked off with At Your Funeral and Chris Conely’s vocal was instantly joined by the (slightly aging) crowd, transporting me back to when I was a wide eyed 20-year-old.  From there they played a string of songs from post SWYA albums and with a heavy heart I bid them farewell in order to line up more drinks and get a decent vantage point for Less Than Jake.

The rain had been falling steadily by the time Gainesville’s favourite sons bounced onto the stage.  They treated the decidedly damp crowd to all the classics (Jonny Quest, All My Best Friends Are Metalheads, History Of A Boring Town, Nervous In The Alley, Gainesville Rock City etc) along with a couple of newer tunes.  At one point the, slightly terrifying, LTJ mascot came on stage with a toilet paper gun and papered the front few rows which is not something I’ve experienced at a show before but it was pretty amusing.  Less Than Jake are one of those bands that you can never see too many times and seeing some of their newer songs played in and amongst their older stuff gave a slightly different perspective on them, which was great.

The penultimate act was Bad Religion, whose seventeenth studio album, Age Of Unreason, dropped a month ago.  We were treated to four songs from their latest offering (Lose Your Head, Chaos From Within, Do The Paranoid Style & My Sanity).  The rest of the set was a tour de force, stretching back to the very beginning (Fuck Armageddon…This Is Hell from 1982’s How Could Hell Be Any Worse?) with good representation from their entire catalogue.  Crowd pleasers like 21st Century Digital Boy, Sorrow, Stranger Than Fiction and Fuck You all kept the crowd moving as the rain continued to fall.  These guys continue to put out great music and impress live and it was heartening to see punks of all ages rocking out to these legends.

I sacrificed the end of Bad Religion’s set to catch a few songs from The Menzingers back on the Dickies stage.  An ill-advised, uphill sprint across the festival site left me lightheaded as I arrived halfway through Mid-Western States.  I just about caught my breath as they started Casey and I stuck around long enough to hear The Freaks and Lookers before heading back to the Punk In Drublic stage for headliners, NOFX.  I’ve been a fan of The Menzingers since 2010’s Chamberlain Waits and have seen them a few times playing club shows and they are always a good time live.

So back to the Punk In Drublic stage for NOFX and the rain finally stopped.  The guys came on stage and proceeded to spend what felt like five minutes chatting shit to each other and the crowd.  Just as the fans started to get restless, they let rip with Seeing Double At The Triple Rock and Six Years On Dope.  They played a set punctuated with long periods of conversation and shit-housery which at times elicited shouts of “Get on with it” from the crowd, but most should know by now that this is standard practise for Mike et al.  To be honest, I was thankful for the chance to catch my breath a lot of the time!  We were treated to Linoleum, Don’t Call Me White, The Brews and Perfect Government from the album from whence the stage took its name, along with Bob (from White Trash..), Kill All The White Man (from the Longest Line EP), Eat The Meek and Murder The Government (from So Long…).  I was really pleased they played I’m So Sorry Tony because Mr Sly should be honoured at every opportunity and they closed the set playing a cover of We’re Only Gonna Die by Bad Religion which was excellent.  NOFX have been through a lot of shit in their personal lives over the years but it’s nice to see them on stage, annoying each other, supporting each other and still fighting the good fight.

Previous Slam Dunk line-ups have always had a few bands that piqued my interested but the inclusion of the Punk In Drublic tour made it a no brainer, here’s hoping it become a permanent fixture moving forwards.

Photo Credits

The Bombpops – Jen Razavi

Aimee Interruptor, Joey Cape, Roger Lima, Greg Graffin – FuckinClairPhotos

NOFX – Jade Greenbrooke

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Show Review: Jawbreaker at Brooklyn Steel with War On Women and Pohgoh

 

            Jawbreaker at Brooklyn Steel 3/24/19. Text and Photos By Kate Hoos.

Jawbreaker- who first ignited a frenzy when they reunited in 2017 at Riot Fest and then went on to tour throughout 2018- is back on the road again, currently on a week long run on the East Coast with War On Women and an also re-united 90s group, Pohgoh. The tour hit NYC for a pair of shows at Brooklyn Steel on 3/23-3/24. While the 3/23 show was sold out, Sunday was more low-key attendance wise, but that didn’t hinder any of the bands in giving rock solid, spot on performances. Keep scrolling for pics and show review.

Pohgoh opened up the night with a set of emo flavored indie cuts. The band was initially active in the mid 1990s, releasing a split with Braid, as well as several of their own singles and a full length in 1997 that came out shortly after they ceased playing shows. Their song “Friend X” was also the closing track on the very first of the legendary Emo Diaries series of comps on Deep Elm Records, which any eagle earred longtime fans in the crowd would have picked out right away when they closed their set with it. Having been a Deep Elm devotee in the late 90s and 2000s, who owned almost every comp they put out until 2003ish, I certainly perked right up when I heard it, smiling as recognition of a nice slice of the past set in.

Though the band ended their first run in 1997, they are officially back now with this tour and a recently released album, Secret Club. Released in 2018, it is a deeply personal album that touches on singer Susie Ulrey’s life with Multiple Sclerosis, the last 20 years, and what it is like being a re-united band now.

War On Women is fresh off of an Australian tour, having just barely arrived back home before this current tour kicked off, but you would never suspect a single ounce of fatigue or jet lag in them. They blazed full force into their set, opening with the searing rager “Pro-Life?” from their 2015 self titled debut leaving no question as to exactly what this band stand for. Singer Shawna Potter is one of the best front women in punk today, captivating audiences while never giving less than 110% in every performance and the rest of her band mates have the intensity to match her. In a set that was pretty evenly split with songs from their debut and their latest album, 2018’s brilliant and fiery Capture The Flag, they minced no words and took no prisoners, making it very clear their stance on life in America today with every lyric of every single song confronting misogyny, rape culture, transphobia, the brutality of healthcare and a whole host of issues that are sadly all too relevant in the political climate of 2019.

The band will continue their frenetic pace up through summer with North East and Canadian dates scheduled for May right before they embark on a UK/European tour with feminist post hardcore shredders Petrol Girls. War On Women is without a doubt one of the most important bands making music today, be sure to keep your eyes open for when they hit your town next.

 

Like many fans of Jawbreaker my age (just a shade under 40 if I’m dating myself!) I’m just a bit too young to have caught them in their initial run which ended in 1996, so this was something I had looked forward to for over 20 years. I also sadly wasn’t able to see them on their first shows back in New York in 2018, so this was really a night I had absolutely been waiting for. They have meant so much to so many people for a very long time, myself included, and I was not at all disappointed; from the reaction of the crowd- with a few attendees in the front row shedding tears- no one else was either. Hearing so many of the songs that were such a big part of my formative years played live was an incredible experience. It didn’t even dawn on me that all of the material they were performing was over 20 years old, some songs even 30 years old; they are all still so fresh in my mind and in the mind of so many of the fans, regardless of if they listened to Jawbreaker in the 90s or were even born at the time some of their albums came out. Needless to say, the band effortlessly delivered an intense and remarkable set as if no time had passed at all since their initial years.

The set list was switched up from night to night and touched on tracks from all over their catalog, sure to please even the most die-hard fans. On Sunday they opened with “Want,” the first track from their 1990 debut Unfun and went on to hit B-Sides “Sea Foam Green,” and “Kiss The Bottle” along with tracks from all four of their albums including solid helping of gems from Dear Youan album that on initial release in 1995 was particularly polarizing to long time fans, but now finally has the healthy respect it always deserved. It almost seemed like they weren’t going to play fan favorite “Boxcar,” but they held out and saved it for the encore to the delight of a very enthusiastic crowd. It is truly a special band that can write and play songs that sound as necessary today in 2019 as they did when they were first written in the late 80s and early 90s.

While fans new and old are certainly waiting to see if this reunion will bring new music, it hasn’t been made clear by the band yet if that is something on the horizon. For now they will finish this tour and then head to the UK/Europe for dates with Beach Slang and will also play for the 25th anniversary of Warped Tour in July.

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Show Review: ‘The Real Will Wood and the Tapeworms’ (Live Album/Concert Film Recording Event)

Dunellen, NJ- Before attending the show at Roxy & Dukes this past Friday, I actually contacted Will Wood to ask if there was anything that I should do to prepare for my first (LIVE) Will Wood and the Tapeworms experience. His response: “That’s like saying meet me at the playground at 3 o’clock, we’re gonna fight, bring brass knuckles. I wouldn’t want to arm my enemies. I wouldn’t want to give you any information that would allow you to be prepared or allow you to be able to defend yourself once the proverbial fan is hit.  It’s not gonna be anything you’ve ever seen before, I promise you that.”

He wasn’t kidding, it was a show experience unlike any other.

Imagine trapeze-artists dropping from the ceiling like spiders dangling from a web, fans that paint their faces with a third eye on their forehead and a diverse crowd made up of “ladies, gentlemen, boys, girls, neithers, boths and inbetweens”; that my friend is just the surface of what you will witness at a WWATT show.

THE REAL WILL WOOD AND THE TAPEWORMS PART TWO’ (Live Album/Concert Film Recording Event) with special guests Bella’s Bartok literally sold out in days and I assure you that everyone who was there realized just how lucky we were to have been in attendance at this intimate concert. A TV crew came around and asked fans “who is the real Will Wood?” and by the end of the show I think we discovered that the real Will Wood was now a part of all of us. If that makes sense, does it? I can’t explain it any other way.

Stand out songs/crowd pleasers: (Not necessarily in this order, I drank bunch of PBR at $4 a pop for a 16 oz. can and my memory got away from me) “Mr. Capgras Encounters a Secondhand Vanity,” “Chemical Overreaction/Compound Fracture,” “Hand Me My Shovel, I’m Going In!,” and “White Knuckle Jerk (Where Do You Get Off?).”All of these songs were sing-alongs as the 90% of the crowd seemed to know all of the lyrics. I expected these songs to be played but it was the encore song that surprised the hell out of me. After the band cleared the stage Will Wood came out by himself and sat down before his keyboard. As he began to play I immediately realized what song it was even with the extended intro but I feel like the crowd was 10 secs behind me as they began to scream in amazement. The song was “Love Me Normally” which I have only seen or heard on a public access TV show appearance and from my understanding it’s not on any albums that I am aware of. This song is a gem and a rarity and it meant so much to the fans that Will decided to end the show with this song. “The lipstick on the mirror are the lyrics to my obituary…”

This show will forever go down in history, not just in our memories but it was recorded and will be released on CD/online in the near future and Will Wood has vowed to give everyone that purchased a ticket to The Real WWATT Show a FREE Copy. There will also be video/film footage in an undetermined format that eventually will be released as well.

To give you some kind of idea of the experience that concert- goers had at The Real Will Wood and the Tapeworms show, I’ve included their latest music video below. The song is entitled Hand Me My Shovel, I’m Going In!” and it’s a very similar feel to the live show. Make-up, sweat, confetti, and Blood.

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Full line-up annouced for 2017 Montebello Rockfest (Iggy Pop, The Offspring, Bad Religion, Pennywise, etc.)

Montebello Rockfest (Formerly Amnesia Rockfest) has finally announced the full lineup for the annual festival’s 2017’s installment and, as usual, it’s pretty awesome. The festival takes place in Montebello, Quebec, from June 22rd-25th. The first two groups to be announced were Rammstein and The Offspring and then it became a waiting game, but it seems the wait was well worth it.

The 2017 lineup includes, but is not limited to: Iggy Pop, Bad Religion, Pennywise, The Specials, Goldfinger, Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, Anti-Flag, Reverend Horton Heat, Agent Orange, Teenage Bottlerocket, Masked Intruder, Frenzal Rhomb, Face to Face and The Unseen.

Also special tribute bands have been assembled to honor Fugazi, Minor Threat, Sex Pistols, Ramones, Spinal Tap and Twisted Sister. Speaking of Twisted Sister we were very surprised to see Dee Snider’s name on the bill after last year’s fiasco when Snider and his band expressed deep displeasure with the festival; guess it wasn’t that bad after all. Other tributes will be held for a few of the best record labels of all time: Fat Wreck Chords, Hellcat Records, Epitaph and Sub Pop.

Wu-Tang Clan is also on the list this year and although they are not punk or metal this addition seems to make perfect sense. If you have never experienced Canada’s largest rock festival check out some of our coverage from last year HERE.

 

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DS Show Review: 11th Annual Amnesia Rockfest Review (NOFX, D.R.I., The Adicts and more)

If you are unfamiliar with Amnesia Rockfest now is the time to plan for next year’s festivities.

Alex Martel was only 17 years old when he had organized the 1st edition of Rockfest back in 2005 and since then his brain-child had grown into the largest music festival in Canada and one of the biggest in North America. This year marked the 11th annual Rockfest and there are no plans of stopping now.

Rockfest focuses on punk-rock as well as hardcore and metal acts, there is usually a rap group in the mix as well. In years past Cypress Hill and Snoop Dogg performed, this year it was Ice Cube that had the crowd screaming “F**k the Police” but I’ve got to say the police in Montebello seemed pretty chill to me.

This small town has a population of under 1,000 residents but for one weekend out of the year the streets are flooded with tens of thousands of punk-rockers and metal-heads alike. I had arrived just about the time that the music was beginning but first things first, had to set up camp. I actually stayed at a host family’s house and camped in their yard with nearly 50 other party-goers. Now that camp was set up, I had to venture to the Fairmont Le Chateau Montebello to get my press credentials.

Media check in was a couple of miles or so away from the concert (or I guess in Canada such and such kilometers away). To get to the fest I had to ride a shuttle boat and everyone on the boat was looking at their watches because we all wanted to see Against Me! As we hit the dock which was directly behind the main stage I could hear the lyrics to “Thrash Unreal”, “If she wants to dance and drink all night…” I may have missed the first half of Laura Jane Grace and her band but at least I got to see them perform and the one thing that was clearly visible from where I was standing was her smile. They appeared to be having a great time and it projected through the music and unto the crowd. Next time I will try my damnedest to be punctual but the half set I did see was amazing and fun.

NOFX as you may know already is one of my favorite groups of all time and this year they were to play Punk In Drublic from beginning to end. Yeah, well did you really expect the boys not to stray from this plan? El Hefe claimed “I didn’t get the memo” and the show started with “72 Hookers” which they announced as the first track from Punk In Drublic. Hey it’s a good way to weed out the posers from the die-hards. When the band attempted to play Scavenger Type they admitted they hadn’t rehearsed it, so instead they played these crowd favorites: Murder The Gov’t, Six Years on Dope, Fuck The Kids, Seeing Double At Triple Rock, Sticking In My Eye and Franco Un-American. So did they play Punk In Drublic in its entirety? You decide, either way they put on a fun show as always and everyone enjoyed themselves even though the band got sidetracked; I mean it’s NOFX we’re talking about here.

I’ll admit I haven’t really listened to Sum 41 that much over the years but seeing them live in Canada has changed my mind a bit. Not that I didn’t enjoy the tunes that they did with Iggy Pop because I did but it’s the pop-punk tunes that I tend to stray away from. However, I have to say they honestly killed it on the main stage and I have a new-found respect for the band. I am also really digging their new single “Fake My Own Death” which was just released with a video that takes aim at pop-culture, memes and emoji’s.

There were many acts that I regrettably had to miss because I have not perfected the act of being in two places at once yet. When it came to a point that I had to choose between Rise Against and DRI, I had to go with DRI. No offense to Rise Against but I have never seen DRI and I had to witness “Acid Rain” live. I believe I made the right choice. DRI has been around since 1982 and Kurt Brecht and Spike Cassidy are still rocking hard. They’ve been through a series of bassists and drummers over the years but I would say they sound better than ever.

Out of all of the groups that I had the chance to see English punk act The Adicts, were the highlight for me. According to one of the band’s stage managers they have been together for 41 years now. This particular gig was Monkey’s birthday and because of this the band sung happy birthday and presented a cake on stage. The set took place on one of the two Tony Sly stages and thanks to Tony Hawk’s Underground all of the kids in the crowd were singing along with “Viva La Revolution”. When the band played “Joker In The Pack”, Monkey tossed an entire pack of shiny purple backed playing cards into the crowd; I didn’t find the joker but I did pick out the 6 of diamonds.

For the last three years Tony Sly has been remembered and honored at Amnesia Rockfest. In 2014 there was a single Tony Sly stage and last year and this year there were two stages dedicated to the late musician. There also was a performance by No Use For A Name Tribute Band and Cokie The Clown ended the two days of performances with an acoustic version of “I’m Sorry, Tony” singing the lyrics “from coast to coast let’s raise our drinks and give a toast to Tony Sly”.

On the way back into the U.S. of A. my driver Russ and I were dreading the border patrol because they are usually pricks but surprisingly the officer at our window actually had a personality. “Where are you coming from?” He asked. “Amnesia Rockfest” was our response. Then what came out of his mouth just made the trip complete, he says “did you rock out with your cock out?”

“Yes, Yes we did!”

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DS Interview: Butcher Knives (New York Gypsybilly punk)

Photo (c) Ana Cissa Pinto

March 1st was Butcher Knives‘ album release show at Piano’s in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. I had a chance to do a brief interview with the band before the show as well as capture some interesting clips of their performance. Butcher Knives, as I have coined the phrase is a “Melting Pot” of musicians stemming from all parts of the globe. Band members include: Nacho Segura (Colombia/vocals/percussion), Nikko Matiz (Colombia/vocals/guitar), Melissa Elledge (New Orleans/accordion), Tal Galfsky (Israel/keyboards/sampler), Ethan Cohen (New York City/banjo/guitar/vocals), Yoni Benshlomo (Israel/bass/vocals), and Mohamed Amine Smires (Morocco/drums/vocals). Opening acts included Bad Buka, Outernational, and Escarioka. The show was upbeat and energetic from beginning to end and I would recommend to any music loving fan to see all of these acts live. Check out our video interview below.

Pedro Erazo of Gogol Bordello even stopped by to do a guest appearance in the song “Nobody Knows Me”. Gogol Bordello on a side note, a few days ago tweeted and posted on Facebook that their March tour dates have been cancelled and refunds will be given to ticket holders due to Pedro’s Arm being broken. At the Butcher Knives’ concert Pedro’s hand was wrapped in bandages but he only lent his vocal styling to this show with Gogol he also plays percussion.

Butcher Knives’ first release from the album entitled “Misery” is “Tell Me Why” and there’s a video to coincide. The second release and video will be “American Dream” which touches on the topic of being an immigrant in America. The album is currently available for streaming and purchase at the band’s official website.

Butcher Knives’ concert dates are also posted on their site. On May 17th they will be playing at The Knitting Factory in Brooklyn with Mustard Plug, so make your calendar now!

(more…)

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Show Review: Pulley at Groezrock ’13

Growing up in Northern California during the mid-90s, Pulley’s “60 Cycle Hum” was just one of the many fun, catchy punk albums that I was introduced to by my friends. There were so many awesome punk bands to keep track of, I only listened to 60 Cycle Hum a few times and never really got super into them. They have had no mainstream success and they aren’t legends or pioneers in the same sense as say Bad Religion.

That being said I remembered Pulley’s tight, straight ahead melodic punk sound and Scott Radinsky’s distinctive vocals and I remember them being pretty damn good. So yeah, even though I hadn’t followed their career in the many years since my teens I was really looking forward to seeing their gig at Groezrock. I also thought it was pretty cool that Scott was a baseball player. I mean, the dude has his own baseball card! I met Scott (currently employed as a pitching coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers) briefly in the press tent before the show. He didn’t seem like a punk rocker to me at all. He acted exactly like a baseball manager, older now with lines of age under his eyes, easy going and spoke with a soft drawl.  My impression of him completely changed when the band got on stage an hour later to a heart warming reception from the European crowd.

They opened with Darkside with Scott walking on stage with his arms raised to greet the cheering audience several moments into the extended intro on that Saturday afternoon. Now Scott had transformed to the quintessential skate punk vocalist, he had the look, body language and pipes. Him and his skilled, veteran band mates put on a smooth 45 minute no-nonsense performance that was rawer and more powerful than their recorded sound.

Their enthusiasm was infectious. I could sense they were humbled by the warm response from the crowd and were truly honored to be able to play at Groezrock. Unbeknownst to me, Pulley has built a cult following through the years as I was struck by how many European punks were into them. They were admired by everyone I mentioned them to at the festival and deservedly so. Their albums are solid, no frills, high quality slabs of melodic punk rock and they can elevate their game on stage. Pulley as a band are the prototypical skate punk band in terms of their sound and the individual members are low-key middle-aged guys with nine-to-five jobs and families.

Seeing Pulley perform turned out to be the highlight of my Groezrock weekend. The band for me has changed from a distant memory into a band whose discography I’ve been listening to non-stop since I got home from Belgium.

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