DS Photo Gallery: The Menzingers, Touché Amoré and Screaming Females at Asbury Park’s House of Independents (2022-11-03)

The Menzingers are on the road celebrating the 10th anniversary of their breakout album On The Impossible Past and they’ve brought both Touché Amoré and Screaming Females along for the ride. The tour officially kicked off last week in Asbury Park at the House of Independents with what turned into a 4-night run. I say […]

The Menzingers are on the road celebrating the 10th anniversary of their breakout album On The Impossible Past and they’ve brought both Touché Amoré and Screaming Females along for the ride. The tour officially kicked off last week in Asbury Park at the House of Independents with what turned into a 4-night run. I say “officially” only because the band did attend Fest 20 down in Gainsville, FL the previous weekend. But moving on, 10 years of water under the bridge can seem like a blink of an eye to some and an eternity to others. For The Menzingers, 2012 not only had them playing in dingey basements, and DIY skateparks, but huge sports arenas (as openers for A Day To Remember) as well as large concert halls (as openers for Taking Back Sunday). To put it further into perspective, 2012 was the year Barack Obama won his second term as President of The United States, Vladimir Putin also won election to his second go-round as President of Russia, Hurricane Sandy struck the northeast, the massacre at Sandy Hook took place and Washington State became the first state in the union to legalize marijuana for personal recreational use. 2012 was also the year “Linsanity” took the NBA by storm, Whitney Houston passed away and in the pop music world, it was the likes of Katy Perry and Adele crushing all competition with #1 song after #1 song. But I’m going to go out on a limb and say that as far as the readers of Dying Scene are concerned, when it came to musical events, these paled in comparison to the release of On The Impossible Past by Philadelphia’s (by way of Scranton, PA) very own The Menzingers.

Released in February of 2012 on Epitaph Records, OTIP was a bit of a departure from 2010’s Chamberlain Waits. Where Chamberlain and their previous releases were straight-up punk, on Impossible Past, the band seemed to be making a concerted effort to be more melodic. This in turn allowed the stories in each of the songs to be more front and center. The move from punk to some kind of mix of melodic/pop punk isn’t always greeted by a band’s fan base, but in The Menzingers’s case, their loyal fans fell in love with the departure. The album, to this day, is often considered by many to be their finest work, this despite the subsequent release of some really stellar albums.

The Menzingers at House of Independents

This brings me to last Thursday night in Asbury Park for the opening night of the tour. I wasn’t sure if they would be doing the album in chronological order or mixing it up and wasn’t totally sure which way I was leaning as far as a preference was concerned. Sometimes the track sequencing of an album doesn’t always translate into a proper flow for a live show but as I would soon find out, OTIP is one of those albums which works perfectly in a live setting from start to finish. Obviously, the opening lines of “I’ve been having a horrible time, pulling myself together” from opening track “Good Things” is a veritable microcosm of what many of us have been experiencing the last 10 years, and HOLY HELL, what a way to start off a set! And right from the get-go, we were off and running. Next up was of course “Burn After Writing” with its call and response line “Do my hands tell a story? Is it boring you?” Fuck no, thus far it was nothing even remotely close to boring.

Joe Godino (drums) Tom May (guitar) & Eric Keen (Bass)

Those who were familiar with the album already knew what was up next and by “those” I mean just about every sweaty body in The House. “Obituaries” started off with that spine-tingling chord strumming from Tom and before Eric and Joe could kick into their pounding rhythms, the entire room (or at least as far as I could see) was one large pulsing, jumping, screaming and slamming mosh pit.

Greg Barnett

The band appeared to be having an absolute blast on stage (even more so than usual). Tom was, as usual, a non-stop jumping machine, bouncing all over the stage mouthing each and every word (especially while Greg was singing lead into the mike). Following the album’s sequencing was working perfectly as everyone in the room knew what was next and was right on queue when each new song commenced. We did get a little back story from Greg regarding “Mexican Guitars” but all in all there really wasn’t all too much stage banter from the guys. In hindsight, this lack of Greg and Tom talking about the songs had me a little disappointed but then I thought that ehhhh, we can save that for the album’s 20th anniversary VH1 Behind The Music episode.

Upon conclusion of the album’s closer “Freedom Bridge” and its lines, “something happened on the way to hell”, Tom assured the crowd that things were far from over as the band kicked into “I Don’t Want To Be An Asshole Anymore” from Impossible Past‘s follow up album Rented World. With its chugging chords and anthemic chorus, the crowd again erupted into the frenzy that Menzinger fans have come to know and love about their shows. Needless to say, what remained was basically a best-of-the-rest set from the band. “House On Fire” to “Anna” to “In Remission” to “Lookers” to “Your Wild Years” and a close out of the evening with “After The Party”.

Greg & Tom of The Menzingers

I for one was 100% satisfied with what the boys from Pennsylvania offered up to us. I was pretty much soaked in sweat from head to toe. I had a decent bruise on the side of my head from getting kicked in the noggin by a crowd surfer who I didn’t see coming as was too busy scoping the stage through my camera lens (something I know is risky in the front of a Menzingers pit, but sometimes you just need to do what you’ve got to do). And my throat was sore and raspy from shouting lyrics at the top of my lungs.

Marissa Paternoster of Screaming Females

I would be remiss if I did not mention and/or share some words on the opening bands that are gracing the stage along with The Menzingers on this tour. First up was New Jersey’s own Screaming Females. I’ve seen this band numerous times over the years although not all that much in the last 5 or so. Anyway, I can honestly say that I have never seen them where I wasn’t completely blown away. Marissa Paternoster, in my humble opinion, is one of, if not the best, punk guitarists today. Her guitar chops are just completely unparalleled. I could listen and watch her shred on the guitar night in and night out and still experience something jaw-dropping each and every time.

Jeremy Bolm of Touché Amoré

With the unenviable task of not only having to follow The Screaming Females but also precede The Menzingers was Los Angeles’s own Touché Amoré. Familiar with the band in name only, I was not at all prepared for the onslaught and fury which singer Jeremy Bolm and the rest of the crew were about to unleash on myself and everyone in attendance. While their brand of post-hardcore punk isn’t something that I generally fancy, I have to admit that the energy, spirit and general ferocity of their set was eye-openingly inspiring.

All in all, I have to say that while “anniversary” tours can sometimes be nothing more than a cash grab, and oftentimes turn out to be somewhat cringe-worthy, this romp around the country by The Menzingers to celebrate On The impossible Past seems to be anything but. First and foremost, it helps that the band itself is at the top of their game. No, let me correct that, they are not at the top of their game at all, because they just seem to be getting better and better, they haven’t even reached the pinnacle just yet. Second, OTIP is such a stellar LP that paying homage to it, by playing it straight through is sheer pop-punk heaven. And lastly, the support acts of Screaming Females and Touché Amoré rock the fuck out of the crowd. They take things to a whole other level, to which even IF The Menzingers were inclined to mail it in, they could never because they’re being pushed so hard by these two openers.

This tour just started so by all means, check your local listings and if it’s passing through a town near you, do yourself a favor and go see the show,

The Menzingers slideshow

Screaming Females slideshow

Touché Amoré slideshow

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Photo Gallery: Pinkshift w/ Jigsaw Youth & Yasmin Nur – Cobra Lounge, Chicago, IL (10/26/2022)

The rapidly-rising pop punk trio Pinkshift stopped in Chicago for their headlining tour after releasing their debut album Love Me Forever. Accompanied by Jigsaw Youth and Yasmin Nur, the all-ages crowd at Cobra Lounge packed the house and left with an unforgettable night of female-fronted music. Wichita, Kansas native singer/songwriter Yasmin Nur opened the night […]

The rapidly-rising pop punk trio Pinkshift stopped in Chicago for their headlining tour after releasing their debut album Love Me Forever. Accompanied by Jigsaw Youth and Yasmin Nur, the all-ages crowd at Cobra Lounge packed the house and left with an unforgettable night of female-fronted music.


Wichita, Kansas native singer/songwriter Yasmin Nur opened the night with her band and brought along all the dreamy-yet-dark indie rock vibes you can ever ask for.


Jigsaw Youth quickly became one of my favorite bands after seeing them at Cobra Lounge in 2021 with Destroy Boys. The sludge-grunge queens of New York brought the same howling energy as they did last year and introduced the new single “Skin.”


Pinkshift released their debut album Love Me Forever on October 21, 2022 through Hopeless Records. The empowering and emotional album boasts several stellar hits including “i’m not crying you’re crying,” “nothing (in my head)” and “BURN THE WITCH.”

The new wave of pop punk is here and this album deserves to be a part of it!


Check out the full gallery below!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Show Review and Gallery: Punk Rock Tacos’ 1st Anniversary with Boss’ Daughter, Grey Trash Aliens, The Turdles, Torch The Hive, and more; Villa Park, IL (10/21/2022)

Earlier this year, Dying Scene introduced our readers to Noah Corona, the founder of Punk Rock Tacos. Corona put on a party for PRT’s 1st Anniversary on October 21, 2022. Held at PRT’s home venue, Cemitas Poblanas in Villa Park, IL, it doubled as a Halloween costume party and featured bands from in and outside […]

Earlier this year, Dying Scene introduced our readers to Noah Corona, the founder of Punk Rock Tacos. Corona put on a party for PRT’s 1st Anniversary on October 21, 2022. Held at PRT’s home venue, Cemitas Poblanas in Villa Park, IL, it doubled as a Halloween costume party and featured bands from in and outside of Illinois, including headliners Boss’ Daughter.


Boss’ Daughter, out of Reno, Nevada, actually took to the stage just after midnight on the 22nd. The trio, composed of singer/guitar player Chris Fox, Jamie Locks on drums, and Danny Paul on bass, ran through a generous set, including “Stupid Chords, Stupid Words, Stupid Song,” “Help To Forget,” “Religious Convenience,” “Embrace Impermanence, and “Photography.” That last tune is a lovely song, which naturally I liked, not just for the title, but rather for the sentiment expressed within. It describes a query, likely most of us photographers will ask ourselves every once in a while.

We will see our last moonrise

I will wish I had those pictures

Though mostly lost that snap of beauty remembers

Somebody wrote the song for how I’m feeling

So I’ll just sit and listen.”

Simply put it, was a very affecting set.


SUMPP is normally composed of Neil P. and Weftin, but on this night drummer, Phil Warren, was added to the mix. The group’s set was highly animated. I use the word animated because the band members, with limbs flailing and growling facial expressions, brought to mind Taz, The Tasmanian Devil from the classic Loony Tunes cartoons. SUMPP drove through “Consume!,” “Laid off,” “The Best, The Worst, and the Most Likely” (written by Weftin, unlike all the other songs which were written by Neil P.) “Pillz,” “Terminator 2 was Right” “Talkin’ Spit,” and “Cranks.” It was an absolutely frenzied performance, one which left many uninitiated to SUMPP, slightly stunned. But the gaped look on many of the attendees soon turned to smiles and laughs. It was a reaction I am betting Neil P and Weftin were pleased to see.


The Turdles – yes that band name is spelled correctly and a play on we all know what, from Elgin IL – played a lively set with “Courtyard,” Dick Pic,” “Why You Gotta Call The Cops,” and “Empty Hallways” included in the set list. As evidenced by their name, this is a band that uses humor to engage the audience. Lead singer Josh Holbrook, Dave Cherek on bass, Dan Cuchiara on guitar, and drummer Charlie Stanley hit their marks this night, and have been doing so for more than a decade and a half. If you have a chance, go catch one of the band’s shows.


Grey Trash Aliens has a unique name and as this event was a costume party as well as a first-anniversary show, band members appeared looking pretty unique as well. Bass player and vocalist Patrick Mineau appeared with a large fake blood stain on his t-shirt to resemble a stab wound to his right side. Said shirt emblazoned with the words, “I’m Fine.” On his cap, a pair of scissors appears to be lodged into his skull. Adam Spizziri, Lead guitar wore a cap and bug-eye sunglasses. He matched in this themes, guitar player Mike Milman who wore a full-on alien bug-looking costume, including full mask. The set, which included among others “Unsocial Media,” “Basement,” “Believe It,” and “Addiction,” was as quirky as the name of the band. It zoomed through the set serving up a blast-off of a good time.


Chicago hardcore trio Anger is composed of half of the Chicago two-tone band The Crombies. Each member has their own distinct performance style. Dave Simon, its lead singer, is also the guitar player for the very popular rocksteady group, Deal’s Gone Bad. Simon is a prominent and colorful figure in the Chicago punk scene. His usual performance incorporates spins, climbs on front stage amps, and being carried through the crowd, on the shoulders of friends, but when in the role of lead singer/guitar player he is more closely tied to the microphone. But he is no less compelling, and every vocal break sets him free to engage the crowd. Matt Meuzelaar is a power drummer. Stoically pounding away, he perfectly balances out the rowdiness of Simon. In the middle, Kevin Lustrup, is light on his feet as he bounces, usually in place. Lustrup and Meuzelaar drive the backbeat’s engine. Altogether, this adds up to forceful performances on the regular. On this night they jammed through another solid set including, “Hard Livin’,” “Earth,” “Lost Last Night,” “Blood,” and “Fucked Up.” Anger also played “Listen Up” written by Simon way back in 1986. The crowd seemed pretty happy to have Anger at this party and Anger seemed pretty happy to have the crowd.


Torch The Hive, from Chicago, kickstarted the party with a fiery performance. The band is made up of Mike Fruel on guitar and vocals, Tyler Sanders on bass, and drummer Sergio Apanco. The set included “Copaganda,” “F.E.A.,” “Molotov Trail,” and “Evil Men,” along with other tunes. The band did not torch any hives at this event, but it did torch the stage. It was a blazing performance, and the crowd obviously dug it. I did too.


Punk Rock Tacos has had a terrific first year full of shows featuring great bands, but the atmosphere is an equal draw. Events take place inside the venue as well as outside. The latter sometimes requires making stages out of trucks and other objects. It is a good time, where old friends hang out and new friends are made. I, for one, hope Corona along with Matt Durica, his partner in this venture, keep it up for years to come.

See below for more images from this event below.


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Photo Gallery: Lucero & LA Edwards @ Music Hall Of Williamsburg (10-18-22)

Don’t you just hate when life gets in the way of the fun things? It’s taken me way too long to get this written up, and for that I wholeheartedly apologize. So without any further ado, here are my thoughts on what has turned into Lucero’s annual mid-October visit to New York City. I arrived […]

Don’t you just hate when life gets in the way of the fun things? It’s taken me way too long to get this written up, and for that I wholeheartedly apologize. So without any further ado, here are my thoughts on what has turned into Lucero’s annual mid-October visit to New York City.

I arrived at Music Hall of Williamsburg a little earlier than expected due to a surprising lack of traffic on the Brooklyn Queens Expressway aka the BQE (if you’re from NY, you know what a surprise it is whenever there isn’t any traffic on this highway). So walking into the venue, to see the room completely empty was a bit startling. At about 8 PM the handful of people in the room were greeted on stage by an unannounced comedian friend of Ben Nichols and the band. (I apologize for not having caught his name but if anyone does know it please leave it in the comments so that I can include it in this piece.) Not surprisingly, standing on a stage in front of maybe a dozen people in a room meant to hold up to 600, led to this sparsity of people to become the focal part of the act. Eventually hitting his stride, especially when he got on the topic of a certain sex act which much to his surprise, millennials have brought to the mainstream, the crowd (or those who were there at least) quite enjoyed the act.


L.A. Edwards, a foursome consisting of 3 brothers plus one, from Nashville by way of San Diego are the official opening act on this tour and they took the stage right at 8:30. With a vocal style very reminiscent of Jackson Browne, lead singer Luke Edwards along with brothers Jay and Jerry as well as guitarist Landon Pigg offered up a really nice opening set laced with soulful Laurel Canyon style harmonies backed by a mix of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers crossed with Dawes brand of rock and roll.

Ben Nichols, Brian Venable, John Stubblefield, Roy Berry and Rick Steff AKA Lucero took the stage shortly before 10 PM and started things off with “For The Lonely Ones” from 2018’s Among The Ghosts. Following this up with 2 fan favorites in “Chain Link Fence” and “Sweet Little Thing” both from their classic Tennessee LP, the boys now had the audience (which had grown into an actual “crowd” by now) singing and shouting right along with Ben at the top of their lungs.


Which brought us to the first of what would be 5 new songs on the evening. As you all have probably heard (or read right here in Dying Scene), Lucero will be releasing their latest full-length LP, Should’ve Learned By Now in February 2023. “Drunken Moon” is a slow burner ballad with actual backup vocals included which the Edwards boys from L.A. Edwards would come onstage to help out with. Ben, while calling them out onstage to help out with vocals, made fun of himself by saying that he’s been called an “anti-harmony” singer since such things are so rare on Lucero songs.


Throughout the rest of the evening we would be treated to “Buy A Little Time”, “Macon If We Make It”, “Nothing’s Alright” and “One Last F.U.” (encore) from the upcoming album. Unlike “Drunken Moon” these other 4 songs are for the most part serious rockers which the band seemed to be having a blast playing. This brings me to one observation which I was happy to see. We all know that 99% of the time we can expect Ben to be…well for lack of a better way to describe it, BEN. And of course this “Ben-ness” often has a direct correlation as to the amount of whiskey passed to the stage from the crowd. This night in Brooklyn was no different than in the past with one exception.


Brian seemed to be much more animated than he has been in quite some time. He jumped into one of Ben’s monologues at one point to say that Lucero had been playing at Music Hall Of Williamsburg for quite some time now, going all the way back to its days when it was known as The North Six. He even started to tell the story of when he played on this stage completely naked, then he came to his senses and held off on sharing the grim details.


In any event, my point is that more so than I’ve seen in the recent past at least, the boys in the band appeared to be having a truly great time on stage. Of course John was his usual campy self on bass and Roy just sat back and had a grand old time beating the hell out of the skins.


It was particularly great to see Rick doing well sitting behind the keyboards with his stately new (to me at least) tied-back ponytail. (Unfortunately, we were not graced with Rick pulling out the accordion on this particular evening, but it was really great to see that he was clearly on the mend from his health issues). Ben even took the time to mention that while this might have been the smallest crowd that they’d thus far played to on this tour, it was by far the most fun and best show (from his perspective) so far.

All in all, it was a fantastic way to pass away an otherwise mundane Tuesday evening in NYC. In what turned out to be a bit of foreshadowed irony, Ben did mention at the end of the show how he was really looking forward to their drive after the show over to beautifully scenic Secaucus, NJ which got quite a cackling of laughter from the crowd. Of course, the irony reared its ugly head the following day when a member of the band’s touring crew had some medical issues and the tour bus was basically sequestered for the next 3 or 4 days in “beautifully scenic Secaucus“.

L.A. Edwards Slideshow

Lucero Slideshow

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Festival Gallery: Riot Fest Day Three (9/18/22) w/ Less Than Jake, Save Face & Mom Jeans

The final day of Riot Fest 2022. What a journey it has been! Do you ever get that post-concert blues? Because I sure was feeling it after Riot Fest. Check out our photo gallery of Save Face, Mom Jeans. and long-time favorites Less Than Jake. Mom Jeans. is an indie rock/emo band from California. Time […]

The final day of Riot Fest 2022. What a journey it has been! Do you ever get that post-concert blues? Because I sure was feeling it after Riot Fest. Check out our photo gallery of Save Face, Mom Jeans. and long-time favorites Less Than Jake.


Mom Jeans. is an indie rock/emo band from California. Time to get your sad on!


Another first for me was seeing Save Face and I’m so glad I did. The red jumpsuit-wearing post-hardcore/emo band released their debut album Merci with Epitaph Records in July 2018.


If you’re a ska fan then you are well familiar with Less Than Jake. They formed in 1992 and been making waves ever since. Check them out in the full gallery below, along with some neat shots of their toilet paper shooter (yes, you read that correctly)!


Don’t forget to check out Riot Fest day one coverage and day two!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Photo Gallery: Lucero and L.A. Edwards return to Boston’s Paradise Rock Club (10/23/22)

This show was initially slated to take place a few days prior (Thursday the 20th, if you must know) but due to…reasons…the band was forced to cancel a few shows in Hamden, CT, and Buffalo, NY, and Titusville, PA, but thankfully the Boston show was able to be slid from a Thursday to a Sunday […]

This show was initially slated to take place a few days prior (Thursday the 20th, if you must know) but due to…reasons…the band was forced to cancel a few shows in Hamden, CT, and Buffalo, NY, and Titusville, PA, but thankfully the Boston show was able to be slid from a Thursday to a Sunday evening, which means instead of being yours truly’s first Lucero show in five days, it was his first Lucero show in eight days. Talk about first-world problems.

ANYWAY…the rescheduled show marked Lucero’s first trip to Boston proper in just over a calendar year, and it took place back at Paradise Rock Club, the legendary 900-ish capacity venue that’s become a bit of a regular stop on the Memphis five-piece’s fall tours. Due in part to the show being moved to a new date (which, in turn, happened to be a cool and drizzly Sunday night), the show was perhaps a little more sparsely attended than it otherwise would have been, but that just gave the attendees more room to dance and get rowdy as the band ripped through a two-hour, twenty-four song barn-burner of a set.


The band kicked things off with the trio of “For The Lonely Ones,” “Chain Link Fence” and “Sweet Little Thing” as has been as close to a script as you’re going to get at a freewheeling Lucero show. From there, at least a cursory level of attention was paid to a “setlist,” although a look at the printed game plan (see the slideshow below) and a look at the list of songs they actually played reveals numerous deviations from the course. It’s a Lucero show, after all – you can’t go off the rails if there were never rails to begin with!


The band ended up playing a pretty representative sample of tracks from across their near quarter-century career. Four tracks from the upcoming twelfth studio album Should’ve Learned By Now (lead single “One Last Fuck You,” “Nothing’s Alright,” “Buy A Little Time,” and “Macon If We Make It,” the latter of which sounds like the closest thing to a crossover hit that we’ve heard from them in some time) were spread out between such classics as “Watch It Burn” and “Smoke” and “Texas & Tennessee” and, of course, “The War.” Crowd requests are a normal part of a Lucero show and they would have spent four hours playing all the suggestions lobbed at them on this night, but some surprise yesses included “Darken My Door” and “Pull Me Close, Don’t Let Go” and “Little Silver Heart” and “No Roses No More,” the latter of which dates back to the earliest days of Lucero’s career but has become a massive, dual-guitar shred-fest of a song that could easily serve as a cathartic show closer on any given night.


L.A. Edwards once again served as formidable openers on this particular night. It marked the band’s first appearance in Boston, although it wasn’t the band’s frontman and namesake’s first time in town, as he regaled the crowd with a story of a night spent at the very same venue years prior working as a guitar tech for the one-and-only Lucinda Williams…only to have one of her guitars wind up stolen on that very night. (Don’t worry, he tracked it down on Comm. Ave after a few nervous moments. A particular high note on this night found the three Edwards brothers (Jay, Jerry and Luke from left to right in the picture here) gathered around a solitary mic to kick off a soulful rendition of the Townes Van Zandt classic “If I Needed You” before returning to their respective instruments and joining guitarist Landon Pigg to close things out.


The Lucero/L.A. Edwards fall tour runs through the rest of this week, winding down Sunday night in Bloomingon, Illinois. Check the full bitchin’ rundown here, and check out our photo slideshows below!

Lucero Slideshow


L.A. Edwards Slideshow

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Show Review & Gallery: The Eradicator, Bad Mechanics, Coronary (Reggie’s Music Joint – 10/14/2022)

Reggie’s Music Joint played Friday night host to a terrific trio of bands. The Joint is the smaller of Reggie’s music rooms but the energy explosion was no less than that of the Rock Club. The all-Chicago show was also the official celebration of The Eradicator’s new album. The Eradicator was inspired by a classic […]

Reggie’s Music Joint played Friday night host to a terrific trio of bands. The Joint is the smaller of Reggie’s music rooms but the energy explosion was no less than that of the Rock Club. The all-Chicago show was also the official celebration of The Eradicator’s new album.


The Eradicator was inspired by a classic Kids in the Hall sketch. As such, The Eradicator comes to the stage armed with a squash racquet, in a tennis outfit, and wears a ski mask. The character of The Eradicator may have been inspired by a comedy troupe, but its performance is itself inspired.

Because The Eradicator is an unmasked member of one of the earlier bands on the bill, it came on like a “hot ball” (no, that’s not a vulgar term). It also failed to stay within the service box that is the stage. But sometimes failure can be a good thing, especially when it produces an unshackled set which included “I Am The Eradicator,” “I’m a Squash Man,” “I’mma Be Me,” “One Rung at a Time,” and “Peak Eradicator.” The Eradicator also debuted tracks off of its new album, “Forever the Eradicator,” which is also billed as his final album, including, “Squash Stomp,” “Squash Bender,” “You Can’t Play Me,” and “Can’t Play Well With Others.”

The Eradicator may call this its final album, but un-retiring is a popular past-time in the USA so perhaps we will see The Eradicator on the court…err stage once again for a rematch with its fans.


Bad Mechanics is another band in the sub-genre of what I call humor-punk. It was in its full glory this night, eliciting smiles, laughs, and cheers from the crowd. The core duo of Ryan “Daddy” Durkin on vocals and Andy “Candy” Slania, were backed by touring band members, Danny Walkowiak on drums, and Scott Thomson on bass. The band tore through the chuckle-worthy set list, “You Drink LaCroix,” “Social Obligation,” “I Collect Stamps,” “Zine Festival,” “Donut in the Park,” DiCaprio Hit A Baby,” (hmm, I hazard to guess that last one could edge close to defamation but does not quite meet its standards) “USA Foods,” and “Must Be The Suburbs.”

That was the entire Bad Mechanics set. Not always possible to list a set list in full but here we are. Short, sweet, and please do a near future hometown repeat.


Coronary kicked off the hometown trifecta. The Windy City hardcore group jammed through a performance so intense, it required some tables near the small stage to be pushed back by venue staff members. Included in Coronary’s set list was “Victim of Truth,” I Quit,” “Bricks,” “Violent Era,” and “Scene Cops.” Coronary is as serious as a heart attack when it comes to expressing its collective opinions. Coronary will also get your blood pumping so catch one of its shows when next you can.


Check out more photos from the show below!


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Festival Recap: Riot Fest Day Three (The Academy Is…Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Sleater-Kinney, Lunachicks and more)

Day 3 of the Riot Fest took place in Chicago’s Douglass Park on September 18, 2022, with some of the most influential all-women or women led bands dominating the stages. Jawbox, the Washington D.C, iconic band founded in 1989, whose original run lasted until 1997, was welcomed back during its midday set. The bright sun […]

Day 3 of the Riot Fest took place in Chicago’s Douglass Park on September 18, 2022, with some of the most influential all-women or women led bands dominating the stages.


Jawbox, the Washington D.C, iconic band founded in 1989, whose original run lasted until 1997, was welcomed back during its midday set. The bright sun beating down on most of the band members’ faces did not cause a step lost as Jawbox gave the crowd a forceful performance. The set included “Mirrorful,” “Motorist,” ”Cooling Card,” “Static,” “Cutoff,” and “Savory.” The band members J. Robbins, Bill Barbot, Kim Coletta, and Zach Barocas also solidly covered “Lowdown” by Wire, and “Cornflake Girl” by Tori Amos. A hot set made the hot sun more bearable for the Sunday attendees.


Concrete Castles hit the Rebel Stage with the Ferris Wheel and other carnival rides in the sightline of many in the crowd. Vocalist Audra Miller, guitarist Matthew Yost, and drummer Sam Gilman held their fans’ attention with an effervescent set which included “Wish I Missed U,” “Half Awake,” “Sting,” “Just a Friend,” “Lucky,”  and “You Won’t See Me Again.” The Erie, PA band started out as the very popular cover band First to Eleven in 2009 before forming Concrete Castles in 2021. Young though the members may be – all three are in their early 20s they all perform with the maturity of confident musical veterans. That’s what they are, combined with a bright and hopefully long future creating terrific music.


Zola Jesus‘ bewitching performance immediately brought to mind Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac, not just because of her flowing garments. The Merrill WI performer, known offstage as Nika Roza Danilova, has an ethereal stage presence, and her set including “Lost,” “Soak,” “Exhumed,” “The Fall,” “Sewn,” and “Undertow” made for as intriguing a performance as her stage name.


Lunachicks kicked off their set with some seriously iconic music, Bill Conti’s inspiring Oscar-nominated theme from Rocky “Gonna Fly Now.” This was the perfect walk-on song as the band appeared, as they always do, ready to fight (for issues in which they believe. Not physically. Though I’m guessing they can hold their own in that manner as well). Band members Theo Kogan, Gina Volpe, Sidney “Squid” Silver, and Chip English didn’t wear their hearts on their sleeves, they wore them on their jumpsuits, dresses and shirts. “Not Government Property,” “Roe Rage Riot,” and “Our Bodies, Our Choice,” were among the messages displayed prominently during a year in which The Supreme Court of the United States overturned Roe V. Wade. Of course, feminist activism is engrained in the DNA of the band. The NYC band’s 2021 memoir “Fallopian Rhapsody” was met with critical acclaim. Lunachicks exhibited their signature power as they ripped through an extensive set including “Bad Ass Bitch,” “Say What You Mean,” “Jerk of All Trades,” “The Day Squid’s Gerbil Died,” “Luxury Problem,” and “Less Teeth More Tits.” A prodigious set indeed by voices perhaps more relevant than ever. Heroes we deserve? Probably not. Heroes we need? Most definitely.


One of Sleater-Kinney‘s first rehearsal spaces was located on Sleater-Kinney Road in Lacey Washington, nearby to Olympia, where the band was founded. The road from that road has been as long one for the now legendary Sleater-Kinney. Its set at Riot Fest 2022 once again proved why Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein continue to be so compelling, both as a band and as individuals. Among other tunes, the band performed “High in the Grass,” “Jumpers,” “All Hands on the Bad One,” “Bury Our Friends,” “Modern Girl,” and “The Center Won’t Hold.” Sleater-Kinney delivered a dynamic performance, one that makes us hope we won’t have to wait long before catching them again. Maybe at Riot Fest 2023?


Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Karen O.’s signature black bowl hairstyle was partially obscured at the start of the band’s set by the topper of an elaborate bright, multi-colored outfit. The first sight of the outfit elicited wows from the crowd and other observers. Her bandmates, Nick Zinner and Brian Chase, clad in clothing nearly matching the night sky, and positioned further away from the spotlight focused on O. were partially obscured themselves. In any case, the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s stood out as a shining example of what a great band can accomplish during a crowded festival weekend. The band performed “Spitting Off The Edge of the World,” and “Burning,” from its new album “Cool it Down.” The well-received album, its first new one since 2013’s “Mosquito,” was released just under two weeks post-Riot Fest, on September 30, 2022. The set also included “Zero,” “Wolf,” “Soft Shock,” “Cheated Hearts,” and “Under the Earth.” It was a fun set to watch and Yeah Yeah Yeahs are enjoyable to shoot photos of as well.


As Riot Fest was born in Chicago, it was fitting that the band with the latest scheduled set start time, by a mere 15 minutes, was from Chicago as well. Nine Inch Nails might have been presented as the Sunday night headliner but The Academy Is… did a pretty good job of drawing many members of the hometown crowd, as well as visitors too, away from Trent Reznor and his bandmates. The band returned to active status seven years after its farewell tour in 2015 and for those fans, seeing them again or for the first time, could not contain their enthusiasm. Band members William Beckett, Adam T. Siska, Mike Carden Andy “The Butcher” Mrotek rewarded their wait with an energetic set, performing “The Phrase That Pays,” “LAX to O’Hare,” “Bulls In Brooklyn,” “Black Mamba,” “We’ve Got a Big Mess on Our Hands,” “Checkmarks,” and “After the Last Midtown Show.” The Academy Is…also paid tribute to Material Issue, the immensely popular Chicago band active from the mid-80’s to the mid-90’s, by covering the latter band’s song, “Very First Lie.” There was a special surprise for fans. Original band members Michael Del Principe and AJ LaTrace joined the others on stage to perform “Attention”  off their debut album, “Almost Here. “


Riot Fest 2022 was an exhausting and hot weekend full of great tunes and good times. As coverage of this year’s event winds down, we’re finding it difficult to take a full break from the event. After all, there’s Riot Fest 2023 in the works.

More photos from the final day of Riot Fest 2022 below!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Photo Gallery: Lucero and L.A. Edwards from The Met in Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Prior to last weekend, it felt like it had been a while since Lucero – my personal favorite band of the last couple of decades – had played in my neck of the woods (let’s call it southeastern New England). In reality, it had been quite literally just a hair shy of one calendar year, […]

Prior to last weekend, it felt like it had been a while since Lucero – my personal favorite band of the last couple of decades – had played in my neck of the woods (let’s call it southeastern New England). In reality, it had been quite literally just a hair shy of one calendar year, but when you’re talking about a band of veritable road warriors like the Memphis-based quintet, one calendar year seems like an eternity. Such is life when still firmly entrenched in a music industry in its third year of pandemic-inspired “new normal” or whatever.

So it was that I found myself in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, on Saturday night as the Lucero / L.A. Edwards tour that’s currently crisscrossing the eastern half of the country finally made its way to the northeast corner for the first time. Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Pawtucket? Really? They don’t even have a baseball team anymore, but they have a cool place to see good shows?” Yes, in fact, they do! It’s called the Met and it’s presently in its third location (the first two were in neighboring Providence. As an aside, shoutout to the old Met Cafe. Well, not the OLD old Met Cafe, but the second one; the one that was next to the old Lupos. Well, not the OLD old Lupos, but the second Lupos, before it moved to where the Strand is now. Yes that’s as confusing as it sounds but if you are from the area, you get it) and it’s a pretty great room, even accounting for the fact that it has a giant support pole right in the middle of stage right (see the picture above).


ANYWAY, this Lucero run finds the band in between album cycles. Touring for their last studio album, When You Found Me, has wrapped, and over the course of the last year, the crew wrote and recorded another new record. Due out in February, the new record is slated to be called Should’ve Learned By Now, it’ll be their second studio album since the start of the pandemic and their twelfth overall (thirteenth if you count The Attic Tapes). If you’ve caught any of the shows on this run, you’re no doubt familiar with probably four or five of the tracks from the new album, as they’ve already woven their way into setlists. That was certainly true on this particular evening, as we were treated to “Buy A Little Time,” “Drunken Moon” with a vocal harmony assist from all three Edwards brothers, “Nothing’s Alright,” and of course lead single and newfound crowd favorite “One Last Fuck You.”


The remainder of the set did a pretty good job of encompassing most stages of the band’s career, which is just about to hit the 25-year mark. The band’s second album, Tennessee, and second-newest album, Among The Ghosts, were equally well represented. “Watch It Burn” from 2005’s Nobody’s Darlings was a welcome surprise, as was “Smoke,” the first track on 2009’s 1372 Overton Park, my own personal favorite Lucero record. The band sounded great; tight to a point, but then again, it’s a Lucero show, so with its requisite amount of chaos embedded in the mix. As Lucero shows go, it was just about as solid as you can get!


As mentioned above, L.A. Edwards are serving as support for the duration of this run. For the uninitiated, LA Edwards is four-piece outfit that finds its frontman and namesake Luke backed on both rhythm section and vocal harmonies by his brothers Jerry and Jay and, on this run, by Landon Pigg on guitar. There’s a real heavy Tom Petty/Jackson Browne/Laurel Canyon vibe to the band’s sound, which probably makes sense given that they have roots that spread from Nashville, Tennessee, to southern California. The newly-released single “The Crow” was a personal favorite – you can check out the lyric video here.

Check out a bunch more pictures of both L.A. Edwards and Lucero below. Tour runs through the end of the month when it wraps up in Bloomington, Illinois. Catch the full rundown here, and if you’re out and about at the rescheduled Boston show this weekend, come say hi!


L.A. Edwards Slideshow

Lucero Slideshow

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

DS Photo Gallery: The Gaslight Anthem & Jeff Rosenstock @ The Metropolitan Opera House, Philidelphia (2022-10-07)

I’d had the weekend of October 7 marked off on my calendar since last March when The Gaslight Anthem announced that they would be coming out of their self-imposed hiatus and would be touring both Europe, The UK and most importantly (to me at least), the U.S. That U.S. leg of the tour would be […]

I’d had the weekend of October 7 marked off on my calendar since last March when The Gaslight Anthem announced that they would be coming out of their self-imposed hiatus and would be touring both Europe, The UK and most importantly (to me at least), the U.S. That U.S. leg of the tour would be coming to a conclusion with a Friday show in Philly and the final show of the tour in Gaslight’s backyard at Holmdel, NJ’s PNC Arts Center (for those of you as old as me, FKA The Garden State Arts Center). Needless to say both dates were etched firmly in my plans. That is however, until an NYC date was finally added to the tour a month or so later. I have to admit that when PNC was announced as the NJ venue, I was not happy. The idea of seeing Gaslight (and Rosenstock) in that cavernous and seated outdoor tin shed didn’t do much for me. So once I knew that I would have the opportunity to see them at the beautiful Pier 17 in Manhattan, PNC was dropped from my plans. Philly, however, I was super stoked for. I’d heard great things about The Met and of course the presence of a GA pit made all the difference in the world.

Jeff Rosenstock at The Philly MET

Jeff Rosenstock hit the stage promptly at 8 PM and when I say “hit” I mean he and his band of John DeDominici on bass, Mike Huguenor on guitar, Kevin Higuchi on drums and Dan Potthast on guitar, sax and keys hit it running! Opening up with “SCRAM!” off their most recent album No Dream (most recent if you don’t count the ska reworking of the same album SKA Dream which came out during pandemic times). I will be the first to admit that I am a huge fan of Rosenstock and while I thought there would be some logical crossover between his and TGA’s fanbases, it didn’t always appear to be that way during Jeff’s set. One place where the set was 100% appreciated however was front and center in the pit where a decently sized circle pit was active throughout “Death Rosenstock’s” rapid fire 10 song set.

As an aside, Jeff did mention midway through his set that shortly before he and the band hit the stage, he discovered that he and a whole bunch of his friends had been laid off from their day jobs. Rosenstock was the musical director for The Cartoon Network’s Craig of The Creek which evidently was uncerimoniously canceled. Nonetheless, this soul-crushing news did nothing to damper Jeff’s energized and exhilarating set. Needless to say, good luck to Jeff & the entire Craig Of The Creek staff; hopefully something pops up soon on the employment front for all of them.

Alex Rosamilia

The Gaslight Anthem came on shortly after 9 PM and opened things up with what has become their opener for most of the tour, “Have Mercy” followed by another tour regular in “Old White Lincoln”. It appeared right from the get-go that Brian was in really good spirits, coming off even more chatty than what has become the norm for him. But when I say “chatty” in this instance, I don’t necessarily mean his going off on wild tangents (don’t get me wrong, there was plenty of that throughout the evening) but I mean his literally being very conversational with the crowd, especially those at the rail. His back and forth with the newlywed upfront about their request for some never mentioned song dedicated to his wife who wasn’t there that night but would be in attendance the following evening at PNC was priceless. I wonder if the band added the song to Saturday’s setlist as promised.

Alex Levine

Moving forward were a pair of songs which were not part of the set which I’d seen 2 weeks prior in NYC, “Wooderson” and “Biloxi Parish”. Now seems like as good a time as any to mention that one of the major complaints on the various TGA facebook groups which I pay attention to was the lack of variety in the night-to-night setlists. Well I for one came out of the show at Philly feeling none of that. Without actually comparing song-for-song the setlists to the 2 shows which I attended, I definitely left The Met feeling like I’d seen a very different show from the one I’d seen in New York a couple of weeks prior. Well it turns out that my gut feeling was 100% spot on. In doing the research to put this piece together, I found that the Philly show contained a total of eight songs which I had not heard at Pier 17. Out of an average set consisting of 21 songs or so, to me 8 is a pretty good number to define variety.

Along the way, we did hear Brian go off on a number of tangents, only one which could be defined as being a little too long, but personally I enjoyed his monologues quite a bit, particularly the one where he suggested to a couple of out of town fans who were traveling to NJ after the show to go out the next morning and find someplace where they could get an authentic pork roll breakfast sandwich…”it’s pork roll, not Taylor ham! Don’t be calling it Taylor ham.” Now I know quite a few Jerseyites who would argue with this pork roll vs Taylor ham verbiage but hearing Brian explain to a couple of out-of-town newbies, the culinary delights of NJ was absolutely hilarious.

Benny Horowitz and Ian Perkins

But back to the music, with a mix that encompassed virtually the band’s entire musical catalogue. With songs from ’59 Sound and Handwritten dominating the remainder of the set, we still were treated to a smattering of selections from Get Hurt (“Get Hurt” “Halloween”, and “Stay Vicious”, Sink Or Swim (” We Came To Dance”) as well as American Slang (“The Spirit of Jazz”).

After making sure that the crowd knew that there would be no “lame walking off the stage and coming back for an encore”, the band finished the night off with none other than “59 Sound” to which they brought out Philadelphia’s own Brit Luna from the band Catbite to help on vocals (Catbite just so happens to be one of my favorite new ska bands).

It was a triumphant return to the stage for Brian, the two Alex’s, Benny and Ian. Each and every member of the band seemed to be having fun being back onstage. And sure as hell, they all sounded fantastic. I know Brian had some voice issues earlier in the tour, having to cancel a show in Denver, but his voice sounded fantastic in Philly. Now the only thing that I can hope for is that they don’t take too long to get back out there again, and if there is a delay in touring again in 2023 I hope it’s because they are busy in the studio working on a new album. Welcome back TGA, it’s great having you back.

THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM (2022-10-07)

  • The Gaslight Anthem (2022-10-07)

Jeff Rosenstock (2022-10-07)

  • Jeff Rosenstock (2022-10-07)

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.